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Sample records for resistance protein lrp

  1. Functional interactions between anthrax toxin receptors and the WNT signalling protein LRP6.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Kunz, Béatrice; Deuquet, Julie; Bafico, Anna; Davidson, Gary; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2008-12-01

    To exert its activity, anthrax toxin must be endocytosed and its enzymatic toxic subunits delivered to the cytoplasm. It has been proposed that, in addition to the anthrax toxin receptors (ATRs), lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), known for its role in Wnt signalling, is also required for toxin endocytosis. These findings have however been challenged. We show that LRP6 can indeed form a complex with ATRs, and that this interaction plays a role both in Wnt signalling and in anthrax toxin endocytosis. We found that ATRs control the levels of LRP6 in cells, and thus the Wnt signalling capacity. RNAi against ATRs indeed led to a drastic decrease in LRP6 levels and a subsequent drop in Wnt signalling. Conversely, LRP6 plays a role in anthrax toxin endocytosis, but is not essential. We indeed found that toxin binding triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of LRP6, induced its redistribution into detergent-resistant domains, and its subsequent endocytosis. RNAis against LRP6 strongly delayed toxin endocytosis. As the physiological role of ATRs is probably to interact with the extracellular matrix, our findings raise the interesting possibility that, through the ATR-LRP6 interaction, adhesion to the extracellular matrix could locally control Wnt signalling.

  2. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  3. LRP1 Protein Deficiency Exacerbates Palmitate-induced Steatosis and Toxicity in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Allyson N; Basford, Joshua E; Jaeschke, Anja; Hui, David Y

    2016-08-05

    LRP1 (LDL receptor-related protein-1) is a ubiquitous receptor with both cell signaling and ligand endocytosis properties. In the liver, LRP1 serves as a chylomicron remnant receptor and also participates in the transport of extracellular cathepsin D to the lysosome for prosaposin activation. The current study showed that in comparison with wild type mice, hepatocyte-specific LRP1 knock-out (hLrp1(-/-)) mice were more susceptible to fasting-induced lipid accumulation in the liver. Primary hepatocytes isolated from hLrp1(-/-) mice also accumulated more intracellular lipids and experienced higher levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress after palmitate treatment compared with similarly treated hLrp1(+/+) hepatocytes. Palmitate-treated hLrp1(-/-) hepatocytes displayed similar LC3-II levels, but the levels of p62 were elevated in comparison with palmitate-treated hLrp1(+/+) hepatocytes, suggesting that the elevated lipid accumulation in LRP1-defective hepatocytes was not due to defects in autophagosome formation but was due to impairment of lipophagic lipid hydrolysis in the lysosome. Additional studies showed increased palmitate-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial and lysosomal permeability, and cell death in hLrp1(-/-) hepatocytes. Importantly, the elevated cell death and ER stress observed in hLrp1(-/-) hepatocytes were abrogated by E64D treatment, whereas inhibiting ER stress diminished cell death but not lysosomal permeabilization. Taken together, these results documented that LRP1 deficiency in hepatocytes promotes lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity through lysosomal-mitochondrial permeabilization and ER stress that ultimately result in cell death. Hence, LRP1 dysfunction may be a major risk factor in fatty liver disease progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  5. LRP6 acts as a scaffold protein in cardiac gap junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Li, Changming; Liang, Dandan; Lv, Fei; Yuan, Tianyou; The, Erlinda; Ma, Xiue; Wu, Yahan; Zhen, Lixiao; Xie, Duanyang; Wang, Shiyi; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Jian; Shi, Jingyi; Liu, Yi; Shi, Dan; Xu, Liang; Lin, Li; Peng, Luying; Cui, Jianmin; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Yi-Han

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is a Wnt co-receptor in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Here, we report the scaffold function of LRP6 in gap junction formation of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac LRP6 is spatially restricted to intercalated discs and binds to gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43). A deficiency in LRP6 disrupts Cx43 gap junction formation and thereby impairs the cell-to-cell coupling, which is independent of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. The defect in Cx43 gap junction resulting from LRP6 reduction is attributable to the defective traffic of de novo Cx43 proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, leading to the lysosomal degradation of Cx43 proteins. Accordingly, the hearts of conditional cardiac-specific Lrp6-knockout mice consistently exhibit overt reduction of Cx43 gap junction plaques without any abnormality in Wnt signalling and are predisposed to lethal arrhythmias. These findings uncover a distinct role of LRP6 as a platform for intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:27250245

  6. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  7. ERK/MAPK activation involves hypoxia-induced MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression and contributes to apoptosis resistance in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Zhang, Hongbo; Sun, Li; Gao, Yuqi; Jin, Haifeng; Liang, Shuhui; Wang, Yanxia; Dong, Mingqing; Shi, Yongquan; Li, Zhichao; Fan, Daiming

    2010-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that hypoxia increased the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1)-dependent MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression, which enhanced adhesion of gastric cancer cells to laminin, inhibited drug-induced apoptosis and caused cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Here, we investigated the role of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in the signaling mechanisms underlying these events. We found that hypoxia activated ERK activity in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK), which preferentially activated ERK, mimics, in a nonadditive way, hypoxia-induced activity of MGr1-Ag/37LRP promoter and expression of MGr1-Ag/37LRP. Furthermore, U0126, the MEK inhibitor, inhibited hypoxia- and MEK-induced MGr1-Ag/37LRP promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. MEK inhibition also reversed hypoxia- and MEK-induced HIF-1 protein and its activity in a dose-dependent manner. We also investigated reactive oxygen species signaling this response. Exogenous addition of H(2)O(2) was sufficient to activate ERK in a dose-dependent profile. Reactive oxygen species scavengers of H(2)O(2) significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced ERK or HIF-1 activation and sequential expression of MGr1-Ag/37LRP. We also investigated the signaling in hypoxia-induced cell adhesion and apoptosis induced by vincristine. Hypoxia significantly enhanced adhesion of SGC7901 cells to laminin in a time-dependent manner, which might be inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126 and MGr1-Ag/37LRP siRNA. Consistent with results of adhesion assay, hypoxia-resistant apoptosis might be reversed by U0126 in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that hypoxia-elicited MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression activated by HIF-1 depends on ERK activation. These events are dependent of reactive oxygen intermediates.

  8. Palmitoylation and ubiquitination regulate exit of the Wnt signaling protein LRP6 from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Kunz, Béatrice; Iacovache, Ioan; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2008-04-08

    Canonical Wnt signaling is initiated by binding of Wnt proteins to members of the Frizzled family and subsequent complex formation with lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5/6 (LRP5/6). Here, we show that LRP6 is palmitoylated on a juxtamembranous cysteine and that palmitoylation is required for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We propose that palmitoylation serves to tilt the long, 23-residue transmembrane domain of LRP6 with respect to the plane of membrane to prevent a hydrophobic mismatch and subsequent recognition by the ER quality control. In support of this model, a palmitoylation-deficient LRP6 mutant could be rescued from ER retention by deletion of two to four residues in the transmembrane domain. Importantly, we found that palmitoylation-deficient LRP6 was retained in the ER by a completely novel monoubiquitination-dependent ER retention mechanism. Mutation of a specific lysine indeed abolished ubiquitination of palmitoylation-deficient LRP6 and led to a rescue from ER retention. Finally, at the cell surface, we found that interplay between palmitoylation and ubiquitination was necessary for efficient Wnt signaling.

  9. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. PMID:26013822

  11. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) C4408R Mutant Promotes Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) α-Cleavage in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huayan; Habib, Ahsan; Zi, Dan; Tian, Kathy; Tian, Jun; Giunta, Brian; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2017-06-13

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) plays conflicting roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, clearing β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain while also enhancing APP endocytosis and resultant amyloidogenic processing. We have recently discovered that co-expression of mutant LRP1 C-terminal domain (LRP1-CT C4408R) with Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells decreases Aβ production, while also increasing sAPPα and APP α-C-terminal fragment (α-CTF), compared with CHO cells expressing APPswe alone. Surprisingly, the location of this mutation on LRP1 corresponded with the α-secretase cleavage site of APP. Further experimentation confirmed that in CHO cells expressing APPswe or wild-type APP (APPwt), co-expression of LRP1-CT C4408R decreases Aβ and increases sAPPα and α-CTF compared with co-expression of wild-type LRP1-CT. In addition, LRP1-CT C4408R enhanced the unglycosylated form of LRP1-CT and reduced APP endocytosis as determined by flow cytometry. This finding identifies a point mutation in LRP1 which slows LRP1-CT-mediated APP endocytosis and amyloidogenic processing, while enhancing APP α-secretase cleavage, thus demonstrating a potential novel target for slowing AD pathogenesis.

  13. Multidrug resistance-associated biomarkers PGP, GST-pi, Topo-II and LRP as prognostic factors in primary ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, D; Shi, H-C; Wang, Z-X; Gu, X-W; Zeng, Y J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the expression of P-glycoprotein (PGP), glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi), DNA topoisomerase II (Topo-II) and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) in ovarian carcinoma, thus providing better chemotherapy choice and post-operative prognosis for ovarian carcinoma patients. A total of 80 primary ovarian carcinoma, 16 benign ovarian epithelial neoplasm, and 12 normal ovarian tissue samples were collected. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of PGP, GST-pi, Topo-II and LRP, and the results were analysed by correlation with clinicopathological parameters. Positive expression rates of PGP, GST-pi, Topo-II and LRP in patients with ovarian carcinoma (57.5%, 58.8%, 76.3% and 73.8%, respectively) were all higher than those found in normal and benign tissue (P<0.05). In clinical stages I/II vs. III/IV, the expression rates of PGP, GST-pi, Topo-II and LRP were 40.7% vs. 66% (P<0.05), 40.7% vs. 67.9% (P<0.05), 66.7% vs. 81.1% (P>0.05) and 55.6% vs. 83.0% (P<0.05), respectively. Carcinoma differentiation ranged from well to poor, and expression levels of each marker were as follows: PGP, 57.9%, 62.1% and 53.1% (P>0.05); GST-pi, 36.8%, 55.2% and 75.0% (P<0.05); Topo-II, 52.6%, 79.3% and 87.5% (P<0.05); and LRP, 84.2%, 69.0% and 71.9% (P>0.05). Ovarian carcinoma patients with PGP-, GST-pi-, Topo-II- and LRP-positive expression had a shorter median survival time than those who were negative for these markers (PGP: 36 months vs. 48 months [P=0.0017]; GST-pi: 36 months vs. 41 months [P=0.0103]; Topo-II: 37 months vs. 39 months [P=0.3811]; LRP: 37 months vs. 55 months [P=0.002]). COX regression analysis demonstrated that the clinical stage of the tumour, and the expression of PGP, GST-pi or LRP, may influence patient survival time after surgery. The relative death risk for patients with clinical stage III/IV tumours increased 9.46-fold compared to those with stage I/II tumours. The relative death risk in the PGP-, GST-pi- and LRP

  14. The endocytic receptor protein LRP also mediates neuronal calcium signaling via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bacskai, B. J.; Xia, M. Q.; Strickland, D. K.; Rebeck, G. W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is an endocytic receptor that is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. We report that the LRP ligand, activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*), induces robust calcium influx in cultured primary neurons, but not in nonneuronal LRP-containing cells in the same culture. The calcium influx is mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channels, which explains the neuron specificity of the response. Microapplication of α2M* leads to a localized response at the site of application that dissipates rapidly, suggesting that the calcium signal is temporally and spatially discrete. Calcium influx to α2M* is blocked by the physiological LRP inhibitor, receptor-associated protein. Bivalent antibodies to the extracellular domain of LRP, but not Fab fragments of the same antibody, cause calcium influx, indicating that the response is specific to LRP and may require dimerization of the receptor. Thus, LRP is an endocytic receptor with a novel signaling role. PMID:11016955

  15. Combination of gambogic acid with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wendian; Zhou, Hechao; Yu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Li, Haiwen; Jiang, Danxian; Chen, Zihong; Yang, Donghong; Xu, Zumin; Yu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a main clinical problem of lung cancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA) could prohibit the proliferation of a variety of human cancer cells. However, the effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to find out the antitumor effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer A549/DDP cells and further explore its underlying mechanisms. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay was used to observe the impacts of GA and/or cisplatin on the proliferation of lung cancer cells; flow cytometry was used to detect the effects of GA on cell cycle and apoptosis; Western blot was used to examine the effects of GA on the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) protein in A549/DDP cells. Our results showed that GA dose- and time-dependently prohibited the proliferation and induced significant cell apoptosis in A549 and A549/DDP cells. GA also induced G0/G1 arrest in both A549/DDP and A549 cells. Moreover, GA upregulated protein expression level of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax and downregulated protein expression level of pro-caspase-9 and Bcl-2 in time- and dose-dependent way in A549/DDP cells. GA combined with cisplatin enhanced the cells apoptotic rate and reduced the cisplatin resistance index in A549/DDP cells. In addition, GA reduced the MRP2 and LRP protein expression level in A549/DDP cells. GA inhibits the proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/DDP cells. Combination of GA with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression. PMID:27330316

  16. F-spondin inhibits differentiation of clastic precursors via lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8).

    PubMed

    Oka, Hiroko; Kitagawa, Masae; Takata, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    F-spondin, known to be a secreted neuronal glycoprotein, is highly expressed on the tooth root surface. The authors previously reported that F-spondin is one of the specific markers of cementoblasts in periodontal tissue. In chronic periodontitis, significant cemental resorption rarely occurs on the root side, although alveolar bone resorption by osteoclasts is one of the major pathologic changes. Thus, it was hypothesized that secretory F-spondin from cementoblasts might be involved in differentiation of clastic cells on the root surface. The authors studied effects of secretory F-spondin from F-spondin-expressing cells and its pathway on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation of clastic cells. Osteoclast precursors were used in this study. With a chamber assay, the authors examined effects of secretory molecules from F-spondin-expressing cells of transgenic mice on RANKL-induced clastic cell differentiation. Secretory molecules from F-spondin-overexpressing cells significantly inhibited the RANKL-mediated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells from primary progenitor cells with the chamber system. F-spondin suppressed RANKL-mediated nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1); TRAP; cathepsin K; and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) expression in the cells. The suppressive effect of F-spondin on RANKL-induced differentiation of clastic cells was partially blocked by knockdown of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8). These findings indicate that secretory factors from F-spondin-expressing cells, including F-spondin, downregulate differentiation of clastic precursors. Moreover, F-spondin inhibits RANKL-mediated differentiation of clastic cells partially via LRP8. It is suggested that secretory F-spondin may act protectively from cemental resorption partially via LRP8 in periodontal tissue.

  17. Expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα and intrinsic resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Jinhui; Zhang, Lichuan; Zhao, Long; Fan, Sufang; Yang, Zhonghai; Gao, Fei; Kong, Ying; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between the endogenous levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathione-s-transferase-π (GST‑π) and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) and intrinsic drug resistance in four human lung cancer cell lines, SK-MES-1, SPCA-1, NCI-H-460 and NCI-H-446, of different histological types. The expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was measured by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Drug resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 was determined using MTT assays. The correlation between expression of the resistance-related proteins and their roles in the resistance to drugs in these cancer cell lines was analyzed. We found that the endogenous levels of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα in the four cell lines varied. The level of GST-π in the SK-MES-1 cells was the highest, whereas the level of P-gp in the SPCA-1 cells was the lowest. The chemoresistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 in the four cell lines was different. The SPCA-1 cell line was most resistance to cisplatin; SK-MES-1 was most resistance to VP-16; whereas SK-MES-1 was most sensitive to doxorubicin. There was a positive correlation between GST-π expression and resistance to cisplatin, between TopoIIα expression and resistance to VP-16; and a negative correlation was noted between TopoIIα expression and resistance to doxorubicin. In summary, the endogenous expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was different in the four human lung cancer cell lines of different histological types, and this variance may be associated with the variation in chemosensitivity to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16. Among the related proteins, GST-π may be useful for the prediction of the intrinsic resistance to cisplatin, whereas TopoIIα may be useful to predict resistance to doxorubicin and VP-16 in human lung cancer cell lines.

  18. LDLR-related protein 10 (LRP10) regulates amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking and processing: evidence for a role in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aβ peptide that accumulates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) following proteolysis by β- and γ-secretases. Substantial evidence indicates that alterations in APP trafficking within the secretory and endocytic pathways directly impact the interaction of APP with these secretases and subsequent Aβ production. Various members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family have been reported to play a role in APP trafficking and processing and are important risk factors in AD. We recently characterized a distinct member of the LDLR family called LDLR-related protein 10 (LRP10) that shuttles between the trans-Golgi Network (TGN), plasma membrane (PM), and endosomes. Here we investigated whether LRP10 participates in APP intracellular trafficking and Aβ production. Results In this report, we provide evidence that LRP10 is a functional APP receptor involved in APP trafficking and processing. LRP10 interacts directly with the ectodomain of APP and colocalizes with APP at the TGN. Increased expression of LRP10 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells induces the accumulation of mature APP in the Golgi and reduces its presence at the cell surface and its processing into Aβ, while knockdown of LRP10 expression increases Aβ production. Mutations of key motifs responsible for the recycling of LRP10 to the TGN results in the aberrant redistribution of APP with LRP10 to early endosomes and a concomitant increase in APP β-cleavage into Aβ. Furthermore, expression of LRP10 is significantly lower in the post-mortem brain tissues of AD patients, supporting a possible role for LRP10 in AD. Conclusions The present study identified LRP10 as a novel APP sorting receptor that protects APP from amyloidogenic processing, suggesting that a decrease in LRP10 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22734645

  19. Binding of α2ML1 to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP1) Reveals a New Role for LRP1 in the Human Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Galliano, Marie-Florence; Toulza, Eve; Jonca, Nathalie; Gonias, Steven L.; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Background The multifunctional receptor LRP1 has been shown to bind and internalize a large number of protein ligands with biological importance such as the pan-protease inhibitor α2-macroglobulin (α2M). We recently identified Α2ML1, a new member of the α2M gene family, expressed in epidermis. α2ML1 might contribute to the regulation of desquamation through its inhibitory activity towards proteases of the chymotrypsin family, notably KLK7. The expression of LRP1 in epidermis as well as its ability to internalize α2ML1 was investigated. Methods and Principal Findings In human epidermis, LRP1 is mainly expressed within the granular layer of the epidermis, which gathers the most differentiated keratinocytes, as shown by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence using two different antibodies. By using various experimental approaches, we show that the receptor binding domain of α2ML1 (RBDl) is specifically internalized into the macrophage-like cell line RAW and colocalizes with LRP1 upon internalization. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that RBDl binds LRP1 at the cell surface. Addition of RAP, a universal inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP1, prevents RBDl binding at the cell surface as well as internalization into RAW cells. Silencing Lrp1 expression with specific siRNA strongly reduces RBDl internalization. Conclusions and Significance Keratinocytes of the upper differentiated layers of epidermis express LRP1 as well as α2ML1. Our study also reveals that α2ML1 is a new ligand for LRP1. Our findings are consistent with endocytosis by LRP1 of complexes formed between α2ML1 and proteases. LRP1 may thus control desquamation by regulating the biodisponibility of extracellular proteases. PMID:18648652

  20. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein

    PubMed Central

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G.

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5′-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the −105/−100 and −148/−143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the −160/−100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  1. Molecular cloning and partial characterization of a low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 13 (Lrp13) involved in vitellogenin uptake in the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki).

    PubMed

    Mushirobira, Yuji; Mizuta, Hiroko; Luo, Wenshu; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko; Reading, Benjamin J; Sullivan, Craig V; Hiramatsu, Naoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ovarian membrane proteins that bind vitellogenin (Vtg) have been detected in teleosts. One of these Vtg receptors was recently identified as low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 13 (lrp13/Lrp13) in perciform species, but little is known about this Vtg receptor in salmonid fish. In this study, a cDNA encoding a putative Vtg receptor with 13+1 ligand binding repeats (lr13+1) was cloned from the ovary, and identified as an lrp13 ortholog for cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki). This lrp13 was predominantly expressed in the pre-vitellogenic stage ovary, and its expression decreased during vitellogenesis. Ovarian localization of Lrp13 was observed by immunohistochemistry using specific antiserum against recombinant Lrp13. Lrp13 immunoreactivity was observed at the oolemma, throughout the zona radiata, and within the perivitelline space between the zona radiata and granulosa cells in ovarian follicles at both the lipid-droplet and vitellogenic stages of growth-an expression pattern that mimics that of a lr8/LR8-type Vtg receptor in this species and of lrp13/Lrp13 in Morone species. Six discrete Vtg-binding proteins were detected in cutthroat trout ovarian membrane proteins when probing with a digoxygenin-labeled salmonid A-type Vtg (VtgAs) followed by chemiluminescent ligand detection. Western blotting using the anti-Lrp13 serum revealed a broad signal consisting of two proteins with masses ranging from ∼190 to ∼210 kDa, which corresponded with some of the VtgA-binding proteins. These findings suggest that, in addition to lr8/LR8, lrp13/Lrp13 acts as a VtgA receptor in trout.

  2. The Sulfolobus solfataricus Lrp-like protein LysM regulates lysine biosynthesis in response to lysine availability.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Arie B; Bell, Stephen D; Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2002-08-16

    Although the archaeal transcription apparatus resembles the eukaryal RNA polymerase II system, many bacterial-like regulators can be found in archaea. Particularly, all archaeal genomes sequenced to date contain genes encoding homologues of Lrp (leucine-responsive regulatory protein). Whereas Lrp-like proteins in bacteria are involved in regulation of amino acid metabolism, their physiological role in archaea is unknown. Although several archaeal Lrp-like proteins have been characterized recently, no target genes apart from their own coding genes have been discovered yet, and no ligands for these regulators have been identified so far. In this study, we show that the Lrp-like protein LysM from Sulfolobus solfataricus is involved in the regulation of lysine and possibly also arginine biosynthesis, encoded by the lys gene cluster. Exogenous lysine is the regulatory signal for lys gene expression and specifically serves as a ligand for LysM by altering its DNA binding affinity. LysM binds directly upstream of the TFB-responsive element of the intrinsically weak lysW promoter, and DNA binding is favored in the absence of lysine, when lysWXJK transcription is maximal. The combined in vivo and in vitro data are most compatible with a model in which the bacterial-like LysM activates the eukarya-like transcriptional machinery. As with transcriptional activation by Escherichia coli Lrp, activation by LysM is apparently dependent on a co-activator, which remains to be identified.

  3. [Expression of the genes encoding RhtB family proteins depends on global regulator Lrp].

    PubMed

    Kutukova, E A; Zakataeva, N P; Livshits, V A

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, further study of the genes encoding RhtB family proteins is presented. In our previous work the involvement of two family members, RhtB and RhtC, in efflux of amino acids was demonstrated. Now we investigated regulation of expression of the rhtB, rhtC, yeaS and yahN genes. It is shown that expression of these genes is under control of the global regulator Lrp, depends on the presence of some amino acids in growth medium, and increases during different physiological stresses.

  4. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-dependent Intracellular Signaling and NMDA-induced Regulation of Postsynaptic Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Kulik, Akos; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Schäfer, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 is essential in neurons of the central nervous system, as was revealed by the analysis of conditional Lrp1-deficient mouse models. The molecular basis of its neuronal functions, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we show by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and postsynaptic density preparation that LRP1 is located postsynaptically. Basal and NMDA-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as NMDA target gene transcription are reduced in LRP1-deficient neurons. In control neurons, NMDA promotes γ-secretase-dependent release of the LRP1 intracellular domain (LRP1-ICD). However, pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed no direct interaction between the LRP1-ICD and either CREB or target gene promoters. On the other hand, NMDA-induced degradation of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 was impaired in the absence of LRP1, whereas its ubiquitination was increased, indicating that LRP1 influences the composition of postsynaptic protein complexes. Accordingly, NMDA-induced internalization of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 was impaired in LRP1-deficient neurons. These results show a role of LRP1 in the regulation and turnover of synaptic proteins, which may contribute to the reduced dendritic branching and to the neurological phenotype observed in the absence of LRP1. PMID:23760271

  5. ERD2 proteins mediate ER retention of the HNEL signal of LRP's receptor-associated protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    Bu, G; Rennke, S; Geuze, H J

    1997-01-01

    The 39 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) is a receptor antagonist that interacts with several members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family. Upon binding to these receptors, RAP inhibits all ligand interactions with the receptors. Our recent studies have demonstrated that RAP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein and an intracellular chaperone for the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). The HNEL sequence at the carboxyl terminus of RAP represents a novel ER retention signal that shares homology with the well-characterized KDEL signal. In the present study, using immunoelectron microscopy we demonstrate that cells stably transfected with human growth hormone (GH) tagged with either KDEL (GH + KDEL) or HNEL (GH + HNEL) signals exhibit ER and cis-Golgi localization typical of ER-retained proteins. Overexpression of not only GH + HNEL but also GH + KDEL cDNA in transfected cells results in saturation of ER retention receptors and secretion of endogenous RAP indicating that the two signals interact with the same ER retention receptor(s). The role of RAP in the maturation of LRP is further supported by the observation that functional LRP is reduced about 60% as a result of decreased intracellular RAP. Pulse-chase labeling and immunolocalization studies of ERD2.1 and ERD2.2 proteins in transfected cells demonstrate a long half-life and Golgi localization for both receptors. Finally, overexpression of either ERD2.1 or ERD2.2 proteins significantly increases the capacity of cells to retain both KDEL and HNEL-containing proteins. Taken together, our results thus demonstrate that ERD2 proteins are capable of retaining the novel ER retention signal associated with RAP.

  6. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan C; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We found that glutamate release in the brain was impaired in mice lacking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein that is critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies revealed compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppressed glutamatergic transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose level was elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice were impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and were resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by blocking the adenosine A1 receptor. The results reveal a critical role for Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our findings provide insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity.

  7. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan. C.; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W.; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we report that glutamate release in the brain is impaired in mice lacking low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies indicate compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppress glutamate transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose levels are elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice are impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and are resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. The results reveal a critical role of Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our study provides insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity. PMID:27294513

  8. Immunization with individual proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family induces protection against Brucella melitensis 16M challenges in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinhui; An, Chang; Yang, Mingjuan; Li, Xinran; Ke, Yuehua; Lei, Shuangshuang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jiuxuan; Ren, Hang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Qiu, Yefeng; Liu, Bo; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses worldwide. Subunit vaccines are promising for the prevention of human brucellosis. In our previous protective antigen screening studies, we identified a new protective antigen, BMEI0357, which belongs to the Lrp/asnC protein family, a conserved transcriptional regulator in bacteria that is absent in eukaryotes. In the present study, the Brucella genome annotation was screened and a total of six proteins were identified as members of the Lrp/AsnC family. Lrp/AsnC proteins have two domains that are conserved among the family members. However, sequence similarities between these proteins ranged from 9 to 50%, indicating high sequence heterogeneity. To test whether proteins of this family have similar characteristics, all six proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were purified and their protective efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged with Brucella melitensis 16M. The results show that all six Lrp/AsnC proteins could induce a protective immune response against Brucella melitensis 16M. Antibodies against the Lrp/AsnC proteins were detected in the immunized mice. However, levels of antibodies against these proteins were relatively variable in human brucellosis sera. Taken together, our results show that these six proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family in Brucella could induce protective immune responses in mice. PMID:26579099

  9. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) expression in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María C; Barcelona, Pablo F; Luna, Jose D; Ortiz, Susana G; Juarez, Patricio C; Riera, Clelia M; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2006-12-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a high-molecular weight receptor of the LDL receptor gene family. Its ability to bind and internalize both proteinases and proteinase-inhibitor complexes from the extracellular space suggests that it has a major role in modulating uncontrolled retinal cell proliferation. In order to test this assumption, we investigated the expression of LRP-1 and receptor-associated ligands in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization. Wistar albino rats were placed into incubators at birth and exposed to an atmosphere alternating between 50% and 10% of oxygen every 24 h. After 14 days, the animals were allowed to recover in room air and sacrificed at postnatal day 20 (P20). The protein expression of LRP-1 and alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) in the retina from unexposed and hyperoxia-exposed rats was investigated by Western blot. The localization of LRP-1 after neovascularization was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The activity of metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by zymography. Histological analysis was done to quantitate the neovascular response in these animals. Western blot analysis showed that LRP-1 was expressed, along with alpha2M, in the retina of rats with oxygen-induced neovascularization at P20. By immunohistochemical analysis, positive staining for LRP-1 appeared in cells extending from the inner limiting membrane (ILM) to the outer limiting membrane (OLM). The cells of the retina that expressed LRP-1 were identified by immunofluorescence as Müller cells. Zymographic analysis demonstrated increased activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 under neovascular conditions. This is the first demonstration of the involvement of LRP-1 in retinal neovascularization. In retinas of rats with oxygen-induced neovascularization, the expression of LRP-1 and alpha2M was increased along with an enhanced activity of MMPs, suggesting that LRP-1 expression may play a role in modulating retinal

  10. Recombinant Expression of the Full-length Ectodomain of LDL Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Unravels pH-dependent Conformational Changes and the Stoichiometry of Binding with Receptor-associated Protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    De Nardis, Camilla; Lössl, Philip; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madoori, Pramod K; Leloup, Nadia; Mertens, Koen; Heck, Albert J R; Gros, Piet

    2017-01-20

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a highly modular protein and the largest known mammalian endocytic receptor. LRP1 binds and internalizes many plasma components, playing multiple crucial roles as a scavenger and signaling molecule. One major challenge to studying LRP1 has been that it is difficult to express such a large, highly glycosylated, and cysteine-rich protein, limiting structural studies to LRP1 fragments. Here, we report the first recombinant expression of the complete 61 domains of the full-length LRP1 ectodomain. This advance was achieved with a multistep cloning approach and by using DNA dilutions to improve protein yields. We investigated the binding properties of LRP1 using receptor-associated protein (RAP) as a model ligand due to its tight binding interaction. The LRP1 conformation was studied in its bound and unbound state using mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and negative-stain electron microscopy at neutral and acidic pH. Our findings revealed a pH-dependent release of the ligand associated with a conformational change of the receptor. In summary, this investigation of the complete LRP1 ectodomain significantly advances our understanding of this important receptor and provides the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of action of LRP1 in a whole and integrated system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Differential expression of Low density lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in prostate gland: From normal to malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Gilardoni, Mónica B; Remedi, María M; Oviedo, Mabel; Dellavedova, Tristán; Sarría, Juan P; Racca, Laura; Dominguez, Mariana; Pellizas, Claudia G; Donadio, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are relevant modulators of inflammation, tumor microenvironment, cancer invasion and metastasis. They can be regulated by the Low density lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP-1), a receptor reported to mediate the clearance of lipoproteins, extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules and proteinases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of LRP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 across various grades of prostatic diseases as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), BPH plus prostatitis (BPH+P), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and prostate cancer (PCa). LRP-1 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and MMPs proteolytic activity by zymography in prostate tissues with different prostatic diseases. LRP-1 was detected in epithelial cells in BPH (16/18), BPH+P (21/21) and HGPIN (6/6), with a staining intensity of 1+, 1+/2+ and 3+, respectively. In PCa, LRP-1 was absent in 19/27 samples while a low expression was observed in 8/27 biopsies. MMP-9 activity was higher and statistically significant in PCa than in BPH (p≤0.01). Considering that LRP-1, by mediating the clearance of MMPs, is involved in the regulation of ECM remodeling and cell migration, we conclude that a decreased expression of LRP-1 could be involved with the increasing activity of MMPs shown in cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  13. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, M. A.; Scheffer, G. L.; Flens, M. J.; Giaccone, G.; Broxterman, H. J.; Meijer, C. J.; van der Valk, P.; Scheper, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, we identified LRP as the human major vault protein, the main component of highly conserved cellular organelles named vaults. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of LRP in freshly frozen normal human tissues and 174 cancer specimens of 28 tumor types. LRP was broadly distributed in normal and malignant cells, but distinct patterns of expression were noticed. High LRP expression was seen in bronchus, digestive tract, renal proximal tubules, keratinocytes, macrophages, and adrenal cortex whereas varying ing levels were observed in other organs. LRP was detected in all tumor types examined, but its frequency varied, fairly reflecting the chemosensitivity of different cancers. For example, low rates of LRP positivity were seen in testicular cancer, neuroblastoma, and acute myeloid leukemia; intermediate in ovarian cancer; and high in colon, renal, and pancreatic carcinomas. The wide occurrence of LRP in normal and transformed cells in humans, its similar distribution to that of vaults in other species, as well as the high level of conservation among eukaryotic cells of both the amino acid sequence of the major vault protein and the composition and structure of vaults, suggest that vault function is important to eukaryotic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8774142

  14. Fission yeast leucine-rich repeat protein Lrp1 is essential for cell morphogenesis as a component of the morphogenesis Orb6 network (MOR).

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori; Kubota, Shunsuke; Koyano, Takayuki; Kanai, Muneyoshi; Mizunuma, Masaki; Toda, Takashi; Hirata, Dai

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, cell morphogenesis is regulated coordinately with the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the morphogenesis network MOR (morphogenesis Orb6 network) consists of 5 conserved proteins, Pmo25, Nak1, Mor2, Orb6, and Mob2, and is essential for cell polarity control and cell separation following cytokinesis. Here we show that the conserved leucine-rich repeat protein Lrp1 is required for cell morphogenesis as a newly recognized component of MOR. Lrp1 has 4 leucine-rich repeats in its N-terminus and is a homolog of the budding yeast Sog2, which is a component of the RAM network (regulation of Ace2 activity and cellular morphogenesis). Lrp1 was essential for both cell growth and cell morphogenesis as were the other MOR components. Lrp1 was localized to the SPBs (spindle pole bodies, the yeast equivalent of the animal centrosome) throughout the cell cycle and to the medial ring during cytokinesis. Lrp1 interacted with Nak1 and was important for Orb6 kinase activity. Thus Lrp1 proved to function upstream of Orb6 in cell morphogenesis.

  15. Cell cholesterol modulates metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and clearance function

    PubMed Central

    Selvais, Charlotte; D'Auria, Ludovic; Tyteca, Donatienne; Perrot, Gwenn; Lemoine, Pascale; Troeberg, Linda; Dedieu, Stéphane; Noël, Agnès; Nagase, Hideaki; Henriet, Patrick; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Marbaix, Etienne; Emonard, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a plasma membrane scavenger and signaling receptor, composed of a large ligand-binding subunit (515-kDa α-chain) linked to a shorter transmembrane subunit (85-kDa β-chain). LRP-1 cell-surface level and function are controlled by proteolytic shedding of its ectodomain. Here, we identified ectodomain sheddases in human HT1080 cells and demonstrated regulation of the cleavage by cholesterol by comparing the classical fibroblastoid type with a spontaneous epithelioid variant, enriched ∼2-fold in cholesterol. Two membrane-associated metalloproteinases were involved in LRP-1 shedding: a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-12 (ADAM-12) and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Although both variants expressed similar levels of LRP-1, ADAM-12, MT1-MMP, and specific tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2), LRP-1 shedding from epithelioid cells was ∼4-fold lower than from fibroblastoid cells. Release of the ectodomain was triggered by cholesterol depletion in epithelioid cells and impaired by cholesterol overload in fibroblastoid cells. Modulation of LRP-1 shedding on clearance was reflected by accumulation of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in the medium. We conclude that cholesterol exerts an important control on LRP-1 levels and function at the plasma membrane by modulating shedding of its ectodomain, and therefore represents a novel regulator of extracellular proteolytic activities.—Selvais, C., D'Auria, L., Tyteca, D., Perrot, G, Lemoine, P., Troeberg, L., Dedieu, S., Noël, A., Nagase, H., Henriet, P., Courtoy, P. J., Marbaix, E., Emonard, H. Cell cholesterol modulates metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and clearance function. PMID:21518850

  16. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Young, Patricia A.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2016-01-01

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  17. [RQ-PCR detection of GST-π and LRP genes in adult acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xiao, Zhen

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to detect the glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) genes and to investigate their relationship with multidrug resistance (MDR) of patients with acute leukemia (AL). Real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) was used to detect the expression of GST-π and LRP genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 44 AL patients and 27 normal subjects. The results showed that the significant difference in GST-π expression level was found between newly diagnosed patients and complete remission patients and between refractory patients and complete remission patients (P < 0.01), while expression level of LRP genes showed obvious difference (P ≤ 0.01) between newly diagnosed patients and refractory patients and between complete remission patients and refractory patients. Statistical analysis indicated that there was no correlation between GST-π gene and LRP gene. The expression of GST-π and LRP genes was not significantly different in different white blood cell (WBC) count groups and different clinical typing groups (ALL and ANLL). It is concluded that the mechanism of MDR resulting from GST-π and LRP genes is different, thereby combination detection of GST-π and LRP genes demonstrates a larger role for evaluating prognosis of AL patients, as compared with detection of GST-π or LRP gene alone. The WBC count and leukemia typing have no relationship with expression of GST-π and LRP genes.

  18. The yeaS (leuE) gene of Escherichia coli encodes an exporter of leucine, and the Lrp protein regulates its expression.

    PubMed

    Kutukova, Ekaterina A; Livshits, Vitaliy A; Altman, Irina P; Ptitsyn, Leonid R; Zyiatdinov, Michael H; Tokmakova, Irina L; Zakataeva, Natalia P

    2005-08-29

    Overexpression of the yeaS gene encoding a protein belonging to the RhtB transporter family conferred upon cells resistance to glycyl-l-leucine, leucine analogues, several amino acids and their analogues. yeaS overexpression promoted leucine and, to a lesser extent, methionine and histidine accumulation by the respective producing strains. Our results indicate that yeaS encodes an exporter of leucine and some other structurally unrelated amino acids. The expression of yeaS (renamed leuE for "leucine export") was induced by leucine, l-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid and, to a lesser extent, by several other amino acids. The global regulator Lrp mediated this induction.

  19. Wnt Proteins Induce Dishevelled Phosphorylation via an LRP5/6- Independent Mechanism, Irrespective of Their Ability To Stabilize β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    González-Sancho, José M.; Brennan, Keith R.; Castelo-Soccio, Leslie A.; Brown, Anthony M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Wnt glycoproteins play essential roles in the development of metazoan organisms. Many Wnt proteins, such as Wnt1, activate the well-conserved canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which results in accumulation of β-catenin in the cytosol and nucleus. Other Wnts, such as Wnt5a, activate signaling mechanisms which do not involve β-catenin and are less well characterized. Dishevelled (Dvl) is a key component of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and becomes phosphorylated upon activation of this pathway. In addition to Wnt1, we show that several Wnt proteins, including Wnt5a, trigger phosphorylation of mammalian Dvl proteins and that this occurs within 20 to 30 min. Unlike the effects of Wnt1, phosphorylation of Dvl in response to Wnt5a is not concomitant with β-catenin stabilization, indicating that Dvl phosphorylation is not sufficient to activate canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, neither Dickkopf1, which inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by binding the Wnt coreceptors LRP5 and -6, nor dominant-negative LRP5/6 constructs could block Wnt-mediated Dvl phosphorylation. We conclude that Wnt-induced phosphorylation of Dvl is independent of LRP5/6 receptors and that canonical Wnts can elicit both LRP-dependent (to β-catenin) and LRP-independent (to Dvl) signals. Our data also present Dvl phosphorylation as a general biochemical assay for Wnt protein function, including those Wnts that do not activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:15143170

  20. MGr1-Ag/37LRP induces cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance through FAK/PI3K and MAPK pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Liu, Lili; Liu, Xiangqiang; Wang, Yafang; Li, Mengbin; Yao, Liping; Yang, Jianjun; Ji, Genlin; Guo, Changcun; Pan, Yanglin; Liang, Shuhui; Wang, Biaoluo; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Hongwei; Shi, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in drug resistance and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), a form of de novo drug resistance. In our previous study, we reported that MGr1-Ag/37LRP ligation-induced adhesion participated in protecting gastric cancer cells from a number of apoptotic stimuli caused by chemotherapeutic drugs. Further study suggested that MGr1-Ag could prompt CAM-DR through interaction with laminin. However, the MGr1-Ag-initiated intracellular signal transduction pathway is still unknown. In this study, our experimental results showed that gastric cancer MDR cell lines mediated CAM-DR through upregulation of Bcl-2 by MGr1-Ag interaction with laminin. Further study found that, as a receptor of ECM components, MGr1-Ag/37LRP may activate the downstream signal pathway PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK through interaction with phosphorylated FAK. Moreover, the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs could be significantly enhanced by inhibiting MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression through mAbs, siRNA, and antisense oligonucleotide. According to these results, we concluded that the FAK/PI3K and MAPK signal pathway plays an important role in MGr1-Ag-mediated CAM-DR in gastric cancer. MGr1-Ag/37LRP might be a potential effective reversal target to MDR in gastric cancer. PMID:24703465

  1. Lrp5 and Lrp6 in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Danese M.; Ke, Jiyuan; Zhong, Zhendong; Xu, H. Eric; Williams, Bart O.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein-related receptors 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) are highly homologous proteins with key functions in canonical Wnt signaling. Alterations in the genes encoding these receptors or their interacting proteins are linked to human diseases and as such they have been a major focus of drug development efforts to treat several human conditions including osteoporosis, cancer, and metabolic disease. Here, we discuss the links between alterations in Lrp5/6 and disease, proteins that interact with them, and insights gained into their function from mouse models. We also highlight current drug development related to Lrp5/6 as well as how the recent elucidation of their crystal structures may allow for further refinement of our ability to target them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23245947

  2. Prion Protein-mediated Toxicity of Amyloid-β Oligomers Requires Lipid Rafts and the Transmembrane LRP1*

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Griffiths, Heledd H.; Watt, Nicole T.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble oligomers of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide cause neurotoxicity, synaptic dysfunction, and memory impairments that underlie Alzheimer disease (AD). The cellular prion protein (PrPC) was recently identified as a high affinity neuronal receptor for Aβ oligomers. We report that fibrillar Aβ oligomers recognized by the OC antibody, which have been shown to correlate with the onset and severity of AD, bind preferentially to cells and neurons expressing PrPC. The binding of Aβ oligomers to cell surface PrPC, as well as their downstream activation of Fyn kinase, was dependent on the integrity of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. In SH-SY5Y cells, fluorescence microscopy and co-localization with subcellular markers revealed that the Aβ oligomers co-internalized with PrPC, accumulated in endosomes, and subsequently trafficked to lysosomes. The cell surface binding, internalization, and downstream toxicity of Aβ oligomers was dependent on the transmembrane low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1). The binding of Aβ oligomers to cell surface PrPC impaired its ability to inhibit the activity of the β-secretase BACE1, which cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce Aβ. The green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and the red wine extract resveratrol both remodeled the fibrillar conformation of Aβ oligomers. The resulting nonfibrillar oligomers displayed significantly reduced binding to PrPC-expressing cells and were no longer cytotoxic. These data indicate that soluble, fibrillar Aβ oligomers bind to PrPC in a conformation-dependent manner and require the integrity of lipid rafts and the transmembrane LRP1 for their cytotoxicity, thus revealing potential targets to alleviate the neurotoxic properties of Aβ oligomers in AD. PMID:23386614

  3. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) can mediate degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1).

    PubMed

    Canuel, Maryssa; Sun, Xiaowei; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Paramithiotis, Eustache; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated LDL-cholesterol (LDLc) levels are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. LDLc is cleared from circulation by the LDL receptor (LDLR). Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) enhances the degradation of the LDLR in endosomes/lysosomes, resulting in increased circulating LDLc. PCSK9 can also mediate the degradation of LDLR lacking its cytosolic tail, suggesting the presence of as yet undefined lysosomal-targeting factor(s). Herein, we confirm this, and also eliminate a role for the transmembrane-domain of the LDLR in mediating its PCSK9-induced internalization and degradation. Recent findings from our laboratory also suggest a role for PCSK9 in enhancing tumor metastasis. We show herein that while the LDLR is insensitive to PCSK9 in murine B16F1 melanoma cells, PCSK9 is able to induce degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1), suggesting distinct targeting mechanisms for these receptors. Furthermore, PCSK9 is still capable of acting upon the LDLR in CHO 13-5-1 cells lacking LRP-1. Conversely, PCSK9 also acts on LRP-1 in the absence of the LDLR in CHO-A7 cells, where re-introduction of the LDLR leads to reduced PCSK9-mediated degradation of LRP-1. Thus, while PCSK9 is capable of inducing degradation of LRP-1, the latter is not an essential factor for LDLR regulation, but the LDLR effectively competes with LRP-1 for PCSK9 activity. Identification of PCSK9 targets should allow a better understanding of the consequences of PCSK9 inhibition for lowering LDLc and tumor metastasis.

  4. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-03-27

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of Wnt co-receptor LRP6 and RNA-binding protein HuR by miR-29b in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwu; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jun-Yao; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression by binding to their target mRNAs for degradation and/or translation repression and are implicated in many aspects of cellular physiology. Our previous study shows that miR-29b acts as a biological repressor of intestinal mucosal growth, but its exact downstream targets remain largely unknown. In the present study, we found that mRNAs, encoding Wnt co-receptor LRP6 (low-density lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 6) and RNA-binding protein (RBP) HuR, are novel targets of miR-29b in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that expression of LRP6 and HuR is tightly regulated by miR-29b at the post-transcriptional level. miR-29b interacted with both Lrp6 and HuR mRNAs via their 3′-UTRs and inhibited LRP6 and HuR expression by destabilizing Lrp6 and HuR mRNAs and repressing their translation. Studies using heterologous reporter constructs revealed a greater repressive effect of miR-29b through a single binding site in the Lrp6 or HuR 3′-UTR, whereas deletion mutation of this site prevented miR-29b-induced repression of LRP6 and HuR expression. Repression of HuR by miR-29b in turn also contributed to miR-29b-induced LRP6 inhibition, since ectopic overexpression of HuR in cells overexpressing miR-29b restored LRP6 expression to near normal levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29b inhibits expression of LRP6 and HuR post-transcriptionally, thus playing a role in the regulation of IEC proliferation and intestinal epithelial homoeostasis. PMID:27089893

  6. LRP5: From bedside to bench to bone.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bart O

    2017-09-01

    A role for low-density lipoprotein-related receptor 5 (LRP5) in human bone was first established by the identification of genetic alterations that led to dramatic changes in bone mass. Shortly thereafter, mutations that altered the function of the sclerostin (SOST) gene were also associated with altered human bone mass. Subsequent studies of LRP5 and sclerostin have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which these proteins regulate skeletal homeostasis. Sclerostin normally binds to LRP5 and the related LRP6 protein and prevents their activation by Wnts, the LRP5/LRP6 ligands. The interaction of sclerostin with LRP5 or LRP6 is facilitated by the LRP4 protein. Loss of LRP5 leads to defective osteoblast function and low bone mass, while loss of SOST or mutations in LRP5, which produce a protein that can no longer be bound by SOST, result in high bone mass. Insights gained from the use of genetically engineered mouse models are presented, as well as a brief summary of the status of antibodies in clinical trials that block the function of SOST as a mechanism to increase bone mass. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) has two high-affinity binding sites for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP): consequences for the chaperone functions of RAP.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Schar, Christine; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-06-26

    RAP (receptor-associated protein) is a three domain 38 kDa ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-resident protein that is a chaperone for the LRP (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein). Whereas RAP is known to compete for binding of all known LRP ligands, neither the location, the number of binding sites on LRP, nor the domains of RAP involved in binding is known with certainty. We have systematically examined the binding of each of the three RAP domains (D1, D2 and D3) to tandem and triple CRs (complement-like repeats) that span the principal ligand-binding region, cluster II, of LRP. We found that D3 binds with low nanomolar affinity to all (CR)2 species examined. Addition of a third CR domain increases the affinity for D3 slightly. A pH change from 7.4 to 5.5 gave only a 6-fold increase in Kd for D3 at 37 degrees C, whereas temperature change from 22 degrees C to 37 degrees C has a similar small effect on affinity, raising questions about the recently proposed D3-destabilization mechanism of RAP release from LRP. Surprisingly, and in contrast to literature suggestions, D1 and D2 also bind to most (CR)2 and (CR)3 constructs with nanomolar affinity. Although this suggested that there might be three high-affinity binding sites in RAP for LRP, studies with intact RAP showed that only two binding sites are available in the intact chaperone. These findings suggest a new model for RAP to function as a folding chaperone and also for the involvement of YWTD domains in RAP release from LRP in the Golgi.

  8. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) in hippocampal neurons does not proportionately reduce, or otherwise alter, amyloid deposition in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) and its family members have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Multiple susceptibility factors converge to metabolic pathways that involve LRP1, including modulation of the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the clearance of Aβ peptide. Methods We used the Cre-lox system to lower LRP1 levels in hippocampal neurons of mice that develop Alzheimer-type amyloid by crosses between mice that express Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the GFAP promoter, mice that harbor loxp sites in the LRP1 gene, and the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic model. We compared amyloid plaque numbers in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice lacking LRP1 expression in hippocampus (n = 13) to mice with normal levels of LRP1 (n = 12). Student t-test was used to test whether there were significant differences in plaque numbers and amyloid levels between the groups. A regression model was used to fit two regression lines for these groups, and to compare the rates of Aβ accumulation. Results Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated efficient elimination of LRP1 expression in the CA fields and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Within hippocampus, we observed no effect on the severity of amyloid deposition, the rate of Aβ40/42 accumulation, or the architecture of amyloid plaques when LRP1 levels were reduced. Conclusions Expression of LRP1 by neurons in proximity to senile amyloid plaques does not appear to play a major role in modulating the formation of these proximal deposits or in the appearance of the associated neuritic pathology. PMID:22537779

  9. A LewisX Glycoprotein Screen Identifies the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) as a Modulator of Oligodendrogenesis in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Eva; Safina, Dina; Haussmann, Ute; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Edenhofer, Frank; Poetsch, Ansgar; Faissner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the developing and adult CNS multipotent neural stem cells reside in distinct niches. Specific carbohydrates and glycoproteins are expressed in these niche microenvironments which are important regulators of stem cell maintenance and differentiation fate. LewisX (LeX), also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 or CD15, is a defined carbohydrate moiety expressed in niche microenvironments of the developing and adult CNS. LeX-glycans are involved in stem cell proliferation, migration, and stemness. A few LeX carrier proteins are known, but a systematic analysis of the targets of LeX glycosylation in vivo has not been performed so far. Using LeX glycosylation as a biomarker we aimed to discover new glycoproteins with a potential functional relevance for CNS development. By immunoaffinity chromatography we enriched LeX glycoproteins from embryonic and postnatal mouse brains and used one-dimensional nLC-ESI-MS/MS for their identification. We could validate phosphacan, tenascin-C, and L1-CAM as major LeX carrier proteins present in vivo. Furthermore, we identified LRP1, a member of the LDL receptor family, as a new LeX carrier protein expressed by mouse neural stem cells. Surprisingly, little is known about LRP1 function for neural stem cells. Thus, we generated Lrp1 knock-out neural stem cells by Cre-mediated recombination and investigated their properties. Here, we provide first evidence that LRP1 is necessary for the differentiation of neural stem cells toward oligodendrocytes. However, this function is independent of LeX glycosylation. PMID:23615909

  10. Dimerization leads to changes in APP (amyloid precursor protein) trafficking mediated by LRP1 and SorLA.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Simone; Gonzalez, A C; Thomas, C; Schilling, S; Schwarz, S M; Tischer, C; Adam, V; Strecker, P; Schmidt, V; Willnow, T E; Hermey, G; Pietrzik, C U; Koo, E H; Kins, Stefan

    2017-08-10

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by α-, β- and γ-secretases is a determining factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imbalances in the activity of all three enzymes can result in alterations towards pathogenic Aβ production. Proteolysis of APP is strongly linked to its subcellular localization as the secretases involved are distributed in different cellular compartments. APP has been shown to dimerize in cis-orientation, affecting Aβ production. This might be explained by different substrate properties defined by the APP oligomerization state or alternatively by altered APP monomer/dimer localization. We investigated the latter hypothesis using two different APP dimerization systems in HeLa cells. Dimerization caused a decreased localization of APP to the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, whereas the levels in the ER and in endosomes were increased. Furthermore, we observed via live cell imaging and biochemical analyses that APP dimerization affects its interaction with LRP1 and SorLA, suggesting that APP dimerization modulates its interplay with sorting molecules and in turn its localization and processing. Thus, pharmacological approaches targeting APP oligomerization properties might open novel strategies for treatment of AD.

  11. LRP1 shedding in human brain: roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Juan; Tran, Hien; Verbeek, Marcel M; Reiss, Karina; Estus, Steven; Bu, Guojun

    2009-04-16

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) plays critical roles in lipid metabolism, cell survival, and the clearance of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide. Functional soluble LRP1 (sLRP1) has been detected in circulating human placenta; however, whether sLRP1 is also present in the central nervous system is unclear. Here we show that abundant sLRP1 capable of binding its ligands is present in human brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Interestingly, the levels of sLRP1 in CSF are significantly increased in older individuals, suggesting that either LRP1 shedding is increased or sLRP1 clearance is decreased during aging. To examine potential effects of pathological ligands on LRP1 shedding, we treated MEF cells with Abeta peptide and found that LRP1 shedding was increased. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are key members of the ADAM family that process membrane-associated proteins including amyloid precursor protein and Notch. We found that LRP1 shedding was significantly decreased in MEF cells lacking ADAM10 and/or ADAM17. Furthermore, forced expression of ADAM10 increased LRP1 shedding, which was inhibited by ADAM-specific inhibitor TIMP-3. Our results demonstrate that LRP1 is shed by ADAM10 and ADAM17 and functional sLRP1 is abundantly present in human brain and CSF. Dysregulated LRP1 shedding during aging could alter its function and may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  12. Six Novel Missense Mutations in the LDL Receptor-Related Protein 5 (LRP5) Gene in Different Conditions with an Increased Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Van Wesenbeeck, Liesbeth; Cleiren, Erna; Gram, Jeppe; Beals, Rodney K.; Bénichou, Olivier; Scopelliti, Domenico; Key, Lyndon; Renton, Tara; Bartels, Cindy; Gong, Yaoqin; Warman, Matthew L.; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Bollerslev, Jens; Van Hul, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is subject to the balanced processes of bone formation and bone resorption. Imbalance can give rise to skeletal pathologies with increased bone density. In recent years, several genes underlying such sclerosing bone disorders have been identified. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene has been shown to be involved in both osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and the high–bone-mass phenotype and turned out to be an important regulator of peak bone mass in vertebrates. We performed mutation analysis of the LRP5 gene in 10 families or isolated patients with different conditions with an increased bone density, including endosteal hyperostosis, Van Buchem disease, autosomal dominant osteosclerosis, and osteopetrosis type I. Direct sequencing of the LRP5 gene revealed 19 sequence variants. Thirteen of these were confirmed as polymorphisms, but six novel missense mutations (D111Y, G171R, A214T, A214V, A242T, and T253I) are most likely disease causing. Like the previously reported mutation (G171V) that causes the high–bone-mass phenotype, all mutations are located in the aminoterminal part of the gene, before the first epidermal growth factor–like domain. These results indicate that, despite the different diagnoses that can be made, conditions with an increased bone density affecting mainly the cortices of the long bones and the skull are often caused by mutations in the LRP5 gene. Functional analysis of the effects of the various mutations will be of interest, to evaluate whether all the mutations give rise to the same pathogenic mechanism. PMID:12579474

  13. Up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: a possible novel mechanism of antiatherogenic activity of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor Atorvastatin and hepatic LRP1 expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Kang, Saet Byol; Park, Jong Suk; Lee, Byung Wan; Kang, Eun Seok; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2011-07-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) binds to apolipoprotein E and serves as a receptor for remnant lipoproteins in the liver, thus playing an important role in clearing these atherogenic particles. In this study, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, on hepatic LRP1 expression. We used HepG2 and Hep3B cells for in vitro study, and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty and Sprague-Dawley rats for in vivo study. We used relatively high pharmacologic dose of atorvastatin in this study (in vitro, 0.5 μmol/L in culture media, for 48 hours; in vivo, 20 mg/[kg d], for 6 weeks). Atorvastatin increased LRP1 and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in HepG2 and Hep3B cells and induced hepatic LRP1 and LDL receptor expression in chow diet-fed Sprague-Dawley rats and high-fat diet-fed Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rats. Atorvastatin decreased intracellular sterol level and increased the amount of the nuclear form of sterol response element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) in both HepG2 and Hep3B cells as well as in two animal models. Treatment of HepG2 cells with LDL increased intracellular sterol level and reduced LRP1, LDL receptor, and SREBP-2. When SREBP-2 in HepG2 cells was knocked down by small interfering RNA, the induction of LRP1 expression by atorvastatin did not take place. In conclusion, up-regulation of hepatic LRP1 might be a novel mechanism by which statin treatment decreases remnant lipoproteins. In addition, SREBP-2 acts as a mediator of atorvastatin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LRP1. Future studies using standard doses of atorvastatin in humans are needed to elucidate clinical relevance of these findings.

  14. LRP4 induces extracellular matrix productions and facilitates chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Asai, Nobuyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-08-22

    Endochondral ossification is an essential step for skeletal development, which requires chondrocyte differentiation in growth cartilage. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), a member of LDLR family, is an inhibitor for Wnt signaling, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation remain to be investigated. Here we found by laser capture microdissection that LRP4 expression was induced during chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate. In order to address the roles, we overexpressed recombinant human LRP4 or knocked down endogenous LRP4 by lentivirus in mouse ATDC5 chondrocyte cells. We found that LRP4 induced gene expressions of extracellular matrix proteins of type II collagen (Col2a1), aggrecan (Acan), and type X collagen (Col10a1), as well as production of total proteoglycans in ATDC5 cells, whereas LRP4 knockdown had opposite effects. Interestingly, LRP4-knockdown reduced mRNA expression of Sox9, a master regulator for chondrogenesis, as well as Dkk1, an extracellular Wnt inhibitor. Analysis of Wnt signaling revealed that LRP4 blocked the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in ATDC5 cells. Finally, the reduction of these extracellular matrix productions by LRP4-knockdown was rescued by a β-catenin/TCF inhibitor, suggesting that LRP4 is an important regulator for extracellular matrix productions and chondrocyte differentiation by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues*

    PubMed Central

    Gettins, Peter G. W.; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13–800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  16. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  17. P-glycoprotein, lung resistance-related protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in de novo adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Daniela; Michelutti, Angela; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Masolini, Paola; Stocchi, Raffaella; Geromin, Antonella; Ermacora, Anna; Russo, Domenico; Fanin, Renato; Baccarani, Michele

    2002-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), lung resistance-related protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) expression, and blast cell intracellular daunorubicin accumulation (IDA) were evaluated in 95 previously untreated cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) using flow cytometry. Forty-five out of 95 (47%) patients were P-gp positive (+), 12/66 (18%) were LRP+ and 11/66 (17%) were MRP+. Eighteen out of 66 (28%) patients showed a simultaneous multidrug resistance (MDR)-related protein expression higher than controls for more than one protein, while 24/66 (36%) cases did not overexpress any protein. Twenty-one out of 24 (87%) cases overexpressing at least one MDR-related protein had a defect in accumulating daunorubicin into their blast cells, while only 4/24 (16%) cases who did not overexpress any protein had similar features. The complete remission rates were similar in MDR-positive and -negative (-) patients but relapses within 6 months were more frequent in P-gp+ cases, and therefore the disease-free survival duration was shorter in P-gp+ than in P-gp- patients (P = 0.01). The number of MRP+ and/or LRP+ cases was too small to be able to draw any conclusion on their role in affecting or predicting therapy outcome. In conclusion, P-gp overexpression associated with a defect in daunorubicin accumulation is a frequent feature in adult ALL at onset and seems to be related to poorer therapy outcome and, consequently, a shorter disease-free survival. LRP and MRP overexpression seems to be a rare event and no conclusion can be drawn on its prognostic role.

  18. LRP1 regulates remodeling of the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Hollister, Margaret; Reynolds, Irene; Hsieh, En-hui; Gonias, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor for diverse proteases, protease inhibitors, and other plasma membrane proteins, including the urokinase receptor (uPAR). LRP1 also functions in cell-signaling and regulates gene expression. The goal of this study was to determine whether LRP1 regulates remodeling of provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) by fibroblasts. To address this problem, we utilized an in vitro model in which type I collagen was reconstituted and overlaid with fibronectin. Either the collagen or fibronectin was fluorescently-labeled. ECM remodeling by fibroblasts deficient in LRP1, uPAR, or MT1-MMP was studied. MT1-MMP was required for efficient remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not involved in fibronectin remodeling. Instead, fibronectin was remodeled by a system that required urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPAR, and exogenously-added plasminogen. LRP1 markedly inhibited fibronectin remodeling by regulating cell-surface uPAR and plasminogen activation. LRP1 also regulated remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not by controlling MT1-MMP. Instead, LRP1 deficiency or inhibition de-repressed a secondary pathway for collagen remodeling, which was active in MT1-MMP-deficient cells but not in uPAR-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that LRP1 regulates ECM remodeling principally by repressing pathways that require plasminogen activation by uPA in association with uPAR. PMID:19699300

  19. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a novel modulator of radial glia stem cell proliferation, survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Safina, Dina; Schlitt, Frederik; Romeo, Ramona; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Edenhofer, Frank; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The LDL family of receptors and its member LRP1 have classically been associated with a modulation of lipoprotein metabolism. Current studies, however, indicate diverse functions for this receptor in various aspects of cellular activities, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. LRP1 is essential for normal neuronal function in the adult CNS, whereas the role of LRP1 in development remained unclear. Previously we have observed an upregulation of LewisX (LeX) glycosylated LRP1 in the stem cells of the developing cortex and demonstrated its importance for oligodendrocyte differentiation. In the current study we show that LeX-glycosylated LRP1 is also expressed in the stem cell compartment of the developing spinal cord and has broader functions in the developing CNS. We have investigated the basic properties of LRP1 conditional knockout on the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from the cortex and the spinal cord, created by means of Cre-loxp mediated recombination in vitro. The functional status of LRP1-deficient cells has been studied using proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis assays. LRP1 deficient NSPCs from both CNS regions demonstrated altered differentiation profiles. Their differentiation capacity towards oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), mature oligodendrocytes and neurons was reduced. In contrast, astrocyte differentiation was promoted. Moreover, LRP1 deletion had a negative effect on NSPCs proliferation and survival. Our observations suggest that LRP1 facilitates NSPCs differentiation via interaction with ApoE. Upon ApoE4 stimulation wild type NSPCs generated more oligodendrocytes, but LRP1 knockout cells showed no response. The effect of ApoE seems to be independent of cholesterol uptake, but is rather mediated by downstream MAPK and Akt activation. PMID:27258849

  20. Quantitative dissection of the binding contributions of ligand lysines of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1).

    PubMed

    Dolmer, Klavs; Campos, Andres; Gettins, Peter G W

    2013-08-16

    Although lysines are known to be critical for ligand binding to LDL receptor family receptors, relatively small reductions in affinity have been found when such lysines have been mutated. To resolve this paradox, we have examined the specific binding contributions of four lysines, Lys-253, Lys-256, Lys-270, and Lys-289, in the third domain (D3) of receptor-associated protein (RAP), by eliminating all other lysine residues. Using D3 variants containing lysine subsets, we examined binding to the high affinity fragment CR56 from LRP1. With this simplification, we found that elimination of the lysine pairs Lys-253/Lys-256 and Lys-270/Lys-289 resulted in increases in Kd of 1240- and 100,000-fold, respectively. Each pair contributed additively to overall affinity, with 61% from Lys-270/Lys-289 and 39% from Lys-253/Lys-256. Furthermore, the Lys-270/Lys-289 pair alone could bind different single CR domains with similar affinity. Within the pairs, binding contributions of Lys-270 ≫ Lys-256 > Lys-253 ∼ Lys-289 were deduced. Importantly, however, Lys-289 could significantly compensate for the loss of Lys-270, thus explaining how previous studies have underestimated the importance of Lys-270. Calorimetry showed that favorable enthalpy, from Lys-256 and Lys-270, overwhelmingly drives binding, offset by unfavorable entropy. Our findings support a mode of ligand binding in which a proximal pair of lysines engages the negatively charged pocket of a CR domain, with two such pairs of interactions (requiring two CR domains), appropriately separated, being alone sufficient to provide the low nanomolar affinity found for most protein ligands of LDL receptor family members.

  1. Sclerostin inhibition reverses skeletal fragility in an Lrp5-deficient mouse model of OPPG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Veera, Shreya; Horan, Daniel J; Moss, Rachel E; Ayturk, Ugur M; Jacobsen, Christina M; Bowen, Margot E; Paszty, Chris; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2013-11-13

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare genetic disease that produces debilitating effects in the skeleton. OPPG is caused by mutations in LRP5, a WNT co-receptor that mediates osteoblast activity. WNT signaling through LRP5, and also through the closely related receptor LRP6, is inhibited by the protein sclerostin (SOST). It is unclear whether OPPG patients might benefit from the anabolic action of sclerostin neutralization therapy (an approach currently being pursued in clinical trials for postmenopausal osteoporosis) in light of their LRP5 deficiency and consequent osteoblast impairment. To assess whether loss of sclerostin is anabolic in OPPG, we measured bone properties in a mouse model of OPPG (Lrp5(-/-)), a mouse model of sclerosteosis (Sost(-/-)), and in mice with both genes knocked out (Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-)). Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-) mice have larger, denser, and stronger bones than do Lrp5(-/-) mice, indicating that SOST deficiency can improve bone properties via pathways that do not require LRP5. Next, we determined whether the anabolic effects of sclerostin depletion in Lrp5(-/-) mice are retained in adult mice by treating 17-week-old Lrp5(-/-) mice with a sclerostin antibody for 3 weeks. Lrp5(+/+) and Lrp5(-/-) mice each exhibited osteoanabolic responses to antibody therapy, as indicated by increased bone mineral density, content, and formation rates. Collectively, our data show that inhibiting sclerostin can improve bone mass whether LRP5 is present or not. In the absence of LRP5, the anabolic effects of SOST depletion can occur via other receptors (such as LRP4/6). Regardless of the mechanism, our results suggest that humans with OPPG might benefit from sclerostin neutralization therapies.

  2. Immunization with Recombinantly Expressed LRP4 Induces Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Canan; Çavuş, Filiz; Yılmaz, Vuslat; Tüzün, Erdem

    2017-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), characterized with muscle weakness. While MG develops due to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies in most patients, antibodies to muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) may also be identified. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has been previously induced by both LRP4 immunization and passive transfer of LRP4 antibodies. Our aim was to confirm previous results and to test the pathogenic effects of LRP4 immunization in a commonly used mouse strain C57BL/6 (B6) using a recombinantly expressed human LRP4 protein. B6 mice were immunized with human LRP4 in CFA, Torpedo Californica AChR in CFA or only CFA. Clinical and pathogenic aspects of EAMG were compared among groups. LRP4- and AChR-immunized mice showed comparable EAMG clinical severity. LRP4-immunized mice displayed serum antibodies to LRP4 and NMJ IgG and complement factor C3 deposits. IgG2 was the dominant anti-LRP4 isotype. Cultured lymph node cells of LRP4- and AChR-immunized mice gave identical pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-17) responses to LRP4 and AChR stimulation, respectively. Our results confirm the EAMG-inducing action of LRP4 immunization and identify B6 as a LRP4-EAMG-susceptible mouse strain. Demonstration of complement fixing anti-LRP4 antibodies in sera and complement/IgG deposits at the NMJ of LRP4-immunized mice indicates complement activation as a putative pathogenic mechanism. We have thus developed a practical LRP4-induced EAMG model using a non-conformational protein and a widely available mouse strain for future investigation of LRP4-related MG.

  3. Importance of detecting multidrug resistance proteins in acute leukemia prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello; Maranho, Caroline Klein; Rauber, Gabriela Schneider; Santos-Silva, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a multifactorial phenomenon and the role of these proteins in generating the MDR phenotype is controversial. With this in mind, this review compiled the current data on the role of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP proteins in the prognosis of hematologic neoplasms and their influence on the choice of therapy. Literature showed that the detection of these proteins, mainly ABCB1, is important in the AL prognosis. However, there is controversy regarding the methodology used for their detection. In summary, the expression and activity profiles of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP, proteins capable of promoting the efflux of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents from the cell cytoplasm represent one of the greatest causes of failure in AL treatment.

  4. Association of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the interaction between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) polymorphisms and overweight and obesity in rural Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jinjin; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Guo'an; Shen, Yanxia; Wu, Dongting; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Linlin; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Zhou, Junmei; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Zhao, Jingzhi; Luo, Xinping; Hu, Dongsheng

    2017-01-09

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) plays an important role in glucose and cholesterol metabolism. The present cohort study evaluated associations of LRP5 variants with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rural adult Chinese population. In all, 7751 subjects aged ≥18 years without T2DM underwent genotyping at baseline; 6326 subjects (81.62%) were followed-up, and 5511 with a clear disease outcome were eligible for analysis. The same questionnaire was administered and the same anthropometric and blood biochemical examinations were performed at baseline and follow-up. Association analysis was performed for five single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of LRP5. Cox proportional hazards testing of three different genetic models found no significant association between T2DM and LRP5 after adjusting for potential risk factors (P > 0.05). However, the incidence of T2DM in subjects with LRP5 mutational genotypes was higher in the overweight/obese than normal weight population. Under the dominant model, the risk of T2DM was increased with an interaction between rs11228303 and the waist-to-height ratio adjusted for baseline age, sex, and family history of T2DM (synergy index [SI] = 4.172; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.014-17.166)], and body mass index (SI = 3.237; 95% CI 1.102-9.509). Furthermore, the A allele of rs3758644 was related to decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function levels, whereas the T allele of rs12363572 was related to increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in new-onset diabetes patients (P < 0.05). The risk of T2DM may be associated with interactions between the LRP5 gene and overweight and obesity. Polymorphisms of LRP5 are related to β-cell function and lipid metabolism. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Progesterone induces expression of Lrp2 in the murine uterus

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seo Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lim, Jeong Mook; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) and progesterone receptor (PR) have important functions in uterine environment. In previous studies, using high density DNA microarray analysis, we identified low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (Lrp2) is one of the genes upregulated by P4 and PR. In present studies, we examined the expression of Lrp2 through real-time PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry by P4-PR response. Lrp2 mRNA transcript was significantly increased after P4 treatment in the luminal and glandular epithelium of the wild-type mice. However, Lrp2 expression was not observed in the progesterone receptor knock out (PRKO) mice treated with P4. The expression of Lrp2 expression is not regulated by estrogen. During early pregnancy, the expression of Lrp2 was detected at 2.5 dpc and then significantly increased at 3.5 dpc in luminal and glandular epithelium. These results suggest that Lrp2 is a novel target gene by P4 and PR. PMID:24140060

  6. LRP2 mediates folate uptake in the developing neural tube.

    PubMed

    Kur, Esther; Mecklenburg, Nora; Cabrera, Robert M; Willnow, Thomas E; Hammes, Annette

    2014-05-15

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell-surface receptor expressed in the embryonic neuroepithelium. Loss of LRP2 in the developing murine central nervous system (CNS) causes impaired closure of the rostral neural tube at embryonic stage (E) 9.0. Similar neural tube defects (NTDs) have previously been attributed to impaired folate metabolism in mice. We therefore asked whether LRP2 might be required for the delivery of folate to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Uptake assays in whole-embryo cultures showed that LRP2-deficient neuroepithelial cells are unable to mediate the uptake of folate bound to soluble folate receptor 1 (sFOLR1). Consequently, folate concentrations are significantly reduced in Lrp2(-/-) embryos compared with control littermates. Moreover, the folic-acid-dependent gene Alx3 is significantly downregulated in Lrp2 mutants. In conclusion, we show that LRP2 is essential for cellular folate uptake in the developing neural tube, a crucial step for proper neural tube closure.

  7. Inflammatory mediators promote production of shed LRP1/CD91, which regulates cell signaling and cytokine expression by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Gaultier, Alban; Campana, W. Marie; Firestein, Gary S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LRP1 is a type-1 transmembrane receptor that mediates the endocytosis of diverse ligands. LRP1 β-chain proteolysis results in release of sLRP1 that is present in human plasma. In this study, we show that LPS and IFN-γ induce shedding of LRP1 from RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs in vitro. ADAM17 was principally responsible for the increase in LRP1 shedding. sLRP1 was also increased in vivo in mouse plasma following injection of LPS and in plasma from human patients with RA or SLE. sLRP1, which was purified from human plasma, and full-length LRP1, purified from mouse liver, activated cell signaling when added to cultures of RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs. Robust activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was observed. The IKK-NF-κB pathway was transiently activated. Proteins that bind to the ligand-binding clusters in LRP1 failed to inhibit sLRP1-initiated cell signaling, however an antibody that targets the sLRP1 N terminus was effective. sLRP1 induced expression of regulatory cytokines by RAW 264.7 cells, including TNF-α, MCP-1/CCL2, and IL-10. These results demonstrate that sLRP1 is generated in inflammation and may regulate inflammation by its effects on macrophage physiology. PMID:20610799

  8. Level of receptor-associated protein moderates cellular susceptibility to pseudomonas exotoxin A.

    PubMed Central

    Mucci, D; Forristal, J; Strickland, D; Morris, R; Fitzgerald, D; Saelinger, C B

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) enters mammalian cells via a receptor-mediated endocytic pathway. The initial step in this pathway is binding to the multiligand receptor termed the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Binding of toxin, and of the many other ligands that bind to LRP, is blocked by the addition of a 39-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP). Here we show that approximately 40% of the cell-associated LRP is on the surface of toxin-sensitive mouse LM fibroblasts and thus accessible for toxin internalization. The remainder is located intracellularly, primarily in the Golgi region. Mammalian cells exhibit a wide range of sensitivity to PE. To investigate possible reasons for this, we examined the expression levels of both LRP and RAP. Results from a variety of cell lines indicated that there was a positive correlation between LRP expression and toxin sensitivity. In the absence of LRP, cells were as much as 200-fold more resistant to PE compared with sensitive cells. A second group of resistant cells expressed LRP but had a high level of RAP. Thus, a toxin-resistant phenotype would be expected when cells expressed either low levels of LRP or high levels of LRP in the presence of high levels of RAP. We hypothesize that RAP has a pivotal role in moderating cellular susceptibility to PE. PMID:7622212

  9. Disruption of LRP6 in osteoblasts blunts the bone anabolic activity of PTH.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Xing, Qiujuan; Yu, Bing; Xie, Hui; Wang, Weishan; Shi, Chenhui; Crane, Janet L; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) are associated with human skeletal disorders. LRP6 is required for parathyroid hormone (PTH)-stimulated signaling pathways in osteoblasts. We investigated whether LRP6 in osteoblasts directly regulates bone remodeling and mediates the bone anabolic effects of PTH by specifically deleting LRP6 in mature osteoblasts in mice (LRP6 KO). Three-month-old LRP6 KO mice had a significant reduction in bone mass in the femora secondary spongiosa relative to their wild-type littermates, whereas marginal changes were found in femoral tissue of 1-month-old LRP6 KO mice. The remodeling area of the 3-month-old LRP6 KO mice showed a decreased bone formation rate as detected by Goldner's Trichrome staining and calcein double labeling. Bone histomorphometric and immumohistochemical analysis revealed a reduction in osteoblasts but little change in the numbers of osteoclasts and osteoprogenitors/osteoblast precursors in LRP6 KO mice compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, the percentage of the apoptotic osteoblasts on the bone surface was higher in LRP6 KO mice compared with wild-type littermates. Intermittent injection of PTH had no effect on bone mass or osteoblastic bone formation in either trabecular and cortical bone in LRP6 KO mice, whereas all were enhanced in wild-type littermates. Additionally, the anti-apoptotic effect of PTH on osteoblasts in LRP6 KO mice was less significant compared with wild-type mice. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that LRP6 in osteoblasts is essential for osteoblastic differentiation during bone remodeling and the anabolic effects of PTH. © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. Disruption of Lrp4 function by genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade increases bone mass and serum sclerostin levels

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Kang; Kramer, Ina; Huber, Thomas; Kinzel, Bernd; Guth-Gundel, Sabine; Leupin, Olivier; Kneissel, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    We identified previously in vitro LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) as a facilitator of the WNT (Wingless-type) antagonist sclerostin and found mutations disrupting this function to be associated with high bone mass in humans similar to patients lacking sclerostin. To further delineate the role of LRP4 in bone in vivo, we generated mice lacking Lrp4 in osteoblasts/osteocytes or osteocytes only. Lrp4 deficiency promoted progressive cancellous and cortical bone gain in both mutants, although more pronouncedly in mice deficient in osteoblast/osteocyte Lrp4, consistent with our observation in human bone that LRP4 is most strongly expressed by osteoblasts and early osteocytes. Bone gain was related primarily to increased bone formation. Interestingly, Lrp4 deficiency in bone dramatically elevated serum sclerostin levels whereas bone expression of Sost encoding for sclerostin was unaltered, indicating that osteoblastic Lrp4 retains sclerostin within bone. Moreover, we generated anti-LRP4 antibodies selectively blocking sclerostin facilitator function while leaving unperturbed LRP4–agrin interaction, which is essential for neuromuscular junction function. These antibodies increased bone formation and thus cancellous and cortical bone mass in skeletally mature rodents. Together, we demonstrate a pivotal role of LRP4 in bone homeostasis by retaining and facilitating sclerostin action locally and provide a novel avenue to bone anabolic therapy by antagonizing LRP4 sclerostin facilitator function. PMID:25404300

  11. Well-Defined Protein/Peptide-Polymer Conjugates by Aqueous Cu-LRP: Synthesis and Controlled Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Muxiu; Zhu, Chongyu; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Li, Zaidong; Wilson, Paul; Kempe, Kristian; Haddleton, David M

    2015-07-29

    The synthesis of well-defined protein/peptide-polymer conjugates with interesting self-assembly behavior via single electron transfer living radical polymerization in water is described. A range of protein/peptides with different physical and chemical properties have been modified to macroinitiators and optimized polymerization conditions ensure successful polymerization from soluble, insoluble, and dispersed protein/peptide molecules or protein aggregates. This powerful strategy tolerates a range of functional monomers and mediates efficient homo or block copolymerization to generate hydrophilic polymers with controlled molecular weight (MW) and narrow MW distribution. The polymerizations from bovine insulin macroinitiators follow surface-initiated "grafting from" polymerization mechanism and may involve a series of self-assembly and disassembly processes. Synthesized insulin-polymer conjugates form spheres in water, and the self-assembly behavior could be controlled via thermal control, carbohydrate-protein interaction, and protein denaturation.

  12. Kremen is required for neural crest induction in Xenopus and promotes LRP6-mediated Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Christine; Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Huang, Ya-Lin; Kuriyama, Sei; Mayor, Roberto; Niehrs, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Kremen 1 and 2 (Krm1/2) are transmembrane receptors for Wnt antagonists of the Dickkopf (Dkk) family and function by inhibiting the Wnt co-receptors LRP5/6. Here we show that Krm2 functions independently from Dkks during neural crest (NC) induction in Xenopus. Krm2 is co-expressed with, and regulated by, canonical Wnts. Krm2 is differentially expressed in the NC, and morpholino-mediated Krm2 knockdown inhibits NC induction, which is mimicked by LRP6 depletion. Conversely, krm2 overexpression induces ectopic NC. Kremens bind to LRP6, promote its cell-surface localization and stimulate LRP6 signaling. Furthermore, Krm2 knockdown specifically reduces LRP6 protein levels in NC explants. The results indicate that in the absence of Dkks, Kremens activate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling through LRP6.

  13. Activation of Wnt Signaling by Chemically Induced Dimerization of LRP5 Disrupts Cellular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Adam C.; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Chiou, Shin-Heng; Cho, Kyucheol; Carstens, Julienne L.; Decker, William K.; McCrea, Pierre D.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling is crucial for a variety of biological processes, including body axis formation, planar polarity, stem cell maintenance and cellular differentiation. Therefore, targeted manipulation of Wnt signaling in vivo would be extremely useful. By applying chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) technology, we were able to modify the Wnt co-receptor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), to generate the synthetic ligand inducible Wnt switch, iLRP5. We show that iLRP5 oligomerization results in its localization to disheveled-containing punctate structures and sequestration of scaffold protein Axin, leading to robust β-catenin-mediated signaling. Moreover, we identify a novel LRP5 cytoplasmic domain critical for its intracellular localization and casein kinase 1-dependent β-catenin signaling. Finally, by utilizing iLRP5 as a Wnt signaling switch, we generated the Ubiquitous Activator of β-catenin (Ubi-Cat) transgenic mouse line. The Ubi-Cat line allows for nearly ubiquitous expression of iLRP5 under control of the H-2Kb promoter. Activation of iLRP5 in isolated prostate basal epithelial stem cells resulted in expansion of p63+ cells and development of hyperplasia in reconstituted murine prostate grafts. Independently, iLRP5 induction in adult prostate stroma enhanced prostate tissue regeneration. Moreover, induction of iLRP5 in male Ubi-Cat mice resulted in prostate tumor progression over several months from prostate hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma. We also investigated iLRP5 activation in Ubi-Cat-derived mammary cells, observing that prolonged activation results in mammary tumor formation. Thus, in two distinct experimental mouse models, activation of iLRP5 results in disruption of tissue homeostasis, demonstrating the utility of iLRP5 as a novel research tool for determining the outcome of Wnt activation in a precise spatially and temporally determined fashion. PMID:22303459

  14. Myeloid cell receptor LRP1/CD91 regulates monocyte recruitment and angiogenesis in tumors.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Nicole D; Jo, Minji; Hu, Jingjing; Bristow, Jeanne M; Pizzo, Donald P; Gaultier, Alban; VandenBerg, Scott R; Gonias, Steven L

    2013-07-01

    Recruitment of monocytes into sites of inflammation is essential in the immune response. In cancer, recruited monocytes promote invasion, metastasis, and possibly angiogenesis. LDL receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic and cell-signaling receptor that regulates cell migration. In this study, we isografted PanO2 pancreatic carcinoma cells into mice in which LRP1 was deleted in myeloid lineage cells. Recruitment of monocytes into orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors was significantly increased in these mice, compared with control mice. LRP1-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) expressed higher levels of multiple chemokines, including, most prominently, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3, which is known to amplify inflammation. Increased levels of CCL3 were detected in LRP1-deficient tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), isolated from PanO2 tumors, and in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells in which LRP1 was silenced. LRP1-deficient BMDMs migrated more rapidly than LRP1-expressing cells in vitro. The difference in migration was reversed by CCL3-neutralizing antibody, by CCR5-neutralizing antibody, and by inhibiting NF-κB with JSH-23. Inhibiting NF-κB reversed the increase in CCL3 expression associated with LRP1 gene silencing in RAW 264.7 cells. Tumors formed in mice with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells showed increased angiogenesis. Although VEGF mRNA expression was not increased in LRP1-deficient TAMs, at the single-cell level, the increase in TAM density in tumors with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells may have allowed these TAMs to contribute an increased amount of VEGF to the tumor microenvironment. Our results show that macrophage density in tumors is correlated with cancer angiogenesis in a novel model system. Myeloid cell LRP1 may be an important regulator of cancer progression. ©2013 AACR.

  15. C-terminal 37 residues of LRP promote the amyloidogenic processing of APP independent of FE65.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana, Madepalli K; Chen, Eunice; Yoon, Il-Sang; Kang, David E

    2008-12-01

    The major defining pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid beta protein (Abeta), a small peptide derived from beta- and gamma-secretase cleavages of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recent studies have shown that the Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) plays a pivotal role in the trafficking of APP and generation of Abeta. In particular, we recently showed that the soluble cytoplasmic tail of LRP (LRP-ST) without a membrane tether was sufficient to promote Abeta generation. In this study, we demonstrate that the last 37 residues of LRP cytoplasmic tail (LRP-C37) lacking the NPxY motifs and FE65 binding mediate the core pro-amyloidogenic activity of LRP-ST. Moreover, we show that the conserved dileucine motif within the LRP-C37 region is a key determinant of its Abeta promoting activity. Finally, results from a yeast two-hybrid screen using LRP-C37 region as bait reveal four new LRP-binding proteins implicated in intracellular signalling and membrane protein trafficking. Our findings indicate that the LRP-C37 sequence represents a new protein-binding domain that may be useful as a therapeutic target and tool to lower Abeta generation in AD.

  16. Evolution of a global regulator: Lrp in four orders of γ-Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Unoarumhi, Yvette; Blumenthal, Robert M; Matson, Jyl S

    2016-05-20

    Bacterial global regulators each regulate the expression of several hundred genes. In Escherichia coli, the top seven global regulators together control over half of all genes. Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is one of these top seven global regulators. Lrp orthologs are very widely distributed, among both Bacteria and Archaea. Surprisingly, even within the phylum γ-Proteobacteria (which includes E. coli), Lrp is a global regulator in some orders and a local regulator in others. This raises questions about the evolution of Lrp and, more broadly, of global regulators. We examined Lrp sequences from four bacterial orders of the γ-Proteobacteria using phylogenetic and Logo analyses. The orders studied were Enterobacteriales and Vibrionales, in which Lrp plays a global role in tested species; Pasteurellales, in which Lrp is a local regulator in the tested species; and Alteromonadales, an order closely related to the other three but in which Lrp has not yet been studied. For comparison, we analyzed the Lrp paralog AsnC, which in all tested cases is a local regulator. The Lrp and AsnC phylogenetic clusters each divided, as expected, into subclusters representing the Enterobacteriales, Vibrionales, and Pasteuralles. However the Alteromonadales did not yield coherent clusters for either Lrp or AsnC. Logo analysis revealed signatures associated with globally- vs. locally- acting Lrp orthologs, providing testable hypotheses for which portions of Lrp are responsible for a global vs. local role. These candidate regions include both ends of the Lrp polypeptide but not, interestingly, the highly-conserved helix-turn-helix motif responsible for DNA sequence specificity. Lrp and AsnC have conserved sequence signatures that allow their unambiguous annotation, at least in γ-Proteobacteria. Among Lrp orthologs, specific residues correlated with global vs. local regulatory roles, and can now be tested to determine which are functionally relevant and which simply reflect

  17. Renal LRP2 expression in man and chicken is estrogen-responsive

    PubMed Central

    Plieschnig, Julia A.; Gensberger, Eva T.; Bajari, Tarek M.; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Hermann, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP2) is an endocytic receptor that binds multiple ligands and is essential for a wide range of physiological processes. To gain new insights into the biology of this complex protein, we have initiated the molecular characterization of the LRP2 homolog from an oviparous species, the chicken (Gallus gallus). The galline LRP2 cDNA encodes a membrane protein of 4658 residues. Overall, the galline and human proteins are 73% identical, indicating that the avian gene has been well conserved over 300 million years. Unexpectedly, LRP2 transcript and protein levels in the kidney of females and estrogen-treated roosters were significantly higher than those in untreated males. The estrogen-responsiveness of avian LRP2 may be related to the dramatic differences in lipoprotein metabolism between mature roosters and laying hens. Newly identified potential estrogen-responsive elements (ERE) in the human and galline LRP2 gene, and additional Sp1 sites present in the promoter of the chicken gene, are compatible with both direct estrogen induction via the classical ligand-induced ERE pathway and the indirect transcription factor crosstalk pathway engaging the Sp1 sites. In agreement with this assumption, estrogen induction of LRP2 was observed not only in primary cultured chicken kidney cells, but also human kidney cell lines. These findings point to novel regulatory features of the LRP2 gene resulting in sex-specific receptor expression. PMID:22868208

  18. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State.

    PubMed

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  19. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E.; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C. Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state. PMID:28496400

  20. LRP5 and plasma cholesterol levels modulate the canonical Wnt pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, Maria; Carolina Romero, July; Badimon, Lina

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is triggered after invasion or injury to restore homeostasis. Although the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is one of the first molecular responses to cellular damage, its role in inflammation is still unclear. It was our hypothesis that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are modulators of inflammatory mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and LRP5(-/-) mice were fed a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet to trigger dislipidemia and chronic inflammation. Diets were supplemented with plant sterol esters (PSEs) to induce LDL cholesterol lowering and the reduction of inflammation. HC WT mice showed increased serum cholesterol levels that correlated with increased Lrp5 and Wnt/β-catenin gene expression while in the HC LRP5(-/-) mice Wnt/β-catenin pathway was shut down. Functionally, HC induced pro-inflammatory gene expression in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of the Wnt pathway in inflammation. Dietary PSE administration downregulated serum cholesterol levels in WT and LRP5(-/-) mice. Furthermore, in WT mice PSE increased anti-inflammatory genes expression and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation. Hepatic gene expression of Vldlr, Lrp2 and Lrp6 was increased after HC feeding in WT mice but not in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in the clearance of plasmatic lipoproteins. Finally, an antiatherogenic role for LRP5 was demonstrated as HC LRP5(-/-) mice developed larger aortic atherosclerotic lesions than WT mice. Our results show an anti-inflammatory, pro-survival role for LRP5 and the Wnt signaling pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

  1. The Lrp family of transcription regulators in archaea.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    Archaea possess a eukaryotic-type basal transcription apparatus that is regulated by bacteria-like transcription regulators. A universal and abundant family of transcription regulators are the bacterial/archaeal Lrp-like regulators. The Lrp family is one of the best studied regulator families in archaea, illustrated by investigations of proteins from the archaeal model organisms: Sulfolobus, Pyrococcus, Methanocaldococcus, and Halobacterium. These regulators are extremely versatile in their DNA-binding properties, response to effector molecules, and molecular regulatory mechanisms. Besides being involved in the regulation of the amino acid metabolism, they also regulate central metabolic processes. It appears that these regulatory proteins are also involved in large regulatory networks, because of hierarchical regulations and the possible combinatorial use of different Lrp-like proteins. Here, we discuss the recent developments in our understanding of this important class of regulators.

  2. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Vassart, Amelia; Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role. PMID:23255531

  3. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Vassart, Amelia; Van Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role.

  4. The association between LRP-1 variants and chylomicron uptake after a high fat meal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In vitro studies suggest that low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) plays a role in the secondary uptake of chylomicrons. In addition, in vivo studies using LRP-1 knockout mice show these animals exhibit delayed chylomicron clearance. Whether this is true in humans is unknown. We...

  5. LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Swanberg, Maria; McGuigan, Fiona; Callreus, Mattias; Gerdhem, Paul; Akesson, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.

  6. Mice with a heterozygous Lrp6 deletion have impaired fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Travis A; Vivanco, Juan F; Zahatnansky, Juraj; Moren, Andrew J Vander; Mason, James J; Williams, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Bone fracture non-unions, the failure of a fracture to heal, occur in 10%–20% of fractures and are a costly and debilitating clinical problem. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critical in bone development and fracture healing. Polymorphisms of linking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), a Wnt-binding receptor, have been associated with decreased bone mineral density and fragility fractures, although this remains controversial. Mice with a homozygous deletion of Lrp6 have severe skeletal abnormalities and are not viable, whereas mice with a heterozygous deletion have a combinatory effect with Lrp5 to decrease bone mineral density. As fracture healing closely models embryonic skeletal development, we investigated the process of fracture healing in mice heterozygous for Lrp6 (Lrp6 +/−) and hypothesized that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 would impair fracture healing. Mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were induced in Lrp6 +/− mice and wild-type controls (Lrp6 +/+). Fractures were analyzed using micro-computed tomography (μCT) scans, biomechanical testing, and histological analysis. Lrp6 +/− mice had significantly decreased stiffness and strength at 28 days post fracture (PF) and significantly decreased BV/TV, total density, immature bone density, and mature area within the callus on day-14 and -21 PF; they had significantly increased empty callus area at days 14 and 21 PF. Our results demonstrate that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 impairs fracture healing, which suggests that Lrp6 has a role in fracture healing. PMID:27635281

  7. A cell-free biochemical complementation assay reveals complex and redundant cytosolic requirements for LRP endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Miwako, Ishido; Schmid, Sandra L

    2006-05-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) binds multiple, distinct ligands and participates in constitutive endocytosis and signal transduction. Using an in vitro reconstitution system and a new biochemical complementation assay, we have explored the limiting cytosolic requirements for endocytosis of LRP from isolated plasma membranes. We find that clathrin, AP2 and dynamin do not support efficient LRP uptake and that additional factors present in a 30% ammonium sulfate supernatant fraction of bovine brain cytosol (AS supt) are required. Fractionation of the AS supt revealed that multiple and redundant factors are required to support LRP endocytosis. Among these, we identified Hsc70, synaptojanin1 and CRMP-2 by mass spectrometry. Our data suggest that LRP, which bears several distinct endocytic motifs in its cytoplasmic domain, may use multiple pathways for endocytosis in vitro.

  8. MESD is Essential for Apical Localization of Megalin/LRP2 in the Visceral Endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lighthouse, Janet K.; Zhang, Liqun; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Rosenquist, Thomas; Holdener, Bernadette C.

    2010-01-01

    Deletion of the Mesd gene region blocks gastrulation and mesoderm differentiation in mice. MESD is a chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors: low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and 6 (LRP5/6). We hypothesized that loss of Wnt signaling is responsible for the polarity defects observed in Mesd deficient embryos. However, because the Mesd deficient embryo is considerably smaller than Lrp5/6 or Wnt3 mutants, we predicted that MESD function extends more broadly to the LRP family of receptors. Consistent with this prediction, we demonstrated that MESD function in vitro was essential for maturation of the β-propeller/EGF domain common to LRPs. To begin to understand the role of MESD in LRP maturation in vivo, we generated a targeted Mesd knockout and verified that loss of Mesd blocks WNT signaling in vivo. Mesd mutants continue to express pluripotency markers, Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2, suggesting that Wnt signaling is essential for differentiation of the epiblast. Moreover, we demonstrated that MESD was essential for the apical localization of the related LRP2 (Megalin/MEG) in the visceral endoderm, resulting in impaired endocytic function. Combined, our results provide evidence that MESD functions as a general LRP chaperone, and suggest that the Mesd phenotype results from both signaling and endocytic defects resulting from mis-folding of multiple LRP receptors. PMID:21337463

  9. MESD is essential for apical localization of megalin/LRP2 in the visceral endoderm.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Zhang, Liqun; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Rosenquist, Thomas; Holdener, Bernadette C

    2011-03-01

    Deletion of the Mesd gene region blocks gastrulation and mesoderm differentiation in mice. MESD is a chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors: low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and 6 (LRP5/6). We hypothesized that loss of Wnt signaling is responsible for the polarity defects observed in Mesd-deficient embryos. However, because the Mesd-deficient embryo is considerably smaller than Lrp5/6 or Wnt3 mutants, we predicted that MESD function extends more broadly to the LRP family of receptors. Consistent with this prediction, we demonstrated that MESD function in vitro was essential for maturation of the β-propeller/EGF domain common to LRPs. To begin to understand the role of MESD in LRP maturation in vivo, we generated a targeted Mesd knockout and verified that loss of Mesd blocks WNT signaling in vivo. Mesd mutants continue to express the pluripotency markers Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2, suggesting that Wnt signaling is essential for differentiation of the epiblast. Moreover, we demonstrated that MESD was essential for the apical localization of the related LRP2 (Megalin/MEG) in the visceral endoderm, resulting in impaired endocytic function. Combined, our results provide evidence that MESD functions as a general LRP chaperone and suggest that the Mesd phenotype results from both signaling and endocytic defects resulting from misfolding of multiple LRP receptors.

  10. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  11. Vascular Smooth Muscle LRP6 Limits Arteriosclerotic Calcification in Diabetic LDLR-/- Mice by Restraining Noncanonical Wnt Signals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Su-Li; Ramachandran, Bindu; Behrmann, Abraham; Shao, Jian-Su; Mead, Megan; Smith, Carolyn; Krchma, Karen; Arredondo, Yoanna Bello; Kovacs, Attila; Kapoor, Kapil; Brill, Laurence M.; Perera, Ranjan; Williams, Bart O.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Wnt signaling regulates key aspects of diabetic vascular disease. Objective We generated SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- mice to determine contributions of Wnt co-receptor LRP6 in the vascular smooth muscle lineage (VSM) of male LDLR-null mice, a background susceptible to diet (HFD) - induced diabetic arteriosclerosis. Methods and Results As compared to LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- controls, SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- (LRP6-VKO) siblings exhibited increased aortic calcification on HFD without changes in fasting glucose, lipids, or body composition. Pulse wave velocity (index of arterial stiffness) was also increased. Vascular calcification paralleled enhanced aortic osteochondrogenic programs and circulating osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular regulator of arteriosclerosis. Survey of ligands and Frizzled (Fzd) receptor profiles in LRP6-VKO revealed upregulation of canonical and noncanonical Wnts alongside Fzd10. Fzd10 stimulated noncanonical signaling and OPN promoter activity via an USF-activated cognate inhibited by LRP6. RNAi revealed that USF1 but not USF2 supports OPN expression in LRP6-VKO VSM, and immunoprecipitation confirmed increased USF1 association with OPN chromatin. ML141, an antagonist of cdc42/Rac1 noncanonical signaling, inhibited USF1 activation, osteochondrogenic programs, alkaline phosphatase, and VSM calcification. Mass spectrometry identified LRP6 binding to protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) - 1, and nuclear asymmetric dimethylarginine modification was increased with LRP6-VKO. RNAi demonstrated that PRMT1 inhibits OPN and TNAP while PRMT4 supports expression. USF1 complexes containing the H3R17Me2a signature of PRMT4 are increased with LRP6-VKO. Jmjd6, a demethylase downregulated with LRP6 deficiency, inhibits OPN and TNAP expression, USF1:H3R17Me2a complex formation and transactivation. Conclusions LRP6 restrains VSM noncanonical signals that promote osteochondrogenic differentiation, mediated in part via USF1- and arginine methylation

  12. Initiation of Wnt signaling: control of Wnt coreceptor Lrp6 phosphorylation/activation via frizzled, dishevelled and axin functions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xin; Huang, He; Tamai, Keiko; Zhang, Xinjun; Harada, Yuko; Yokota, Chika; Almeida, Karla; Wang, Jianbo; Doble, Brad; Woodgett, Jim; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hsieh, Jen-Chieh; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling has central roles in development and diseases, and is initiated by the action of the frizzled (Fz) receptor, its coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), and the cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dvl) protein. The functional relationships among Fz, Lrp6 and Dvl have long been enigmatic. We demonstrated previously that Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation via glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3) initiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Here we show that both Fz and Dvl functions are critical for Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation through Fz-Lrp6 interaction. We also show that axin, a key scaffolding protein in the Wnt pathway, is required for Lrp6 phosphorylation via its ability to recruit Gsk3, and inhibition of Gsk3 at the plasma membrane blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our results suggest a model that upon Wnt-induced Fz-Lrp6 complex formation, Fz recruitment of Dvl in turn recruits the axin-Gsk3 complex, thereby promoting Lrp6 phosphorylation to initiate β-catenin signaling. We discuss the dual roles of the axin-Gsk3 complex and signal amplification by Lrp6-axin interaction during Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:18077588

  13. LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta is inhibited by KPI-containing isoforms of APP.

    PubMed

    Moir, Robert D; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2005-04-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the abnormal accumulation and deposition of beta-amyloid in cerebral blood vessels and in the brain parenchyma. Critical in modulating beta-amyloid deposition in brain is the flux of Abeta across the blood brain barrier. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), is a large endocytic receptor that mediates the efflux of Abeta out of brain and into the periphery. The first step in the LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta involves the formation of a complex between Abeta and the LRP ligands apolipoprotein E (apoE) or alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M). The Abeta/chaperone complexes then bind to LRP via binding sites on apoE or alpha(2)M. The efflux of Abeta/chaperone complexes out of the neuropil and into the periphery may be attenuated by LRP-ligands that compete with apoE or alpha(2)M for LRP binding. LRP is also the cell surface receptor for Kunitz Protease Inhibitor (KPI) containing isoforms of Abeta's parent protein, the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Protein and mRNA levels of KPI-containing APP isoforms (APP-KPI) are elevated in AD brain and are associated with increased Abeta production. In this study we show that soluble non-amyloidogenic APP-KPI can also inhibit the uptake of Abeta/alpha(2)M in a cell culture model of LRP mediated Abeta clearance. Clearance of Abeta/apoE complexes was not inhibited by APP-KPI. Our findings are consistent with studies showing that apoE and alpha(2)M have discrete binding sites on LRP. Most significantly, our data suggests that the elevated levels of APP-KPI in AD brain may attenuate the clearance of Abeta, the proteins own amyloidogenic catabolic product.

  14. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Baardman, Maria E; Zwier, Mathijs V; Wisse, Lambertus J; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Hofstra, Robert M W; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Berger, Rolf M F; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2016-04-01

    Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts ofLrp2knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development ofLrp2KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. TheLrp2KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in theLrp2KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans withLRP2mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Baardman, Maria E.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development of Lrp2 KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. The Lrp2 KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in the Lrp2 KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans with LRP2 mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis. PMID:26822476

  16. Role of LRP-1 in cancer cell migration in 3-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Bennasroune, Amar; Jeannesson, Pierre; Terryn, Christine; Fuhrmann, Guy; Morjani, Hamid; Dedieu, Stéphane

    2016-07-27

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a member of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) family, which is ubiquitously expressed and which is described as a multifunctional endocytic receptor which mediates the clearance of various extracellular matrix molecules including serine proteinases, proteinase-inhibitor complexes, and matricellular proteins. Several studies showed that high LRP-1 expression promotes breast cancer cell invasiveness, and LRP-1 invalidation leads to cell motility abrogation in both tumor and non-tumor cells. Furthermore, our group has reported that LRP-1 silencing prevents the invasion of a follicular thyroid carcinoma despite increased pericellular proteolytic activities from MMP2 and uPA using a 2D-cell culture model. As the use of 3D culture systems is becoming more and more popular due to their promise as enhanced models of tissue physiology, the aim of the present work is to characterize for the first time how the 3D collagen type I matrix may impact the ability of LRP-1 to regulate the migratory properties of thyroid carcinoma using as a model FTC-133 cells. Our results show that inhibition of LRP-1 activity or expression leads to morphological changes affecting cell-matrix interactions, reorganizations of the actin-cytoskeleton especially by inhibiting FAK activation and increasing RhoA activity and MLC-2 phosphorylation, thus preventing cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that LRP-1 silencing leads to a decrease of cell migratory capacity in a 3D configuration.

  17. Lrp4 Modulates Extracellular Integration of Cell Signaling Pathways in Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Johnson, Eric B.; Ota, Masato S.; Choi, Hong J.; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Oommen, Shelly; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Herz, Joachim; Sharpe, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which cell signaling is integrated outside the cell is not currently appreciated. We show that a member of the low-density receptor-related protein family, Lrp4 modulates and integrates Bmp and canonical Wnt signalling during tooth morphogenesis by binding the secreted Bmp antagonist protein Wise. Mouse mutants of Lrp4 and Wise exhibit identical tooth phenotypes that include supernumerary incisors and molars, and fused molars. We propose that the Lrp4/Wise interaction acts as an extracellular integrator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell signaling. Wise, secreted from mesenchyme cells binds to BMP's and also to Lrp4 that is expressed on epithelial cells. This binding then results in the modulation of Wnt activity in the epithelial cells. Thus in this context Wise acts as an extracellular signaling molecule linking two signaling pathways. We further show that a downstream mediator of this integration is the Shh signaling pathway. PMID:19116665

  18. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B.; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment. PMID:26427016

  19. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Khumalo, Thandokuhle; Ferreira, Eloise; Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment.

  20. Role of Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinlu; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Xu, Bo; Li, Yonghe

    2017-03-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Although studies have shown an increased expression of LRP6 in several types of cancer, its function in tumor development and progression remains to be elucidated. We herein demonstrated that LRP6 expression is up-regulated in human triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients and human TNBC cell lines, and that knockdown of LRP6 expression and treatment of recombinant Mesd protein (a specific inhibitor of LRP6) significantly decreased cell migration and invasion of TNBC MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Interestingly, the effects of LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment on TNBC cell migration and invasion were more prominent than on TNBC cell proliferation/viability. Mechanistically, LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling and decreased the expression of S100A4, a mediator of cancer metastasis and a specific target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in TNBC cells. Together, our data suggest that LRP6 promotes TNBC cell migration and invasion by regulating the expression and function of S100A4 via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. The genome-wide binding profile of the Sulfolobus solfataricus transcription factor Ss-LrpB shows binding events beyond direct transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Duc, Trong; van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Song, Ningning; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Muyldermans, Serge; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2013-11-25

    Gene regulatory processes are largely resulting from binding of transcription factors to specific genomic targets. Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein (Lrp) is a prevalent transcription factor family in prokaryotes, however, little information is available on biological functions of these proteins in archaea. Here, we study genome-wide binding of the Lrp-like transcription factor Ss-LrpB from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) has revealed that Ss-LrpB interacts with 36 additional loci besides the four previously identified local targets. Only a subset of the newly identified binding targets, concentrated in a highly variable IS-dense genomic region, is also bound in vitro by pure Ss-LrpB. There is no clear relationship between the in vitro measured DNA-binding specificity of Ss-LrpB and the in vivo association suggesting a limited permissivity of the crenarchaeal chromatin for transcription factor binding. Of 37 identified binding regions, 29 are co-bound by LysM, another Lrp-like transcription factor in S. solfataricus. Comparative gene expression analysis in an Ss-lrpB mutant strain shows no significant Ss-LrpB-mediated regulation for most targeted genes, with exception of the CRISPR B cluster, which is activated by Ss-LrpB through binding to a specific motif in the leader region. The genome-wide binding profile presented here implies that Ss-LrpB is associated at additional genomic binding sites besides the local gene targets, but acts as a specific transcription regulator in the tested growth conditions. Moreover, we have provided evidence that two Lrp-like transcription factors in S. solfataricus, Ss-LrpB and LysM, interact in vivo.

  2. Caveolin-1-LRP6 signaling module stimulates aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Salahaldin A; Yang, Guang; Goltsov, Alexei; Song, Ki-Duk; Ren, Chengzhen; Wang, Jianxiang; Chang, Wenjun; Thompson, Timothy C

    2013-03-15

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is a plasma membrane-associated protein with the capacity to modulate signaling activities in a context-dependent fashion. Interactions between Cav-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) were reported to be important for the regulation of Wnt-β-catenin (β-cat) signaling. Cav-1 also interacts with insulin and IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR/IR) and can stimulate IR kinase activities. We found positive correlation between Cav-1 and LRP6 expression in both human primary prostate cancer and metastasis tissues and in PC-3 cells. Cav-1 stimulation of Wnt-β-cat signaling and c-Myc levels was positively associated with LRP6 expression in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 prostate cancer cells. Importantly, LRP6 and, to a lesser extent, Cav-1 were found to stimulate aerobic glycolysis. These activities were positively associated with the expression of HK2 and Glut3 and shown to be dependent on Akt signaling by both gene knockdown and chemical inhibition methods. We further showed that Cav-1 and LRP6 exert their effects on Akt and glycolytic activities by stimulating IGF-IR/IR signaling. Overall, our results show that Cav-1 interacts with LRP6 to generate an integrated signaling module that leads to the activation of IGF-IR/IR and results in stimulation of Akt-mTORC1 signaling and aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer.

  3. Caveolin-1–LRP6 Signaling Module Stimulates Aerobic Glycolysis in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Salahaldin A.; Yang, Guang; Goltsov, Alexei; Song, Ki-Duk; Ren, Chengzhen; Wang, Jianxiang; Chang, Wenjun; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is a plasma membrane–associated protein with the capacity to modulate signaling activities in a context-dependent fashion. Interactions between Cav-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 6 (LRP6) were reported to be important for the regulation of Wnt-β-catenin (β-cat) signaling. Cav-1 also interacts with insulin and IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR/IR) and can stimulate IR kinase activities. We found positive correlation between Cav-1 and LRP6 expression in both human primary prostate cancer and metastasis tissues and in PC-3 cells. Cav-1 stimulation of Wnt–β-cat signaling and c-Myc levels was positively associated with LRP6 expression in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 prostate cancer cells. Importantly, LRP6 and, to a lesser extent, Cav-1 were found to stimulate aerobic glycolysis. These activities were positively associated with the expression of HK2 and Glut3 and shown to be dependent on Akt signaling by both gene knockdown and chemical inhibition methods. We further showed that Cav-1 and LRP6 exert their effects on Akt and glycolytic activities by stimulating IGF-IR/IR signaling. Overall, our results demonstrate that Cav-1 interacts with LRP6 to generate an integrated signaling module that leads to the activation of IGF-IR/IR and results in stimulation of Akt–mTORC1 signaling and aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer. PMID:23302227

  4. Loss of Lrp2 in zebrafish disrupts pronephric tubular clearance but not forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Esther; Christa, Anna; Veth, Kerry N.; Gajera, Chandresh R.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Willer, Jason R.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bachmann, Sebastian; Link, Brian A.; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor conserved from nematodes to humans. In mammals, it acts as regulator of sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein pathways in patterning of the embryonic forebrain and as a clearance receptor in the adult kidney. Little is known about activities of this LRP in other phyla. Here, we extend the functional elucidation of LRP2 to zebrafish as model organism of receptor (dys)function. We demonstrate that expression of Lrp2 in embryonic and larval fish recapitulates the patterns seen in mammalian brain and kidney. Furthermore, we studied the consequence of receptor deficiencies in lrp2 and in lrp2b, a homologue unique to fish, using ENU mutagenesis or morpholino knockdown. While receptor-deficient zebrafish suffer from overt renal resorption deficiency, their brain development proceeds normally, suggesting evolutionary conservation of receptor functions in pronephric duct clearance but not in patterning of the teleost forebrain. PMID:21455927

  5. LRP6 expression promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by altering beta-catenin subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; He, Xi; Schwartz, Alan L; Bu, Guojun

    2004-12-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6), a novel member of the expanding LDL receptor family, functions as an indispensable co-receptor for the Wnt signaling pathway. Although the role of LRP6 in embryonic development is now well established, its role in tumorigenesis is unclear. We report that LRP6 is readily expressed at the transcript level in several human cancer cell lines and human malignant tissues. Furthermore, using a retroviral gene transfer system, we find that stable expression of LRP6 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells alters subcellular beta-catenin distribution such that the cytosolic beta-catenin level is significantly increased. This is accompanied by a significant increase in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that LRP6 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results thus indicate that LRP6 may function as a potential oncogenic protein by modulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  6. Atorvastatin inhibits hypercholesterolemia-induced calcification in the aortic valves via the Lrp5 receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Caira, Frank; Stock, Stuart R; Spelsberg, Thomas C

    2005-08-30

    Calcific aortic valve disease is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement in the United States. The cellular mechanisms of valve calcification are not well understood. We have previously shown that cellular proliferation and osteoblastogenesis are important in the development of valvular heart disease. Lrp5, a known low-density receptor-related protein, plays an essential role in cellular proliferation and osteoblastogenesis via the beta-catenin signaling pathway. We hypothesize that Lrp5 also plays a role in aortic valve (AV) calcification in experimental hypercholesterolemia. We examined the effects of cholesterol and atorvastatin in Watanabe rabbits (n=54). Group I (n=18) received a normal diet, group II (n=18) a 0.25% cholesterol diet, and group III (n=18) a 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol diet with atorvastatin for the development of calcification. The AVs were examined for cellular proliferation, Lrp5/beta-catenin, and bone matrix markers. Bone formation was assessed by micro-computed tomography, calcein injection, and osteopontin expression. Low-density lipoprotein with and without atorvastatin was also tested in AV myofibroblasts for cellular proliferation and regulation of the Lrp5/beta-catenin pathway. Our results demonstrate that the cholesterol diet induced complex bone formations in the calcified AVs with an increase in the Lrp5 receptors, osteopontin, and p42/44 expression. Atorvastatin reduced bone formation, cellular proliferation, and Lrp5/beta-catenin protein levels in the AVs. In vitro analysis confirmed the Lrp5/beta-catenin expression in myofibroblast cell proliferation. Hypercholesterolemic AV calcification is attenuated by atorvastatin and is mediated in part by the Lrp5/beta-catenin pathway. This developmental pathway may be important in the signaling pathway of this disease.

  7. Tyrosine-based signal mediates LRP6 receptor endocytosis and desensitization of Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Roth, Barbara; Bu, Guojun

    2014-10-03

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling orchestrates a number of critical events including cell growth, differentiation, and cell survival during development. Misregulation of this pathway leads to various human diseases, specifically cancers. Endocytosis and phosphorylation of the LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an essential co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, play a vital role in mediating Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction. However, its regulatory mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we define the mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytic trafficking regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. We show that LRP6 mutant with defective tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail has an increased cell surface distribution and decreased endocytosis rate. These changes in LRP6 endocytosis coincide with an increased distribution to caveolae, increased phosphorylation, and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We further demonstrate that treatment of Wnt3a ligands or blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LRP6 leads to a redistribution of wild-type receptor to lipid rafts. The LRP6 tyrosine mutant also exhibited an increase in signaling activation in response to Wnt3a stimulation when compared with wild-type LRP6, and this activation is suppressed when caveolae-mediated endocytosis is blocked. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytosis routes regulate its phosphorylation and the strength of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and have implications on how this pathway can be modulated in human diseases.

  8. Astrocytic LRP1 Mediates Brain Aβ Clearance and Impacts Amyloid Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jian; Wang, Na; Cirrito, John R; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Holtzman, David M; Bu, Guojun

    2017-04-12

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain represent an early and perhaps necessary step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ accumulation leads to the formation of Aβ aggregates, which may directly and indirectly lead to eventual neurodegeneration. While Aβ production is accelerated in many familial forms of early-onset AD, increasing evidence indicates that impaired clearance of Aβ is more evident in late-onset AD. To uncover the mechanisms underlying impaired Aβ clearance in AD, we examined the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in astrocytes. Although LRP1 has been shown to play critical roles in brain Aβ metabolism in neurons and vascular mural cells, its role in astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain responsible for maintaining neuronal homeostasis, remains unclear. Here, we show that astrocytic LRP1 plays a critical role in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 knockdown in primary astrocytes resulted in decreased cellular Aβ uptake and degradation. In addition, silencing of LRP1 in astrocytes led to downregulation of several major Aβ-degrading enzymes, including matrix metalloproteases MMP2, MMP9, and insulin-degrading enzyme. More important, conditional knock-out of the Lrp1 gene in astrocytes in the background of APP/PS1 mice impaired brain Aβ clearance, exacerbated Aβ accumulation, and accelerated amyloid plaque deposition without affecting its production. Together, our results demonstrate that astrocytic LRP1 plays an important role in Aβ metabolism and that restoring LRP1 expression and function in the brain could be an effective strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance and counter amyloid pathology in AD.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes represent a major cell type regulating brain homeostasis; however, their roles in brain clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) and underlying mechanism are not clear. In this study, we used both cellular models and conditional knock-out mouse models to

  9. Dissection of RAP-LRP interactions: binding of RAP and RAP fragments to complement-like repeats 7 and 8 from ligand binding cluster II of LRP.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Ana; Dolmer, Klavs; Strickland, Dudley K; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-06-15

    The receptor associated protein (RAP) is a three domain 38kDa ER-resident chaperone that helps folding of LRP and other LDL receptor family members and prevents premature binding of protein ligands. It competes strongly with all known LRP ligands. To further understanding of the specificity of RAP-LRP interactions, the binding of RAP and RAP fragments to two domains (CR7-CR8) from one of the main ligand-binding regions of LRP has been examined by 2D HSQC NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that RAP contains two binding sites for CR7-CR8, with the higher affinity site (K(d) approximately 1microM) located in the C-terminal two-thirds and the weaker site (K(d) approximately 5microM) in the N-terminal third of RAP. Residues from both CR7 and CR8 are involved in binding at each RAP site. The presence of more than one binding site on RAP for CR domains from LRP, together with the previous demonstration by others that RAP can bind to CR5-CR6 with comparably low affinities suggest an explanation for the dual roles of RAP as a folding chaperone and a tight competitive inhibitor of ligand binding.

  10. Wise Regulates Bone Deposition through Genetic Interactions with Lrp5

    PubMed Central

    Ellies, Debra L.; Economou, Androulla; Viviano, Beth; Rey, Jean-Philippe; Paine-Saunders, Stephenie; Krumlauf, Robb; Saunders, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In this study using genetic approaches in mouse we demonstrate that the secreted protein Wise plays essential roles in regulating early bone formation through its ability to modulate Wnt signaling via interactions with the Lrp5 co-receptor. In Wise−/− mutant mice we find an increase in the rate of osteoblast proliferation and a transient increase in bone mineral density. This change in proliferation is dependent upon Lrp5, as Wise;Lrp5 double mutants have normal bone mass. This suggests that Wise serves as a negative modulator of Wnt signaling in active osteoblasts. Wise and the closely related protein Sclerostin (Sost) are expressed in osteoblast cells during temporally distinct early and late phases in a manner consistent with the temporal onset of their respective increased bone density phenotypes. These data suggest that Wise and Sost may have common roles in regulating bone development through their ability to control the balance of Wnt signaling. We find that Wise is also required to potentiate proliferation in chondrocytes, serving as a potential positive modulator of Wnt activity. Our analyses demonstrate that Wise plays a key role in processes that control the number of osteoblasts and chondrocytes during bone homeostasis and provide important insight into mechanisms regulating the Wnt pathway during skeletal development. PMID:24789067

  11. Targeting the LRP5 pathway improves bone properties in a mouse model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Christina M.; Barber, Lauren A.; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Roberts, Heather J.; Deal, Lauren E.; Schwartz, Marissa A.; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    The cell surface receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a key regulator of bone mass and bone strength. Heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5 cause autosomal dominant high bone mass (HBM) in humans by reducing binding to LRP5 by endogenous inhibitors, such as sclerostin (SOST). Mice heterozygous for a knockin allele (Lrp5p.A214V) that is orthologous to a human HBM-causing mutation have increased bone mass and strength. Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal fragility disorder predominantly caused by mutations that affect type I collagen. We tested whether the LRP5 pathway can be used to improve bone properties in animal models of OI. First, we mated Lrp5+/p.A214V mice to Col1a2+/p.G610C mice, which model human type IV OI. We found that Col1a2+/p.G610C;Lrp5+/p.A214V offspring had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to Col1a2+/p.G610C;Lrp5+/+ littermates. The improved bone properties were not due to altered mRNA expression of type I collagen or its chaperones, nor were they due to changes in mutant type I collagen secretion. Second, we treated Col1a2+/p.G610C mice with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits sclerostin activity (Scl-Ab). We found that antibody treated mice had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to vehicle treated littermates. These findings indicate increasing bone formation, even without altering bone collagen composition, may benefit patients with OI. PMID:24677211

  12. Targeting the LRP5 pathway improves bone properties in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Christina M; Barber, Lauren A; Ayturk, Ugur M; Roberts, Heather J; Deal, Lauren E; Schwartz, Marissa A; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G; Warman, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    The cell surface receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a key regulator of bone mass and bone strength. Heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5 cause autosomal dominant high bone mass (HBM) in humans by reducing binding to LRP5 by endogenous inhibitors, such as sclerostin (SOST). Mice heterozygous for a knockin allele (Lrp5(p.A214V) ) that is orthologous to a human HBM-causing mutation have increased bone mass and strength. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal fragility disorder predominantly caused by mutations that affect type I collagen. We tested whether the LRP5 pathway can be used to improve bone properties in animal models of OI. First, we mated Lrp5(+/p.A214V) mice to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice, which model human type IV OI. We found that Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/p.A214V) offspring had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/+) littermates. The improved bone properties were not a result of altered mRNA expression of type I collagen or its chaperones, nor were they due to changes in mutant type I collagen secretion. Second, we treated Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits sclerostin activity (Scl-Ab). We found that antibody-treated mice had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to vehicle-treated littermates. These findings indicate increasing bone formation, even without altering bone collagen composition, may benefit patients with OI. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. LRP12 silencing during brain development results in cortical dyslamination and seizure sensitization.

    PubMed

    Grote, Alexander; Robens, Barbara K; Blümcke, Ingmar; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Gembé, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Correct positioning and differentiation of neurons during brain development is a key precondition for proper function. Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are increasingly recognized as causes of therapy refractory epilepsies. Neuropathological analyses of respective surgical specimens from neurosurgery for seizure control often reveal aberrant cortical architecture and/or aberrantly shaped neurons in FCDs. However, the molecular pathogenesis particularly of FCDs with aberrant lamination (so-called FCD type I) is largely unresolved. Lipoproteins and particularly low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 12 (LRP12) are involved in brain development. Here, we have examined a potential role of LRP12 in the pathogenesis of FCDs. In vitro knockdown of LRP12 in primary neurons results in impaired neuronal arborization. In vivo ablation of LRP12 by intraventricularly in utero electroporated shRNAs elicits cortical maldevelopment, i.e. aberrant lamination by malpositioning of upper cortical layer neurons. Subsequent epilepsy phenotyping revealed pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures to be aggravated in cortical LRP12-silenced mice. Our data demonstrates IUE mediated cortical gene silencing as an excellent approach to study the role of distinct molecules for epilepsy associated focal brain lesions and suggests LRP12 and lipoprotein homeostasis as potential molecular target structures for the emergence of epilepsy-associated FCDs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Common Polymorphism in the LRP5 Gene May Increase the Risk of Bone Fracture and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Yue; Qiu, Yong; Mao, Hai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) was identified to be linked to the variation in bone mineral density and types of bone diseases. The present study was aimed at examining the association of LRP5 rs3736228 C>T gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis by meta-analysis. A systematic electronic search of literature was conducted to identify all published studies in English or Chinese on the association of the LRP5 gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis risks. All analyses were calculated using the Version 12.0 STATA software. Odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. An updated meta-analysis was currently performed, including seven independent case-control studies. Results identified that carriers of rs3736228 C>T variant in the LRP5 gene were associated with an increased risk of developing osteoporosis and fractures under 4 genetic models but not under the dominant model (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.97~1.46, and P = 0.103). Ethnicity-subgroup analysis implied that LRP5 rs3736228 C>T mutation was more likely to develop osteoporosis and fractures among Asians and Caucasians in majority of subgroups. These results suggest that there is a modest effect of the LRP5 rs3736228 C>T on the increased susceptibility of bone fracture and osteoporosis. PMID:25580429

  15. Induction of drug resistance and protein kinase C genes in A2780 ovarian cancer cells after incubation with antineoplastic agents at sublethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brügger, Dorothee; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Niethammer, Dietrich; Gekeler, Volker; Beck, James F

    2002-01-01

    We examined the inducibility of drug resistance (MDR1, MRP1, LRP) and protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme (alpha, epsilon, eta, theta, tau, zeta) corresponding genes in A2780 ovarian cancer cells after a 24-hour treatment with adriamycin (ADR), camptothecin (CAM), etoposide (ETO) or vincristine (VCR). Sublethal concentrations of drugs were used to exclude short-term effects caused by selection. Cell cycle analysis was performed to identify possible correlation between resistance factors, PKC isozymes and proliferation. We found a mostly combined induction of MDR1, LRP, PKC tau and PKC zeta by CAM, ETO and VCR. PKC alpha, epsilon, eta and theta gene expression altered variably. Cell cycle analysis showed that A2780 cells responded with a marked G2/M arrest after a 24-hour treatment with CAM, ETO and VCR but an association between the induction of PKC isozymes corresponding genes and proliferation was not seen. Our analysis points to a possible link between atypical PKC tau/PKC zeta and MDR1/LRP in cytostatic stress response of cancer cells.

  16. Prognostic significance of miR-23b in combination with P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Janikova, M; Zizkova, V; Skarda, J; Kharaishvili, G; Radova, L; Kolar, Z

    2016-01-01

    Recently, miR-23b has emerged as a promising new cancer biomarker but its role in lung cancer has not been established yet. Patients still do not respond well to available treatments, probably due to expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, such as P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP. The aim of this study was to determine the role of miR-23b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its relationship to the patient outcome together with MDR transporter proteins. We immunohistochemically evaluated expression of P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP and quantified the relative levels of miR-23b in 62 NSCLC patients´ samples. The prognostic significance of miR-23b and MDR proteins was tested by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. Our results showed that miR-23b is mostly downregulated in NSCLC samples (57/62) and that its upregulation in tumors is connected with longer progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.065) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.048). The Cox proportional hazard model revealed that the risk of death or relapse in NSCLC patients with miR-23b downregulation increases together with LRP/MVP expression and both risks decrease with miR-23b upregulation (HRPFS = 4.342, PPFS = 0.022; HROS = 4.408, POS = 0.015). Our findings indicate that miR-23b, especially in combination with LRP/MVP expression, might serve as a suitable prognostic biomarker for NSCLC patients.

  17. Inactivation of Lrp5 in Osteocytes Reduces Young’s Modulus and Responsiveness to the Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Shim, Joon W.; Dodge, Todd R.; Robling, Alexander G.; Yokota, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) is a co-receptor in Wnt signaling, which plays a critical role in development and maintenance of bone. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome, for instance, arises from loss-of- function mutations in Lrp5, and global deletion of Lrp5 in mice results in significantly lower bone mineral density. Since osteocytes are proposed to act as a mechanosensor in bone, we addressed a question whether a conditional loss-of-function mutation of Lrp5 selective to osteocytes (Dmp1-Cre; Lrp5f/f) would alter responses to ulna loading. Loading was applied to the right ulna for 3 min (360 cycles at 2 Hz) at a peak force of 2.65 N for 3 consecutive days, and the contralateral ulna was used as a non-loaded control. Young’s modulus was determined using a midshaft section of the femur. The results showed that compared to age-matched littermate controls, mice lacking Lrp5 in osteocytes exhibited smaller skeletal size with reduced bone mineral density and content. Compared to controls, Lrp5 deletion in osteocytes also led to a 4.6-fold reduction in Young’s modulus. In response to ulna loading, mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate were diminished in mice lacking Lrp5 in osteocytes by 52%, 85%, and 69%, respectively. Collectively, the results support the notion that the loss-of-function mutation of Lrp5 in osteocytes causes suppression of mechanoresponsiveness and reduces bone mass and Young’s modulus. In summary, Lrp5-mediated Wnt signaling significantly contributes to maintenance of mechanical properties and bone mass. PMID:23356985

  18. The LRP1-independent mechanism of PAI-1-induced migration in CpG-ODN activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bikash; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs) induces plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) expression in macrophages, leading to enhanced migration through vitronectin. However, the precise role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in PAI-1 induced migration of macrophages in the inflammatory environment is not known. In this study, we elucidated a novel mechanism describing the altered role of LRP1 in macrophage migration depending on the activation state of the cells. Experimental evidence clearly shows that the blocking of LRP1 function inhibited the PAI-induced migration of resting RAW 264.7 cells through vitronectin but exerted a pro-migratory effect on CpG-ODN-activated cells. We also demonstrate that CpG-ODN downregulates the protein and mRNA levels of LRP1 both in vivo and in vitro, a function that depends on the NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in reduced internalization of PAI-1. This work illustrates the distinct mechanism that PAI-1-induced migration of CpG-ODN-activated cells through vitronectin depends on the interaction of PAI-1 with vitronectin but not LRP1 unlike in the resting cells, where the migration is LRP1 dependent and vitronectin independent. In conclusion, our experimental results demonstrate the altered function of LRP1 in the migration of resting and activated macrophages in the context of microenvironmental extracellular matrix components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Wnt3a-stimulated LRP6 phosphorylation is dependent upon arginine methylation of G3BP2

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Malbon, Craig C.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling is initiated upon binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled proteins and their co-receptors LRP5 and 6. The signal is then propagated to several downstream effectors, mediated by the phosphoprotein scaffold, dishevelled. We report a novel role for arginine methylation in regulating Wnt3a-stimulated LRP6 phosphorylation. G3BP2, a dishevelled-associated protein, is methylated in response to Wnt3a. The Wnt3a-induced LRP6 phosphorylation is attenuated by G3BP2 knockdown, chemical inhibition of methyl transferase activity or expression of methylation-deficient mutants of G3BP2. Arginine methylation of G3BP2 appears to be a Wnt3a-sensitive ‘switch’ regulating LRP6 phosphorylation and canonical Wnt–β-catenin signaling. PMID:22357953

  20. Effects of standard chemotherapy on tumor growth and regulation of multidrug resistance genes and proteins in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Guido; Warmann, Steven W; Vokuhl, Christian O; Heitmann, Heike; Treuner, Claudia; Leuschner, Ivo; Fuchs, Jörg

    2007-05-01

    The prognosis of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in advanced stages is still sobering. Therapy is limited due to local tumor recurrence, development of metastases and multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of multidrug resistance in cell lines and in xenografts of alveolar and embryonal RMS treated according to the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study (CWS). Alveolar and embryonal RMS cell lines were treated with Vincristine, Topotecan, Carboplatin, Actinomycin D, or Ifosfamide. Expression levels of resistance-associated genes were assessed using Real time-PCR. Nude mice (NMRI nu/nu, n = 10 per group) underwent xenotransplantation of human embryonal or alveolar RMS. Animals were treated with standard chemotherapeutic drugs Vincristine, Topotecan, Carboplatin, Actinomycin D, or Ifosfamide according to treatment schedules of the CWS-study. Tumor sizes were measured and relative tumor volumes were calculated. Animals were sacrificed after 20 days and standard histology, Real-time-PCR for MDR1-, MRP-, LRP- and MDM2-gene as well as immunohistochemistry for MDR1-, LRP-, and MRP-protein were performed. In the cell lines, an up-regulation of MDR-1 gene was found in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, an up-regulation of LRP and MRP was found. Standard chemotherapy of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth (P < 0.05) in all groups. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma strongest effects were found after treatment with Ifosfamide, Vincristine and Carboplatin (P < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed a MDR1-dependent mechanism in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, MDR1 occurred to a lower degree. Immunohistochemistry revealed correlating expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated proteins. The use of established chemotherapy on human RMS in vivo had strong effects on xenografts compared to their controls. In all cases, there was only a reduction of tumor growth, but not a

  1. Use of an in vivo titration method to study a global regulator: effect of varying Lrp levels on expression of gltBDF in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Borst, D W; Blumenthal, R M; Matthews, R G

    1996-01-01

    Most studies of global regulatory proteins are performed in vitro or involve phenotypic comparisons between wild-type and mutant strains. We report the use of strains in which the gene for the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (lrp) is transcribed from isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoters for the purpose of continuously varying the in vivo concentration of Lrp. To obtain a broad range of Lrp concentrations, strains were employed that contained the lrp fusion either in the chromosome (I. C. Blomfield, P. J. Calie, K. J. Eberhardt, M. S. McClain, and B. I. Eisenstein, J. Bacteriol. 175:27-36, 1993) or on a multicopy plasmid. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with polyclonal antiserum to Lrp confirmed that Lrp levels could be varied more than 70-fold by growing the strains in glucose minimal 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) medium containing different amounts of IPTG. Expression of an Lrp-regulated gltB::lacZ operon fusion was measured over this range of Lrp concentrations. beta-Galactosidase activity rose with increasing Lrp levels up to the level of Lrp found in wild-type strains, at which point expression is maximal. The presence of leucine in the medium increased the level of Lrp necessary to achieve half-maximal expression of the gltB::lacZ fusion, as predicted by earlier in vitro studies (B. R. Ernsting, J. W. Denninger, R. M. Blumenthal, and R. G. Matthews, J. Bacteriol. 175:7160-7169, 1993). Interestingly, levels of Lrp greater than those in wild-type cells interfered with activation of gltB::lacZ expression. The growth rate of cultures correlated with the intracellular Lrp concentration: levels of Lrp either lower or higher than wild-type levels resulted in significantly slower growth rates. Thus, the level of Lrp in the cell appears to be optimal for rapid growth in minimal medium, and the gltBDF control region is designed to give maximal expression at this Lrp level. PMID:8955313

  2. Lrp4 is a retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation at neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Norihiro; Kim, Natalie; Burden, Steven J

    2012-09-20

    Motor axons receive retrograde signals from skeletal muscle that are essential for the differentiation and stabilization of motor nerve terminals. Identification of these retrograde signals has proved elusive, but their production by muscle depends on the receptor tyrosine kinase, MuSK (muscle, skeletal receptor tyrosine-protein kinase), and Lrp4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein 4), an LDLR family member that forms a complex with MuSK, binds neural agrin and stimulates MuSK kinase activity. Here we show that Lrp4 also functions as a direct muscle-derived retrograde signal for early steps in presynaptic differentiation. We demonstrate that Lrp4 is necessary, independent of MuSK activation, for presynaptic differentiation in vivo, and we show that Lrp4 binds to motor axons and induces clustering of synaptic-vesicle and active-zone proteins. Thus, Lrp4 acts bidirectionally and coordinates synapse formation by binding agrin, activating MuSK and stimulating postsynaptic differentiation, and functioning in turn as a muscle-derived retrograde signal that is necessary and sufficient for presynaptic differentiation.

  3. A comprehensive analysis of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of anti-LRP4 in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zisimopoulou, P; Evangelakou, P; Tzartos, J; Lazaridis, K; Zouvelou, V; Mantegazza, R; Antozzi, C; Andreetta, F; Evoli, A; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Durmus, H; Brenner, T; Vaknin, A; Berrih-Aknin, S; Frenkian Cuvelier, M; Stojkovic, T; DeBaets, M; Losen, M; Martinez-Martinez, P; Kleopa, K A; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Kyriakides, T; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Szczudlik, P; Szyluk, B; Lavrnic, D; Basta, I; Peric, S; Tallaksen, C; Maniaol, A; Tzartos, S J

    2014-08-01

    Double-seronegative myasthenia gravis (dSN-MG, without detectable AChR and MuSK antibodies) presents a serious gap in MG diagnosis and understanding. Recently, autoantibodies against the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) have been identified in several dSN-MG sera, but with dramatic frequency variation (∼2-50%). We have developed a cell based assay (CBA) based on human LRP4 expressing HEK293 cells, for the reliable and efficient detection of LRP4 antibodies. We have screened about 800 MG patient sera from 10 countries for LRP4 antibodies. The overall frequency of LRP4-MG in the dSN-MG group (635 patients) was 18.7% but with variations among different populations (range 7-32.7%). Interestingly, we also identified double positive sera: 8/107 anti-AChR positive and 10/67 anti-MuSK positive sera also had detectable LRP4 antibodies, predominantly originating from only two of the participating groups. No LRP4 antibodies were identified in sera from 56 healthy controls tested, while 4/110 from patients with other neuroimmune diseases were positive. The clinical data, when available, for the LRP4-MG patients were then studied. At disease onset symptoms were mild (81% had MGFA grade I or II), with some identified thymic changes (32% hyperplasia, none with thymoma). On the other hand, double positive patients (AChR/LRP4-MG and MuSK/LRP4-MG) had more severe symptoms at onset compared with any single positive MG subgroup. Contrary to MuSK-MG, 27% of ocular dSN-MG patients were LRP4 antibody positive. Similarly, contrary to MuSK antibodies, which are predominantly of the IgG4 subtype, LRP4 antibodies were predominantly of the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes. The prevalence was higher in women than in men (female/male ratio 2.5/1), with an average disease onset at ages 33.4 for females and 41.9 for males. Overall, the response of LRP4-MG patients to treatment was similar to published responses of AChR-MG rather than to MuSK-MG patients. Copyright © 2013

  4. LRP/LR as an alternative promising target in therapy of prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vana, Karen; Zuber, Chantal; Pflanz, Heike; Kolodziejczak, Dominika; Zemora, Georgeta; Bergmann, Ann-Katrin; Weiss, Stefan

    2009-02-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) represents a key player for cell adhesion, is associated with the metastatic potential of solid tumors and is required for maintenance of cell viability by preventing apoptosis. LRP/LR acts as a receptor for viruses such as Sindbis virus, Venezuelean Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, Adeno-associated-viruses (AAV) and Dengue Virus, the latter causing 50 to 100 million infections in humans per year. LRP/LR acts further as a receptor for prions and represents a multifunctional protein subcellularly located to the nucleus, the cytoplasm and the cell surface. The receptor represents an alternative target for therapy of viral infections, cancer and prion disorders and might play additional roles in further neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The species barrier in prion disorders might be at least in part determined by the presence of LRP/LR in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium. Anti-LRP/LR antibodies, siRNAs directed against LRP mRNA, polysulfated glycanes such as pentosan polysulfate and heparan mimetics and LRP decoy mutants are promising tools for blocking or downregulating the receptor and may represent alternative therapeutics for the treatment of prion disorders, Alzheimer's Disease and metastatic cancer.

  5. Prevention of neural tube defects in Lrp2 mutant mouse embryos by folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Julia A; Stokes, Bethany A; Zohn, Irene E

    2017-01-20

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common structural birth defects in humans and are caused by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Periconceptional supplementation with folic acid can prevent NTDs in both mouse models and human populations. A better understanding of how genes and environmental factors interact is critical toward development of rational strategies to prevent NTDs. Low density lipoprotein-related protein 2 (Lrp2) is involved in endocytosis of the folic acid receptor among numerous other nutrients and ligands. We determined the effect of iron and/or folic acid supplementation on the penetrance of NTDs in the Lrp2(null) mouse model. The effects of supplementation on folate and iron status were measured in embryos and dams. Periconceptional dietary supplementation with folic acid did not prevent NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos, whereas high levels of folic acid supplementation by intraperitoneal injection reduced incidence of NTDs. Importantly, Lrp2(null/+) dams had reduced blood folate levels that improved with daily intraperitoneal injections of folate but not dietary supplementation. On the contrary, iron supplementation had no effect on the penetrance of NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos and negated the preventative effect of folic acid supplementation in Lrp2(null/null) mutants. Lrp2 is required for folate homeostasis in heterozygous dams and high levels of supplementation prevents NTDs. Furthermore, high levels of dietary iron supplementation interfered with folic acid supplementation negating the positive effects of supplementation in this model. Birth Defects Research 109:16-26, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Fanben; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-12-09

    Resistive switching memory constitutes a prospective candidate for next-generation data storage devices. Meanwhile, naturally occurring biomaterials are promising building blocks for a new generation of environmentally friendly, biocompatible, and biodegradable electronic devices. Recent progress in using proteins to construct resistive switching memory devices is highlighted. The protein materials selection, device engineering, and mechanism of such protein-based resistive switching memory are discussed in detail. Finally, the critical challenges associated with protein-based resistive switching memory devices are presented, as well as insights into the future development of resistive switching memory based on natural biomaterials.

  7. Measurement of plasma, serum, and platelet serotonin in individuals with high bone mass and mutations in LRP5

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace S.; Simpson, Christine; Sun, Ben-Hua; Yao, Chen; Foer, Dinah; Sullivan, Becky; Matthes, Susann; Alenina, Natalia; Belsky, Joseph; Bader, Michael; Insogna, Karl L.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) regulates bone mass by suppressing secretion of serotonin from duodenal enterochromaffin cells. In mice with targeted expression of a high bone mass-causing (HBM-causing) LRP5 mutation and in humans with HBM LRP5 mutations, circulating serotonin levels have been reported to be lower than in controls while individuals with loss-of-function mutations in LRP5 have high blood serotonin. In contrast, others have reported that conditionally activating a knock-in allele of an HBM-causing LRP5 mutation in several tissues, or genetic deletion of LRP5 in mice has no effect on serum serotonin levels. To further explore the possible association between HBM-causing LRP5 mutations and circulating serotonin, levels of the hormone were measured in the platelet poor plasma (PPP), serum, and platelet pellet (PP) of 16 affected individuals from 2 kindreds with HBM-causing LRP5 mutations (G171V and N198S) and 16 age-matched controls. When analyzed by HPLC, there were no differences in levels of serotonin in PPP and PP between affected individuals and age-matched controls. Similarly, when analyzed by ELISA, there were no differences in PPP or PP between these two groups. By ELISA, serum levels of serotonin were higher in the affected individuals when compared to age-matched controls. A subgroup analysis of only the G171V subjects (n=14) demonstrated that there were no differences in PPP and PP serotonin between affected individuals and controls when analyzed by HPLC. PP serotonin was lower in the affected individuals when measured by ELISA but serum serotonin levels were not different. We conclude that there is no change in PPP serotonin in individuals with HBM-causing mutations in LRP5. PMID:24038240

  8. LRP-1 and LRP-2 receptors function in the membrane neuron. Trafficking mechanisms and proteolytic processing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Ortolano, Saida; Navarro, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) belongs to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, generally recognized as cell surface endocytic receptors, which bind and internalize extracellular ligands for degradation in lysosomes. Neurons require cholesterol to function and keep the membrane rafts stable. Cholesterol uptake into the neuron is carried out by ApoE via LRPs receptors on the cell surface. In neurons the most important are LRP-1 and LRP-2, even it is thought that a causal factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the malfunction of this process which cause impairment intracellular signaling as well as storage and/or release of nutrients and toxic compounds. Both receptors are multifunctional cell surface receptors that are widely expressed in several tissues including neurons and astrocytes. LRPs are constituted by an intracellular (ICD) and extracellular domain (ECD). Through its ECD, LRPs bind at least 40 different ligands ranging from lipoprotein and protease inhibitor complex to growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins. These receptors has also been shown to interact with scaffolding and signaling proteins via its ICD in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and to function as a co-receptor partnering with other cell surface or integral membrane proteins. Thus, LRPs are implicated in two major physiological processes: endocytosis and regulation of signaling pathways, which are both involved in diverse biological roles including lipid metabolism, cell growth processes, degradation of proteases, and tissue invasion. Interestingly, LRPs were also localized in neurons in different stages, suggesting that both receptors could be implicated in signal transduction during embryonic development, neuronal outgrowth or in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22934024

  9. Association of LRP5 genotypes with osteoporosis in Tunisian post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Rim; Sahli, Hela; Souissi, Chiraz; El Mahmoudi, Hejer; Zouari, Bechir; Ben Ammar ElGaaied, Amel; Sellami, Slaheddine; Ferrari, Serge Livio

    2014-04-30

    Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait. Among the genes associated with bone mineral density (BMD), the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) has been consistently identified in Caucasians. However LRP5 contribution to osteoporosis in populations of other ethnicities remains poorly known. To determine whether LRP5 polymorphisms Ala1330Val and Val667Met are associated with BMD in North Africans, these genotypes were analyzed in 566 post-menopausal Tunisian women with mean age of 59.5 ± 7 .7 years, of which 59.1% have low bone mass (T-score<-1 at spine or hip). In post-menopausal Tunisian women, 1330Val was weakly associated with reduced BMD T-score at lumbar spine (p=0.047) but not femur neck. Moreover, the TT/TC genotypes tended to be more frequent in women with osteopenia and osteoporosis than in women with normal BMD (p=0.066). Adjusting for body size and other potential confounders, LRP5 genotypes were no longer significantly associated with aBMD at any site. The less common Val667Met polymorphism showed no association with osteoporosis. The Ala1330Val polymorphism is weakly associated with lower lumbar spine bone density and osteopenia/osteoporosis in postmenopausal Tunisian women. These observations expand our knowledge about the contribution of LRP5 genetic variation to osteoporosis risk in populations of diverse ethnic origin.

  10. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  11. The Bacterial Two-Hybrid System Uncovers the Involvement of Acetylation in Regulating of Lrp Activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ran; Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qiufen; Li, Shuxian; Cui, Zhongli; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    N𝜀-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat – or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (de)acetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36) in helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:27909434

  12. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG)

    PubMed Central

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations. PMID:21407258

  13. Chromosomal localization of human genes for the LDL receptor family member glycoprotein 330 (LRP2) and its associated protein RAP (LRPAP1)

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Argraves, K.M.

    1994-07-01

    Glycoprotein 330 (gp330) is a member of a family of receptors with structural similarities to the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Gp330 is expressed by a number of specialized epithelia, including renal proximal tubules, where it can mediate endocytosis of ligands such as complexes of urokinase and the serpin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Gp330 has also been shown to bind in vitro to lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein E-enriched {beta}VLDL, suggesting a role for this receptor in lipoprotein metabolism. The 39-kDa protein, referred to as receptor associated protein (RAP), binds to and copurifies with gp330 and antagonizes the ligand binding activity of gp330. In this paper, the authors report the use of homology-PCR cloning to isolate cDNAs encoding human gp330. Using gp330 cDNA and previously isolated human RAP cDNA probes, they performed fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the human chromosomal location of the genes for these proteins. The gene for gp330 was mapped at a single site on the long arm of human chromosome 2 on the border of bands 2q24-q31. The gene for RAP was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 4 at position 4q16.3, which is in the region of the chromosomal deletion causing Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The assignment of chromosomal map positions for gp330 and RAP genes will aid in the evaluation of their potential roles in human diseases such as Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, such as atherosclerosis. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Regulation of Pap phase variation. Lrp is sufficient for the establishment of the phase off pap DNA methylation pattern and repression of pap transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weyand, N J; Low, D A

    2000-02-04

    The pyelonephritis-associated pili (pap) operon in Escherichia coli is regulated by an epigenetic mechanism involving the formation of specific DNA methylation patterns characteristic of transcriptionally active (phase ON) and inactive (phase OFF) cells. The formation of pap DNA methylation patterns in vivo was previously shown to require the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) and DNA adenine methylase (Dam). To monitor the binding of Lrp to pap DNA, an in vitro methylation protection assay was developed. Binding of Lrp to a Dam target site proximal to the papBA promoter (designated GATC(prox)) blocked methylation of this site and specifically repressed transcription. The DNA methylation pattern and transcription state are identical to those observed in vivo in phase OFF cells. To determine if binding of Lrp at GATC(prox) was necessary for repression of papBA transcription, we analyzed a pap mutation (pap-13) that reduced the affinity of Lrp for the GATC(prox) region. Binding of Lrp to pap-13 DNA was shifted to a promoter distal Dam target site (designated GATC(dist)). Lrp blocked methylation of GATC(dist) in the pap-13 mutant, but did not repress papBA transcription. Together, these results show that binding of Lrp to the GATC(prox) region is sufficient for the establishment of the phase OFF DNA methylation pattern and repression of papBA transcription.

  15. Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6 overexpression confers protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced neurotoxicity and reduces tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqi; Bahety, Priti; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Emerging studies have suggested the involvement of dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin cascade in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, genetic variations in Wnt co-receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 6 causing reduced Wnt signaling has been linked to late-onset AD. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 would serve as an effective new approach in reducing neurotoxicity induced by oxidative stress and decreasing tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our results showed that overexpression of LRP5 and LRP6 in SH-SY5Y cells activates Wnt signaling and downstream proliferation genes, whereas knockdown of the co-receptors represses Wnt signaling and the transcription of proliferative markers. We further demonstrated that overexpression of LRP5 and LRP6 protects SH-SY5Y from cell death caused by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, inhibits GSK3β activity and subsequently reduces tau phosphorylation. Together, our findings suggest that rescuing LRP5/6-mediated Wnt signaling improves neuronal cell survival and reduces tau phosphorylation, which support the hypothesis that Wnt signaling might be an attractive therapeutic strategy for managing AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inference of Expanded Lrp-Like Feast/Famine Transcription Factor Targets in a Non-Model Organism Using Protein Structure-Based Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Justin; Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang Yin; Reiss, David J.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread microbial genome sequencing presents an opportunity to understand the gene regulatory networks of non-model organisms. This requires knowledge of the binding sites for transcription factors whose DNA-binding properties are unknown or difficult to infer. We adapted a protein structure-based method to predict the specificities and putative regulons of homologous transcription factors across diverse species. As a proof-of-concept we predicted the specificities and transcriptional target genes of divergent archaeal feast/famine regulatory proteins, several of which are encoded in the genome of Halobacterium salinarum. This was validated by comparison to experimentally determined specificities for transcription factors in distantly related extremophiles, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, and cis-regulatory sequence conservation across eighteen related species of halobacteria. Through this analysis we were able to infer that Halobacterium salinarum employs a divergent local trans-regulatory strategy to regulate genes (carA and carB) involved in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, whereas Escherichia coli employs an operon. The prediction of gene regulatory binding sites using structure-based methods is useful for the inference of gene regulatory relationships in new species that are otherwise difficult to infer. PMID:25255272

  17. Preliminary evidence for an association between LRP-1 genotype and body mass index in humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The LDL receptor-related protein-1 gene (LRP-1) has been associated with obesity in animal models, but no such association has yet been reported in humans. As data suggest this increase in fat mass may be mediated through a mechanism involving the clearance of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (...

  18. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G.; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani–Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner. PMID:24234652

  19. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-04-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner.

  20. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-03-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5(A214V)) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5(A214V) mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1(CAosb)), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5(A214V) mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  1. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5A214V) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5A214V mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1CAosb), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5A214V mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. PMID:26681532

  2. Anti-LRP/LR specific antibody IgG1-iS18 and knock-down of LRP/LR by shRNAs rescue cells from Aβ42 induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Penny, Clement; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles, senile plaques and neuronal loss. Amyloid beta (Aβ) is proposed to elicit neuronal loss through cell surface receptors. As Aβ shares common binding partners with the 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR), we investigated whether these proteins interact and the pathological significance of this association. An LRP/LR-Αβ42 interaction was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and pull down assays. The cell biological effects were investigated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthaizol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Bromodeoxyuridine assays. LRP/LR and Αβ42 co-localised on the cell surface and formed immobilized complexes suggesting an interaction. Antibody blockade by IgG1-iS18 and shRNA mediated down regulation of LRP/LR significantly enhanced cell viability and proliferation in cells co-treated with Αβ42 when compared to cells incubated with Αβ42 only. Results suggest that LRP/LR is implicated in Αβ42 mediated cytotoxicity and that anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs may serve as potential therapeutic tools for AD. PMID:24048171

  3. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Bernd; Tao, Shijie; Yu, Tingsheng; Huysseune, Ann; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26121341

  4. Structural basis of agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, Yinong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Shenyan; Lee, Kwangkook; Zhou, Jie; Yao, Guorui; Figueiredo, Dwight; Perry, Kay; Mei, Lin; Jin, Rongsheng

    2012-06-27

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neural circuits that enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a synapse formed between a motoneuron and a muscle fiber, has contributed greatly to understanding of the general principles of synaptogenesis as well as of neuromuscular disorders. NMJ formation requires neural agrin, a motoneuron-derived protein, which interacts with LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase). However, little is known of how signals are transduced from agrin to MuSK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an agrin-LRP4 complex, consisting of two agrin-LRP4 heterodimers. Formation of the initial binary complex requires the z8 loop that is specifically present in neuronal, but not muscle, agrin and that promotes the synergistic formation of the tetramer through two additional interfaces. We show that the tetrameric complex is essential for neuronal agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Collectively, these results provide new insight into the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling cascade and NMJ formation and represent a novel mechanism for activation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  5. Structural basis of agrin–LRP4–MuSK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yinong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Shenyan; Lee, Kwangkook; Zhou, Jie; Yao, Guorui; Figueiredo, Dwight; Perry, Kay; Mei, Lin; Jin, Rongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neural circuits that enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a synapse formed between a motoneuron and a muscle fiber, has contributed greatly to understanding of the general principles of synaptogenesis as well as of neuromuscular disorders. NMJ formation requires neural agrin, a motoneuron-derived protein, which interacts with LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase). However, little is known of how signals are transduced from agrin to MuSK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an agrin–LRP4 complex, consisting of two agrin–LRP4 heterodimers. Formation of the initial binary complex requires the z8 loop that is specifically present in neuronal, but not muscle, agrin and that promotes the synergistic formation of the tetramer through two additional interfaces. We show that the tetrameric complex is essential for neuronal agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Collectively, these results provide new insight into the agrin–LRP4–MuSK signaling cascade and NMJ formation and represent a novel mechanism for activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:22302937

  6. Inhibition of ADAM10 promotes the clearance of Aβ across the BBB by reducing LRP1 ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, B; Crawford, F; Bachmeier, C

    2016-08-08

    Transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important mediator of beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain and a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the receptors responsible for the transport of Aβ in the BBB is the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). LRP1 is susceptible to proteolytic shedding at the cell surface, which prevents endocytic transport of ligands. Previously, we reported a strong inverse correlation between LRP1 shedding in the brain and Aβ transit across the BBB. Several proteases contribute to the ectodomain shedding of LRP1 including the α-secretase, a desintegrin and metalloproteinase domain containing protein 10 (ADAM10). The role of ADAM10 in the shedding of LRP1 and Aβ BBB clearance was assessed through pharmacological inhibition of ADAM10 in an in vitro model of the BBB and through the use of ADAM10 endothelial specific knock-out mice. In addition, an acute treatment paradigm with an ADAM10 inhibitor was also tested in an AD mouse model to assess the effect of ADAM10 inhibition on LRP1 shedding and Aβbrain accumulation. In the current studies, inhibition of ADAM10 reduced LRP1 shedding in brain endothelial cultures and increased Aβ42 transit across an in vitro model of the BBB. Similarly, transgenic ADAM10 endothelial knockout mice displayed lower LRP1 shedding in the brain and significantly enhanced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to wild-type animals. Acute treatment with the ADAM10-selective inhibitor GI254023X in an AD mouse model substantially reduced brain LRP1 shedding and increased Aβ40 levels in the plasma, indicating enhanced Aβ transit from the brain to the periphery. Furthermore, both soluble and insoluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 brain levels were decreased following GI254023X treatment, but these effects lacked statistical significance. These studies demonstrate a role for ADAM10 in the ectodomain shedding of LRP1 in the brain and the clearance of

  7. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  8. Anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs impede amyloid beta shedding in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Penny, Clement; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia. The amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide is the predominant candidate aetiological agent and is generated through the sequential proteolytic cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by beta (β) and gamma (γ) secretases. Since the cellular prion protein (PrPc) has been shown to regulate Aβ shedding, we investigated whether the cellular receptor for PrPc, namely the 37 kDa/67 kDa Laminin Receptor (LRP/LR) played a role in Aβ shedding. Here we show that LRP/LR co-localises with the AD relevant proteins APP, β- and γ-secretase, respectively. Antibody blockage and shRNA knock-down of LRP/LR reduces Aβ shedding, due to impediment of β-secretase activity, rather than alteration of APP, β- and γ-secretase levels. These findings indicate that LRP/LR contributes to Aβ shedding and recommend anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs as novel therapeutic tools for AD treatment. PMID:24048412

  9. A mutagenesis-derived Lrp5 mouse mutant with abnormal retinal vasculature and low bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Jeremy R.; Earp, Sarah E.; Bell, Brent A.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Godfrey, Dana A.; Rao, Sujata; Anand-Apte, Bela; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is caused by mutations in the genes encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP5) or its interacting partners, namely frizzled class receptor 4 (FZD4) and norrin cystine knot growth factor (NDP). Mouse models for Lrp5, Fzd4, and Ndp have proven to be important for understanding the retinal pathophysiology underlying FEVR and systemic abnormalities related to defective Wnt signaling. Here, we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm111B, which was identified by electroretinogram (ERG) screening of mice generated in the Jackson Laboratory Translational Vision Research Models (TVRM) mutagenesis program. Methods ERGs were used to examine outer retinal physiology. The retinal vasculature was examined by in vivo retinal imaging, as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. The tvrm111B locus was identified by genetic mapping of mice generated in a cross to DBA/2J, and subsequent sequencing analysis. Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR of retinal RNA. Bone mineral density (BMD) was examined by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The tvrm111B allele is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Genetic mapping of the decreased ERG b-wave phenotype of tvrm111B mice localized the mutation to a region on chromosome 19 that included Lrp5. Sequencing of Lrp5 identified the insertion of a cytosine (c.4724_4725insC), which is predicted to cause a frameshift that disrupts the last three of five conserved PPPSPxS motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of LRP5, culminating in a premature termination. In addition to a reduced ERG b-wave, Lrp5tvrm111B homozygotes have low BMD and abnormal features of the retinal vasculature that have been reported previously in Lrp5 mutant mice, including persistent hyaloid vessels, leakage on fluorescein angiography, and an absence of the deep retinal capillary bed. Conclusions The phenotype of the Lrp5tvrm111B mutant includes abnormalities of the retinal

  10. Ubiquitin-dependent folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6.

    PubMed

    Perrody, Elsa; Abrami, Laurence; Feldman, Michal; Kunz, Beatrice; Urbé, Sylvie; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-10-18

    Many membrane proteins fold inefficiently and require the help of enzymes and chaperones. Here we reveal a novel folding assistance system that operates on membrane proteins from the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6 is promoted by ubiquitination of a specific lysine, retaining it in the ER while avoiding degradation. Subsequent ER exit requires removal of ubiquitin from this lysine by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP19. This ubiquitination-deubiquitination is conceptually reminiscent of the glucosylation-deglucosylation occurring in the ER lumen during the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle. To avoid infinite futile cycles, folded LRP6 molecules undergo palmitoylation and ER export, while unsuccessfully folded proteins are, with time, polyubiquitinated on other lysines and targeted to degradation. This ubiquitin-dependent folding system also controls the proteostasis of other membrane proteins as CFTR and anthrax toxin receptor 2, two poor folders involved in severe human diseases.

  11. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H.; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  12. Novel mutations in LRP6 highlight the role of WNT signaling in tooth agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Sullivan, Robert; van Rooij, Iris A.L.M.; Thonissen, Michelle; Swinnen, Steven; Phan, Milien; Conte, Federica; Ishorst, Nina; Gilissen, Christian; RoaFuentes, Laury; van de Vorst, Maartje; Henkes, Arjen; Steehouwer, Marloes; van Beusekom, Ellen; Bloemen, Marjon; Vankeirsbilck, Bruno; Bergé, Stefaan; Hens, Greet; Schoenaers, Joseph; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Roosenboom, Jasmien; Verdonck, An; Devriendt, Koen; Roeleveldt, Nel; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Lupski, James R.; de Ligt, Joep; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Pfundt, Rolph; Brunner, Han G.; Zhou, Huiqing; Dixon, Jill; Mangold, Elisabeth; van Bokhoven, Hans; Dixon, Michael J.; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Here we aimed to identify a novel genetic cause of tooth agenesis (TA) and/or orofacial clefting (OFC) by combining whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted re-sequencing in a large cohort of TA and OFC patients. Methods WES was performed in two unrelated patients, one with severe TA and OFC and another with severe TA only. After identifying deleterious mutations in a gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), all its exons were re-sequenced with molecular inversion probes, in 67 patients with TA, 1,072 patients with OFC and in 706 controls. Results We identified a frameshift (c.4594delG, p.Cys1532fs) and a canonical splice site mutation (c.3398-2A>C, p.?) in LRP6 respectively in the patient with TA and OFC, and in the patient with severe TA only. The targeted re-sequencing showed significant enrichment of unique LRP6 variants in TA patients, but not in nonsyndromic OFC. From the 5 variants in patients with TA, 2 affect the canonical splice site and 3 were missense variants; all variants segregated with the dominant phenotype and in 1 case the missense mutation occurred de novo. Conclusion Mutations in LRP6 cause tooth agenesis in man. PMID:26963285

  13. DIRProt: a computational approach for discriminating insecticide resistant proteins from non-resistant proteins.

    PubMed

    Meher, Prabina Kumar; Sahu, Tanmaya Kumar; Banchariya, Anjali; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna

    2017-03-24

    Insecticide resistance is a major challenge for the control program of insect pests in the fields of crop protection, human and animal health etc. Resistance to different insecticides is conferred by the proteins encoded from certain class of genes of the insects. To distinguish the insecticide resistant proteins from non-resistant proteins, no computational tool is available till date. Thus, development of such a computational tool will be helpful in predicting the insecticide resistant proteins, which can be targeted for developing appropriate insecticides. Five different sets of feature viz., amino acid composition (AAC), di-peptide composition (DPC), pseudo amino acid composition (PAAC), composition-transition-distribution (CTD) and auto-correlation function (ACF) were used to map the protein sequences into numeric feature vectors. The encoded numeric vectors were then used as input in support vector machine (SVM) for classification of insecticide resistant and non-resistant proteins. Higher accuracies were obtained under RBF kernel than that of other kernels. Further, accuracies were observed to be higher for DPC feature set as compared to others. The proposed approach achieved an overall accuracy of >90% in discriminating resistant from non-resistant proteins. Further, the two classes of resistant proteins i.e., detoxification-based and target-based were discriminated from non-resistant proteins with >95% accuracy. Besides, >95% accuracy was also observed for discrimination of proteins involved in detoxification- and target-based resistance mechanisms. The proposed approach not only outperformed Blastp, PSI-Blast and Delta-Blast algorithms, but also achieved >92% accuracy while assessed using an independent dataset of 75 insecticide resistant proteins. This paper presents the first computational approach for discriminating the insecticide resistant proteins from non-resistant proteins. Based on the proposed approach, an online prediction server DIRProt has

  14. An LRP1-Dependent Endocytic Mechanism Governs the Signaling Output of the BMP System in Endothelial Cells and in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Xinchun; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Xie, Liang; Portbury, Andrea L.; Wu, Yaxu; Lockyer, Pamela; Dyer, Laura A.; Moser, Martin; Bu, Guojun; Flynn, Edward J.; Jin, Suk-Won; Patterson, Cam

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Among the extracellular modulators of Bmp (bone morphogenetic protein) signaling, Bmper (Bmp endothelial cell precursor-derived regulator) both enhances and inhibits Bmp signaling. Recently we found that Bmper modulates Bmp4 activity via a concentration-dependent, endocytic trap-and-sink mechanism. Objective To investigate the molecular mechanisms required for endocytosis of the Bmper/Bmp4 and signaling complex and determine the mechanism of Bmper’s differential effects on Bmp4 signaling. Methods and Results Using an array of biochemical and cell biology techniques, we report that LRP1 (Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1), a member of the LDL receptor family, acts as an endocytic receptor for Bmper and a co-receptor of Bmp4 to mediate the endocytosis of the Bmper/Bmp4 signaling complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LRP1-dependent Bmper/Bmp4 endocytosis is essential for Bmp4 signaling, as evidenced by the phenotype of lrp1-deficient zebrafish, which have abnormal cardiovascular development and decreased Smad1/5/8 activity in key vasculogenic structures. Conclusions Together, these data reveal a novel role for LRP1 in the regulation of Bmp4 signaling by regulating receptor complex endocytosis. In addition, these data introduce LRP1 as a critical regulator of vascular development. These observations demonstrate Bmper’s ability to fine-tune Bmp4 signaling at the single-cell level, unlike the spatial regulatory mechanisms applied by other Bmp modulators. PMID:22777006

  15. Cisplatin induces expression of drug resistance-related genes through c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Fu, Yingya; Li, Youlun; Han, Xiaoli

    2017-08-01

    Change of multidrug resistance-related genes (e.g., lung resistance protein, LRP) and overexpression of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-Xl, XIAP, Survivin) are responsible for cisplatin resistance. In our study, we investigated the mechanism by which cisplatin induces LRP, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, XIAP, and Survivin expression in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and human H446 small cell lung cancer cells at mRNA and protein levels. In our study, cell proliferation was assessed with CCK-8 assays, and cell apoptosis was assessed with flow cytometric analysis and Annexin-V/PI staining. qPCR was used to complete RNA experiments. Protein expression was assessed with Western blotting. Cisplatin increased Bcl-2, LRP, and Survivin expression, but decreased Bcl-xL and XIAP expression in a dose-dependent manner. Preincubation with JNK-specific inhibitor, SP600125, significantly inhibited these genes' expression at mRNA and protein levels, enhanced chemosensitivity of lung cancer cells to cisplatin, and promoted cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that the JNK signaling pathway plays an important role in cisplatin resistance. Lung resistance protein (LRP) and anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-Xl, XIAP, Survivin) are involved in the process. The results reminded us of a novel therapy target for lung cancer treatment.

  16. LRP2, an auxiliary receptor that controls sonic hedgehog signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Christ, Annabel; Herzog, Katja; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    To fulfill their multiple roles in organ development and adult tissue homeostasis, hedgehog (HH) morphogens act through their receptor Patched (PTCH) on target cells. However, HH actions also require HH binding proteins, auxiliary cell surface receptors that agonize or antagonize morphogen signaling in a context-dependent manner. Here, we discuss recent findings on the LDL receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2), an exemplary HH binding protein that modulates sonic hedgehog activities in stem and progenitor cell niches in embryonic and adult tissues. LRP2 functions are crucial for developmental processes in a number of tissues, including the brain, the eye, and the heart, and defects in this receptor pathway are the cause of devastating congenital diseases in humans. Developmental Dynamics 245:569-579, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Sequencing of the coding exons of the LRP1 and LDLR genes on individual DNA samples reveals novel mutations in both genes.

    PubMed

    Van Leuven, F; Thiry, E; Lambrechts, M; Stas, L; Boon, T; Bruynseels, K; Muls, E; Descamps, O

    2001-02-15

    Five coding polymorphisms in de LRP1 gene, i.e. A217V, A775P, D2080N, D2632E and G4379S were discovered by sequencing its 89 exons in three test-groups of 22 healthy individuals, 29 Alzheimer patients and 18 individuals with different clinical and molecularly uncharacterized lipid metabolism problems. No genetic defect was evident in the LRP1 gene of any of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, further excluding LRP1 as a major genetic problem in AD. Lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) A217V (exon 6) was clearly present in all groups as a polymorphism, while D2632E was observed only once in a healthy volunteer. On the other hand, LRP1 alleles A775P, D2080N, and G4379 were encountered only in patients with FH or with undefined problems of lipid metabolism. This finding forced one to also analyze the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene, for which a method was devised to sequence the entire region comprising LDLR exons 2-18. The resulting sequence contig of 33567 nucleotides yielded finally an exact physical map that corrects published and listed LDLR gene maps in many positions. In addition, next to known mutations in LDLR that cause FH, four novel LDLR defects were defined, i.e. del e7-10, exon 9 mutation N407T, a 20 bp insertion in exon 4, and a double mutation C292W/K290R in exon 6. No evidence for pathology connected to the LRP1 'mutations' was obtained by subsequent screening for the five LRP1 variants in larger groups of 110 FH patients and 118 patients with molecularly undefined, clinical problems of cholesterol and/or lipid metabolism. In three individuals with a mutant LDLR gene a variant LRP1 allele was also present, but without direct, obvious clinical compound effects, indicating that the variant LRP1 alleles must, for the present, be considered polymorphisms.

  18. Association of LRP5 gene polymorphism with type 2 diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Miao; Wang, Yonglan; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Jun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    This study was to explore the association of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5 (LRP5) gene polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover markers and glycometabolism in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and/or osteoporosis (OP) in Shanghai. 354 unrelated Han Chinese post-menopausal women were recruited from Shanghai and divided into 4 groups: OP group (n=90), T2DM group (n=96), T2DM + OP group (n=90) and control group (n=78). The LRP5 genotypes were determined by DNA sequencing. The BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The bone transformation indicators and glycometabolism index (HbA1c and Fasting insulin) were also detected. The association of LRP5 polymorphism with BMD, bone turnover markers and glycometabolism was evaluated. Result showed that, In OP group, the BMD of L2-4 was higher in patients with rs3736228 CC genotype than those with CT/TT genotypes (P<0.05). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI) and years of menopause, rs3736228 polymorphism was still associated with BMD of L2-4 (P<0.01). In the control group, HbA1c was significantly higher in patients with rs3736228 CC genotype than those with CT/TT genotypes (P<0.05), but no significant difference was found after adjustment for BMI, age and years of menopause (P>0.05). Thus, LRP5 gene is an impressionable gene in postmenopausal women with OP in Shanghai. T2DM patients have a high BMD when compared with controls, which may be related to BMI and fasting insulin (FINS). LRP5 genotype is not an impressionable gene in postmenopausal women with T2DM in Shanghai. PMID:24482712

  19. Association of LRP5 genotypes with osteoporosis in Tunisian post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait. Among the genes associated with bone mineral density (BMD), the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) has been consistently identified in Caucasians. However LRP5 contribution to osteoporosis in populations of other ethnicities remains poorly known. Methods To determine whether LRP5 polymorphisms Ala1330Val and Val667Met are associated with BMD in North Africans, these genotypes were analyzed in 566 post-menopausal Tunisian women with mean age of 59.5 ± 7.7 years, of which 59.1% have low bone mass (T-score < −1 at spine or hip). Results In post-menopausal Tunisian women, 1330Val was weakly associated with reduced BMD T-score at lumbar spine (p = 0.047) but not femur neck. Moreover, the TT/TC genotypes tended to be more frequent in women with osteopenia and osteoporosis than in women with normal BMD (p = 0.066). Adjusting for body size and other potential confounders, LRP5 genotypes were no longer significantly associated with aBMD at any site. Conclusions The less common Val667Met polymorphism showed no association with osteoporosis. The Ala1330Val polymorphism is weakly associated with lower lumbar spine bone density and osteopenia/osteoporosis in postmenopausal Tunisian women. These observations expand our knowledge about the contribution of LRP5 genetic variation to osteoporosis risk in populations of diverse ethnic origin. PMID:24885293

  20. Identification of two novel LRP5 mutations in families with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Luling; Xu, Yu; Zhu, Xiong; Tai, Zhengfu; Gong, Bo; Ma, Shi; Yao, Quanyao; Li, Jing; Zhao, Peiquan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical features and disease-causing mutations in two Chinese families with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Methods Clinical data and genomic DNA were collected for patients with FEVR. The coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of FZD4, LRP5, TSPAN12, and NDP were amplified with PCR, and the resulting amplicons were analyzed with Sanger sequencing. Wild-type and mutant LRP5 proteins were assayed for the Norrin/β-catenin pathway by luciferase reporter assays. Results Two novel heterozygous mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in two relatives—p.A422T and p.L540P. Typical FEVR fundus change and mild reduced bone mineral density (BMD) was found in the two patients and the affected parent. In the luciferase studies, both p.A422T and p.L540P mutants displayed a significant reduction of the luciferase activity in SuperTopFlash (STF) cells in response to Norrin (87% reduction for p.A422T and 97% reduction for p.L540P). Both patients had an additional LRP5 sequence change (p.Q816P in Patient 1 from the unaffected mother and p.T852M in Patient 2 verified as a new mutation). Luciferase assay showed no reduction for p.Q816P and 94.9% reduction for the new mutation p.T852M, suggesting that p.Q816P may be not pathogenic and p.T852M may be pathogenic. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated two new novel LRP5 mutations in Chinese patients with FEVR and mild reduced BMD. They emphasize the complexity of FEVR mutations and phenotypes. PMID:24715757

  1. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  2. No association between LRP5 gene polymorphisms and bone and obesity phenotypes in Chinese male-offspring nuclear families.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-bo; Ke, Yao-hua; He, Jin-wei; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Wei-wei; Hu, Yun-qiu; Li, Miao; Liu, Yu-juan; Gu, Jie-mei; Fu, Wen-zhen; Gao, Gao; Yue, Hua; Xiao, Wen-jin; Zhang, Zhen-lin

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene polymorphisms on bone and obesity phenotypes in young Chinese men. A total of 1244 subjects from 411 Chinese nuclear families were genotyped by using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique at the Q89R, N740N, and A1330V sites in the LRP5 gene. Bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and the hip, total fat mass and total lean mass were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The association between LRP5 gene polymorphisms and peak BMD, body mass index (BMI), total fat mass, total lean mass and percentage of fat mass was assessed using a quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT). No significant within-family associations were found between genotypes or haplotypes of the LRP5 gene and peak BMD, BMI, total fat mass, total lean mass and percentage of fat mass. The 1000 permutations that were subsequently simulated were in agreement with these within-family association results. Our results suggest that common polymorphic variations of the LRP5 gene do not influence peak bone mass acquisition and obesity phenotypes in young Chinese men.

  3. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S.; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W. Marie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  4. LRP4 Is Critical for Neuromuscular Junction Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei; Xiong, Wen-cheng

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critical for NMJ maintenance because null mutation of any of the three genes is perinatal lethal. In this study, we generated imKO mice, a mutant strain whose LRP4 gene can be deleted in muscles by doxycycline (Dox) treatment. Ablation of the LRP4 gene in adult muscle enabled studies of its role in NMJ maintenance. We demonstrate that Dox treatment of P30 mice reduced muscle strength and compound muscle action potentials. AChR clusters became fragmented with diminished junctional folds and synaptic vesicles. The amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials were reduced, indicating impaired neuromuscular transmission and providing cellular mechanisms of adult LRP4 deficiency. We showed that LRP4 ablation led to the loss of synaptic agrin and the 90 kDa fragments, which occurred ahead of other prejunctional and postjunctional components, suggesting that LRP4 may regulate the stability of synaptic agrin. These observations demonstrate that LRP4 is essential for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the NMJ and that loss of muscle LRP4 in adulthood alone is sufficient to cause myasthenic symptoms. PMID:25319686

  5. The Proline Rich Homeodomain Protein PRH/Hhex Forms Stable Oligomers That Are Highly Resistant to Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anshuman; Burton, Nicholas M.; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Gaston, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background Many transcription factors control gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences at or near the genes that they regulate. However, some transcription factors play more global roles in the control of gene expression by altering the architecture of sections of chromatin or even the whole genome. The ability to form oligomeric protein assemblies allows many of these proteins to manipulate extensive segments of DNA or chromatin via the formation of structures such as DNA loops or protein-DNA fibres. Principal Findings Here we show that the proline rich homeodomain protein PRH/Hhex forms predominantly octameric and/or hexadecameric species in solution as well as larger assemblies. We show that these assemblies are highly stable resisting denaturation by temperature and chemical denaturants. Conclusion These data indicate that PRH is functionally and structurally related to the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, a group of proteins that are known to act globally to control gene expression in bacteria and archaea. PMID:22540015

  6. LRP1 influences trafficking of N-type calcium channels via interaction with the auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kadurin, Ivan; Rothwell, Simon W.; Lana, Beatrice; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit, which determines the main functional and pharmacological attributes of the channel. The CaV1 and CaV2 channels are associated with auxiliary β- and α2δ-subunits. The molecular mechanisms involved in α2δ subunit trafficking, and the effect of α2δ subunits on trafficking calcium channel complexes remain poorly understood. Here we show that α2δ-1 is a ligand for the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-related Protein-1 (LRP1), a multifunctional receptor which mediates trafficking of cargoes. This interaction with LRP1 is direct, and is modulated by the LRP chaperone, Receptor-Associated Protein (RAP). LRP1 regulates α2δ binding to gabapentin, and influences calcium channel trafficking and function. Whereas LRP1 alone reduces α2δ-1 trafficking to the cell-surface, the LRP1/RAP combination enhances mature glycosylation, proteolytic processing and cell-surface expression of α2δ-1, and also increase plasma-membrane expression and function of CaV2.2 when co-expressed with α2δ-1. Furthermore RAP alone produced a small increase in cell-surface expression of CaV2.2, α2δ-1 and the associated calcium currents. It is likely to be interacting with an endogenous member of the LDL receptor family to have these effects. Our findings now provide a key insight and new tools to investigate the trafficking of calcium channel α2δ subunits. PMID:28256585

  7. Rescuing effects of RXR agonist bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss depend on neuronal LRP1.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaya; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Yu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Rogers, Justin; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic integrity by transporting cholesterol to neurons through the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1). Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, has been reported to have potential beneficial effects on cognition by increasing brain apoE levels and lipidation. To investigate the effects of bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss and the contribution of neuronal LRP1 to the pathway, forebrain neuron-specific LRP1 knockout (nLrp1(-/-)) and littermate control mice were administered with bexarotene-formulated diet (100mg/kg/day) or control diet at the age of 20-24 months for 8 weeks. Upon bexarotene treatment, levels of brain apoE and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) were significantly increased in both mice. While levels of PSD95, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit (NR1), which are key postsynaptic proteins that regulate synaptic plasticity, were decreased with aging, they were restored by bexarotene treatment in the brains of control but not nLrp1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of bexarotene on synaptic integrity depend on the presence of neuronal LRP1. However, we also found that bexarotene treatment led to the activation of glial cells, weight loss and hepatomegaly, which are likely due to hepatic failure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE-targeted treatment through the RXR pathway has a potential beneficial effect on synapses during aging; however, the therapeutic application of bexarotene requires extreme caution due to its toxic side effects.

  8. Osteoblast-Specific Krm2 Overexpression and Lrp5 Deficiency Have Different Effects on Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liedert, Astrid; Röntgen, Viktoria; Schinke, Thorsten; Benisch, Peggy; Ebert, Regina; Jakob, Franz; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Lennerz, Jochen K.; Amling, Michael; Ignatius, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays a key role in the regulation of bone remodeling in mice and humans. Two transmembrane proteins that are involved in decreasing the activity of this pathway by binding to extracellular antagonists, such as Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1), are the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5 (Lrp5) and Kremen 2 (Krm2). Lrp 5 deficiency (Lrp5−/−) as well as osteoblast-specific overexpression of Krm2 in mice (Col1a1-Krm2) result in severe osteoporosis occurring at young age. In this study, we analyzed the influence of Lrp5 deficiency and osteoblast-specific overexpression of Krm2 on fracture healing in mice using flexible and semi-rigid fracture fixation. We demonstrated that fracture healing was highly impaired in both mouse genotypes, but that impairment was more severe in Col1a1-Krm2 than in Lrp5−/− mice and particularly evident in mice in which the more flexible fixation was used. Bone formation was more reduced in Col1a1-Krm2 than in Lrp5−/− mice, whereas osteoclast number was similarly increased in both genotypes in comparison with wild-type mice. Using microarray analysis we identified reduced expression of genes mainly involved in osteogenesis that seemed to be responsible for the observed stronger impairment of healing in Col1a1-Krm2 mice. In line with these findings, we detected decreased expression of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) and less active β-catenin in the calli of Col1a1-Krm2 mice. Since Krm2 seems to play a significant role in regulating bone formation during fracture healing, antagonizing KRM2 might be a therapeutic option to improve fracture healing under compromised conditions, such as osteoporosis. PMID:25061805

  9. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  10. Molecular simulation analysis of the structure complex of C2 domains of DKK family members and β-propeller domains of LRP5/6: explaining why DKK3 does not bind to LRP5/6.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Hoshino, Tyuji; Kumon, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Dickkopf (DKK) proteins interact with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5/6 (LRP5/6) to modulate WNT signaling. The interaction is mediated by a cysteine-rich domain (C2) in the DKK protein and beta-propeller domains (PD) of LRP5/6. However, the third member of the DKK family (DKK3) does not bind to LRP5/6. To determine why DKK3 does not bind to the receptor domains, we performed a molecular modeling simulation study including homology modeling, protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD). The computed affinities (ΔGbinding) between the C2 and PD models were consistent with the previously reported experimental results. The C2 model of DKK3 showed the lowest affinity for PD models. Multiple sequence alignment of C2 domains revealed that the DKK3 genes have a unique 7-amino-acid insertion (L249-E255 in human DKK3) and P258 in a finger loop 1 (FL1). Interestingly, the insertion sequence is evolutionally conserved. MD simulations of high-affinity complex models of C2 and PD showed that FL1 directly interacts with the PD models and stabilizes the complex models. We also built a 7-amino-acid-deletion/P258G mutant model of DKK3C2 and estimated its affinities for the PD models. The affinity for human LRP5PD2 was increased by the substitution (ΔGbinding=-48.9kcal/mol) and the affinity was compatible with that of high-affinity ligands. The results suggested that the lack of affinity between human DKK3 and human LRP5/6 results from: i) insertion of the 7 amino acids, and ii) P258 in human DKK3. The sequence differences thus suggest an explanation for this unique property of DKK3.

  11. Resisting protein adsorption on biodegradable polyester brushes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinfang; Gorman, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    The protein adsorption and degradation behaviors of poly(lactic acid), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) brushes and their co-polymer brushes with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) were studied. Both brush structure and relative amount of OEG and polyester were found to be important to the protein resistance of the brushes. A protein-resisting surface can be fabricated either by using OEG as the top layer of a copolymer brush or by increasing the amount of OEG relative to polyester when using a hydroxyl terminated OEG (OEG-OH) and a methoxy terminated OEG (OEG-OMe) mixture as the substrate layer. The degradation of single polyester brushes and their co-polymer brushes using OEG-OH as a substrate layer or using OEG as a top layer was hindered. This phenomenon was rationalized by the inhibition of the proposed back-biting process as the hydroxy end groups of polyester were blocked by OEG molecules. Among these brushes tested, PGA co-polymer brushes using the methoxy/hydroxyl OEG mixture as the substrate layer proved to be both protein-resistant and degradable due to the relatively large amount of OEG moieties and the good biodegradability of PGA.

  12. Protein oxidation: key to bacterial desiccation resistance?

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, James K; Li, Shu-mei W; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Zhai, Min; Sulloway, Heather M; Scholten, Johannes C; Brown, Mindy G; Balkwill, David L; Daly, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    For extremely ionizing radiation-resistant bacteria, survival has been attributed to protection of proteins from oxidative damage during irradiation, with the result that repair systems survive and function with far greater efficiency during recovery than in sensitive bacteria. Here we examined the relationship between survival of dry-climate soil bacteria and the level of cellular protein oxidation induced by desiccation. Bacteria were isolated from surface soils of the shrub-steppe of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. A total of 63 isolates were used for phylogenetic analysis. The majority of isolates were closely related to members of the genus Deinococcus, with Chelatococcus, Methylobacterium and Bosea also among the genera identified. Desiccation-resistant isolates accumulated high intracellular manganese and low iron concentrations compared to sensitive bacteria. In vivo, proteins of desiccation-resistant bacteria were protected from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups in sensitive bacteria during drying. We present the case that survival of bacteria that inhabit dry-climate soils are highly dependent on mechanisms, which limit protein oxidation during dehydration.

  13. Expression of the alaE gene is positively regulated by the global regulator Lrp in response to intracellular accumulation of l-alanine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kohei; Sato, Kazuki; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Makino, Yumiko; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The alaE gene in Escherichia coli encodes an l-alanine exporter that catalyzes the active export of l-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. In our previous study, alaE expression was shown to increase in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (Ala-Ala). In this study, the global regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) was identified as an activator of the alaE gene. A promoter less β-galactosidase gene was fused to an alaE upstream region (240 nucleotides). Cells that were lacZ-deficient and harbored this reporter plasmid showed significant induction of β-galactosidase activity (approximately 17-fold) in the presence of 6 mM l-alanine, l-leucine, and Ala-Ala. However, a reporter plasmid possessing a smaller alaE upstream region (180 nucleotides) yielded transformants with strikingly low enzyme activity under the same conditions. In contrast, lrp-deficient cells showed almost no β-galactosidase induction, indicating that Lrp positively regulates alaE expression. We next performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a DNase I footprinting assay using purified hexahistidine-tagged Lrp (Lrp-His). Consequently, we found that Lrp-His binds to the alaE upstream region spanning nucleotide -161 to -83 with a physiologically relevant affinity (apparent KD, 288.7 ± 83.8 nM). Furthermore, the binding affinity of Lrp-His toward its cis-element was increased by l-alanine and l-leucine, but not by Ala-Ala and d-alanine. Based on these results, we concluded that the gene expression of the alaE is regulated by Lrp in response to intracellular levels of l-alanine, which eventually leads to intracellular homeostasis of l-alanine concentrations.

  14. sRNA roles in regulating transcriptional regulators: Lrp and SoxS regulation by sRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors contributes to regulatory circuits. We created translational reporter fusions for multiple central regulators in Escherichia coli and examined the effect of Hfq-dependent non-coding RNAs on these fusions. This approach yields an ‘RNA landscape,’ identifying Hfq-dependent sRNAs that regulate a given fusion. No significant sRNA regulation of crp or fnr was detected. hns was regulated only by DsrA, as previously reported. Lrp and SoxS were both found to be regulated post-transcriptionally. Lrp, ‘leucine-responsive regulatory protein,’ regulates genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism and other cellular functions. sRNAs DsrA, MicF and GcvB each independently downregulate the lrp translational fusion, confirming previous reports for MicF and GcvB. MicF and DsrA interact with an overlapping site early in the lrp ORF, while GcvB acts upstream at two independent sites in the long lrp leader. Surprisingly, GcvB was found to be responsible for significant downregulation of lrp after oxidative stress; MicF also contributed. SoxS, an activator of genes used to combat oxidative stress, is negatively regulated by sRNA MgrR. This study demonstrates that while not all global regulators are subject to sRNA regulation, post-transcriptional control by sRNAs allows multiple environmental signals to affect synthesis of the transcriptional regulator. PMID:27137887

  15. Association of LRP5, TCF7L2, and GCG variants and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as fasting plasma glucose and lipid metabolism indexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinjin; Yan, Guoli; Zhang, Jianfeng; Gao, Kaiping; Zhang, Ming; Li, Linlin; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhai, Yujia; You, Haifei; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Hu, Dongsheng

    2015-05-01

    Recent data puts WNT signaling pathway in a pivotal role in regulating pancreas development as well as islet function, insulin production and secretion. The key effectors in the WNT signaling pathway are low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), and downstream-regulated glucagon (GCG). Our previous studies suggest that the WNT signaling pathway plays a significant role in risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Chinese population. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LRP5, TCF7L2 and glucagon (GCG) and quantitative traits in a healthy population. We used tag SNP to screen candidate SNPs for LRP5 and GCG; for TCF7L2, used the confirmed SNP rs11196218. A total of 1842 patients with T2DM and 7777 healthy controls underwent genotyping for the SNPs. We found a significant association of rs3758644 in LRP5 and fasting plasma glucose (p=0.006), and rs11196218 in TCF7L2 and triglycerides level (p=0.004). Among the SNPs in LRP5, TCF7L2, and GCG analyzed, only rs3758644 of LRP5 and rs11196218 of TCF7L2 were significantly associated with fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides index, respectively, in a healthy population. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polarized Traffic of LRP1 Involves AP1B and SNX17 Operating on Y-dependent Sorting Motifs in Different Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, Maribel; Cancino, Jorge; Lee, Jiyeon; van Kerkhof, Peter; Retamal, Claudio; Bu, Guojun; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic recycling receptor with two cytoplasmic tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signals. Here we show that during biosynthetic trafficking LRP1 uses AP1B adaptor complex to move from a post-TGN recycling endosome (RE) to the basolateral membrane. Then it recycles basolaterally from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE) involving recognition by sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). In the biosynthetic pathway, Y29 but not N26 from a proximal NPXY directs LRP1 basolateral sorting from the TGN. A N26A mutant revealed that this NPXY motif recognized by SNX17 is required for the receptor's exit from BSE. An endocytic Y63ATL66 motif also functions in basolateral recycling, in concert with an additional endocytic motif (LL86,87), by preventing LRP1 entry into the transcytotic apical pathway. All this sorting information operates similarly in hippocampal neurons to mediate LRP1 somatodendritic distribution regardless of the absence of AP1B in neurons. LRP1 basolateral distribution results then from spatially and temporally segregation steps mediated by recognition of distinct tyrosine-based motifs. We also demonstrate a novel function of SNX17 in basolateral/somatodendritic recycling from a different compartment than AP1B endosomes. PMID:19005208

  17. Characterization of genetically engineered mouse models carrying Col2a1-cre-induced deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Cassie A; Joiner, Danese M; Less, Kennen D; Drewry, Melissa Oosterhouse; Williams, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Mice carrying Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6 were created and characterized. Mice lacking either gene alone were viable and fertile with normal knee morphology. Mice in which both Lrp5 and Lrp6 were conditionally ablated via Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletion displayed severe defects in skeletal development during embryogenesis. In addition, adult mice carrying Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6 displayed low bone mass suggesting that the Collagen2a1-cre transgene was active in cells that subsequently differentiated into osteoblasts. In both embryonic skeletal development and establishment of adult bone mass, Lrp5 and Lrp6 carry out redundant functions. PMID:26962465

  18. Manipulating protein adsorption using a patchy protein-resistant brush.

    PubMed

    Gon, Saugata; Bendersky, Marina; Ross, Jennifer L; Santore, Maria M

    2010-07-20

    Toward the development of surfaces for the precise manipulation of proteins, this study explores the fabrication and protein-interactive behavior of a new type of surface containing extremely small (on the order of 10 nm or less) flat adhesive "patches" or islands embedded in and partially concealed by a protein-repellant PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)) brush. The adsorption of fibrinogen, the model protein chosen to probe the biomaterial interactions of these surfaces, is very sensitive to the surface density of the adhesive patches, occurring only above a threshold. This suggests that two or more adhesive patches are needed to capture each protein. When the average spacing of the adhesive patches exceeds the fibrinogen length, no adsorption occurs because individual patches are too weakly binding for protein capture, as a result of being at least partially obstructed by the brush. The small size of the adhesive patches relative to the 47 nm fibrinogen length thus defines a limiting regime of surface design, distinct from surfaces where larger features can adhere single isolated proteins or multiple proteins together. The restricted protein-surface contact may comprise a means of preserving protein structure and function in the adsorbed state. This article demonstrates several additional interesting features of PEG brushes relevant to biomaterial design. First a moderate amount of adhesive material can be buried at the base of a brush without a measurable impact on the corona density. Second, a different amount of material at the base of a brush can be rendered ineffective to capturing adhesive proteins, despite a modest compromise of the brush corona. From this will follow insight into the design of patterned biomaterial surfaces, the bioactivity of the edges of patterned features, and an understanding of how flaws in brushes compromise protein resistance or allow access to small adhesive sites.

  19. Whole Exome Sequencing Analysis Identifies Mutations in LRP5 in Indian Families with Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yeming; Li, Shujin; Tai, Zhengfu; Huang, Lulin; Liu, Yuqing; Zhu, Xiong; Di, Yanan; Qu, Chao; Jiang, Zhilin; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Guolin; Kim, Ramasamy; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Yang, Zhenglin; Zhu, Xianjun

    2016-07-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR, OMIM 133780) is a severe inherited retinal disorder characterized by incomplete retinal vascular development and neovascularization. At least five genes have been reported to be associated with FEVR, including NDP, LRP5, FZD4, TSPAN12, and ZNF408. Recently reported data showed that mutations in the KIF11 gene can also lead to FEVR conditions. Previous studies suggested that known mutations only explain approximately 40-60% of FEVR cases in different populations. To investigate the causative genetic mutations in four Indian families with FEVR. Whole exome sequencing was carried out to analyze the genomic DNA samples from the four FEVR proband patients and Sanger sequencing was utilized to verify all identified polymorphisms. A luciferase assay was used to test the mutant protein activity. We identified four novel LRP5 missense mutations in these FEVR families: c.C1042T (p.R348W), c.G1141A (p.D381N), c.C1870T (p.R624W), and c.A4550G (p.Y1517C). The luciferase assay demonstrated that all four of these LRP5 mutations led to significant reduction of enzymatic activity with response to NORRIN, suggesting that they are pathogenic. Our findings expand the mutational spectrum of FEVR in the Indian population and provide some guidelines in clinical diagnosis.

  20. Analysis of the effect of LRP-1 silencing on the invasive potential of cancer cells by nanomechanical probing and adhesion force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cigne, A.; Chièze, L.; Beaussart, A.; El-Kirat-Chatel, S.; Dufrêne, Y. F.; Dedieu, S.; Schneider, C.; Martiny, L.; Devy, J.; Molinari, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies that target LRP-1 to modulate proteolysis could also affect adhesion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Here, we investigated the effect of LRP-1 silencing on parameters reflecting cancer cells' invasiveness by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that LRP-1 silencing induces changes in the cells' adhesion behavior, particularly the dynamics of cell attachment. Clear alterations in morphology, such as more pronounced stress fibers and increased spreading, leading to increased area and circularity, were also observed. The determination of the cells' mechanical properties by AFM showed that these differences are correlated with an increase in Young's modulus. Moreover, the measurements show an overall decrease in cell motility and modifications of directional persistence. An overall increase in the adhesion force between the LRP-1-silenced cells and a gelatin-coated bead was also observed. Ultimately, our AFM-based force spectroscopy data, recorded using an antibody directed against the β1 integrin subunit, provide evidence that LRP-1 silencing modifies the rupture force distribution. Together, our results show that techniques traditionally used for the investigation of cancer cells can be coupled with AFM to gain access to complementary phenotypic parameters that can help discriminate between specific phenotypes associated with different degrees of invasiveness.Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies

  1. Shedding of membrane-associated LDL receptor-related protein-1 from microglia amplifies and sustains neuro-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brifault, Coralie; Gilder, Andrew S; Laudati, Emilia; Banki, Michael; Gonias, Steven L

    2017-09-28

    In the CNS, microglia are activated in response to injury or infection and in neurodegenerative diseases. The endocytic and cell-signaling receptor, LDL receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), is reported to suppress innate immunity in macrophages and oppose microglial activation. The goal of this study was to identify novel mechanisms by which LRP1 may regulate microglial activation. Using primary cultures of microglia isolated from mouse brains, we demonstrated that LRP1 gene-silencing increases expression of pro-inflammatory mediators; however, the observed response was modest. By contrast, the LRP1 ligand, receptor-associated protein (RAP), robustly activated microglia and its activity was attenuated in LRP1-deficient cells. An important element of the mechanism by which RAP activated microglia was its ability to cause LRP1 shedding from the plasma membrane. This process eliminated cellular LRP1, which is anti-inflammatory, and generated a soluble product, shed LRP1 (sLRP1), which is potently pro-inflammatory. Purified sLRP1 induced expression of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines and the mRNA encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase in both LRP1- expressing and -deficient microglia. LPS also stimulated LRP1 shedding, as did the heat shock protein and LRP1 ligand, calreticulin. Other LRP1 ligands, including α2-macroglobulin and tissue-type plasminogen activator, failed to cause LRP1 shedding. Treatment of microglia with a metalloproteinase inhibitor inhibited LRP1 shedding and significantly attenuated RAP-induced cytokine expression. RAP and sLRP1 both caused neuro-inflammation in vivo when administered by stereotaxic injection into mouse spinal cords. Collectively, these results suggest that LRP1 shedding from microglia may amplify and sustain neuro-inflammation in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Anti-LRP4 autoantibodies in AChR- and MuSK-antibody-negative myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Alexandra; Schoser, Benedikt; Peters, Katja; Cosma, Nicoleta-Carmen; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Schalke, Berthold; Melms, Arthur; Kröger, Stephan

    2012-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a defect in synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction causing fluctuating muscle weakness with a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation or altered jitter in single-fiber electromyography (EMG). Approximately 80% of all myasthenia gravis patients have autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in their serum. Autoantibodies against the tyrosine kinase muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) are responsible for 5-10% of all myasthenia gravis cases. The autoimmune target in the remaining cases is unknown. Recently, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP4) has been identified as the agrin receptor. LRP4 interacts with agrin, and the binding of agrin activates MuSK, which leads to the formation of most if not all postsynaptic specializations, including aggregates containing acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in the junctional plasma membrane. In the present study we tested if autoantibodies against LRP4 are detectable in patients with myasthenia gravis. To this end we analyzed 13 sera from patients with generalized myasthenia gravis but without antibodies against AChR or MuSK. The results showed that 12 out of 13 antisera from double-seronegative MG patients bound to proteins concentrated at the neuromuscular junction of adult mouse skeletal muscle and that approximately 50% of the tested sera specifically bound to HEK293 cells transfected with human LRP4. Moreover, 4 out of these 13 sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes by more than 50%, suggesting a pathogenic role regarding the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. These results indicate that LRP4 is a novel target for autoantibodies and is a diagnostic marker in seronegative MG patients.

  3. Upregulation of breast cancer resistance protein and major vault protein in drug resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee Dixit, Aparna; Sharma, Devina; Srivastava, Arpna; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Tripathi, Manjari; Prakash, Deepak; Sarat Chandra, P

    2017-04-01

    Identifying factors involved in the development of drug resistant epilepsy (DRE) remains a challenge. Candidate gene studies have shown modulation of resistance to drugs by various multidrug resistance proteins in DRE. However the resistance to drugs in DRE could be more complex and multifactorial involving molecules in different pharmacokinetic processes. In this study for the first time we have analyzed the relative expression of four molecules with different drug resistance mechanisms in two most common DRE pathologies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) with respect to each other and also with different non-epileptic controls. Brain tissues resected from MTLE (n=16) and FCD type I and II (n=12) patients who had undergone surgery were analysed for mRNA levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1(MRP1), major vault protein (MVP), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and one drug metabolising enzyme (UGT1A4) as compared to non-epileptic controls which were tissues resected from tumor periphery (n=6) and autopsy tissues (n=4) by quantitative PCR. We found significant upregulation of MVP and BCRP whereas MRP1 and UGT1A4 were unaltered in both pathologies. While upregulation of BCRP was significantly higher in MTLE (9.34±0.45; p<0.05), upregulation of MVP was significantly higher in FCD (2.94±0.65; p<0.01). We propose that upregulation of BCRP and MVP is associated with MTLE and FCD and these molecules not only may have the potential to predict pathology specific phenotypes but may also have therapeutic potential as adjunct treatment in these pathologies. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Crystal structures of the extracellular domain of LRP6 and its complex with DKK1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhihong; Biechele, Travis; Wei, Zhiyi; Morrone, Seamus; Moon, Randall T.; Wang, Liguo; Xu, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    LRP5 and LRP6 are Wnt co-receptors essential for Wnt/β-catenin signaling. DKK1 inhibits Wnt signaling by interacting with the extracellular domain of LRP5/6, and is a drug target for multiple diseases. Here we present the crystal structures of the first and second halves of LRP6’s four propeller–EGF pairs (LRP6-E1E2 and LRP6-E3E4), and a LRP6-E3E4/DKK1 complex. Combined with EM analysis, these data demonstrate that LRP6-E1E2 and LRP6-E3E4 form two rigid structural blocks, with a short intervening hinge that restrains their relative orientation. DKK1c interacts with the top surface of the LRP6-E3 YWTD propeller, and likely also that of the LRP6-E1 propeller due to structural similarity, through conserved hydrophobic patches buttressed by a network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. Our work provides key insights for understanding LRP5/6 structure and the interaction of LRP5/6 with DKK, as well as for drug discovery. PMID:21984209

  5. Protein Acetylation in Procaryotes Increases Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. PMID:21703240

  6. Protein acetylation in prokaryotes increases stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K

    2011-07-15

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Research on the Relationship of RAGE, LRP-1, and Aβ Accumulation in the Hippocampus, Prefrontal Lobe, and Amygdala of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lou-Yan; Fei, Yu-Lang; Wang, Xiao-Ye; Wu, Song-Di; Du, Jun-Hui; Zhu, Mei; Jin, Long; Li, Ming; Li, Hai-Long; Zhai, Jia-Jia; Ji, Lu-Peng; Ma, Ran-Ran; Liu, Song-Fang; Li, Mo; Ma, Li; Ma, Xiao-Rui; Qu, Qiu-Min; Lv, Ya-Li

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been regarded as an important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and diabetic patients and animals have shown cognitive dysfunction. More research has shown that the amyloid-β (Aβ), which is a hallmark of AD, was found deposited in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. This Aβ accumulation is regulated by the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1). However, the expression of RAGE and LRP-1 in diabetic rats is not very clear. In the present study, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats to investigate whether the expression of RAGE and LRP-1 is related to Aβ1-42 deposition at the hippocampus, prefrontal lobe, and amygdala in DM. We found that diabetic rats had longer escape latency and less frequency of entrance into the target zone than that of the control group (P < 0.05) in the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The Aβ1-42 expression in the hippocampus and prefrontal lobe significantly increased in the DM group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). RAGE increased (P < 0.05), while LRP-1 decreased (P < 0.05) in the hippocampus tissue and prefrontal lobe tissue of DM rats. The Aβ1-42 deposition was correlated with RAGE positively (P < 0.05), but with LRP-1 negatively (P < 0.05). Further, the expression levels of Aβ1-42, RAGE, and LRP-1 were not changed in the amygdala between the diabetic rats and the control group. These findings indicated that upregulating RAGE and/or downregulating LRP-1 at the hippocampus and the prefrontal lobe contributed to the Aβ1-42 accumulation and then further promoted the cognitive impairment of diabetic rats.

  8. Lrp, a global regulator, regulates the virulence of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Chi; Hung, Feng-Ru; Weng, Chao-Hui; Li, Wei-Ting; Chuang, Tzu-Hung; Liu, Tsung-Lin; Lin, Ching-Yuan; Lo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chen, Jen-Wei; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Hor, Lien-I

    2017-08-11

    An attenuated mutant (designated NY303) of Vibrio vulnificus, which causes serious wound infection and septicemia in humans, was isolated fortuitously from a clinical strain YJ016. This mutant was defective in cytotoxicity, migration on soft agar and virulence in the mouse. The purpose of this study was to map the mutation in this attenuated mutant and further explore how the gene thus identified is involved in virulence. The whole genome sequence of mutant NY303 determined by next-generation sequencing was compared with that of strain YJ016 to map the mutations. By isolating and characterizing the specific gene-knockout mutants, the gene associated with the phenotype of mutant NY303 was identified. This gene encodes a global regulator, Lrp. A mutant, YH01, deficient in Lrp was isolated and examined in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo to find the affected virulence mechanisms. The target genes of Lrp were further identified by comparing the transcriptomes, which were determined by RNA-seq, of strain YJ016 and mutant YH01. The promoters bound by Lrp were identified by genome footprinting-sequencing, and those related with virulence were further examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mutation in lrp was shown to be associated with the reduced cytotoxicity, chemotaxis and virulence of mutant NY303. Mutant YH01 exhibited a phenotype resembling that of mutant NY303, and was defective in colonization in the mouse and growth in mouse serum, but not the antiphagocytosis ability. 596 and 95 genes were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in mutant YH01. Many of the genes involved in secretion of the MARTX cytotoxin, chemotaxis and iron-acquisition were down-regulated in mutant YH01. The lrp gene, which was shown to be negatively autoregulated, and 7 down-regulated virulence-associated genes were bound by Lrp in their promoters. A 14-bp consensus sequence, mkCrTTkwAyTsTG, putatively recognized by Lrp was identified in the promoters of these genes. Lrp is a global

  9. Wnt Isoform-Specific Interactions with Coreceptor Specify Inhibition or Potentiation of Signaling by LRP6 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I.; Liu, Bob Y.; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C.; Carano, Richard A. D.; Ernst, James A.; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N.; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  10. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  11. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  12. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  13. Impaired vitreous composition and retinal pigment epithelium function in the FoxG1::LRP2 myopic mice.

    PubMed

    Cases, Olivier; Obry, Antoine; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Augustin, Sébastien; Joseph, Antoine; Toutirais, Géraldine; Simonutti, Manuel; Christ, Annabel; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2017-06-01

    High myopia (HM) is one of the main causes of visual impairment and blindness all over the world and an unsolved medical problem. Persons with HM are predisposed to other eye pathologies such as retinal detachment, myopic retinopathy or glaucomatous optic neuropathy, complications that may at least partly result from the extensive liquefaction of the myopic vitreous gel. To identify the involvement of the liquid vitreous in the pathogenesis of HM we here analyzed the vitreous of the recently described highly myopic low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (Lrp2)-deficient eyes. Whereas the gel-like fraction was not apparently modified, the volume of the liquid vitreous fraction (LVF) was much higher in the myopic eyes. Biochemical and proteome analysis of the LVF revealed several modifications including a marked decrease of potassium, sodium and chloride, of proteins involved in ocular tissue homeostasis and repair as well as of ADP-ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4), a protein possibly involved in LRP2 trafficking. A small number of proteins, mainly comprising known LRP2 ligands or proteins of the inflammatory response, were over expressed in the mutants. Moreover the morphology of the LRP2-deficient retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells was affected and the expression of ARF4 as well as of proteins involved in degradative endocytosis was strongly reduced. Our results support the idea that impairment of the RPE structure and most likely endocytic function may contribute to the vitreal modifications and pathogenesis of HM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Resistant mechanisms of anthracyclines--pirarubicin might partly break through the P-glycoprotein-mediated drug-resistance of human breast cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Furukawa, T; Tanino, H; Suto, A; Otan, Y; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, T; Kitajima, M

    2001-01-01

    Juliano and Ling initially reported the expression of a 170 kDa glycoprotein in the membrane of Chinese hamster ovarian cells in 1976, and named this glycoprotein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) based on its predicted role of causing "permeability" of the cell membrane. After much research on anthracycline-resistance, this P-gp was finally characterized as a multidrug-resistant protein coded by the mdr1 gene. Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) was initially cloned from H69AR, a human small cell-lung carcinoma cell line which is resistant to doxorubicin (DXR) but does not express P-gp. MRP also excretes substrates through the cell membrane using energy from ATP catabolism. The substrate of MRP is conjugated with glutathione before active efflux from cell membrane. Recently, membrane transporter proteins were re-categorized as members of "ATP-Binding Cassette transporter"(ABC-transporter) superfamily, as shown at http://www.med.rug.nl/mdl/humanabc.htm and http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/genefamily/abc.html. A total of ABC transporters have been defined, and MDR1 and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) were reclassified as ABCB1 and ABCC1, respectively. Their associated superfamilies include 11 and 13 other protein, in addition to ABCB and ABCC, respectively. Lung resistance-related protein (LRP) is not a member of the superfamily of ABC transporter proteins, because it shows nuclear membrane expression and transports substrate between nucleus and cytoplasm. LRP was initially cloned from a non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line, SW1573/2R120 which is resistant to DXR, vincristine, etoposide and gramicidin D and does not express P-gp. The mechanisms of resistance remains unclear, and why some resistant cell lines express P-gp and others express MRP and/or LRP is likewise unclear.

  15. Rare nonconservative LRP6 mutations are associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajvir; Smith, Emily; Fathzadeh, Mohsen; Liu, Wenzhong; Go, Gwang-Woong; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Faramarzi, Saeed; McKenna, William; Mani, Arya

    2013-09-01

    A rare mutation in LRP6 has been shown to underlie autosomal dominant coronary artery disease (CAD) and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian kindred. The prevalence and spectrum of LRP6 mutations in the disease population of the United States is not known. Two hundred white Americans with early onset familial CAD and metabolic syndrome and 2,000 healthy Northern European controls were screened for nonconservative mutations in LRP6. Three novel mutations were identified, which cosegregated with the metabolic traits in the kindreds of the affected subjects and none in the controls. All three mutations reside in the second propeller domain, which plays a critical role in ligand binding. Two of the mutations substituted highly conserved arginines in the second YWTD domain and the third substituted a conserved glycosylation site. The functional characterization of one of the variants showed that it impairs Wnt signaling and acts as a loss of function mutation.

  16. Ubiquitin-dependent folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Perrody, Elsa; Abrami, Laurence; Feldman, Michal; Kunz, Beatrice; Urbé, Sylvie; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-01-01

    Many membrane proteins fold inefficiently and require the help of enzymes and chaperones. Here we reveal a novel folding assistance system that operates on membrane proteins from the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6 is promoted by ubiquitination of a specific lysine, retaining it in the ER while avoiding degradation. Subsequent ER exit requires removal of ubiquitin from this lysine by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP19. This ubiquitination-deubiquitination is conceptually reminiscent of the glucosylation-deglucosylation occurring in the ER lumen during the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle. To avoid infinite futile cycles, folded LRP6 molecules undergo palmitoylation and ER export, while unsuccessfully folded proteins are, with time, polyubiquitinated on other lysines and targeted to degradation. This ubiquitin-dependent folding system also controls the proteostasis of other membrane proteins as CFTR and anthrax toxin receptor 2, two poor folders involved in severe human diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19083.001 PMID:27751231

  17. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein levels and endocytic function are reduced by overexpression of the FE65 adaptor protein, FE65L1.

    PubMed

    Guénette, Suzanne Y; Chang, Yang; Hyman, Bradley T; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Rebeck, G William

    2002-08-01

    The FE65 adaptor protein family was identified in two-hybrid screens as proteins that bind the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Studies have shown that FE65 binding to APP modulates APP processing. Increased levels of alpha-secretase derived secreted APP (APPsalpha) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) were recovered from conditioned media upon FE65L1 or FE65 overexpression. These effects were associated with an increase in the ratio of mature/immature APP and increased cell-surface APP. FE65 has also been reported to bind low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Here we show that FE65L1 overexpression results in decreased LRP steady state levels, LRPs, and LRP endocytic receptor function. These changes in LRP protein levels are not due to decreased transcription of LRP. Furthermore, pulse/chase experiments demonstrate that changes in LRP protein only occurred 12-18 h after translation. We conclude that the decreases in LRP levels likely reflect routing of LRP away from the cell surface into a degradative pathway. Previous studies suggested that LRP plays an important role for Abeta production of Kunitz protease inhibitor forms of APP in the endocytic pathway. These data show that FE65L1 can differentially affect the metabolic fate of APP and LRP. In addition, these data suggest that the LRP decrease observed in FE65L1 overexpressing cells may in part contribute to altered APP processing.

  18. A sorting nexin 17-binding domain within the LRP1 cytoplasmic tail mediates receptor recycling through the basolateral sorting endosome

    PubMed Central

    Farfán, Pamela; Lee, Jiyeon; Larios, Jorge; Sotelo, Pablo; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2013-01-01

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is an adaptor protein present in EEA1-positive sorting endosomes that promotes the efficient recycling of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to the plasma membrane through recognition of the first NPxY motif in the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor. The interaction of LRP1 with SNX17 also regulates the basolateral recycling of the receptor from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE). In contrast, megalin, which is apically distributed in polarized epithelial cells and localizes poorly to EEA1-positive sorting endosomes, does not interact with SNX17, despite containing three NPxY motifs, indicating that this motif is not sufficient for receptor recognition by SNX17. Here, we identified a cluster of 32 amino acids within the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for SNX17 binding. To delineate the function of this SNX17-binding domain, we generated chimeric proteins in which the SNX17-binding domain was inserted into the cytoplasmic tail of megalin. This insertion mediated the binding of megalin to SNX17 and modified the cell surface expression and recycling of megalin in non-polarized cells. However, the polarized localization of chimeric megalin was not modified in polarized MDCK cells. These results provide evidence regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the specificity of SNX17-binding receptors and the restricted function of SNX17 in the BSE. PMID:23593972

  19. A sorting nexin 17-binding domain within the LRP1 cytoplasmic tail mediates receptor recycling through the basolateral sorting endosome.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Pamela; Lee, Jiyeon; Larios, Jorge; Sotelo, Pablo; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2013-07-01

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is an adaptor protein present in early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive sorting endosomes that promotes the efficient recycling of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to the plasma membrane through recognition of the first NPxY motif in the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor. The interaction of LRP1 with SNX17 also regulates the basolateral recycling of the receptor from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE). In contrast, megalin, which is apically distributed in polarized epithelial cells and localizes poorly to EEA1-positive sorting endosomes, does not interact with SNX17, despite containing three NPxY motifs, indicating that this motif is not sufficient for receptor recognition by SNX17. Here, we identified a cluster of 32 amino acids within the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for SNX17 binding. To delineate the function of this SNX17-binding domain, we generated chimeric proteins in which the SNX17-binding domain was inserted into the cytoplasmic tail of megalin. This insertion mediated the binding of megalin to SNX17 and modified the cell surface expression and recycling of megalin in non-polarized cells. However, the polarized localization of chimeric megalin was not modified in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These results provide evidence regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the specificity of SNX17-binding receptors and the restricted function of SNX17 in the BSE.

  20. Cytotoxicity mechanism of α-MMC in normal liver cells through LRP1 mediated endocytosis and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Shen, Fubing; Zhang, Min; He, Qianchuan; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xiaoping; Yang, Shuxia; Liu, Yang; Deng, Nianhua; Zheng, Juecun; Zhu, Lixia; Liu, Xiaolan

    2016-05-16

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein isolated from Momordica charantia, is a potential drug candidate with strong anti-tumor activity. However, α-MMC has a severe hepatotoxicity when applied in vivo, which may greatly hinders its use in clinic in the future. The biological mechanism of hepatotoxicity induced by α-MMC is largely unknown, especially the mechanism by which α-MMC enters the hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity in normal liver L02 cell line as well as the mechanism underlying it. As expected, α-MMC is more toxic in L02 cells than in various normal cells from other organs. The cytotoxic effect of α-MMC on L02 cells is found to be mediated through cell apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Importantly, α-MMC was shown to bind to a specific receptor on cell membrane, as the density of the cell membrane receptor is closely related to both the amount of α-MMC endocytosed and the cytotoxicity in different cell lines. By using LRP1 competitive inhibitor α2-M or siRNA targeting LRP1, we further identified that LRP1 protein served as the membrane receptor for α-MMC. Both α2-M and siRNA targeting LRP1 can significantly inhibit α-MMC's endocytosis as well as its cytotoxicity in L02 cells. In addition, it was found that α-MMC can activate the JNK signalling pathways via LRP1 in L02 cells. As JNK activation often leads to cell apoptosis, the activation of JNK may play an important role in α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that LRP1 mediates the cytotoxicity of α-MMC through (1) endocytosis and induced apoptosis and (2) the activation of the JNK pathway. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of hepatotoxicity of α-MMC and offer reference to understand its mechanism of lymphocytotoxicity and neurotoxicity.

  1. Reversal of cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells by Taxus chinensis var.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y Q; Xu, X P; Guo, Q M; Xu, X C; Liu, Q Y; An, S H; Xu, J L; Su, F; Tai, J B

    2016-09-02

    Drug resistance in cells is a major impedance to successful treatment of lung cancer. Taxus chinensis var. inhibits the growth of tumor cells and promotes the synthesis of interleukins 1 and 2 and tumor necrosis factor, enhancing immune function. In this study, T. chinensis var.-induced cell death was analyzed in lung cancer cells (H460) enriched for stem cell growth in a defined serum-free medium. Taxus-treated stem cells were also analyzed for Rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) expression by flow cytometry, and used as a standard functional indicator of MDR. The molecular basis of T. chinensis var.-mediated drug resistance was established by real-time PCR analysis of ABCC1, ABCB1, and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) mRNA, and western blot analysis of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP. Our results revealed that stem cells treated with higher doses of T. chinensis var. showed significantly lower growth inhibition rates than did H460 cells (P < 0.05). The growth of stem and H460 cells treated with a combination of T. chinensis var. and cisplatin was also significantly inhibited (P < 0.05). Rh-123 was significantly accumulated in the intracellular region and showed delayed efflux in stem cells treated with T. chinensis var. (P < 0.05), compared to those treated with verapamil. T. chinensis var.-treated stem cells showed significant downregulation of the ABCC1, ABCB1, and LRP mRNA and MRP1, MDR1, and LRP (P < 0.05) compared to H460 cells. Thus, T. chinensis var.-mediated downregulation of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP might contribute to the reversal of drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells.

  2. The Extracellular Domain of Lrp5/6 Inhibits Noncanonical Wnt Signaling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emma R.; Schambony, Alexandra; Esner, Milan; Bryjová, Lenka; Biris, Kristin K.; Hall, Anita C.; Kraft, Bianca; Cajanek, Lukas; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Buckingham, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Lrp5/6 are crucial coreceptors for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a pathway biochemically distinct from noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. Here, we examined the possible participation of Lrp5/6 in noncanonical Wnt signaling. We found that Lrp6 physically interacts with Wnt5a, but that this does not lead to phosphorylation of Lrp6 or activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Overexpression of Lrp6 blocks activation of the Wnt5a downstream target Rac1, and this effect is dependent on intact Lrp6 extracellular domains. These results suggested that the extracellular domain of Lrp6 inhibits noncanonical Wnt signaling in vitro. In vivo, Lrp6−/− mice exhibited exencephaly and a heart phenotype. Surprisingly, these defects were rescued by deletion of Wnt5a, indicating that the phenotypes resulted from noncanonical Wnt gain-of-function. Similarly, Lrp5 and Lrp6 antisense morpholino-treated Xenopus embryos exhibited convergent extension and heart phenotypes that were rescued by knockdown of noncanonical XWnt5a and XWnt11. Thus, we provide evidence that the extracellular domains of Lrp5/6 behave as physiologically relevant inhibitors of noncanonical Wnt signaling during Xenopus and mouse development in vivo. PMID:19056682

  3. New Insights into Wnt–Lrp5/6–β-Catenin Signaling in Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Shin; Robling, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading is essential to maintain normal bone metabolism and the balance between bone formation and resorption. The cellular mechanisms that control mechanotransduction are not fully defined, but several key pathways have been identified. We discuss the roles of several components of the Wnt signaling cascade, namely Lrp5, Lrp6, and β-catenin in mechanical loading-induced bone formation. Lrp5 is an important Wnt co-receptor for regulating bone mass and mechanotransduction, and appears to function principally by augmenting bone formation. Lrp6 also regulates bone mass but its action might involve resorption as well as formation. The role of Lrp6 in mechanotransduction is unclear. Studies addressing the role of β-catenin in bone metabolism and mechanotransduction highlight the uncertainties in downstream modulators of Lrp5 and Lrp6. Taken together, these data indicate that mechanical loading might affect bone regulation triggering the canonical Wnt signaling (and perhaps other pathways) not only via Lrp5 but also via Lrp6. Further work is needed to clarify the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in Lrp5 and/or Lrp6-mediated mechanotransduction, which could eventually lead to powerful therapeutic agents that might mimic the anabolic effects of mechanical stimulation. PMID:25653639

  4. Mutations in Zebrafish lrp2 Result in Adult-Onset Ocular Pathogenesis That Models Myopia and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Veth, Kerry N.; Willer, Jason R.; Collery, Ross F.; Gray, Matthew P.; Willer, Gregory B.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Mullins, Mary C.; Udvadia, Ava J.; Smith, Richard S.; John, Simon W. M.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Link, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, Bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals—but not all—develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease. PMID:21379331

  5. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Veth, Kerry N; Willer, Jason R; Collery, Ross F; Gray, Matthew P; Willer, Gregory B; Wagner, Daniel S; Mullins, Mary C; Udvadia, Ava J; Smith, Richard S; John, Simon W M; Gregg, Ronald G; Link, Brian A

    2011-02-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  6. Double Seronegative Myasthenia Gravis with Anti-LRP4 Antibodies Presenting with Dropped Head and Acute Respiratory Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Goichi; Yabumoto, Taiki; Baba, Kousuke; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Higuchi, Osamu; Matsuo, Hidenori; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 72-year-old man demonstrating myasthenia gravis (MG) with a dropped head and acute respiratory insufficiency. There was no ocular, bulbar, or limb involvement. The patient was seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies. Subsequent tests showed seropositivity for anti-low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) antibodies. The addition of steroid pulse therapy resulted in a full remission of his respiratory symptoms. This presentation suggests that LRP4-positive MG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory insufficiency without either cranial or limb involvement. PMID:27853084

  7. miR-375-3p negatively regulates osteogenesis by targeting and decreasing the expression levels of LRP5 and β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianhao; Li, Chen-Tian; Xiong, Lifeng; Ning, Ziyu; Leung, Frankie; Peng, Songlin

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways are essential for bone formation. Previous studies showed that Wnt signaling pathways were regulated by miR-375. Thus, we aim to explore whether miR-375 could affect osteogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the roles of miR-375 and its downstream targets. Firstly, we revealed that miR-375-3p negatively modulated osteogenesis by suppressing positive regulators of osteogenesis and promoting negative regulators of osteogenesis. In addition, the results of TUNEL cell apoptosis assay showed that miR-375-3p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis. Secondly, miR-375-3p targeted low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), a co-receptor of the Wnt signaling pathways, and β-catenin as determined by luciferase activity assay, and it decreased the expression levels of LRP5 and β-catenin. Thirdly, the decline of protein levels of β-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Finally, silence of LRP5 in osteoblast precursor cells resulted in diminished cell viability and cell proliferation as detected by WST-1-based colorimetric assay. Additionally, all the parameters including the relative bone volume from μCT measurement suggested that LRP5 knockout in mice resulted in a looser and worse-connected trabeculae. The mRNA levels of important negative modulators relating to osteogenesis increased after the functions of LRP5 were blocked in mice. Last but not least, the expression levels of LRP5 increased during the osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1, while the levels of β-catenin decreased in bone tissues from osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures. In conclusion, we revealed miR-375-3p negatively regulated osteogenesis by targeting LRP5 and β-catenin. In addition, loss of functions of LRP5 damaged bone formation in vivo. Clinically, miR-375-3p and its targets might be used as diagnostic biomarkers for osteoporosis and might be also as novel therapeutic agents in osteoporosis treatment. The relevant

  8. Striking differences of LDL receptor-related protein 1B expression in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2005-08-05

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) is a member of the expanding LDL receptor family, and is closely related to LRP. It was discovered as a putative tumor suppressor, and is frequently inactivated in human malignant tissues. However, the expression pattern of LRP1B in normal human tissues was unclear. In the present study, we analyzed LRP1B expression in normal mouse and human tissues. By using RT-PCR, we found that, while mouse LRP1B expression is mostly restricted to the brain, human LRP1B expression is more widespread with highest expression levels detected in the brain, adrenal gland, salivary gland, and testis. Although mouse LRP1B expresses in the forms of both full-length receptor tail and an alternatively spliced form lacking a 33-amino acid insert, human LRP1B is expressed exclusively in the form of full-length receptor tail. Finally, we found that, unlike mouse LRP1B, human LRP1B is cleaved by furin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that there are striking differences between LRP1B expression in mouse and human tissues. The broader expression pattern of LRP1B in human tissues suggests that this putative tumor suppressor may play roles in several types of human cancer.

  9. LRP-1-mediated intracellular antibody delivery to the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaohe; Nyberg, Sophie; S. Sharp, Paul; Madsen, Jeppe; Daneshpour, Nooshin; Armes, Steven P.; Berwick, Jason; Azzouz, Mimoun; Shaw, Pamela; Abbott, N. Joan; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is by far the most important target in developing new approaches to improve delivery of drugs and diagnostic tools into the Central Nervous System (CNS). Here we report the engineering of pH- sensitive polymersomes (synthetic vesicles formed by amphiphilic copolymers) that exploit endogenous transport mechanisms to traverse the BBB, enabling delivery of large macromolecules into both the CNS parenchyma and CNS cells. We achieve this by targeting the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor. We show that LRP-1 is associated with endothelial transcytosis that does not involve acidification of cargo in membrane-trafficking organelles. By contrast, this receptor is also associated with traditional endocytosis in CNS cells, thus aiding the delivery of relevant cargo within their cytosol. We prove this using IgG as a model cargo, thus demonstrating that the combination of appropriate targeting combined with pH-sensitive polymersomes enables the efficient delivery of macromolecules into CNS cells.

  10. LRP-1-mediated intracellular antibody delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohe; Nyberg, Sophie; S. Sharp, Paul; Madsen, Jeppe; Daneshpour, Nooshin; Armes, Steven P.; Berwick, Jason; Azzouz, Mimoun; Shaw, Pamela; Abbott, N. Joan; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is by far the most important target in developing new approaches to improve delivery of drugs and diagnostic tools into the Central Nervous System (CNS). Here we report the engineering of pH- sensitive polymersomes (synthetic vesicles formed by amphiphilic copolymers) that exploit endogenous transport mechanisms to traverse the BBB, enabling delivery of large macromolecules into both the CNS parenchyma and CNS cells. We achieve this by targeting the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor. We show that LRP-1 is associated with endothelial transcytosis that does not involve acidification of cargo in membrane-trafficking organelles. By contrast, this receptor is also associated with traditional endocytosis in CNS cells, thus aiding the delivery of relevant cargo within their cytosol. We prove this using IgG as a model cargo, thus demonstrating that the combination of appropriate targeting combined with pH-sensitive polymersomes enables the efficient delivery of macromolecules into CNS cells. PMID:26189707

  11. Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Myogenic Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Fry, Christopher S; Igbinigie, Sherry; Deer, Rachel R; Jennings, Kristofer; Cope, Mark B; Mukherjea, Ratna; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-02-14

    It has been proposed that protein supplementation during resistance exercise training enhances muscle hypertrophy. The degree of hypertrophy during training is controlled in part through activation of satellite cells and myonuclear accretion.

  12. Severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by loss of LRP4 function.

    PubMed

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Stollfuß, Barbara; Li, Yun; Bögershausen, Nina; Boss, Karin; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-06-01

    Limb patterning and growth are complex embryonic processes in which the elaborately orchestrated interplay of diverse endocrine and paracrine factors is crucial to limb integrity. LRP4 is a lipoprotein receptor known for its regulatory effects on LRP5- and LRP6-mediated Wnt signaling, a pathway that plays a pivotal role in limb development. Recessive mutations in LRP4 have been shown to cause Cenani-Lenz syndrome, which is characterized by severe limb malformations, an unusual face, and renal abnormalities. We report on a child with severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in LRP4. The severity of the phenotype in a patient with absent residual LRP4 function may point to a genotype-phenotype correlation.

  13. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  14. Integrative mutation, haplotype and G × G interaction evidence connects ABGL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 genes to cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Yao, Li-Mei; Huang, Feng; Pan, Ling; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Yang, De-Zhai; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2016-11-17

    This study is expected to investigate the association of ATP/GTP binding protein-like 4 (AGBL4), LDL receptor related protein 8 (LRP8) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with lipid metabolism in 2,552 individuals (Jing, 1,272 and Han, 1,280). We identified 12 mutations in this motif. The genotype and allele frequencies of these variants were different between the two populations. Multiple-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) elucidated the detected sites are not statistically independent. Possible integrative haplotypes and gene-by-gene (G × G) interactions, comprising mutations of the AGBL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 associated with total cholesterol (TC, AGBL4 G-G-A, PCSK9 C-G-A-A and G-G-A-A-C-A-T-T-T-G-G-A), triglyceride (TG, AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, AGBL4 A-A-G and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and the apolipoprotein(Apo)A1/ApoB ratio (A1/B, PCSK9 C-A-A-G) in Jing minority. However, in the Hans, with TG (AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C), LDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and A1/B (LRP8 A-C-A-T-T and PCSK9 C-A-A-G). Association analysis based on haplotype clusters and G × G interactions probably increased power over single-locus tests especially for TG.

  15. Integrative mutation, haplotype and G × G interaction evidence connects ABGL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 genes to cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Yao, Li-Mei; Huang, Feng; Pan, Ling; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Yang, De-Zhai; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2016-01-01

    This study is expected to investigate the association of ATP/GTP binding protein-like 4 (AGBL4), LDL receptor related protein 8 (LRP8) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with lipid metabolism in 2,552 individuals (Jing, 1,272 and Han, 1,280). We identified 12 mutations in this motif. The genotype and allele frequencies of these variants were different between the two populations. Multiple-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) elucidated the detected sites are not statistically independent. Possible integrative haplotypes and gene-by-gene (G × G) interactions, comprising mutations of the AGBL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 associated with total cholesterol (TC, AGBL4 G-G-A, PCSK9 C-G-A-A and G-G-A-A-C-A-T-T-T-G-G-A), triglyceride (TG, AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, AGBL4 A-A-G and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and the apolipoprotein(Apo)A1/ApoB ratio (A1/B, PCSK9 C-A-A-G) in Jing minority. However, in the Hans, with TG (AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C), LDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and A1/B (LRP8 A-C-A-T-T and PCSK9 C-A-A-G). Association analysis based on haplotype clusters and G × G interactions probably increased power over single-locus tests especially for TG. PMID:27853278

  16. Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: a review and examination of protein spread and change theories.

    PubMed

    Bosse, John D; Dixon, Brian M

    2012-09-08

    An appreciable volume of human clinical data supports increased dietary protein for greater gains from resistance training, but not all findings are in agreement. We recently proposed "protein spread theory" and "protein change theory" in an effort to explain discrepancies in the response to increased dietary protein in weight management interventions. The present review aimed to extend "protein spread theory" and "protein change theory" to studies examining the effects of protein on resistance training induced muscle and strength gains. Protein spread theory proposed that there must have been a sufficient spread or % difference in g/kg/day protein intake between groups during a protein intervention to see muscle and strength differences. Protein change theory postulated that for the higher protein group, there must be a sufficient change from baseline g/kg/day protein intake to during study g/kg/day protein intake to see muscle and strength benefits. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria. In studies where a higher protein intervention was deemed successful there was, on average, a 66.1% g/kg/day between group intake spread versus a 10.2% g/kg/day spread in studies where a higher protein diet was no more effective than control. The average change in habitual protein intake in studies showing higher protein to be more effective than control was +59.5% compared to +6.5% when additional protein was no more effective than control. The magnitudes of difference between the mean spreads and changes of the present review are similar to our previous review on these theories in a weight management context. Providing sufficient deviation from habitual intake appears to be an important factor in determining the success of additional protein in enhancing muscle and strength gains from resistance training. An increase in dietary protein favorably effects muscle and strength during resistance training.

  17. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species’ resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta

  18. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species' resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta-isomerase family.

  19. The rs3736228 polymorphism in the LRP5 gene is associated with calcaneal ultrasound parameter but not with body composition in a cohort of young Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rodríguez, María; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Rueda-Medina, Blanca

    2016-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and sclerostin (SOST) genes as genetic factors contributing to calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and body composition variables in a population of young Caucasian adults. The study population comprised a total of 575 individuals (mean age 20.41years; SD 2.36) whose bone mass was assessed through QUS to determine broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz). Body composition measurements were performed using a body composition analyser. Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of LRP5 (rs2306862, rs599083, rs556442 and rs3736228) and SOST (rs4792909, rs851054 and rs2023794) were selected as genetic markers and genotyped using TaqMan OpenArray(®) technology. Linear regression analysis was used to test the possible association of the tested SNPs with QUS and body composition parameters. Linear regression analysis revealed that the rs3736228 SNP of LPR5 was significantly associated with BUA after adjustment for age, sex, weight, height, physical activity and calcium intake (P = 0.028, β (95% CI) = 0.089 (0.099-1.691). For the remaining SNPs, no significant association with the QUS measurement was observed. Regarding body composition, no significant association was found between LRP5 and SOST polymorphisms and body mass index, total fat mass and total lean mass after adjustment for age and sex as covariates. We concluded that the rs3736228 LRP5 genetic polymorphism influences calcaneal QUS parameter in a population of young Caucasian adults. This finding suggests that LRP5 might be an important genetic marker contributing to bone mass accrual early in life.

  20. LRP1 is a receptor for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin indicating a two-receptor model of clostridial glycosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Schorch, Björn; Song, Shuo; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Bock, Hans H; May, Petra; Herz, Joachim; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-04-29

    Large glycosylating toxins are major virulence factors of various species of pathogenic Clostridia. Prototypes are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which cause antibiotics-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The current model of the toxins' action suggests that receptor binding is mediated by a C-terminal domain of combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROP). This model is challenged by the glycosylating Clostridium perfringens large cytotoxin (TpeL toxin) that is devoid of the CROP domain but still intoxicates cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) as a host cell receptor for the TpeL toxin. LRP1-deficient cells are not able to take up TpeL and are not intoxicated. Expression of cluster IV of LRP1 is sufficient to rescue toxin uptake in these cells. By plasmon resonance spectroscopy, a KD value of 23 nM was determined for binding of TpeL to LRP1 cluster IV. The C terminus of TpeL (residues 1335-1779) represents the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the toxin. RBD-like regions are conserved in all other clostridial glycosylating toxins preceding their CROP domain. CROP-deficient C. difficile toxin B is toxic to cells, depending on the RBD-like region (residues 1349-1811) but does not interact with LRP1. Our data indicate the presence of a second, CROP-independent receptor-binding domain in clostridial glycosylating toxins and suggest a two-receptor model for the cellular uptake of clostridial glycosylating toxins.

  1. Nerve growth factor induces rapid increases in functional cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Bu, G; Sun, Y; Schwartz, A L; Holtzman, D M

    1998-05-22

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a large endocytic receptor that binds multiple ligands and is highly expressed in neurons. Several LRP ligands, including apolipoprotein E/lipoproteins and amyloid precursor protein, have been shown to participate either in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis or pathology. However, factors that regulate LRP expression in neurons are unknown. In the current study, we analyzed the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment on LRP expression, distribution, and function within neurons in two neuronal cell lines. Our results show that NGF induces a rapid increase of cell surface LRP expression in a central nervous system-derived neuronal cell line, GT1-1 Trk, which was seen within 10 min and reached a maximum at about 1 h of NGF treatment. This increase of cell surface LRP expression is concomitant with an increase in the endocytic activity of LRP as measured via ligand uptake and degradation assays. We also found that the cytoplasmic tail of LRP is phosphorylated and that NGF rapidly increases the amount of phosphorylation. Furthermore, we detected a significant increase of LRP expression at the messenger RNA level following 24 h of NGF treatment. Both rapid and long term induction of LRP expression were also detected in peripheral nervous system-derived PC12 cells following NGF treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NGF regulates LRP expression in neuronal cells.

  2. Effect and mechanism of resveratrol on drug resistance in human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Qian; Xie, Qing; Zhang, Man

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant barrier to the effective treatment of bladder cancer. In order to improve the management of bladder cancer, it is crucial to identify strategies that may reverse MDR. The effects of three herbal medicines, ginsenoside Rh2, (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol (RES) on bladder cancer were determined. The effect of these three herbal medicines against the drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM)-resistant pumc-91 cells (pumc-91/ADM) was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit-8 cell proliferation assay system. Cell cycle distribution analysis was performed using flow cytometry following treatment with RES. The mRNA and protein expression levels of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), lung resistance protein (LRP), glutathione S-transferase (GST), B cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) and topoisomerase-II (Topo-II) were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence, respectively. RES enhanced the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on pumc-91/ADM cells; however, Rh2 and EGCG were unable to induce a similar effect. Additionally, RES treatment led to S phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by a decrease in the number of cells in the G1 phase. A significant decrease of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL-2 levels and an increase of Topo-II levels were observed in RES groups compared with the control group. RES effectively reversed ADM resistance in pumc-91/ADM cells and the underlying molecular mechanism may be associated with the alteration of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL-2 and Topo-II expression levels. Therefore, RES may be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28098863

  3. Effect and mechanism of resveratrol on drug resistance in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Qian; Xie, Qing; Zhang, Man

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant barrier to the effective treatment of bladder cancer. In order to improve the management of bladder cancer, it is crucial to identify strategies that may reverse MDR. The effects of three herbal medicines, ginsenoside Rh2, (‑)‑epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol (RES) on bladder cancer were determined. The effect of these three herbal medicines against the drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM)‑resistant pumc‑91 cells (pumc‑91/ADM) was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit‑8 cell proliferation assay system. Cell cycle distribution analysis was performed using flow cytometry following treatment with RES. The mRNA and protein expression levels of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), lung resistance protein (LRP), glutathione S‑transferase (GST), B cell leukemia/lymphoma‑2 (BCL‑2) and topoisomerase‑II (Topo‑II) were evaluated using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence, respectively. RES enhanced the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on pumc‑91/ADM cells; however, Rh2 and EGCG were unable to induce a similar effect. Additionally, RES treatment led to S phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by a decrease in the number of cells in the G1 phase. A significant decrease of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL‑2 levels and an increase of Topo‑II levels were observed in RES groups compared with the control group. RES effectively reversed ADM resistance in pumc‑91/ADM cells and the underlying molecular mechanism may be associated with the alteration of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL‑2 and Topo‑II expression levels. Therefore, RES may be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Post-absorptive muscle protein turnover affects resistance training hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Borack, Michael S; Markofski, Melissa M; Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Deer, Rachel R; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-05-01

    Acute bouts of resistance exercise and subsequent training alters protein turnover in skeletal muscle. The mechanisms responsible for the changes in basal post-absorptive protein turnover and its impact on muscle hypertrophy following resistance exercise training are unknown. Our goal was to determine whether post-absorptive muscle protein turnover following 12 weeks of resistance exercise training (RET) plays a role in muscle hypertrophy. In addition, we were interested in determining potential molecular mechanisms responsible for altering post-training muscle protein turnover. Healthy young men (n = 31) participated in supervised whole body progressive RET at 60-80% 1 repetition maximum (1-RM), 3 days/week for 3 months. Pre- and post-training vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and blood samples taken during an infusion of (13)C6 and (15)N phenylalanine and were used to assess skeletal muscle protein turnover in the post-absorptive state. Lean body mass (LBM), muscle strength (determined by dynamometry), vastus lateralis muscle thickness (MT), myofiber type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA), and mRNA were assessed pre- and post-RET. RET increased strength (12-40%), LBM (~5%), MT (~15%) and myofiber CSA (~20%) (p < 0.05). Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) increased 24% while muscle protein breakdown (MPB) decreased 21%, respectively. These changes in protein turnover resulted in an improved net muscle protein balance in the basal state following RET. Further, the change in basal MPS is positively associated (r = 0.555, p = 0.003) with the change in muscle thickness. Post-absorptive muscle protein turnover is associated with muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise training.

  5. Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Volk, Brittanie M; Gómez, Ana L; Kunces, Laura J; Kupchak, Brian R; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Aristizabal, Juan C; Saenz, Catherine; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kawiecki, Diana L; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Fragala, Maren S; Earp, Jacob E; Fernandez, Maria L; Bruno, Richard S; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark D; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Compared to soy, whey protein is higher in leucine, absorbed quicker and results in a more pronounced increase in muscle protein synthesis. To determine whether supplementation with whey promotes greater increases in muscle mass compared to soy or carbohydrate, we randomized non-resistance-trained men and women into groups who consumed daily isocaloric supplements containing carbohydrate (carb; n = 22), whey protein (whey; n = 19), or soy protein (soy; n = 22). All subjects completed a supervised, whole-body periodized resistance training program consisting of 96 workouts (~9 months). Body composition was determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months. Plasma amino acid responses to resistance exercise followed by supplement ingestion were determined at baseline and 9 months. Daily protein intake (including the supplement) for carb, whey, and soy was 1.1, 1.4, and 1.4 g·kg body mass⁻¹, respectively. Lean body mass gains were significantly (p < 0.05) greater in whey (3.3 ± 1.5 kg) than carb (2.3 ± 1.7 kg) and soy (1.8 ± 1.6 kg). Fat mass decreased slightly but there were no differences between groups. Fasting concentrations of leucine were significantly elevated (20%) and postexercise plasma leucine increased more than 2-fold in whey. Fasting leucine concentrations were positively correlated with lean body mass responses. Despite consuming similar calories and protein during resistance training, daily supplementation with whey was more effective than soy protein or isocaloric carbohydrate control treatment conditions in promoting gains in lean body mass. These results highlight the importance of protein quality as an important determinant of lean body mass responses to resistance training.

  6. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system.

  7. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Nancy K.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  8. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  9. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein and Apolipoprotein E Expression is Altered in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Our recent microarray study reported altered mRNA expression of several low density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP) associated with the first 4 years following diagnosis with schizophrenia. Whilst this finding is novel, apolipoprotein E (APOE), which mediates its activity through LRPs, has been reported by several studies to be altered in brains of subjects with schizophrenia. We used qPCR to measure the expression of LRP2, LRP4, LRP6, LRP8, LRP10 and LRP12 mRNA in Brodmann's area (BA) 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 15 subjects with short duration of illness schizophrenia (SDS) and 15 pair matched controls. We also used Western blotting to measure APOE protein expression in BA46 from these subjects. Amongst the LRPs examined, LRP10 expression was significantly increased (P = 0.03) and LRP12 was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in SDS. APOE protein expression was also increased in SDS (P = 0.01). No other marker examined in this study was altered with diagnosis. Our data supports a role for distinct members of the LRP family in the pathology of schizophrenia and adds weight to the hypothesis that aberrant apolipoprotein signaling is involved in the early stages of schizophrenia. PMID:21423430

  10. Smooth Muscle Cell Deletion of LDL Receptor Related Protein-1 Augments AngII-Induced Superior Mesenteric Arterial and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Frank M.; Rateri, Debra L.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Strickland, Dudley K.; Muratoglu, Selen C.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective LRP1, a multifunctional protein involved in endocytosis and cell signaling pathways, leads to a range of vascular pathologies when deleted in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether LRP1 deletion in SMCs influenced AngII-induced arterial pathologies. Approach and Results LRP1 protein abundance was equivalent in selected arterial-regions, but SMC-specific LRP1 depletion had no effect on abdominal and ascending aortic diameters in young mice. To determine the effects of LRP1 deficiency on AngII vascular responses, SMC-specific LRP1 (smLRP1) +/+ and -/- mice were infused with saline, AngII, or norepinephrine (NE). Several smLRP-/- mice died of superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) rupture during AngII infusion. In surviving mice, AngII profoundly augmented SMA dilation in smLRP1-/- mice. SMA dilation was blood pressure-dependent as demonstrated by a similar response during NE infusion. SMA dilation was also associated with profound macrophage accumulation, but minimal elastin fragmentation. AngII infusion led to no significant differences in abdominal aorta diameters between smLRP1+/+ and -/- mice. In contrast, ascending aortic dilation was exacerbated markedly in AngII-infused smLRP1-/- mice, but NE had no significant effect on either aortic region. Ascending aortas of smLRP1-/- mice infused with AngII had minimal macrophage accumulation but significantly increased elastin fragmentation and mRNA abundance of several LRP1 ligands including MMP-2 and uPA. Conclusions smLRP1 deficiency had no effect on AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation. Conversely, AngII infusion in smLRP1-/- mice exacerbated SMA and ascending aorta dilation. Dilation in these two regions had differential association with blood pressure and divergent pathologic characteristics. PMID:25395615

  11. Tween surfactants: Adsorption, self-organization, and protein resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Guo, Athena; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2011-03-01

    Tween surfactants, each containing hydrophilic ethylene glycol head groups and a hydrophobic alkyl tail, are being actively explored as protein-resistant surface coatings, but little is known about how they adsorb on surfaces. We carry out a comparative study of the adsorption of two Tween molecules (same hydrophilic head group, but a shorter dodecyl tail for Tween 20 and a longer octadecyl tail for Tween 40) on Au and polystyrene surfaces. Despite the similarity between these two molecules, there is a drastic difference in their protein resistance: a monolayer of Tween 20 on a hydrophobic surface is repulsive against protein adsorption but that of Tween 40 is not. The difference in protein resistance can be attributed to two distinctly different adsorption mechanisms. While the adsorption of Tween 40 is described by a simple first-order mechanism, that of Tween 20 consists of a fast adsorption step and a slower reorganization process at a high surface coverage. The latter leads to the formation of a high-density and self-organized monolayer, which is responsible for the enhanced stability and resistance against non-specific protein adsorption.

  12. Frameshift Mutation Confers Function as Virulence Factor to Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein from Acidovorax avenae

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Machiko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Takehito; Yoshida, Yuki; Suzuki, Aika; Kawaguchi, Takemasa; Che, Fang-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Many plant pathogens inject type III (T3SS) effectors into host cells to suppress host immunity and promote successful infection. The bacterial pathogen Acidovorax avenae causes brown stripe symptom in many species of monocotyledonous plants; however, individual strains of each pathogen infect only one host species. T3SS-deleted mutants of A. avenae K1 (virulent to rice) or N1141 (virulent to finger millet) caused no symptom in each host plant, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in the symptom formation. To identify T3SS effectors as virulence factors, we performed whole-genome and predictive analyses. Although the nucleotide sequence of the novel leucine-rich repeat protein (Lrp) gene of N1141 had high sequence identity with K1 Lrp, the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins were quite different due to a 1-bp insertion within the K1 Lrp gene. An Lrp-deleted K1 strain (KΔLrp) did not cause brown stripe symptom in rice (host plant for K1); by contrast, the analogous mutation in N1141 (NΔLrp) did not interfere with infection of finger millet. In addition, NΔLrp retained the ability to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI), including hypersensitive response cell death and expression of ETI-related genes. These data indicated that K1 Lrp functions as a virulence factor in rice, whereas N1141 Lrp does not play a similar role in finger millet. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that K1 Lrp interacts with oryzain α, a pathogenesis-related protein of the cysteine protease family, whereas N1141 Lrp, which contains LRR domains, does not. This specific interaction between K1 Lrp and oryzain α was confirmed by Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in rice cells. Thus, K1 Lrp protein may have acquired its function as virulence factor in rice due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:28101092

  13. Essential role of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2003-12-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor highly expressed in human aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we used the short interfering RNA (siRNA) technique to explore the role of LRP in smooth muscle cell migration. We identified an LRP-specific siRNA that selective silences LRP expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells. As a consequence, LRP-mediated ligand degradation was significantly reduced. More important, we found that platelet-derived growth factor-dependent cell migration was inhibited in cells transfected with LRP siRNA. These results demonstrate an important role of LRP in smooth muscle cell migration.

  14. [ABC transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-08-01

    The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family includes membrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes. These proteins play an essential role in the protection of cells from toxic compounds/metabolites. Their overexpression which leads to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in pathogens and enables cancer cells to survive chemotherapy is of major concern for human health. Mutations in ABC transporters are implicated in a number of Mendelian disorders such as cystic fibrosis, adrenoleukodystrophy and cholesterol and bile transport defects. In microbial cells, several homologues of human ABC transporters were identified. Their further molecular biological study can contribute to better understanding and treatment of MDR or diseases caused by dysfunction of ABC transporter proteins. A review is presented of the state of the art in ABC transporter proteins in both prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells. The role of microbial ABC transporters in the development of drug resistance is analyzed.

  15. N-cadherin restrains PTH repressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTH1R interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Dong, Jinbo; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Zhong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Feng

    2016-12-01

    Sclerostin/SOST is a robust negative regulator of bone formation. Loss-of-function mutations of the sclerostin gene (SOST) cause sclerosteosis and Van Buchem disease characterized by bone overgrowth. Mediated by myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors, parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses SOST expression through formation of complexes of parathyroid hormone-parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor 1 (PTH1R) and lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). N-cadherin has been shown to negatively regulate Wnt/β-catenin and PTH induced, protein kinase-dependent β-catenin signaling. Here, we investigated whether N-cadherin mediates the inhibitory effects of PTH on sclerostin/SOST. In vitro, overexpression of N-cadherin resulted in blunted PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST expression, as detected by immunoblot and qPCR analysis; PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2A, C, and D was impaired by N-cadherin; and N-cadherin reduced LRP6-PTHR1 interaction and endocytosis in response to PTH. In vivo, intermittent PTH (iPTH)-induced suppression of sclerostin/SOST was accentuated in Dmp1-cre; Cdh2(f/f) (Cdh2(ΔDmp1) ) mice, compared with Cdh2(f/f) mice. Additionally, iPTH had greater bone anabolic effects in Cdh2(ΔDmp1) mice compared to Cdh2(f/f) mice. These data indicate that N-cadherin negatively mediates PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTHR1 interaction, ultimately influencing PTH anabolic effects on bone.

  16. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  17. Drug resistance features and S-phase fraction as possible determinants for drug response in a panel of human ovarian cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kolfschoten, G M; Hulscher, T M; Pinedo, H M; Boven, E

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and more specifically the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) have been studied extensively in vitro. Unfortunately, it appears that the predictive value of MDR recognized in vitro is mostly an incorrect measure to determine the responsiveness of a particular tumour in the clinic. This misunderstood or overvalued role of MDR might explain the failure of strategies to reverse Pgp function by the use of modulators in solid tumours. To obtain more insight in in vivo drug resistance we investigated a panel of 15 human ovarian cancer xenografts consisting of the most common histological subtypes known in ovarian cancer patients. The response rate to cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin in the xenografts resembled the results of phase II trials with these agents in ovarian cancer patients. This resemblance justifies drug resistance studies in this experimental in vivo human tumour system. We determined the expression levels of MDR 1, MRP 1, LRP and topoisomerase IIα mRNA by the RNase protection assay and the presence of MRP1 and LRP proteins by immunohistochemistry. The S-phase fraction was investigated as a separate parameter by flow cytometry. In none of the 15 ovarian cancer xenografts was MDR 1 expression detectable. The expression levels of MRP 1 and LRP were low to moderate and resembled the presence of the MRP1 and LRP proteins. There was a weak, inverse relationship between the expression levels of LRP and sensitivity to cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (r = –0.44 and –0.45), but not to doxorubicin. The levels of topoisomerase IIα varied among the xenografts (0.73–2.66) and failed to correlate with doxorubicin resistance (r = 0.14). The S-phase fraction, however, showed a relation with the sensitivity to cisplatin (r = 0.66). Among the determinants studied in ovarian cancer in vivo, LRP mRNA and the S-phase fraction were the best predictive factors for drug response and most specifically for the activity of cisplatin.

  18. Mouse C-Reactive Protein and Endotoxin-Induced Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L. T.; Higginbotham, R. D.

    1965-01-01

    Patterson, L. T. (University of Texas, Galveston), and R. D. Higginbotham. Mouse C-reactive protein and endotoxin-induced resistance. J. Bacteriol. 90:1520–1524. 1965.—The relationship between the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the sera of mice and resistance to Staphylococcus aureus infection after the injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin was studied. The CRP level was essentially unchanged at 6 hr after endotoxin, and resistance was slightly decreased. At 24 hr after endotoxin, both CRP levels and resistance were increased. Since the increase in the CRP level and resistance appeared to be associated, it was of interest that, when mouse CRP was tested for in vitro reactions with several strains of bacteria, cells of all species of gram-positive bacteria tested (including S. aureus) were agglutinated by CRP. E. coli was not agglutinated under the conditions of the test. It is proposed that mouse CRP is an opsonin, and possibly a lysin, and is involved in nonspecific resistance to infection with S. aureus. PMID:5322718

  19. Interferon-induced human protein with homology to protein Mx of influenza virus-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, P; Haller, O

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies with specificity for protein Mx (a karyophilic 75,000-dalton protein induced by interferon [IFN] in mouse cells carrying the influenza virus resistance allele Mx+) detected an IFN-induced 80,000-dalton protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in fibroblasts of healthy human donors. The human protein, like protein Mx, was induced by IFN-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Unlike the mouse protein, it was predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. Images PMID:3939324

  20. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting Protein Kinases to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  2. Wingless/Wnt signal transduction requires distinct initiation and amplification steps that both depend on Arrow/LRP.

    PubMed

    Baig-Lewis, Shahana; Peterson-Nedry, Wynne; Wehrli, Marcel

    2007-06-01

    Members of the Wg/Wnt family provide key intercellular signals during embryonic development and in the maintenance of homeostatic processes, but critical aspects of their signal transduction pathways remain controversial. We have found that canonical Wg signaling in Drosophila involves distinct initiation and amplification steps, both of which require Arrow/LRP. Expressing a chimeric Frizzled2-Arrow protein in flies that lack endogenous Wg or Arrow showed that this construct functions as an activated Wg receptor but is deficient in signal amplification. In contrast, a chimeric Arrow protein containing the dimerization domain of Torso acted as a potent amplifier of Wg signaling but could not initiate Wg signaling on its own. The two chimeric proteins synergized, so that their co-expression largely reconstituted the signaling levels achieved by expressing Wg itself. The amplification function of Arrow/LRP appears to be particularly important for long-range signaling, and may reflect a general mechanism for potentiating signals in the shallow part of a morphogen gradient.

  3. Wingless/Wnt signal transduction requires distinct initiation and amplification steps that both depend on Arrow/LRP

    PubMed Central

    Baig-Lewis, Shahana; Peterson-Nedry, Wynne; Wehrli, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Members of the Wg/Wnt family provide key intercellular signals during embryonic development and in the maintenance of homeostatic processes, but critical aspects of their signal transduction pathways remain controversial. We have found that canonical Wg signaling in Drosophila involves distinct initiation and amplification steps, both of which require Arrow/LRP. Expressing a chimeric Frizzled2-Arrow protein in flies that lack endogenous Wg or Arrow showed that this construct functions as an activated Wg receptor but is deficient in signal amplification. In contrast, a chimeric Arrow protein containing the dimerization domain of Torso acted as a potent amplifier of Wg signaling but could not initiate Wg signaling on its own. The two chimeric proteins synergized, so that their co-expression largely reconstituted the signaling levels achieved by expressing Wg itself. The amplification function of Arrow/LRP appears to be particularly important for long-range signaling, and may reflect a general mechanism for potentiating signals in the shallow part of a morphogen gradient. PMID:17433287

  4. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  5. A common LRP4 haplotype is associated with bone mineral density and hip geometry in men-data from the Odense Androgen Study (OAS).

    PubMed

    Boudin, Eveline; Steenackers, Ellen; de Freitas, Fenna; Nielsen, Torben Leo; Andersen, Marianne; Brixen, Kim; Van Hul, Wim; Piters, Elke

    2013-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by an increased susceptibility to fracture. It is a complex disorder resulting from the interaction of several polymorphisms in different genes and environmental factors. Since we recently reported a role for low density lipoprotein-related protein (LRP)-4 in monogenic disorders with bone overgrowth, we now wanted to evaluate whether genetic variation in the LRP4 gene has an effect on the susceptibility to osteoporosis in a population based cohort from the Odense Androgen Study. We chose to genotype four common (minor allele frequency (MAF)≥0.05) and non-synonymous coding polymorphisms located in the extracellular region of the LRP4 protein: rs3816614 (A/g), rs2306029 (G/a), rs2306033 (C/t) and rs6485702 (G/a) (large and small characters indicate major and minor alleles, respectively). Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the hip, the spine and whole body as well as different hip geometry parameters were available for a total of 1404 Danish men from two age groups ([20-29 years]: n=804; [60-74 years]: n=600). Using linear regression analysis adjusted for age, height and weight, we found significant associations between both rs2306029 and rs6485702 and BMD at all sites except the lumbar spine. The most significant association was found with whole body BMD (p=4.7×10(-5)). In addition, we found these two polymorphisms to be associated with different geometry parameters especially of the femoral shaft. Analysis of the two associated SNPs in the separate age groups demonstrated that most associations are only present in the youngest group of Danish men. In the group of elderly men, one Bonferroni corrected association between whole body BMD and rs6485702 was found to be significant. Subsequently, all polymorphisms were included in haplotype analyses using the PLINK software (v1.07). After adjusting for age, height and weight, two out of five common haplotypes (MAF≥0.01) were found to be of particular interest in

  6. M. tuberculosis Hypothetical Proteins and Proteins of Unknown Function: Hope for Exploring Novel Resistance Mechanisms as well as Future Target of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in tuberculosis predominantly, mono-resistance, multi drug resistance, extensively drug resistance and totally drug resistance have emerged as a major problem in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Failures of first and second line anti-tuberculosis drugs treatment leads to emergence of resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Few genes are reported as the principal targets of the resistance and apart from the primary targets many explanations have been proposed for drug resistance but still some resistance mechanisms are unknown. As proteins involved in most of the biological processes, these are potentially explored the unknown mechanism of drug resistance and attractive targets for diagnostics/future therapeutics against drug resistance. In last decade a panel of studies on expression proteomics of drug resistant M. tuberculosis isolates reported the differential expression of uncharacterized proteins and suggested these might be involved in resistance. Here we emphasize that detailed bioinformatics analysis (like molecular docking, pupylation, and proteins-proteins interaction) of these uncharacterized and hypothetical proteins might predict their interactive partners (other proteins) which are involved in various pathways of M. tuberculosis system biology and might give a clue for novel mechanism of drug resistance or future drug targets. In future these uncharacterized targets might be open the new resistance mechanism and used as potential drug targets against drug resistant tuberculosis.

  7. M. tuberculosis Hypothetical Proteins and Proteins of Unknown Function: Hope for Exploring Novel Resistance Mechanisms as well as Future Target of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in tuberculosis predominantly, mono-resistance, multi drug resistance, extensively drug resistance and totally drug resistance have emerged as a major problem in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Failures of first and second line anti-tuberculosis drugs treatment leads to emergence of resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Few genes are reported as the principal targets of the resistance and apart from the primary targets many explanations have been proposed for drug resistance but still some resistance mechanisms are unknown. As proteins involved in most of the biological processes, these are potentially explored the unknown mechanism of drug resistance and attractive targets for diagnostics/future therapeutics against drug resistance. In last decade a panel of studies on expression proteomics of drug resistant M. tuberculosis isolates reported the differential expression of uncharacterized proteins and suggested these might be involved in resistance. Here we emphasize that detailed bioinformatics analysis (like molecular docking, pupylation, and proteins-proteins interaction) of these uncharacterized and hypothetical proteins might predict their interactive partners (other proteins) which are involved in various pathways of M. tuberculosis system biology and might give a clue for novel mechanism of drug resistance or future drug targets. In future these uncharacterized targets might be open the new resistance mechanism and used as potential drug targets against drug resistant tuberculosis. PMID:28377758

  8. The rLrp of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and downregulates APC function in mouse macrophages via a TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway activation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Jia-Yun; Chen, Su-Ting; Huang, Hai-Rong; Cai, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant leucine-responsive regulatory protein (rLrp) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-12 production and blocks the nuclear translocation of subunits of the nuclear-receptor transcription factor NF-κB (Nuclear factor-kappa B). Moreover, rLrp attenuated LPS-induced DNA binding and NF-κB transcriptional activity, which was accompanied by the degradation of inhibitory IκBα and a consequent decrease in the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. RLrp interfered with the LPS-induced clustering of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 binding to TAK1. Furthermore, rLrp did not attenuate proinflammatory cytokines or the expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class-II induced by interferon-gamma in the macrophages of Toll-like receptor 2 deletion (TLR2(-/-)) mice and in protein kinase b (Akt)-depleted mouse cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of rLrp were dependent on TLR2-mediated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. RLrp could also activate the PI3K/Akt pathway by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in macrophages. In addition, 19 amino acid residues in the N-terminus of rLrp were determined to be important and required for the inhibitory effects mediated by TLR2. The inhibitory function of these 19 amino acids of rLrp raises the possibility that mimetic inhibitory peptides could be used to restrict innate immune responses in situations in which prolonged TLR signaling has deleterious effects. Our study offers new insight into the inhibitory mechanisms by which the TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway ensures the transient expression of potent inflammatory mediators.

  9. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 is required for parathyroid hormone-induced Sost suppression.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Wang, Weishan; Xie, Liang; Luo, Xianghang; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses the expression of the bone formation inhibitor sclerostin (Sost) in osteocytes by inducing nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to inhibit the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent Sost bone enhancer. Previous studies revealed that lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) mediates the intracellular signaling activation and the anabolic bone effect of PTH. Here, we investigated whether LRP6 mediates the inhibitory effect of PTH on Sost using an osteoblast-specific Lrp6-knockout (LRP6-KO) mouse model. An increased level of Sost mRNA expression was detected in femur tissue from LRP6-KO mice, compared to wild-type littermates. The number of osteocytes expressing sclerostin protein was also increased in bone tissue of LRP6-KO littermates, indicating a negative regulatory role of LRP6 on Sost/sclerostin. In wild-type littermates, intermittent PTH treatment significantly suppressed Sost mRNA expression in bone and the number of sclerostin(+) osteocytes, while the effect of PTH was much less significant in LRP6-KO mice. Additionally, PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2C and 2D, as well as HDAC changes in osteocytes, were abrogated in LRP6-KO mice. These data indicate that LRP6 is required for PTH suppression of Sost expression.

  10. Hormone resistance caused by mutations in G proteins and G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1999-04-01

    G proteins couple receptors for many hormones to effectors that regulate second messenger metabolism. Several endocrine disorders have been shown to be caused by either loss or gain of function mutations in G proteins or G protein-coupled receptors. Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), the first described example of a hormone resistance disorder, is characterized by renal resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) proximal to generation of the second messenger, cAMP. In PHP Ia there is more generalized hormone resistance (PTH, TSH, gonadotropins) and associated abnormal physical features, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Subjects with PHP Ib are normal in appearance and resistant exclusively to PTH. Germline loss of function mutations have been identified in the Gs-alpha gene in PHP Ia, and recent evidence suggests that the Gs-alpha gene is paternally imprinted in a tissue-specific manner. In PHP Ib, several studies have excluded PTH receptor gene mutations, and the molecular basis has not yet been defined.

  11. Origins of the protein synthesis cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Largely derived from experiments in molecular evolution, a theory of protein synthesis cycles has been constructed. The sequence begins with ordered thermal proteins resulting from the self-sequencing of mixed amino acids. Ordered thermal proteins then aggregate to cell-like structures. When they contained proteinoids sufficiently rich in lysine, the structures were able to synthesize offspring peptides. Since lysine-rich proteinoid (LRP) also catalyzes the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphate to polynucleotides, the same microspheres containing LRP could have synthesized both original cellular proteins and cellular nucleic acids. The LRP within protocells would have provided proximity advantageous for the origin and evolution of the genetic code.

  12. Origins of the protein synthesis cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Largely derived from experiments in molecular evolution, a theory of protein synthesis cycles has been constructed. The sequence begins with ordered thermal proteins resulting from the self-sequencing of mixed amino acids. Ordered thermal proteins then aggregate to cell-like structures. When they contained proteinoids sufficiently rich in lysine, the structures were able to synthesize offspring peptides. Since lysine-rich proteinoid (LRP) also catalyzes the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphate to polynucleotides, the same microspheres containing LRP could have synthesized both original cellular proteins and cellular nucleic acids. The LRP within protocells would have provided proximity advantageous for the origin and evolution of the genetic code.

  13. Lrp5 Has a Wnt-Independent Role in Glucose Uptake and Growth for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Emily N.; Martin, Joshua A.; Kim, Soyoung; Fakhraldeen, Saja A.

    2015-01-01

    Lrp5 is typically described as a Wnt signaling receptor, albeit a less effective Wnt signaling receptor than the better-studied sister isoform, Lrp6. Here we show that Lrp5 is only a minor player in the response to Wnt3a-type ligands in mammary epithelial cells; instead, Lrp5 is required for glucose uptake, and glucose uptake regulates the growth rate of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Thus, a loss of Lrp5 leads to profound growth suppression, whether growth is induced by serum or by specific growth factors, and this inhibition is not due to a loss of Wnt signaling. Depletion of Lrp5 decreases glucose uptake, lactate secretion, and oxygen consumption rates; inhibition of glucose consumption phenocopies the loss of Lrp5 function. Both Lrp5 knockdown and low external glucose induce mitochondrial stress, as revealed by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activation of the ROS-sensitive checkpoint, p38α. In contrast, loss of function of Lrp6 reduces Wnt responsiveness but has little impact on growth. This highlights the distinct functions of these two Lrp receptors and an important Wnt ligand-independent role of Lrp5 in glucose uptake in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26711269

  14. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties.

  15. LRP2 Acts as SHH Clearance Receptor to Protect the Retinal Margin from Mitogenic Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Christ, Annabel; Christa, Anna; Klippert, Julia; Eule, J Corinna; Bachmann, Sebastian; Wallace, Valerie A; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E

    2015-10-12

    During forebrain development, LRP2 promotes morphogen signaling as an auxiliary SHH receptor. However, in the developing retina, LRP2 assumes the opposing function, mediating endocytic clearance of SHH and antagonizing morphogen action. LRP2-mediated clearance prevents spread of SHH activity from the central retina into the retinal margin to protect quiescent progenitor cells in this niche from mitogenic stimuli. Loss of LRP2 in mice increases the sensitivity of the retinal margin for SHH, causing expansion of the retinal progenitor cell pool and hyperproliferation of this tissue. Our findings document the ability of LRP2 to act, in a context-dependent manner, as activator or inhibitor of the SHH pathway. Our current findings uncovered LRP2 activity as the molecular mechanism imposing quiescence of the retinal margin in the mammalian eye and suggest SHH-induced proliferation of the retinal margin as cause of the large eye phenotype observed in mouse models and patients with LRP2 defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Marine natural products as breast cancer resistance protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cherigo, Lilia; Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2015-04-03

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters.

  17. Protein design algorithms predict viable resistance to an experimental antifolate.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Stephanie M; Gainza, Pablo; Frey, Kathleen M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Donald, Bruce R; Anderson, Amy C

    2015-01-20

    Methods to accurately predict potential drug target mutations in response to early-stage leads could drive the design of more resilient first generation drug candidates. In this study, a structure-based protein design algorithm (K* in the OSPREY suite) was used to prospectively identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms that confer resistance to an experimental inhibitor effective against dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Staphylococcus aureus. Four of the top-ranked mutations in DHFR were found to be catalytically competent and resistant to the inhibitor. Selection of resistant bacteria in vitro reveals that two of the predicted mutations arise in the background of a compensatory mutation. Using enzyme kinetics, microbiology, and crystal structures of the complexes, we determined the fitness of the mutant enzymes and strains, the structural basis of resistance, and the compensatory relationship of the mutations. To our knowledge, this work illustrates the first application of protein design algorithms to prospectively predict viable resistance mutations that arise in bacteria under antibiotic pressure.

  18. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cherigo, Lilia; Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters. PMID:25854646

  19. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  20. LRP5 associates with specific subsets of macrophages: Molecular and functional effects.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, M; Romero, J C; Crespo, J; Juan-Babot, O; Badimon, L

    2016-01-01

    Innate and acquired immunity is involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanisms ruling monocyte to macrophage (Mø) differentiation are not yet fully understood. Different subtypes of plaque macrophages that have differentiated from monocytes recruited from circulating blood, have been characterized based on surface epitopes. We have recently shown that LRP5, a member of the LDL receptor superfamily supporting Wnt signalling, has an important role in monocyte to macrophage differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the CD16- and CD16+ macrophage subsets found in human atherosclerotic plaques have a differential LRP5 expression/function and Wnt signalling potential. We show for the first time that LRP5 expression is significantly higher in human CD16+Mø derived from CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes than in CD16-Mø macrophages derived from CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes. LRP5 is not found in human healthy vessel or arterial intimal thickening but is found in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions co-localizing only with the CD16+Mø macrophage subset. LRP5 expressing macrophages infiltrate the deep layers of atherosclerotic plaques towards the intima-media boundaries showing increased migratory activity and higher phagocytic activity. The equivalent for human patrolling CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in mice, CD115(+)GR1(low) monocytes, also show an increased expression of LRP5. In summary, classical CD14(+)CD16(-)monocytes that differentiate into CD16-Mø do not express LRP5. Instead, human monocytes expressing LRP5 differentiate into CD16+Mø antiinflammatory macrophages. These antiinflammatory macrophages are found in advanced atherosclerotic human plaques. Thus LRP5 is a signature of the anti-inflammatory defensive phenotype of macrophages.

  1. Analysis of the proteins associated with platelet detergent resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Szklanna, Paulina B; Foy, Martina; Wynne, Kieran; Byrne, Dwayne; Maguire, Patricia B

    2016-09-01

    Proteomic studies have facilitated the identification of proteins associated with the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction in a variety of cell types. Here, we have undertaken label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomic profiling of the proteins associated with detergent-resistant plasma and internal membranes from resting and activated platelets. One hundred forty-one proteins were identified and raw data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554. The proteins identified include a myriad of important platelet signaling and trafficking proteins including Rap1b, Src, SNAP-23, syntaxin-11, and members of the previously unattributed Ragulator complex. Mean LFQ intensities calculated across three technical replicates for the three biological donors revealed that several important platelet signaling proteins altered their detergent solubility upon activation, including GPIbα, GPIbβ, Src, and 14-3-3ζ. Altered detergent solubility for GPIbα, following activation using a variety of platelet agonists, was confirmed by immunoblotting and further coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GPIbα forms a complex with 14-3-3ζ that shifts into DRMs following activation. Taken together, proteomic profiling of platelet DRMs allowed greater insight in the complex biology of both DRMs and platelets and will be a useful subproteome to study platelet-related disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002554). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Structure and functional properties of Norrin mimic Wnt for signalling with Frizzled4, Lrp5/6, and proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Zebisch, Matthias; Harlos, Karl; Elegheert, Jonathan; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates multiple processes including angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Norrin (Norrie Disease Protein) is a cystine-knot like growth factor. Although unrelated to Wnt, Norrin activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Signal complex formation involves Frizzled4 (Fz4), low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5/6 (Lrp5/6), Tetraspanin-12 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we report crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses of Norrin in complex with Fz4 cysteine-rich domain (Fz4CRD), of this complex bound with GAG analogues, and of unliganded Norrin and Fz4CRD. Our structural, biophysical and cellular data, map Fz4 and putative Lrp5/6 binding sites to distinct patches on Norrin, and reveal a GAG binding site spanning Norrin and Fz4CRD. These results explain numerous disease-associated mutations. Comparison with the Xenopus Wnt8–mouse Fz8CRD complex reveals Norrin mimics Wnt for Frizzled recognition. The production and characterization of wild-type and mutant Norrins reported here open new avenues for the development of therapeutics to combat abnormal Norrin/Wnt signalling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06554.001 PMID:26158506

  3. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  4. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  5. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  6. Effect of protein quality on recovery after intense resistance training.

    PubMed

    Rindom, E; Nielsen, M H; Kececi, K; Jensen, M E; Vissing, K; Farup, J

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of high- versus low-quality protein supplementation on the regain of exercise performance during recovery from a period of high-intensity resistance training. In a diet-controlled crossover study, 12 resistance-trained participants performed two identical training periods, with each training period including four sessions of high-intensity resistance exercise during 5 days, while receiving either high- or low-quality protein. Prior to and at 3, 24 and 48 h after the training periods, performance was evaluated in knee extensor and flexor isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), counter-movement jumping height (CMJ), and peak and mean anaerobic power. In addition, prior to and at 48 h after the training periods, performance in time-to-exhaustion at 70 % of VO2max (TTE) was evaluated. After the intense training periods, decrements in the order of 4-24 % were observed for MVCext, CMJ, mean anaerobic power, and TTE. In particular for TTE, this decrement in exercise performance did not attain full recovery at 48 h post-exercise. The regain of exercise performance was not dictated by type of protein supplement. The regain of muscle strength as well as anaerobic or aerobic performances were not markedly influenced by the type of protein supplement.

  7. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Falu; Liu, Junyong; Qiao, Tingting; Li, Ting; Shen, Qi; Peng, Fang

    2016-06-28

    The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC) and defatted extract (PADF) from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP); PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π), but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC). Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1); PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing) the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes.

  8. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  9. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Rita; Schwarz, Christoph; Furtwängler, Katarina; Tarasov, Valery; Wende, Andy; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-05-28

    Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  10. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3. PMID:20509863

  11. Aerobic Exercise Recovers Disuse-induced Atrophy Through the Stimulus of the LRP130/PGC-1α Complex in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vechetti-Junior, Ivan J; Bertaglia, Raquel S; Fernandez, Geysson J; de Paula, Tassiana G; de Souza, Rodrigo W A; Moraes, Leonardo N; Mareco, Edson A; de Freitas, Carlos E A; Aguiar, Andreo F; Carvalho, Robson F; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2016-05-01

    Physical training has been shown to be important to the control of muscle mass during aging, through the activation of several pathways including, IGF1-AKT and PGC-1α. Also, it was demonstrated that LRP130, a component of the PGC-1α complex, is important for the PGC-1α-dependent transcription of several mitochondrial genes in vivo. To explore the role of physical training during aging, we investigated the effects on muscle recovery after short-term immobilization followed by 3 or 7 days with aerobic or resistance training. Using morphological (myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase activity, to assess the total muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and the frequency of specific fiber types), biochemical (myosin heavy chain), and molecular analyses (quantitative real-time PCR, functional pathways analyses, and Western blot), our results indicated that after an atrophic stimulus, only animals subjected to aerobic training showed entire recovery of cross-sectional area; aerobic training reduced the ubiquitin-proteasome system components involved in muscle atrophy after 3 days of recovery, and the upregulation in PGC-1α expression enhanced the process of muscle recovery by inhibiting the FoxO pathway, with the possible involvement of LRP130. These results suggest that aerobic training enhanced the muscle regeneration process after disuse-induced atrophy in aged rats possibly through of the LRP130/PGC-1α complex by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  12. Induction of heat shock proteins may combat insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for obesity-associated insulin resistance has been partially clarified: increased fatty acid levels in muscle fibers promote diacylglycerol synthesis, which activates certain isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). This in turn triggers a kinase cascade which activates both IkappaB kinase-beta (IKK-beta) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), each of which can phosphorylate a key serine residue in IRS-1, rendering it a poor substrate for the activated insulin receptor. Heat shock proteins Hsp27 and Hsp72 have the potential to prevent the activation of IKK-beta and JNK, respectively; this suggests that induction of heat shock proteins may blunt the adverse impact of fat overexposure on insulin function. Indeed, bimoclomol--a heat shock protein co-inducer being developed for treatment of diabetic neuropathy--and lipoic acid--suspected to be a heat shock protein inducer--have each demonstrated favorable effects on the insulin sensitivity of obese rodents, and parenteral lipoic acid is reported to improve the insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetics. Moreover, there is reason to believe that heat shock protein induction may have a favorable impact on the microvascular complications of diabetes, and on the increased risk for macrovascular disease associated with diabetes and insulin resistance syndrome. Heat shock protein induction may also have potential for preventing or treating neurodegenerative disorders, controlling inflammation, and possibly even slowing the aging process. The possible complementarity of bimoclomol and lipoic acid for heat shock protein induction should be assessed, and further efforts to identify well-tolerated agents active in this regard are warranted.

  13. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  14. Urotensin II inhibited the proliferation of cardiac side population cells in mice during pressure overload by JNK-LRP6 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhidan; Xu, Jiahong; Ye, Yong; Li, Yang; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Guoping; Wu, Jian; jia, Jianguo; Liu, Ming; Chen, Ying; Yang, Chunjie; Tang, Yu; Zhu, Yichun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac side population cells (CSPs) are promising cell resource for the regeneration in diseased heart as intrinsic cardiac stem cells. However, the relative low ratio of CSPs in the heart limited the ability of CSPs to repair heart and improve cardiac function effectively under pathophysiological condition. Which factors limiting the proliferation of CSPs in diseased heart are unclear. Here, we show that urotensin II (UII) regulates the proliferation of CSPs by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) signalling during pressure overload. Pressure overload greatly upregulated UII level in plasma, UII receptor (UT) antagonist, urantide, promoted CSPs proliferation and improved cardiac dysfunction during chronic pressure overload. In cultured CSPs subjected to mechanical stretch (MS), UII significantly inhibited the proliferation by UT. Nanofluidic proteomic immunoassay showed that it is the JNK activation, but not the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signalling, that involved in the UII-inhibited- proliferation of CSPs during pressure overload. Further analysis in vitro indicated UII-induced-phospho-JNK regulates phosphorylation of LRP6 in cultured CSPs after MS, which is important in the inhibitory effect of UII on the CSPs during pressure overload. In conclusion, UII inhibited the proliferation of CSPs by JNK/LRP6 signalling during pressure overload. Pharmacological inhibition of UII promotes CSPs proliferation in mice, offering a possible therapeutic approach for cardiac failure induced by pressure overload. PMID:24447593

  15. Salinomycin suppresses LRP6 expression and inhibits both Wnt/β-catenin and mTORC1 signaling in breast and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling at the cell surface results in inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), leading to activation of mTORC1 signaling in cancer cells. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Salinomycin is a novel small molecule inhibitor of LRP6. In the present study, we found that LRP6 overexpression induced mTORC1 signaling activation in cancer cells, and that salinomycin was not only a potent Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, but also a strong mTORC1 signaling antagonist in breast and prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, salinomycin activated GSK3β in cancer cells. Moreover, salinomycin was able to suppress the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, two targets of both Wnt/β-catenin and mTORC1 signaling, in prostate and breast cancer cells, and displayed remarkable anticancer activity. Our results present novel mechanisms underlying salinomycin-mediated cancer cell death.

  16. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  17. Diverging roles for Lrp4 and Wnt signaling in neuromuscular synapse development during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Katherine D.; Lee, Jennifer K.; Kim, Natalie; Hallock, Peter T.; Delestrée, Nicolas; Mentis, George Z.; Froemke, Robert C.; Granato, Michael; Burden, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Motor axons approach muscles that are prepatterned in the prospective synaptic region. In mice, prepatterning of acetylcholine receptors requires Lrp4, a LDLR family member, and MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase. Lrp4 can bind and stimulate MuSK, strongly suggesting that association between Lrp4 and MuSK, independent of additional ligands, initiates prepatterning in mice. In zebrafish, Wnts, which bind the Frizzled (Fz)-like domain in MuSK, are required for prepatterning, suggesting that Wnts may contribute to prepatterning and neuromuscular development in mammals. We show that prepatterning in mice requires Lrp4 but not the MuSK Fz-like domain. In contrast, prepatterning in zebrafish requires the MuSK Fz-like domain but not Lrp4. Despite these differences, neuromuscular synapse formation in zebrafish and mice share similar mechanisms, requiring Lrp4, MuSK, and neuronal Agrin but not the MuSK Fz-like domain or Wnt production from muscle. Our findings demonstrate that evolutionary divergent mechanisms establish muscle prepatterning in zebrafish and mice. PMID:27151977

  18. Membrane Targeting of Disheveled Can Bypass the Need for Arrow/LRP5.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Lam, Vanessa Yuk Man; Mannava, Anirudh Gautam; Suresh, Jahnavi; Jenny, Andreas; Tolwinski, Nicholas S

    2017-07-31

    The highly conserved Wnt signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation and differentiation in vertebrates and invertebrates. Upon binding of a Wnt ligand to a receptor of the Fz family, Disheveled (Dsh/Dvl) transduces the signal during canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The specific details of how this process occurs have proven difficult to study, especially as Dsh appears to function as a switch between different branches of Wnt signaling. Here we focus on the membrane-proximal events that occur once Dsh is recruited to the membrane. We show that membrane-tethering of the Dsh protein is sufficient to induce canonical Wnt signaling activation even in the absence of the Wnt co-receptor Arrow/LRP5/6. We map the protein domains required for pathway activation in membrane tethered constructs finding that both the DEP and PDZ domains are dispensable for canonical signaling only in membrane-tethered Dsh, but not in untethered/normal Dsh. These data lead to a signal activation model, where Arrow is required to localize Dsh to the membrane during canonical Wnt signaling placing Dsh downstream of Arrow.

  19. Proteomic plasma membrane profiling reveals an essential role for gp96 in the cell surface expression of LDLR family members, including the LDL receptor and LRP6.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, Robin; Talbot, Suzanne; Hör, Simon; Simecek, Nikol; Smith, Duncan L; Bloor, Stuart; Randow, Felix; Lehner, Paul J

    2012-03-02

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96.

  20. Proteomic Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals an Essential Role for gp96 in the Cell Surface Expression of LDLR Family Members, Including the LDL Receptor and LRP6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96. PMID:22292497

  1. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  3. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 dependent endosomal trapping and recycling of apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles.

  4. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 Dependent Endosomal Trapping and Recycling of Apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Principal Findings Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. Conclusion We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles. PMID:22238606

  5. Pyramiding and evaluation of both a foreign Bacillus thuringiensis and a Lysine-rich protein gene in the elite indica rice 9311

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Cuicui; Li, Xiaogang; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Gene pyramiding is an efficient approach for the genetic improvement of multiple agronomic traits simultaneously. In this study, we pyramided two foreign genes, cry1Ac driven by the rice Actin I promoter, and lysine-rich protein (LRP), driven by the endosperm-specific GLUTELIN1 (GT1) promoter, into the elite indica cultivar 9311. These two genes were chosen in an attempt to enhance insect-resistance and Lysine (Lys) content. In the pyramided line, the foreign gene cry1Ac was efficiently expressed in the leaves and stems, and exhibited highly efficient resistance to striped stem borer (SSB, Chilo suppressalis Walker) in the laboratory and rice leaf folder (RLF, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee) in the field. Furthermore, the LRP gene was highly expressed in the endosperm and produced a remarkable increase of Lys content in the seeds of the pyramided line. The data from field trials demonstrated that most of the agronomic traits including yield were well maintained in the pyramided line compared to the parental control. These results strongly suggest that the foreign cry1Ac and LRP genes have remarkable application potential in rice, and the resultant pyramided line serves as an ideal bridge material for the improvement of insect-resistance and high Lys rice in the future. PMID:27795684

  6. Blast resistance of CC-NB-LRR protein Pb1 is mediated by WRKY45 through protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Matsushita, Akane; Xinqiong, Liu; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-06-04

    Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) is a panicle blast resistance gene derived from the indica rice cultivar "Modan." Pb1 encodes a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein and confers durable, broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae races. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Pb1-mediated blast resistance. The Pb1 protein interacted with WRKY45, a transcription factor involved in induced resistance via the salicylic acid signaling pathway that is regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome system. Pb1-mediated panicle blast resistance was largely compromised when WRKY45 was knocked down in a Pb1-containing rice cultivar. Leaf-blast resistance by Pb1 overexpression (Pb1-ox) was also compromised in WRKY45 knockdown/Pb1-ox rice. Blast infection induced higher accumulation of WRKY45 in Pb1-ox than in control Nipponbare rice. Overexpression of Pb1-Quad, a coiled-coil domain mutant that had weak interaction with WRKY45, resulted in significantly weaker blast resistance than that of wild-type Pb1. Overexpression of Pb1 with a nuclear export sequence failed to confer blast resistance to rice. These results suggest that the blast resistance of Pb1 depends on its interaction with WRKY45 in the nucleus. In a transient system using rice protoplasts, coexpression of Pb1 enhanced WRKY45 accumulation and increased WRKY45-dependent transactivation activity, suggesting that protection of WRKY45 from ubiquitin proteasome system degradation is possibly involved in Pb1-dependent blast resistance.

  7. Activated protein C resistance testing for factor V Leiden.

    PubMed

    Kadauke, Stephan; Khor, Bernard; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2014-12-01

    Activated protein C resistance assays can detect factor V Leiden with high accuracy, depending on the method used. Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and direct thrombin inhibitors including dabigatran, argatroban, and bivalirudin can cause falsely normal results. Lupus anticoagulants can cause incorrect results in most current assays. Assays that include dilution into factor V-deficient plasma are needed to avoid interference from factor deficiencies or elevations, which can arise from a wide variety of conditions such as warfarin, liver dysfunction, or pregnancy. The pros and cons of the currently available assays are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rapid hepatic clearance of full length CCN-2/CTGF: a putative role for LRP1-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, K G F; Bovenschen, N; Nguyen, T Q; Sprengers, D; Koeners, M P; van Koppen, A N; Joles, J A; Goldschmeding, R; Kok, R J

    2016-12-01

    CCN-2 (connective tissue growth factor; CTGF) is a key factor in fibrosis. Plasma CCN-2 has biomarker potential in numerous fibrotic disorders, but it is unknown which pathophysiological factors determine plasma CCN-2 levels. The proteolytic amino-terminal fragment of CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the kidney. Here, we investigated elimination and distribution profiles of full length CCN-2 by intravenous administration of recombinant CCN-2 to rodents. After bolus injection in mice, we observed a large initial distribution volume (454 mL/kg) and a fast initial clearance (120 mL/kg/min). Immunosorbent assay and immunostaining showed that CCN-2 distributed mainly to the liver and was taken up by hepatocytes. Steady state clearance in rats, determined by continuous infusion of CCN-2, was fast (45 mL/kg/min). Renal CCN-2 clearance, determined by arterial and renal vein sampling, accounted for only 12 % of total clearance. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with receptor-associated protein (RAP), an antagonist of LDL-receptor family proteins, showed that RAP prolonged CCN-2 half-life and completely prevented CCN-2 internalization by hepatocytes. This suggests that hepatic uptake of CCN-2 is mediated by a RAP-sensitive mechanism most likely involving LRP1, a member of the LDL-receptor family involved in hepatic clearance of various plasma proteins. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies confirmed that CCN-2 is an LRP1 ligand. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with an excess of the heparan sulphate-binding protamine lowered the large initial distribution volume of CCN-2 by 88 % and reduced interstitial staining of CCN-2, suggesting binding of CCN-2 to heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Protamine did not affect clearance rate, indicating that RAP-sensitive clearance of CCN-2 is HSPG independent. In conclusion, unlike its amino-terminal fragment which is cleared by the kidney, full length CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the liver via a fast RAP-sensitive, probably LRP1-dependent

  9. Uncoupling Proteins: Role in Insulin Resistance and Insulin Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine B.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are modulators of mitochondrial metabolism that have been implicated in the development of both insulin resistance and insulin insufficiency, the two major pathophysiological events associated with type 2 diabetes. UCP2 mRNA is expressed in a wide range of tissues; however UCP2 protein expression is restricted to fewer tissues, including the endocrine pancreas, spleen, stomach, brain and the lung. To date, its role in the pathophysiology of diabetes has been most strongly associated with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the β-cell, particularly after its induction by free fatty acids. The physiological role of UCP2 remains controversial, but it may act as a downstream signal transducer of superoxide. UCP3 mRNA and protein are expressed in relatively few tissues, predominately skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue and heart. Increased expression of UCP3 in skeletal muscle is associated with protection from diet-induced insulin resistance in mice. In patients with type 2 diabetes UCP3 protein in muscle is reduced by 50% compared to healthy controls. The primary physiological role of the novel UCPs does not appear to be protection against positive energy balance and obesity; this is based largely on findings from studies of UCP2 and UCP3 knockout mice and from observed increases in UCP3 expression with fasting. The mechanism(s) of action of UCP2 and UCP3 are poorly understood. However, findings support roles for UCP2 and UCP3 as modifiers of fatty acid metabolism and in mitigating damage from reactive oxygen species. PMID:18220632

  10. LRP5-linked osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome mimicking isolated microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Sezen Guntekin; Akay, Guvem Gumus; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Perçin, E Ferda

    2017-03-01

    Microphthalmia is defined as the measurement of the total axial length of the eyeball to be below average of the two standard deviation according to the age. While several genes have been identified so far related to microphthalmia, the genetic etiology of the disease has not been fully understood because of genetic heterogeneity observed in this disease. After exclusion of the genes that had been known to be the cause of microphthalmia, we performed homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to clarify the genetic etiology of the bilateral microphthalmia in this family. When the results of the exome and microarray data were considered together as a splice-site mutation in LRP5 gene [c.2827 + 1G > A], which is known to be important for eye development and Wnt receptor signaling pathway, was found to be the cause of microphthalmia in our family. It was understood that after finding this mutation, when bone mineral density was measured with DXA in the family whose ages range between 19 and 28 and who have no bone problem before, osteoporosis was diagnosed. It was also understood that microphthalmia found in this family is a clinical finding of OPPG syndrome.

  11. N-terminal motifs in some plant disease resistance proteins function in membrane attachment and contribute to disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Daigo; Rafiqi, Maryam; Hurley, Ursula; Lawrence, Greg J; Bernoux, Maud; Hardham, Adrienne R; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N; Jones, David A

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of N-terminal domains of plant disease resistance proteins in membrane targeting, the N termini of a number of Arabidopsis and flax disease resistance proteins were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the fusion proteins localized in planta using confocal microscopy. The N termini of the Arabidopsis RPP1-WsB and RPS5 resistance proteins and the PBS1 protein, which is required for RPS5 resistance, targeted GFP to the plasma membrane, and mutation of predicted myristoylation and potential palmitoylation sites resulted in a shift to nucleocytosolic localization. The N-terminal domain of the membrane-attached Arabidopsis RPS2 resistance protein was targeted incompletely to the plasma membrane. In contrast, the N-terminal domains of the Arabidopsis RPP1-WsA and flax L6 and M resistance proteins, which carry predicted signal anchors, were targeted to the endomembrane system, RPP1-WsA to the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, L6 to the Golgi apparatus, and M to the tonoplast. Full-length L6 was also targeted to the Golgi apparatus. Site-directed mutagenesis of six nonconserved amino acid residues in the signal anchor domains of L6 and M was used to change the localization of the L6 N-terminal fusion protein to that of M and vice versa, showing that these residues control the targeting specificity of the signal anchor. Replacement of the signal anchor domain of L6 by that of M did not affect L6 protein accumulation or resistance against flax rust expressing AvrL567 but removal of the signal anchor domain reduced L6 protein accumulation and L6 resistance, suggesting that membrane attachment is required to stabilize the L6 protein.

  12. Protein Anabolic Resistance in Cancer: Does it really exist?

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Mariëlle P. K. J.; van der Meij, Barbara S.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Preventing unintentional weight and muscle loss is of crucial importance to maintain the condition and well-being of patients with cancer, improve treatment response and tolerance, and prolong survival. Anabolic resistance might explain why some cancer patients do not respond to nutritional intervention but does recent evidence actually support this? We will discuss recent literature that cast doubt on attenuated anabolic potential in cancer. Recent findings Although anabolic resistance was observed in the past, more recent studies have shown that advanced cancer patients have an anabolic potential after intake of high-quality proteins. Furthermore a consistent linear relationship is observed in cancer between (essential) amino acid availability from the diet and net protein gain. The studied cancer patients however were often characterized by a normal or obese body weight, following the trend in the general population, and mild systemic inflammation. Factors like recent chemotherapy, surgery or cachexia do not seem to attenuate the anabolic potential to feeding. Summary Cancer patients have a normal anabolic potential which relates to the amount of essential amino acids in the meal. It remains to be determined if this is also the case in weak cancer patients with a short life expectancy and high systemic inflammation. PMID:26560520

  13. Protein anabolic resistance in cancer: does it really exist?

    PubMed

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; van der Meij, Barbara S; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2016-01-01

    Preventing unintentional weight and muscle loss is of crucial importance to maintain the condition and well-being of patients with cancer, improve treatment response and tolerance, and prolong survival. Anabolic resistance might explain why some cancer patients do not respond to nutritional intervention, but does recent evidence actually support this? We will discuss recent literature that casts doubt on attenuated anabolic potential in cancer. Although anabolic resistance was observed in the past, more recent studies have shown that advanced cancer patients have an anabolic potential after intake of high-quality proteins. Furthermore, a consistent linear relationship is observed in cancer between (essential) amino acid availability from the diet and net protein gain. The studied cancer patients, however, were often characterized by a normal or obese body weight, following the trend in the general population, and mild systemic inflammation. Factors like recent chemotherapy, surgery, or cachexia do not seem to attenuate the anabolic potential to feeding. Cancer patients have a normal anabolic potential which relates to the amount of essential amino acids in the meal. It remains to be determined if this is also the case in weak cancer patients with a short life expectancy and high systemic inflammation.

  14. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-05-09

    Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TC-99m MIBI SPECT imaging in patients with lung carcinoma: is it a functional probe of multidrug resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Ak, Ilknur; Gülbaş, Zafer; Ocak, Suna; Kaya, Eser; Alataş, Füsun; Vardareli, Erkan; Metintaş, Muzaffer

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype concerns altered membrane transport that results in lower cell concentrations of cytotoxic drug in many cancer types, including lung cancer, and is related to the overexpression of a variety of proteins that act as adenosine triphosphate-dependent extrusion pumps. Tc-99m Sestamibi (MIBI) is a transport substrate for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) pump. In this study, we assessed the uptake and clearance of technetium-99m-2-hexakis 2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (Tc-99m MIBI) from the tumor and its correlation with messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of Pgp, MDR-associated protein (MRP1), and lung resistance protein (LRP) in lung carcinoma. This study was carried out on 19 patients (mean age, 60.1 +/- 2.07 years) with advanced-stage lung carcinoma. The tumor samples obtained by bronchoscopy were assessed to estimate the levels of Pgp, MRP1, and LRP expression on mRNA level by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tc-99m MIBI chest imaging was performed 15 and 180 minutes after injection of 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI. The early (T/Be) and delayed (T/Bd) Tc-99m MIBI uptakes and washout rate (WR) of Tc-99m MIBI from the tumor were measured. No correlation was found between the T/Be Tc-99m MIBI uptake of tumors (T/Be) and the levels of Pgp mRNA, MRP1 mRNA, and LRP mRNA by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. There was a correlation between the mean T/Bd Tc-99m MIBI uptake and Pgp expression of the tumors (P = 0.001, Spearman rho = - 0.702). There was a correlation between the WR of Tc-99m MIBI from the tumor and Pgp expression of the tumor (P = 0.000, Spearman rho = 0.875). Washout rate of Tc-99m MIBI was not related to the levels of MRP1 mRNA (P = 0.93, Spearman rho = 0.02) or LRP mRNA (P = 0.47, Spearman rho = 0.177). Increased WR of Tc-99m MIBI is related in Pgp over expression of the tumor. Tc-99m MIBI single photon emission computed tomography imaging may be a functional probe of overexpression of Pgp in

  16. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  17. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 and 6 gene variants and ischaemic stroke risk.

    PubMed

    Harriott, A M; Heckman, M G; Rayaprolu, S; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Kanekiyo, T; Liu, C-C; Bu, G; Malik, R; Cole, J W; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2015-08-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor related proteins (LRPs) 1 and 6 have been implicated in cerebral ischaemia. In addition, genetic variation in LRP1 and LRP6 has been linked with various factors that are related to risk of ischaemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the association of LRP1 and LRP6 gene variants with risk of ischaemic stroke as part of the Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS). A Caucasian series (434 stroke patients, 319 controls) and an African American series (161 stroke patients, 116 controls) were included. Fourteen LRP6 variants and three LRP1 variants were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke. In the Caucasian series, significant associations with ischaemic stroke were observed for LRP6 rs2075241 [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, P = 0.023], rs2302685 (OR 0.44, P = 0.049), rs7975614 (OR 0.07, P = 0.017), rs10492120 (OR 0.62, P = 0.036) and rs10743980 (OR 0.66, P = 0.037). Risk of ischaemic stroke was significantly lower for carriers of any of these five protective LRP6 variants (24.0% of subjects) compared to non-carriers (OR 0.57, P = 0.003). The protective association for LRP6 rs2075241 was observed at a similar magnitude across ischaemic stroke subtypes, whilst the effects of rs23022685, rs10492120 and rs10743980 were most apparent for cardioembolic and large vessel stroke. In the African American series, LRP1 rs11172113 was associated with an increased risk of stroke (OR 1.89, P = 0.006). The results of our preliminary study provide evidence that LRP6 and LRP1 variants may be associated with risk of ischaemic stroke. Validation in larger studies is warranted. © 2015 EAN.

  18. Identification of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein and Its Involvement in the Regulation of In Vivo-Induced Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Trevor K.; Mulks, Martha H.

    2007-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes a severe hemorrhagic pneumonia in swine. We have previously shown that the limitation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) is a cue that induces the expression of a subset of A. pleuropneumoniae genes identified as specifically induced during infection of the natural host animal by using an in vivo expression technology screen. Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a global regulator and has been shown in Escherichia coli to regulate many genes, including genes involved in BCAA biosynthesis. We hypothesized that A. pleuropneumoniae contains a regulator similar to Lrp and that this protein is involved in the regulation of a subset of genes important during infection and recently shown to have increased expression in the absence of BCAAs. We report the identification of an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 gene encoding a protein with similarity to amino acid sequence and functional domains of other reported Lrp proteins. We further show that purified A. pleuropneumoniae His6-Lrp binds in vitro to the A. pleuropneumoniae promoter regions for ilvI, antisense cps1AB, lrp, and nqr. A genetically defined A. pleuropneumoniae lrp mutant was constructed using an allelic replacement and sucrose counterselection method. Analysis of expression from the ilvI and antisense cps1AB promoters in wild-type, lrp mutant, and complemented lrp mutant strains indicated that Lrp is required for induction of expression of ilvI under BCAA limitation. PMID:17060463

  19. Studies on pyrrolopyrimidines as selective inhibitors of multidrug-resistance-associated protein in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Folkes, Adrian; Chuckowree, Irina; Cockcroft, Xiaoling; Sohal, Sukhjit; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Wren, Stephen P; Vicker, Nigel; Depledge, Paul; Scott, John; Smith, Lyndsay; Jones, Hazel; Mistry, Prakash; Faint, Richard; Thompson, Deanne; Cocks, Simon

    2004-03-11

    Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) remains a major obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. Inhibition of Pgp and MRP transport is important for high efficacy of anticancer drugs. While several Pgp inhibitors have entered clinical trials, the development of specific MRP1 inhibitors is still in its infancy. In our screening program, we have identified a pyrrolopyrimidine (4) as a novel and selective MRP1 inhibitor. Subsequent SAR work on the 4-position of the template revealed the phenethylpiperazine side chain as a potent replacement of the benzylthio group of the lead molecule. Introduction of groups at the 2-position seems to have no detrimental effect on activity. Modifications to the nitrile group at the 7-position resulted in the identification of analogues with groups, such as amides, with superior pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo efficacy has been demonstrated by xenograft studies on selected compounds.

  20. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B.; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E.; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria. PMID:27375598

  1. Mutations in LRP5 or FZD4 Underlie the Common Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy Locus on Chromosome 11q

    PubMed Central

    Toomes, Carmel; Bottomley, Helen M.; Jackson, Richard M.; Towns, Katherine V.; Scott, Sheila; Mackey, David A.; Craig, Jamie E.; Jiang, Li; Yang, Zhenglin; Trembath, Richard; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.; Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Parker, Michael J.; Black, Graeme C. M.; Downey, Louise M.; Zhang, Kang; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2004-01-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding disorder of the retinal vascular system. Autosomal dominant FEVR is genetically heterogeneous, but its principal locus, EVR1, is on chromosome 11q13-q23. The gene encoding the Wnt receptor frizzled-4 (FZD4) was recently reported to be the EVR1 gene, but our mutation screen revealed fewer patients harboring mutations than expected. Here, we describe mutations in a second gene at the EVR1 locus, low-density-lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 (LRP5), a Wnt coreceptor. This finding further underlines the significance of Wnt signaling in the vascularization of the eye and highlights the potential dangers of using multiple families to refine genetic intervals in gene-identification studies. PMID:15024691

  2. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  3. APP interacts with LRP4 and agrin to coordinate the development of the neuromuscular junction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong Y; Liu, Yun; Tennert, Christian; Sugiura, Yoshie; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Kröger, Stephan; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Lin, Weichun; Herz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    ApoE, ApoE receptors and APP cooperate in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Intriguingly, the ApoE receptor LRP4 and APP are also required for normal formation and function of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In this study, we show that APP interacts with LRP4, an obligate co-receptor for muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Agrin, a ligand for LRP4, also binds to APP and co-operatively enhances the interaction of APP with LRP4. In cultured myotubes, APP synergistically increases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Deletion of the transmembrane domain of LRP4 (LRP4 ECD) results in growth retardation of the NMJ, and these defects are markedly enhanced in APP−/−;LRP4ECD/ECD mice. Double mutant NMJs are significantly reduced in size and number, resulting in perinatal lethality. Our findings reveal novel roles for APP in regulating neuromuscular synapse formation through hetero-oligomeric interaction with LRP4 and agrin and thereby provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern NMJ formation and maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00220.001 PMID:23986861

  4. LRP5 regulates human body fat distribution by modulating adipose progenitor biology in a dose- and depot-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Loh, Nellie Y; Neville, Matt J; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Fielding, Barbara A; Duncan, Emma L; McCarthy, Mark I; Tobias, Jonathan H; Gregson, Celia L; Karpe, Fredrik; Christodoulides, Constantinos

    2015-02-03

    Common variants in WNT pathway genes have been associated with bone mass and fat distribution, the latter predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Rare mutations in the WNT co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 are similarly associated with bone and cardiometabolic disorders. We investigated the role of LRP5 in human adipose tissue. Subjects with gain-of-function LRP5 mutations and high bone mass had enhanced lower-body fat accumulation. Reciprocally, a low bone mineral density-associated common LRP5 allele correlated with increased abdominal adiposity. Ex vivo LRP5 expression was higher in abdominal versus gluteal adipocyte progenitors. Equivalent knockdown of LRP5 in both progenitor types dose-dependently impaired β-catenin signaling and led to distinct biological outcomes: diminished gluteal and enhanced abdominal adipogenesis. These data highlight how depot differences in WNT/β-catenin pathway activity modulate human fat distribution via effects on adipocyte progenitor biology. They also identify LRP5 as a potential pharmacologic target for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. LRP5 Regulates Human Body Fat Distribution by Modulating Adipose Progenitor Biology in a Dose- and Depot-Specific Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Nellie Y.; Neville, Matt J.; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Hardcastle, Sarah A.; Fielding, Barbara A.; Duncan, Emma L.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Tobias, Jonathan H.; Gregson, Celia L.; Karpe, Fredrik; Christodoulides, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Common variants in WNT pathway genes have been associated with bone mass and fat distribution, the latter predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Rare mutations in the WNT co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 are similarly associated with bone and cardiometabolic disorders. We investigated the role of LRP5 in human adipose tissue. Subjects with gain-of-function LRP5 mutations and high bone mass had enhanced lower-body fat accumulation. Reciprocally, a low bone mineral density-associated common LRP5 allele correlated with increased abdominal adiposity. Ex vivo LRP5 expression was higher in abdominal versus gluteal adipocyte progenitors. Equivalent knockdown of LRP5 in both progenitor types dose-dependently impaired β-catenin signaling and led to distinct biological outcomes: diminished gluteal and enhanced abdominal adipogenesis. These data highlight how depot differences in WNT/β-catenin pathway activity modulate human fat distribution via effects on adipocyte progenitor biology. They also identify LRP5 as a potential pharmacologic target for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:25651180

  6. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  7. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein of Escherichia coli negatively regulates transcription of ompC and micF and positively regulates translation of ompF.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, M; Ernsting, B R; Borst, D W; Wiese, D E; Blumenthal, R M; Matthews, R G

    1995-01-01

    The two major porins of Escherichia coli K-12 strains, OmpC and OmpF, are inversely regulated with respect to one another. The expression of OmpC and OmpF has been shown to be influenced by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp): two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins from strains with and strains without a functional Lrp protein revealed that OmpC expression is increased in an lrp strain, while OmpF expression is decreased. In agreement with these findings, we now present evidence that transcriptional (operon) fusions of lacZ+ to ompC and micF are negatively regulated by Lrp. Lrp binds specifically to the intergenic region between micF and ompC, as indicated by mobility shift assays and by DNase I footprinting. The expression of an ompF'-lacZ+ gene (translational) fusion is increased 3.7-fold in an lrp+ background compared with an lrp background, but expression of an ompF-lacZ+ operon fusion is not. Studies of in vivo expression of the outer membrane porins during growth on glucose minimal medium showed that the OmpF/OmpC ratio is higher in lrp+ strains than it is in isogenic lrp strains. The effect of Lrp was not seen in a strain containing a deletion of micF. Our studies suggest that the positive effect of Lrp on OmpF expression stems from a negative effect of Lrp on the expression of micF, an antisense RNA that inhibits ompF translation. PMID:8002608

  8. Role of C reactive protein (CRP) in leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hribal, Marta Letizia; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Sesti, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Increased plasma levels of both leptin and C reactive protein (CRP) have been reported in a number of conditions, including obesity, and have been linked to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes and increased cardiovascular risk; interestingly these two biomarkers appear to be able to reciprocally regulate their bioavailability, through complex mechanisms that have not been completely clarified yet. Here we first review clinical evidence suggesting not only that the circulatory levels of CRP and leptin show an independent correlation, but also that assessing them in tandem may result in an increased ability to predict cardiovascular disease. We summarize also molecular studies showing that leptin is able to promote CRP production from hepatocytes and endothelial cells in vitro and discuss the studies addressing the possibility that in vivo leptin administration may be able to modulate plasma CRP levels. Furthermore, we describe two studies demonstrating that CRP directly binds leptin in extra-cellular settings, thus impairing its biological actions. Finally we report genetic evidence that common variations at the leptin receptor locus are associated with CRP blood levels. Overall, the data reviewed here show that the chronic elevation of CRP observed in obese subjects may worsen leptin resistance, contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, and highlight a potential link between conditions, such as leptin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, that may be amenable of pharmacological treatment targeted to the disruption of leptin-CRP interaction.

  9. Exocytosis of polyubiquitinated proteins in bortezomib-resistant leukemia cells: a role for MARCKS in acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Niels E.; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Niewerth, Denise; Kessler, Floortje L.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Kole, Jeroen; Smeets, Serge J.; Ylstra, Bauke; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee Joo; Horton, Terzah M.; Menezes, Rene X.; Musters, Renée J.P.; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    PSMB5 mutations and upregulation of the β5 subunit of the proteasome represent key determinants of acquired resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) in leukemic cells in vitro. We here undertook a multi-modality (DNA, mRNA, miRNA) array-based analysis of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and BTZ-resistant subclones to determine whether or not complementary mechanisms contribute to BTZ resistance. These studies revealed signatures of markedly reduced expression of proteolytic stress related genes in drug resistant cells over a broad range of BTZ concentrations along with a high upregulation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) gene expression. MARCKS upregulation was confirmed on protein level and also observed in other BTZ-resistant tumor cell lines as well as in leukemia cells with acquired resistance to other proteasome inhibitors. Moreover, when MARCKS protein expression was demonstrated in specimens derived from therapy-refractory pediatric leukemia patients (n = 44), higher MARCKS protein expression trended (p = 0.073) towards a dismal response to BTZ-containing chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we show a BTZ concentration-dependent association of MARCKS protein levels with the emergence of ubiquitin-containing vesicles in BTZ-resistant CEM cells. These vesicles were found to be extruded and taken up in co-cultures with proteasome-proficient acceptor cells. Consistent with these observations, MARCKS protein associated with ubiquitin-containing vesicles was also more prominent in clinical leukemic specimen with ex vivo BTZ resistance compared to BTZ-sensitive leukemia cells. Collectively, we propose a role for MARCKS in a novel mechanism of BTZ resistance via exocytosis of ubiquitinated proteins in BTZ-resistant cells leading to quenching of proteolytic stress. PMID:27542283

  10. Biased random walk model for the prioritization of drug resistance associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Dong, Jiaqiang; Hu, Sijun; Cai, Xiqiang; Tang, Guangbo; Dou, Jianhua; Tian, Miaomiao; He, Fuchu; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance is the main cause of treatment failure in cancer patients. How to identify molecules underlying drug resistance from multi-omics data remains a great challenge. Here, we introduce a data biased strategy, ProteinRank, to prioritize drug-resistance associated proteins in cancer cells. First, we identified differentially expressed proteins in Adriamycin and Vincristine resistant gastric cancer cells compared to their parental cells using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS experiments, and then mapped them to human protein-protein interaction network; second, we applied ProteinRank to analyze the whole network and rank proteins similar to known drug resistance related proteins. Cross validations demonstrated a better performance of ProteinRank compared to the method without usage of MS data. Further validations confirmed the altered expressions or activities of several top ranked proteins. Functional study showed PIM3 or CAV1 silencing was sufficient to reverse the drug resistance phenotype. These results indicated ProteinRank could prioritize key proteins related to drug resistance in gastric cancer and provided important clues for cancer research. PMID:26039373

  11. [National evaluation of the diagnosis of activated protein C resistance].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Manzano, Guadalupe; de la Peña-Díaz, Aurora; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Corona-de la Peña, Norma; Cruz-Cruz, Donají; Gaminio, Elizabeth; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Mayagoitia, Teresa; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Poblete, Teresita; Quintana-Martínez, Sandra; Ramírez, Raúl; Razo, Daniel; Ruiz de Chávez-Ochoa, Adriana; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia Adriana; Salazar, Rosario; Vicencio-Santiago, Guadalupe Virginia; Villa, Rosario; Reyes-Núñez, Aurelia Virginia

    2003-01-01

    Thrombophilia or prothrombotic state appears when activation of blood hemostatic mechanisms overcomes the physiological anticoagulant capacity allowing a thrombotic event. Thrombosis is the leading worldwide mortality cause and due to its high associated morbidity and mortality, it should be insisted in the opportune identification of a thrombophilic state. The study of thrombophilia identifies individuals at high risk for thrombosis. This meeting was conceived first to analyze the current status of the diagnosis of thrombophilia in Mexico and second to create the base for a national consensus for thrombophilia screening and for the establishment of a national center for laboratory reference and quality control for thrombophilia. Since searching of activated protein C resistance (APCR) and FV Leiden seem to have priority either in the clinical setting and in public health services, it was decided to start with these two abnormalities as a model to analyze the current status of thrombophilia diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. At this time, several thrombophilic abnormalities have been described however, APCR remains the most important cause of thrombophilia, accounting for as much as 20% to 60% of all venous thrombosis. APCR is a consequence of the resistance of activated FV to be inactivated by activated protein C. Procoagulant activity of activated FV increases the risk of thrombosis. Hereditary APCR is almost always due to a point mutation at the nucleotide 1691 of the FV gen inducing an Arg506Glu substitution in FV molecule. This mutation is better known as FV Leiden. Heterocygous carriers of FV Leiden have a thrombotic risk 5 to 10 times higher than general population while the risk for the homocygote state is increased 50 to 100-fold. When activated PC is added to plasma from patients with FV Leiden, this last resists the anticoagulant effect of activated PC. Therefore, thrombin production is not inhibited. This phenomenon is called APCR. The functional

  12. Protein kinase PKR mutants resistant to the poxvirus pseudosubstrate K3L protein.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Joo; Liu, Furong; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Ung, Tekly L; Cao, Chune; Dar, Arvin C; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2008-11-04

    As part of the mammalian cell innate immune response, the double-stranded RNA activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha to inhibit protein synthesis and thus block viral replication. Poxviruses including vaccinia and smallpox viruses express PKR inhibitors such as the vaccinia virus K3L protein that resembles the N-terminal substrate-targeting domain of eIF2alpha. Whereas high-level expression of human PKR was toxic in yeast, this growth inhibition was suppressed by coexpression of the K3L protein. We used this yeast assay to screen for PKR mutants that are resistant to K3L inhibition, and we identified 12 mutations mapping to the C-terminal lobe of the PKR kinase domain. The PKR mutations specifically conferred resistance to the K3L protein both in yeast and in vitro. Consistently, the PKR-D486V mutation led to nearly a 15-fold decrease in K3L binding affinity yet did not impair eIF2alpha phosphorylation. Our results support the identification of the eIF2alpha-binding site on an extensive face of the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain, and they indicate that subtle changes to the PKR kinase domain can drastically impact pseudosubstrate inhibition while leaving substrate phosphorylation intact. We propose that these paradoxical effects of the PKR mutations on pseudosubstrate vs. substrate interactions reflect differences between the rigid K3L protein and the plastic nature of eIF2alpha around the Ser-51 phosphorylation site.

  13. ϕX174 Procapsid Assembly: Effects of an Inhibitory External Scaffolding Protein and Resistant Coat Proteins In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cherwa, James E; Tyson, Joshua; Bedwell, Gregory J; Brooke, Dewey; Edwards, Ashton G; Dokland, Terje; Prevelige, Peter E; Fane, Bentley A

    2017-01-01

    During ϕX174 morphogenesis, 240 copies of the external scaffolding protein D organize 12 pentameric assembly intermediates into procapsids, a reaction reconstituted in vitro In previous studies, ϕX174 strains resistant to exogenously expressed dominant lethal D genes were experimentally evolved. Resistance was achieved by the stepwise acquisition of coat protein mutations. Once resistance was established, a stimulatory D protein mutation that greatly increased strain fitness arose. In this study, in vitro biophysical and biochemical methods were utilized to elucidate the mechanistic details and evolutionary trade-offs created by the resistance mutations. The kinetics of procapsid formation was analyzed in vitro using wild-type, inhibitory, and experimentally evolved coat and scaffolding proteins. Our data suggest that viral fitness is correlated with in vitro assembly kinetics and demonstrate that in vivo experimental evolution can be analyzed within an in vitro biophysical context. Experimental evolution is an extremely valuable tool. Comparisons between ancestral and evolved genotypes suggest hypotheses regarding adaptive mechanisms. However, it is not always possible to rigorously test these hypotheses in vivo We applied in vitro biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the mechanistic details that allowed an experimentally evolved virus to become resistant to an antiviral protein and then evolve a productive use for that protein. Moreover, our results indicate that the respective roles of scaffolding and coat proteins may have been redistributed during the evolution of a two-scaffolding-protein system. In one-scaffolding-protein virus assembly systems, coat proteins promiscuously interact to form heterogeneous aberrant structures in the absence of scaffolding proteins. Thus, the scaffolding protein controls fidelity. During ϕX174 assembly, the external scaffolding protein acts like a coat protein, self-associating into large aberrant spherical

  14. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, H.; Takahashi, K.; Hamilton, R.L.; Havel, R.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The high affinity of {sup 45}Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellar distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high a rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. The data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism.

  15. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  16. Transport of amphipathic anions by human multidrug resistance protein 3.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Liu, G; Rea, P A; Kruh, G D

    2000-09-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) are ATP-binding cassette transporters that confer resistance to some anticancer drugs and efflux glutathione and glucuronate conjugates from the cell. The MRP subfamily of ABC transporters, however, contains at least four other members of which MRP3 (MOAT-D) bears the closest structural resemblance to MRP1. Although transfection studies have established that human MRP3 confers increased resistance to several anticancer agents, neither the substrate selectivity nor physiological functions of this transporter have been determined. Here we report the results of investigations of the in vitro transport properties of cloned human MRP3 using membrane vesicles prepared from MRP3-transfected HEK293 cells. It is shown that the expression of MRP3 is specifically associated with enhancement of the MgATP-dependent transport into membrane vesicles of the glucuronide estradiol 17-beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17betaG), the glutathione conjugates 2,4-dinitrophenyl S-glutathione (DNP-SG) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4), the antimetabolite methotrexate, and the bile acid glycocholate. DNP-SG, LTC4, and E(2)17betaG are transported at moderate affinity and low capacity with Km and Vmax values of 5.7 +/- 1.7 microM and 3.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/mg/min, 5.3 +/- 2.6 microM and 20.2 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, and 25.6 +/- 5.4 microM and 75.6 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, respectively. Methotrexate and glycocholate are transported at low affinity and high capacity with Km and Vmax values of 776 +/- 319 microM and 288 +/- 54 pmol/mg/min and 248 +/- 113 microM and 183 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min, respectively. On the basis of these findings, the osmotic dependence of the transport measured and its inability to transport taurocholate, MRP3, like MRP1 and cMOAT, is concluded to be competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates, glucuronides, and methotrexate, albeit at low to moderate affinity. In

  17. The rLrp of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and downregulates APC function in mouse macrophages via a TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway activation-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Jia-Yun; Chen, Su-Ting; Huang, Hai-Rong; Cai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant leucine-responsive regulatory protein (rLrp) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-12 production and blocks the nuclear translocation of subunits of the nuclear-receptor transcription factor NF-κB (Nuclear factor-kappa B). Moreover, rLrp attenuated LPS-induced DNA binding and NF-κB transcriptional activity, which was accompanied by the degradation of inhibitory IκBα and a consequent decrease in the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. RLrp interfered with the LPS-induced clustering of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 binding to TAK1. Furthermore, rLrp did not attenuate proinflammatory cytokines or the expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class-II induced by interferon-gamma in the macrophages of Toll-like receptor 2 deletion (TLR2−/−) mice and in protein kinase b (Akt)-depleted mouse cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of rLrp were dependent on TLR2-mediated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. RLrp could also activate the PI3K/Akt pathway by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in macrophages. In addition, 19 amino acid residues in the N-terminus of rLrp were determined to be important and required for the inhibitory effects mediated by TLR2. The inhibitory function of these 19 amino acids of rLrp raises the possibility that mimetic inhibitory peptides could be used to restrict innate immune responses in situations in which prolonged TLR signaling has deleterious effects. Our study offers new insight into the inhibitory mechanisms by which the TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway ensures the transient expression of potent inflammatory mediators. PMID:26166760

  18. Physical association of the NB-LRR resistance protein Rx with a Ran GTPase-activating protein is required for extreme resistance to Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Tameling, Wladimir I L; Baulcombe, David C

    2007-05-01

    Nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins play an important role in plant and mammalian innate immunity. In plants, these resistance proteins recognize specific pathogen-derived effector proteins. Recognition subsequently triggers a rapid and efficient defense response often associated with the hypersensitive response and other poorly understood processes that suppress the pathogen. To investigate mechanisms associated with the activation of disease resistance responses, we investigated proteins binding to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) NB-LRR protein Rx that confers extreme resistance to Potato virus X (PVX) in potato and Nicotiana benthamiana. By affinity purification experiments, we identified an endogenous N. benthamiana Ran GTPase-Activating Protein2 (RanGAP2) as an Rx-associated protein in vivo. Further characterization confirmed the specificity of this interaction and showed that the association occurs through their N-terminal domains. By specific virus-induced gene silencing of RanGAP2 in N. benthamiana carrying Rx, we demonstrated that this interaction is required for extreme resistance to PVX and suggest that RanGAP2 is part of the Rx signaling complex. These results implicate RanGAP-mediated cellular mechanisms, including nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, in the activation of disease resistance.

  19. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  20. Different haplotypes encode the same protein for independent sources of ZYMV resistance in cucumber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) production is negatively affected by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Three sources of ZYMV resistance have been commercially deployed and all three resistances are conditioned by a single recessive gene. A vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4-like (VPS4-like)...

  1. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  2. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  3. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  4. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  5. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  6. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  7. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  8. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  9. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  10. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  11. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  12. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  13. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  14. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  15. 42 CFR 68c.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.7 Section 68c.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  16. 42 CFR 68c.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.7 Section 68c.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  17. Induction of the LRP16 gene by estrogen promotes the invasive growth of Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuan Guang; Han, Wei Dong; Zhao, Ya Li; Huang, Ke; Si, Yi Ling; Wu, Zhi Qiang; Mu, Yi Ming

    2007-10-01

    LRP16 was previously identified as an estrogen-induced gene in breast cancer cells. The responsiveness of LRP16 to estrogen and its functional effects in endometrial cancer (EC) cells are still unclear. Here, we show that the mRNA level and promoter activity of the LRP16 gene were significantly increased by 17beta-estradiol (E2) in estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-positive Ishikawa human EC cells. Although the growth rate of Ishikawa cells was not obviously affected by ectopic expression of LRP16, the results of a Transwell assay showed an approximate one-third increase of the invasive capacity of LRP16-overexpressing cells. As a result of molecular screening, we observed that the expression of E-cadherin, an essential adhesion molecule associated with tumor metastasis, was repressed by LRP16. Further promoter analyses demonstrated that LRP16 inhibited E-cadherin transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibition was abolished by estrogen deprivation, indicating that the downregulation of E-cadherin transcription by LRP16 requires ER alpha mediation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the binding of ER alpha to the E-cadherin promoter was antagonized by LRP16, suggesting that LRP16 could interfere with ER alpha-mediated transcription. These results suggest that the upregulation of LRP16 by estrogen could be involved in invasive growth by downregulating E-cadherin in human ECs.

  18. p38 MAP kinase is required for Wnt3a-mediated osterix expression independently of Wnt-LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis in dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Kanaya, Sousuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2016-09-16

    Wnt3a is a secreted glycoprotein that activates the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)/β-catenin signaling pathway through low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)5/6 co-receptors. Wnt3a has been implicated in periodontal development and homeostasis, as well as in cementum formation. Recently, we have reported that Wnt3a increases alkaline phosphatase expression through the induction of osterix (Osx) expression in dental follicle cells, a precursor of cementoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism by which Wnt3a induces Osx expression is still unknown. In this study, we show that Wnt3a-induced Osx expression was inhibited in the presence of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and SB202190) at gene and protein levels, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunocytohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with Dickkopf-1, a potent canonical Wnt antagonist binding to LRP5/6 co-receptors, did not influence Wnt3a-mediated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting that Wnt3a activates p38 MAPK through LRP5/6-independent signaling. On the other hand, pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors had no effects on the phosphorylated status of GSK3β and β-catenin as well as β-catenin nuclear translocation, but inhibited Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK modulates canonical Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level without any crosstalk with the Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis and subsequent β-catenin nuclear translocation. These findings expand our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling periodontal development and regeneration.

  19. Polyhydramnios in Lrp4 knockout mice with bilateral kidney agenesis: Defects in the pathways of amniotic fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Hiroshi; Tian, Qing-Bao; Hara, Yoshinobu; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Endo, Shogo; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2016-02-05

    Amniotic fluid volume during mid-to-late gestation depends mainly on the urine excretion from the foetal kidneys and partly on the fluid secretion from the foetal lungs during foetal breathing-like movements. Urine is necessary for foetal breathing-like movements, which is critical for foetal lung development. Bilateral renal agenesis and/or obstruction of the urinary tract lead to oligohydramnios, which causes infant death within a short period after birth due to pulmonary hypoplasia. Lrp4, which functions as an agrin receptor, is essential for the formation of neuromuscular junctions. Herein, we report novel phenotypes of Lrp4 knockout (Lrp4(-/-)) mice. Most Lrp4(-/-) foetuses showed unilateral or bilateral kidney agenesis, and Lrp4 knockout resulted in polyhydramnios. The loss of Lrp4 compromised foetal swallowing and breathing-like movements and downregulated the expression of aquaporin-9 in the foetal membrane and aquaporin-1 in the placenta, which possibly affected the amniotic fluid clearance. These results suggest that amniotic fluid removal was compromised in Lrp4(-/-) foetuses, resulting in polyhydramnios despite the impairment of urine production. Our findings indicate that amniotic fluid removal plays an essential role in regulating the amniotic fluid volume.

  20. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5.

    PubMed

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-09-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation.

  1. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-01-01

    Background/aims Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. Methods All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Conclusion Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation. PMID:16929062

  2. [Activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden: clinical interest].

    PubMed

    Guermazi, S; Znazen, R

    2011-10-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCR) is a coagulation abnormality often linked to FV Leiden mutation, a single nucleotide G1691A substitution resulting in arginine 506→glutamine missense factor V mutation. FV Leiden has a frequency of 20 to 30% in groups of patients with venous thrombosis while it is of 4 to 10% in normal subjects. FV Leiden is considered as a weak risk factor of thrombosis except in homozygote. FV Leiden is implicated in deep venous thrombosis occurrence. Duration of oral anticoagulant treatment is six months in patients developing a first venous thrombosis except in patients with combined defects or a clinical context suggesting a high risk of severe relapse. Detection of APCR by coagulation methods is often used in first intention with a high specificity if plasmas tested are diluted in factor V deficient plasma. Genotyping study is essential to establish the heterozygote or homozygote statute and certain teams perform it directly. Nevertheless, APCR not related to FV Leiden could be an independent thrombosis risk factor. APCR and FV Leiden are included in laboratory investigations of thrombophilic markers in patients less than 50 years with venous thrombosis. In arterial thrombosis, FV Leiden implication is weak or absent. FV Leiden increases the risk of thrombosis in other situations as in patients with cancer. An association with recurrent miscarriages and other vasculoplacental complications is also reported in many studies but the data concerning the efficacy of antithrombotic treatment to prevent recurrence are currently insufficient. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit the Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Markowitz, John S.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Hong-Jie; DeVane, C. Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The ABCG2 transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) has been identified in several physiological sites. It has been suggested to play an important role in disposition of many drugs and environmental toxins. We investigated the effects of several antipsychotic drugs, including risperidone, 9-hydroxy-risperidone (paliperidone), olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine, and a positive control inhibitor Ko143 on functions of BCRP in MCF7 and BCRP over-expressing MCF7/MX100 cell lines using a BCRP prototypical substrate mitoxantrone. Our findings indicated that the tested antipsychotics rank order of potency of inhibition of BCRP according to concentrations required to reach 50% of maximum inhibition (IC50) was as follows: Ko143 (0.07 μM) > risperidone (38.1 μM) > clozapine (42.0 μM) > paliperidone (51 μM) > chlorpromazine (52.2 μM) > quetiapine (66.1 μM) > olanzapine = haloperidol (>100.0 μM). We further tested the effects of various concentrations of risperidone on the BCRP-mediated transport of oestrone-3-sulfate in a colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2, a widely used model to study drug absorption. Our findings show that risperidone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 μM significantly inhibited intracellular accumulation of oestrone-3-sulfate in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present results suggest that a potential source of pharmacokinetic interactions exists between BCRP substrates and several antipsychotics. PMID:18834354

  4. Association of the breast cancer antiestrogen resistance protein 1 (BCAR1) and BCAR3 scaffolding proteins in cell signaling and antiestrogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Wallez, Yann; Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2014-04-11

    Most breast cancers are estrogen receptor-positive and treated with antiestrogens, but aberrant signaling networks can induce drug resistance. One of these networks involves the scaffolding protein BCAR1/p130CAS, which regulates cell growth and migration/invasion. A less investigated scaffolding protein that also confers antiestrogen resistance is the SH2 domain-containing protein BCAR3. BCAR1 and BCAR3 bind tightly to each other through their C-terminal domains, thus potentially connecting their associated signaling networks. However, recent studies using BCAR1 and BCAR3 interaction mutants concluded that association between the two proteins is not critical for many of their interrelated activities regulating breast cancer malignancy. We report that these previously used BCAR mutations fail to cause adequate loss-of-function of the complex. By using structure-based BCAR1 and BCAR3 mutants that lack the ability to interact, we show that BCAR3-induced antiestrogen resistance in MCF7 breast cancer cells critically depends on its ability to bind BCAR1. Interaction with BCAR3 increases the levels of phosphorylated BCAR1, ultimately potentiating BCAR1-dependent antiestrogen resistance. Furthermore, antiestrogen resistance in cells overexpressing BCAR1/BCAR3 correlates with increased ERK1/2 activity. Inhibiting ERK1/2 through overexpression of the regulatory protein PEA15 negates the resistance, revealing a key role for ERK1/2 in BCAR1/BCAR3-induced antiestrogen resistance. Reverse-phase protein array data show that PEA15 levels in invasive breast cancers correlate with patient survival, suggesting that PEA15 can override ERK1/2 activation by BCAR1/BCAR3 and other upstream regulators. We further uncovered that the BCAR3-related NSP3 can also promote antiestrogen resistance. Thus, strategies to disrupt BCAR1-BCAR3/NSP3 complexes and associated signaling networks could ultimately lead to new breast cancer therapies.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes identifies candidate proteins for glyphosate resistance

    PubMed Central

    González-Torralva, Fidel; Brown, Adrian P.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes is an example of how unrelenting use of a single mode of action herbicide in agricultural weed control drives genetic adaptation in targeted species. While in other weeds glyphosate resistance arose from target site mutation or target gene amplification, the resistance mechanism in horseweed uses neither of these, being instead linked to reduced herbicide uptake and/or translocation. The molecular components underpinning horseweed glyphosate-resistance remain unknown. Here, we used an in vitro leaf disc system for comparative analysis of proteins extracted from control and glyphosate-treated tissues of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-susceptible biotypes. Analysis of shikimic acid accumulation, ABC-transporter gene expression, and cell death were used to select a suitable glyphosate concentration and sampling time for enriching proteins pivotal to glyphosate resistance. Protein gel analysis and mass spectrometry identified mainly chloroplast proteins differentially expressed between the biotypes before and after glyphosate treatment. Chloroplasts are the organelles in which the shikimate pathway, which is targeted by glyphosate, is located. Calvin cycle enzymes and proteins of unknown function were among the proteins identified. Our study provides candidate proteins that could be pivotal in engendering resistance and implicates chloroplasts as the primary sites driving glyphosate-resistance in horseweed. PMID:28198407

  6. MuSK IgG4 autoantibodies cause myasthenia gravis by inhibiting binding between MuSK and Lrp4

    PubMed Central

    Huijbers, Maartje G.; Zhang, Wei; Klooster, Rinse; Niks, Erik H.; Friese, Matthew B.; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; Thijssen, Peter E.; Vrolijk, Hans; Plomp, Jaap J.; Vogels, Pauline; Losen, Mario; Van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Burden, Steven J.; Verschuuren, Jan J.

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a severely debilitating autoimmune disease that is due to a decrease in the efficiency of synaptic transmission at neuromuscular synapses. MG is caused by antibodies against postsynaptic proteins, including (i) acetylcholine receptors, the neurotransmitter receptor, (ii) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for the formation and maintenance of neuromuscular synapses, and (iii) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), which responds to neural Agrin by binding and stimulating MuSK. Passive transfer studies in mice have shown that IgG4 antibodies from MuSK MG patients cause disease without requiring complement or other immune components, suggesting that these MuSK antibodies cause disease by directly interfering with MuSK function. Here we show that pathogenic IgG4 antibodies to MuSK bind to a structural epitope in the first Ig-like domain of MuSK, prevent binding between MuSK and Lrp4, and inhibit Agrin-stimulated MuSK phosphorylation. In contrast, these IgG4 antibodies have no direct effect on MuSK dimerization or MuSK internalization. These results provide insight into the unique pathogenesis of MuSK MG and provide clues toward development of specific treatment options. PMID:24297891

  7. MuSK IgG4 autoantibodies cause myasthenia gravis by inhibiting binding between MuSK and Lrp4.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Zhang, Wei; Klooster, Rinse; Niks, Erik H; Friese, Matthew B; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; Thijssen, Peter E; Vrolijk, Hans; Plomp, Jaap J; Vogels, Pauline; Losen, Mario; Van der Maarel, Silvère M; Burden, Steven J; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2013-12-17

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a severely debilitating autoimmune disease that is due to a decrease in the efficiency of synaptic transmission at neuromuscular synapses. MG is caused by antibodies against postsynaptic proteins, including (i) acetylcholine receptors, the neurotransmitter receptor, (ii) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for the formation and maintenance of neuromuscular synapses, and (iii) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), which responds to neural Agrin by binding and stimulating MuSK. Passive transfer studies in mice have shown that IgG4 antibodies from MuSK MG patients cause disease without requiring complement or other immune components, suggesting that these MuSK antibodies cause disease by directly interfering with MuSK function. Here we show that pathogenic IgG4 antibodies to MuSK bind to a structural epitope in the first Ig-like domain of MuSK, prevent binding between MuSK and Lrp4, and inhibit Agrin-stimulated MuSK phosphorylation. In contrast, these IgG4 antibodies have no direct effect on MuSK dimerization or MuSK internalization. These results provide insight into the unique pathogenesis of MuSK MG and provide clues toward development of specific treatment options.

  8. Dickkopf-1 negatively regulates the expression of osteoprotegerin, a key osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, by sequestering Lrp6 in primary and metastatic lytic bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yun-Yan; Sun, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an inverse role for Wnt signaling in the development of osteoclasts in the bone was demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether there is a commonality in the mechanism of bone resorption and lysis that occur in a diverse set of bone metastatic lesions, as well as in primary bone lesions. Compared with control bone tissue and bone biopsies from patients with nonmetastatic primary tumors (i.e., breast carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and prostate carcinoma), patients with bone metastatic lesions from the three aforementioned primary tumors, as well as osteolytic lesions obtained from the bone biopsies of patients with multiple myeloma, demonstrated an upregulated expression of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, by coimmunoprecipitation, Dickkopf-1 pulled-down low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), which is a key downstream effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. The expression of Lrp6 was unaltered in the osteometastatic lesions. This negative regulation was associated with a lowered expression of osteoprotegerin in the osteometastatic lesions, an observation that was previously reported to promote osteoclastogenesis. These findings provide a common mechanism for the inverse relationship between the Wnt signaling pathway and the development of primary or metastatic bone lesions. Pharmacological modulation of the Wnt signaling pathway might benefit the clinical management of primary and metastatic bone lesions.

  9. Ribosomal protein alterations in thiostrepton- and Micrococcin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wienen, B; Ehrlich, R; Stöffler-Meilicke, M; Stöffler, G; Smith, I; Weiss, D; Vince, R; Pestka, S

    1979-08-25

    Ribosomal proteins of parental thiostrepton- and micrococcin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis cysA14 and thiostrepton-and micrococcin-resistant mutants were compared. Several electrophoretic and immunochemical techniques showed unambiguously that BS-L11 was not present on 50 S ribosomal subunits from the six thiostrepton-resistant mutants. Protein BS-L11 reappeared in all six revertants from thiostrepton resistance to thiostrepton sensitivity. No definitive protein alteration could be ascribed to the mutation from micrococcin sensitivity to resistance. It was also demonstrated that B. subtilis protein BS-L11 is homologous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L11. The finding that ribosomes from thiostrepton-resistant mutants do not contain protein L11 suggests that L11 not only is involved in binding of thiostrepton, but also, when mutationally altered, confers resistance to this antibiotic. Although the ribosomes of these strains do not contain protein L11, all thiostrepton-resistant mutants showed the same viability as the parental strain. Thus protein L11 cannot be obligatory for the structure and function of the ribosome.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  12. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 variants and dietary fatty acids: meta-analysis of European origin and African American studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low-density lipoprotein-related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor and signaling molecule that is expressed in adipose and the hypothalamus. Evidence for a role of LRP1 in adiposity is accumulating from animal and in vitro models, but data from human studies are limit...

  13. LDL receptor-related protein-1 regulates NFκB and microRNA-155 in macrophages to control the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Brifault, Coralie; Lam, Michael S.; Azmoon, Pardis; Gilder, Andrew S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    LDL receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is an endocytic and cell-signaling receptor. In mice in which LRP1 is deleted in myeloid cells, the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was greatly exacerbated. LRP1 deletion in macrophages in vitro, under the control of tamoxifen-activated Cre-ERT fusion protein, robustly increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In LRP1-expressing macrophages, proinflammatory mediator expression was regulated by LRP1 ligands in a ligand-specific manner. The LRP1 agonists, α2-macroglobulin and tissue-type plasminogen activator, attenuated expression of inflammatory mediators, even in the presence of LPS. The antagonists, receptor-associated protein (RAP) and lactoferrin (LF), and LRP1-specific antibody had the entirely opposite effect, promoting inflammatory mediator expression and mimicking LRP1 deletion. NFκB was rapidly activated in response to RAP and LF and responsible for the initial increase in expression of proinflammatory mediators. RAP and LF also significantly increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155) after a lag phase of about 4 h. miR-155 expression reflected, at least in part, activation of secondary cell-signaling pathways downstream of TNFα. Although miR-155 was not involved in the initial induction of cytokine expression in response to LRP1 antagonists, miR-155 was essential for sustaining the proinflammatory response. We conclude that LRP1, NFκB, and miR-155 function as members of a previously unidentified system that has the potential to inhibit or sustain inflammation, depending on the continuum of LRP1 ligands present in the macrophage microenvironment. PMID:26787872

  14. Characteristics of protein variants in trichlorphon-resistant Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera; Tephritidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Zeng, L; Lin, Y-Y; Lu, Y-Y; Liang, G-W

    2012-08-16

    Functional proteins in larvae of Bactrocera dorsalis, a major fruit pest, play a central role in their resistance to organophosphorus insecticides. Changes in proteins in B. dorsalis larvae after trichlorphon treatment may have a role in the resistance response to trichlorphon. We analyzed 14 protein spots of crude proteins from B. dorsalis larvae post-treatment with trichlorphon in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis through mass spectrometry and protein sequencing. We found functional proteins that are responsible for signal transduction (pkaap and dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase), immunity (hemolectin), synthesis and decomposition (twinstar, cathepsin B, RE66325p), oxidative stress metabolism (glutathione S transferase and CG7320), energy metabolism (Act57B), and cytoskeleton formation (actin). These proteins appear to be involved in the resistance response to trichlorphon.

  15. Heat-resistant protein expression during germination of maize seeds under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abreu, V M; Silva Neta, I C; Von Pinho, E V R; Naves, G M F; Guimarães, R M; Santos, H O; Von Pinho, R G

    2016-08-12

    Low water availability is one of the factors that limit agricultural crop development, and hence the development of genotypes with increased water stress tolerance is a challenge in plant breeding programs. Heat-resistant proteins have been widely studied, and are reported to participate in various developmental processes and to accumulate in response to stress. This study aimed to evaluate heat-resistant protein expression under water stress conditions during the germination of maize seed inbreed lines differing in their water stress tolerance. Maize seed lines 91 and 64 were soaked in 0, -0.3, -0.6, and -0.9 MPa water potential for 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h. Line 91 is considered more water stress-tolerant than line 64. The analysis of heat-resistant protein expression was made by gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry. In general, higher expression of heat-resistant proteins was observed in seeds from line 64 subjected to shorter soaking periods and lower water potentials. However, in the water stress-tolerant line 91, a higher expression was observed in seeds that were subjected to -0.3 and -0.6 MPa water potentials. In the absence of water stress, heat-resistant protein expression was reduced with increasing soaking period. Thus, there was a difference in heat-resistant protein expression among the seed lines differing in water stress tolerance. Increased heat-resistant protein expression was observed in seeds from line 91 when subjected to water stress conditions for longer soaking periods.

  16. Structure-property studies on carbohydrate-derived polymers for use as protein-resistant biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Metzke, Mark; Guan, Zhibin

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe structure-property studies on our carbohydrate-derived side-chain ether polymers as protein-resistant biomaterials. A series of side-chain ether polymers, including two polyesters and two polyamides, were prepared by condensation polymerization of monomers derived from simple carbohydrates. The two side-chain permethoxylated polyesters having different stereochemical repeating units demonstrate excellent resistance toward nonspecific protein adsorption as shown by surface plasmon resonance, indicating that the polymer stereochemistry does not have much effect on its protein-resistant properties. The introduction of amide bonds to polymer backbones leads to more pronounced effects. While the polymer degradation stability is significantly enhanced by replacing ester with amide linkages, the protein resistance for the polymer is greatly reduced by introduction of amide bonds. Finally, our results suggest that free hydroxyl and amide groups, while both are hydrogen-bond donors, seem to have different effects on protein resistant properties for polymers. It appears that free amide groups have more detrimental effect on protein resistance than free hydroxyl groups. These results show that the protein-resistant properties of this family of polymers can be tailored by modifying the backbone and side chain functionalities. In combination with the biodegradability and functionalizability, this family of carbohydrate-derived polymers shows promise as versatile biomaterials for biomedical applications.

  17. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  18. Identification of novel leads applying in silico studies for Mycobacterium multidrug resistant (MMR) protein.

    PubMed

    Malkhed, Vasavi; Mustyala, Kiran Kumar; Potlapally, Sarita Rajender; Vuruputuri, Uma

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug efflux mechanism is the main cause of intrinsic drug resistance in bacteria. Mycobacterium multidrug resistant (MMR) protein belongs to small multidrug resistant family proteins (SMR), causing multidrug resistance to proton (H(+))-linked lipophilic cationic drug efflux across the cell membrane. In the present work, MMR is treated as a novel target to identify new molecular entities as inhibitors for drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In silico techniques are applied to evaluate the 3D structure of MMR protein. The putative amino acid residues present in the active site of MMR protein are predicted. Protein-ligand interactions are studied by docking cationic ligands transported by MMR protein. Virtual screening is carried out with an in-house library of small molecules against the grid created at the predicted active site residues in the MMR protein. Absorption distribution metabolism and elimination (ADME) properties of the molecules with best docking scores are predicted. The studies with cationic ligands and those of virtual screening are analysed for identification of new lead molecules as inhibitors for drug resistance caused by the MMR protein.

  19. Protein cyclization enhanced thermostability and exopeptidase-resistance of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhonglin; Ma, Xin; Li, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Ping, Shuzhen; Xu, Ming-Qun; Lin, Min

    2010-03-01

    A mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFPmut3*) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria was cyclized in vitro and in vivo by the use of a naturally split intein from the dnaE gene of Synechocystis species PCC6803 (Ssp). Cyclization of GFPmut3* was confirmed by amino acid sequencing and resulted in an increased electrophoretic mobility compared with the linear GFPmut3*. The circular GFPmut3* was 5 degrees C more thermostable than the linear form and significantly more resistant to proteolysis of exopeptidase. The circular GFPmut3* also displayed increased relative fluorescence intensity. In addition, chemical stability of GFPmut3* against GdnHCl revealed more stability of the circular form compared with the linear form.

  20. 42 CFR 68c.14 - When can a CIR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM § 68c.14 When can a CIR-LRP payment...

  1. 42 CFR 68c.14 - When can a CIR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM § 68c.14 When can a CIR-LRP...

  2. 42 CFR 68c.14 - When can a CIR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM § 68c.14 When can a CIR-LRP...

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibition by an apolipoprotein E-derived peptide relies on low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Prorok, Mary; Brown, Brigid E.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a synthetic apoE1 peptide, viz., residues 133–149 (apoE[133–149]), a mimetic that comprises the apoE receptor-binding domain, on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/glycine-induced ion flow through NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channels, has been investigated. The activity of apoE[133–149] was found to depend on the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Competition experiments with receptor associated protein (RAP) and activated α2macroglobulin (α2M*), two proteins that compete for apoE binding to LRP, demonstrate that apoE[133–149] inhibition of NMDAR function is mediated at a locus in LRP that overlaps with the binding sites of RAP and α2M*. A co-receptor of LRP, cell-surface heparin sulfate proteoglycan, did not function in this system. Additional electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that the inhibitory potency of apoE[133–149] was 3-fold greater for NMDAR-transfected wild-type Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells compared with NMDAR-transfected CHO cells deficient in LRP. Studies with truncation and replacement variants of the apoE peptide demonstrated that the NMDAR-inhibitory properties of these peptides correlate with their binding affinities for LRP. These novel results indicate that apoE functions as an inhibitor of NMDAR ion channels indirectly via LRP, and are suggestive of a participatory role for LRP in NMDAR-based neuropathies. PMID:18602124

  4. Crystal structure of the carbapenem intrinsic resistance protein CarG.

    PubMed

    Tichy, E M; Luisi, B F; Salmond, G P C

    2014-05-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue.

  5. Differential expression of hemolymph proteins between susceptible and insecticide-resistant Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Wang, X J; Huang, Y H; Zhao, Z G; Zhang, S S; Gong, X S; Xie, L; Kang, D M; Jing, X

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach combining two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry was used to compare hemolymph expression profiles of a beta-cypermethrin-resistant Blattella germanica L. strain and a beta-cypermethrin-susceptible strain. Twenty-eight hemolymph proteins were differentially expressed in the resistant cockroach strain; 19 proteins were upregulated and 9 proteins were downregulated compared with the susceptible strain. Protein identification indicated that expression of putative cuticular protein, nitric oxide synthase, triosephosphate isomerase, alpha-amylase, ABC transporter, and Per a 3 allergen was elevated, and expression of arginine kinase and glycosidase was reduced. The differential expression of these proteins reflects the overall change in cellular structure and metabolism related to the resistance of pyrethroid insecticides.

  6. High throughput atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization for identifying protein-resistant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Kilduff, James E; Belfort, Georges

    2012-02-01

    Three critical aspects of searching for and understanding how to find highly resistant surfaces to protein adhesion are addressed here with specific application to synthetic membrane filtration. They include the (i) discovery of a series of previously unreported monomers from a large library of monomers with high protein resistance and subsequent low fouling characteristics for membrane ultrafiltration of protein-containing fluids, (ii) development of a new approach to investigate protein-resistant mechanisms from structure-property relationships, and (iii) adaptation of a new surface modification method, called atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization (APP), together with a high throughput platform (HTP), for low cost vacuum-free synthesis of anti-fouling membranes. Several new high-performing chemistries comprising two polyethylene glycol (PEG), two amines and one zwitterionic monomers were identified from a library (44 commercial monomers) of five different classes of monomers as strong protein-resistant monomers. Combining our analysis here, using the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) approach, and data from the literature, we conclude that strong interactions with water (hydrogen bonding) and surface flexibility are necessary for producing the highest protein resistance. Superior protein-resistant surfaces and subsequent anti-fouling performance was obtained with the HTP-APP as compared with our earlier HTP-photo graft-induced polymerization (PGP).

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mite (Varroa destructor) resistance-related proteins in Eastern honeybees (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Ji, T; Shen, F; Liu, Z; Yin, L; Shen, J; Liang, Q; Luo, Y X

    2015-08-21

    The mite (Varroa destructor) has become the greatest threat to apiculture worldwide. As the original host of the mite, Apis cerana can effectively resist the mite. An increased understanding of the resistance mechanisms of Eastern honeybees against V. destructor may help researchers to protect other species against these parasites. In this study, the proteomes of 4 Apis cerana colonies were analyzed using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation technology. We determined the differences in gene and protein expression between susceptible and resistant colonies that were either unchallenged or challenged by V. destructor. The results showed that a total of 1532 proteins were identified. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that the transcription factors and basic metabolic and respiratory processes were efficient and feasible factors controlling this resistance, and 12 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Venn analysis. The results were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This study may provide insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of honeybee to mites.

  8. Knockdown of LRP/LR induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma cells through activation of caspases.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Carryn J; Ferreira, Eloise; Jovanovic, Katarina; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2017-09-10

    The 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) serves various physiological and pathological roles such as enhancing tumour-related processes including metastasis, angiogenesis, cellular viability and telomerase activation in cancerous cell lines. The present study investigates the effect of siRNA mediated downregulation of LRP/LR on pancreatic cancer (AsPC-1) and neuroblastoma (IMR-32) cells. MTT and BrdU assays revealed that siRNA mediated downregulation of LRP resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability and cell proliferation. In addition, knock-down of LRP resulted in phosphatidylserine externalization, diminished nuclear integrity and significantly enhanced caspase-3 activity, which is indicative of apoptosis. LRP downregulation resulted in a significant increase in caspase-8 activity in IMR-32 cells and enhanced caspase-8 and 9 activity in AsPC-1 cells. These data recommend siRNA mediated knock-down of LRP as a potential therapeutic avenue for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition.

  10. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, A. M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, M. E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer, using nanoLC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ~5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ~550 ng protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n=24 and n=27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag (AMT) reference databases.

  11. Role of LRP1 and ERK and cAMP Signaling Pathways in Lactoferrin-Induced Lipolysis in Mature Rat Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma-Seki, Keiko; Nakamura, Kanae; Morishita, Satoru; Ono, Tomoji; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Nishino, Hoyoku; Hirano, Hisashi; Murakoshi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein present in milk. A clinical study showed that enteric-coated bovine LF tablets decrease visceral fat accumulation. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that ingested LF is partially delivered to mesenteric fat, and in vitro studies showed that LF promotes lipolysis in mature adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism underlying the induction of lipolysis in mature adipocytes that is induced by LF. To address this question, we used proteomics techniques to analyze protein expression profiles. Mature adipocytes from primary cultures of rat mesenteric fat were collected at various times after exposure to LF. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis, were upregulated and that HSL was activated by protein kinase A within 15 min after the cells were treated with LF. We previously reported that LF increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), suggesting that LF activates the cAMP signaling pathway. In this study, we show that the expression level and the activity of the components of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway were upregulated. Moreover, LF increased the activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which acts downstream in the cAMP and ERK signaling pathways and regulates the expression levels of adenylyl cyclase and HSL. Moreover, silencing of the putative LF receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) attenuated lipolysis in LF-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that LF promoted lipolysis in mature adipocytes by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in lipolysis through controlling the activity of cAMP/ERK signaling pathways via LRP1. PMID:26506094

  12. Role of LRP1 and ERK and cAMP Signaling Pathways in Lactoferrin-Induced Lipolysis in Mature Rat Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikoma-Seki, Keiko; Nakamura, Kanae; Morishita, Satoru; Ono, Tomoji; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Nishino, Hoyoku; Hirano, Hisashi; Murakoshi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein present in milk. A clinical study showed that enteric-coated bovine LF tablets decrease visceral fat accumulation. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that ingested LF is partially delivered to mesenteric fat, and in vitro studies showed that LF promotes lipolysis in mature adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism underlying the induction of lipolysis in mature adipocytes that is induced by LF. To address this question, we used proteomics techniques to analyze protein expression profiles. Mature adipocytes from primary cultures of rat mesenteric fat were collected at various times after exposure to LF. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis, were upregulated and that HSL was activated by protein kinase A within 15 min after the cells were treated with LF. We previously reported that LF increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), suggesting that LF activates the cAMP signaling pathway. In this study, we show that the expression level and the activity of the components of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway were upregulated. Moreover, LF increased the activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which acts downstream in the cAMP and ERK signaling pathways and regulates the expression levels of adenylyl cyclase and HSL. Moreover, silencing of the putative LF receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) attenuated lipolysis in LF-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that LF promoted lipolysis in mature adipocytes by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in lipolysis through controlling the activity of cAMP/ERK signaling pathways via LRP1.

  13. Contemporary Issues in Protein Requirements and Consumption for Resistance Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jacob; Wilson, Gabriel J

    2006-01-01

    In recent years an explosion of research papers concerning protein consumption has been published. The need to consolidate this information has become critical from both practical and future research standpoints. For this reason, the following paper presents an in depth analysis of contemporary issues in protein requirements and consumption for resistance trained athletes. Specifically, the paper covers: 1.) protein requirements for resistance trained athletes; 2.) the effect of the digestion rate of protein on muscular protein balance; 3.) the optimal timing of protein intake relative to exercise; 4.) the optimal pattern of protein ingestion, relative to how an individual should consume their protein throughout a 24 hour period, and what sources are utilized during this time frame; 5.) protein composition and its interaction with measures of protein balance and strength performance; 6.) the combination of protein and carbohydrates on plasma insulin levels and protein balance; 7.) the efficacy of protein supplements and whole food protein sources. Our goal is to provide the reader with practical information in optimizing protein intake as well as for provision of sound advice to their clients. Finally, special care was taken to provide future research implications. PMID:18500966

  14. Hexamerin a novel protein associated with Bacillus sphaericus resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Thirugnanasambantham, K; Mani, C; Mary, K Athisaya; Mary, B Ann; Balagangadharan, K

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial insecticides like, Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis, have been used for the control of nuisance and vector mosquitoes for more than two decades. For many years, it was assumed that the use of microbial larvicides based on B. sphaericus would not lead to resistance in mosquitoes. However, recent reports have shown that B. sphaericus toxins are not free from this problem. Therefore, the resistance of mosquito populations to be will seriously threaten the sustainability of current mosquito control programme using these microbial insecticides. In the present study, we have characterised a novel protein responsible for resistance development in the filariasis vector of Culex quinquefasciatus. Laboratory selection experiments with B. sphaericus against the larvae were carried out up to 17 generations, and the occurrence of resistance was reported (resistance ratio (RR) at lethal concentration (LC)50 and LC90 = 1,987 and 2,051 folds, respectively). The protein profiles of B. sphaericus-resistant and susceptible population have confirmed with the expression of a new polypeptide (80 kDa) in the resistant strain only. Sequence result revealed that the newly expressed protein was 'hexamerin', and this factor might conceivably be responsible for the inheritance of resistance. This study is therefore valuable for comprehending the underlining factor and management of B. sphaericus resistance problem in mosquito population.

  15. Activated protein C resistance in patients with central retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, J; Sellman, A; Bauer, B

    1997-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND—A new defect in the anticoagulant system has recently been discovered—activated protein C resistance. The frequency of this disorder has been shown to be increased in young patients (<50 years of age) with central retinal vein occlusion. This study was carried out to determine if there was any overrepresentation of activated protein C resistance in patients >50 years of age with central retinal vein occlusion.
METHODS—Blood samples were obtained from 83 patients >50 years of age and with a history of central retinal vein occlusion. The blood samples were analysed for activated protein C resistance with standard clinical laboratory methods.
RESULTS—In this material 11% of the patients were resistant to activated protein C. The normal incidence of activated protein C resistance in the same geographical area is 10-11%.
CONCLUSION—Activated protein C resistance does not seem to be a cause of central retinal vein occlusion in people older than 50 years.

 PMID:9486021

  16. Folate Decorated Dual Drug Loaded Nanoparticle: Role of Curcumin in Enhancing Therapeutic Potential of Nutlin-3a by Reversing Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manasi; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Malfunctioning of many signaling pathways regulating cell survival or apoptosis, make the disease more vulnerable. Notably, resistance to chemotherapy mediated by MRP-1, lung-resistance protein (LRP) is the most challenging aspect to treat this disease. Presently, much attention has been given to the recently developed anticancer drug nutlin-3a because of its non-genotoxic nature and potency to activate tumor suppressor protein p53. However, being a substrate of multidrug resistance protein MRP1 and Pgp its application has become limited. Currently, research has step towards reversing Multi drug resistance (MDR) by using curcumin, however its clinical relevance is restricted by plasma instability and poor bioavailability. In the present investigation we tried to encapsulate nutlin-3a and curcumin in PLGA nanoparticle (NPs) surface functionalized with folate to enhance therapeutic potential of nutlin-3a by modulating MDR. We document that curcumin can inhibit the expression of MRP-1 and LRP gene/protein in a concentration dependent manner in Y79 cells. In vitro cellular cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis studies were done to compare the effectiveness of native drugs (single or combined) and single or dual drug loaded nanoparticles (unconjugated/folate conjugated). The result demonstrated an augmented therapeutic efficacy of targeted dual drug loaded NPs (Fol-Nut-Cur-NPs) over other formulation. Enhanced expression or down regulation of proapoptotic/antiapoptotic proteins respectively and down-regulation of bcl2 and NFκB gene/protein by Fol-Nut-Cur-NPs substantiate the above findings. This is the first investigation exploring the role of curcumin as MDR modulator to enhance the therapeutic potentiality of nutlin-3a, which may opens new direction for targeting cancer with multidrug resistance phenotype. PMID:22470431

  17. Protein Kinase C-α–Mediated Regulation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein and Urokinase Increases Astrocytoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Samson; Mut, Melike; diPierro, Charles G.; Carpenter, Joan E.; Xiao, Aizhen; Kohutek, Zachary A.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Zhao, Yunge; Wang, Jiahu; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive and infiltrative invasion is one of the hallmarks of glioblastoma. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) is expressed by glioblastoma, but the role of this receptor in astrocytic tumor invasion remains poorly understood. We show that activation of protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) phosphorylated and down-regulated LRP expression. Pretreatment of tumor cells with PKC inhibitors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, PKC-α small interfering RNA (siRNA), and short hairpin RNA abrogated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate–induced down-regulation of LRP and inhibited astrocytic tumor invasion in vitro. In xenograft glioblastoma mouse model and in vitro transmembrane invasion assay, LRP-deficient cells, which secreted high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), invaded extensively the surrounding normal brain tissue, whereas the LRP-overexpressing and uPA-deficient cells did not invade into the surrounding normal brain. siRNA, targeted against uPA in LRP-deficient clones, attenuated their invasive potential. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of PKC-α/PI3K signaling pathways in the regulation of LRP-mediated astrocytoma invasion. Thus, a strategy of combining small molecule inhibitors of PKC-α and PI3K could provide a new treatment paradigm for glioblastomas. PMID:17974965

  18. Polyglycerol coatings of glass vials for protein resistance.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Becherer, Tobias; Qiang, Wei; Haag, Rainer; Friess, Wolfgang; Küchler, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are surface active molecules which undergo non-specific adsorption when getting in contact with surfaces such as the primary packaging material. This process is critical as it may cause a loss of protein content or protein aggregation. To prevent unspecific adsorption, protein repellent coatings are of high interest. We describe the coating of industrial relevant borosilicate glass vials with linear methoxylated polyglycerol, hyperbranched polyglycerol, and hyperbranched methoxylated polyglycerol. All coatings provide excellent protein repellent effects. The hyperbranched, non-methoxylated coating performed best. The protein repellent properties were maintained also after applying industrial relevant sterilization methods (≥200 °C). Marginal differences in antibody stability between formulations stored in bare glass vials and coated vials were detected after 3 months storage; the protein repellent effect remained largely stable. Here, we describe a new material suitable for the coating of primary packaging material of proteins which significantly reduces the protein adsorption and thus could present an interesting new possibility for biomedical applications.

  19. Trehalose Glycopolymer Resists Allow Direct Writing of Protein Patterns by Electron-Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively cross-link to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometer and nanometer scale without requiring cleanroom conditions. PMID:25791943

  20. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y; Maynard, Heather D

    2015-03-20

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  1. Differential expression of salivary proteins between susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes of Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Djegbe, Innocent; Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Demettre, Edith; Seveno, Martial; Remoue, Franck; Corbel, Vincent

    2011-03-23

    The Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito, a major pest and vector of filariasis and arboviruses in the tropics, has developed multiple resistance mechanisms to the main insecticide classes currently available in public health. Among them, the insensitive acetylcholinesterase (ace-1(R) allele) is widespread worldwide and confers cross-resistance to organophosphates and carbamates. Fortunately, in an insecticide-free environment, this mutation is associated with a severe genetic cost that can affect various life history traits. Salivary proteins are directly involved in human-vector contact during biting and therefore play a key role in pathogen transmission. An original proteomic approach combining 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was adopted to compare the salivary expression profiles of two strains of C. quinquefasciatus with the same genetic background but carrying either the ace-1(R) resistance allele or not (wild type). Four salivary proteins were differentially expressed (>2 fold, P<0.05) in susceptible (SLAB) and resistant (SR) mosquito strains. Protein identification indicated that the D7 long form, a major salivary protein involved in blood feeding success, presented lower expression in the resistant strain than the susceptible strain. In contrast, three other proteins, including metabolic enzymes (endoplasmin, triosephosphate isomerase) were significantly over-expressed in the salivary gland of ace-1(R) resistant mosquitoes. A catalogue of 67 salivary proteins of C. quinquefasciatus sialotranscriptome was also identified and described. The "resistance"-dependent expression of salivary proteins in mosquitoes may have considerable impact on biting behaviour and hence on the capacity to transmit parasites/viruses to humans. The behaviour of susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes in the presence of vertebrate hosts and its impact on pathogen transmission urgently requires further investigation. All proteomic data will be deposited at PRIDE (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/).

  2. Expression, detergent solubilization, and purification of a membrane transporter, the MexB multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Forum H; Jeffery, Constance J

    2010-12-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the ability of a cancer cell or pathogen to be resistant to a wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics, is a current serious problem in public health. This multidrug resistance is largely due to energy-dependent drug efflux pumps. The pumps expel anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics into the external medium, lowering their intracellular concentration below a toxic threshold. We are studying multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes infections in patients with many types of injuries or illness, for example, burns or cystic fibrosis, and also in immuno-compromised cancer, dialysis, and transplantation patients. The major MDR efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa are tripartite complexes comprised of an inner membrane proton-drug antiporter (RND), an outer membrane channel (OMF), and a periplasmic linker protein (MFP). The RND and OMF proteins are transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins make up more than 30% of all proteins and are 65% of current drug targets. The hydrophobic transmembrane domains make the proteins insoluble in aqueous buffer. Before a transmembrane protein can be purified, it is necessary to find buffer conditions containing a mild detergent that enable the protein to be solubilized as a protein detergent complex (PDC). In this example, we use an RND protein, the P. aeruginosa MexB transmembrane transporter, to demonstrate how to express a recombinant form of a transmembrane protein, solubilize it using detergents, and then purify the protein detergent complexes. This general method can be applied to the expression, purification, and solubilization of many other recombinantly expressed membrane proteins. The protein detergent complexes can later be used for biochemical or biophysical characterization including X-ray crystal structure determination or crosslinking studies.

  3. Fluoroquinolone resistance protein NorA of Staphylococcus aureus is a multidrug efflux transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Neyfakh, A A; Borsch, C M; Kaatz, G W

    1993-01-01

    The gene of the Staphylococcus aureus fluoroquinolone efflux transporter protein NorA confers resistance to a number of structurally dissimilar drugs, not just to fluoroquinolones, when it is expressed in Bacillus subtilis. NorA provides B. subtilis with resistance to the same drugs and to a similar extent as the B. subtilis multidrug transporter protein Bmr does. NorA and Bmr share 44% sequence similarity. Both the NorA- and Bmr-conferred resistances can be completely reversed by reserpine. PMID:8431010

  4. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures.

  5. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  6. Modulation of Protein A Formation in Staphylococcus aureus by Genetic Determinants for Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sidney; Sweeney, Helen M.

    1979-01-01

    Many methicillin-resistant (Mecr) strains of Staphylococcus aureus either produce no protein A or secrete it extracellularly (S. Winblad and C. Ericson, Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. Sect. B 81:150–156, 1973). We found that methicillin resistance and protein A production were apparently lost coordinately from the natively Mecr strain A676. Restoration of the genetic determinant for methicillin resistance (mec) by transduction or transformation restored protein A production. In two other Mecr strains, loss of mec was accompanied by marked reduction in protein A formation. Genetic transfer of mec to derivatives of S. aureus 8325 affected protein A formation differently with different mec determinants. Those derived from strain A676 and two other Mecr strains reduced the scanty amount of protein A produced by strain 8325 to even lower or undetectable levels, whereas mec from two more Mecr strains increased its protein A content. This “mec-effect,” i.e., stimulation or inhibition of protein A formation dependent on the combination of host strain and mec determinant, was reduced in methicillin-susceptible (Mecs) mutants produced by ethyl methane sulfonate treatment of Mecr strains. The mec-effect reappeared in spontaneous revertants to methicillin resistance. Phenotypic reduction of methicillin resistance in Mecr strains grown at 44°C was accompanied by reduction of the mec-effect on protein A, but it had no effect on protein A formation in Mecs strains. Two independent mutants of strain 8325 produced large amounts of protein A at rates that were unaffected by growth at 44°C or by the introduction of mec determinants. PMID:533763

  7. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  8. Nuclear inheritance of erythromycin resistance in human cells: New class of mitochondrial protein synthesis mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The characterization of two new erythromycin-resistant mutants of HeLa cells is described. The strains ERY2305 and ERY2309 both exhibited resistance to erythromycin in growth assays and cell-free mitochondrial protein synthesis assays. The erythromycin resistance phenotype could not be transferred by cybridization. The mutation appeared to be encoded in the nucleus and inherited as a recessive trait. These two mutants, therefore, represent a new class of erythromycin-resistant mutants in human cells that is distinct from the cytoplasmically inherited mutation in strain ERY2301 described previously.

  9. Sorcin, a calcium binding protein involved in the multidrug resistance mechanisms in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Colotti, Gianni; Poser, Elena; Fiorillo, Annarita; Genovese, Ilaria; Chiarini, Valerio; Ilari, Andrea

    2014-09-05

    Sorcin is a penta-EF hand calcium binding protein, which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in cells. Sorcin regulates calcium channels and exchangers located at the plasma membrane and at the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR), and allows high levels of calcium in the ER to be maintained, preventing ER stress and possibly, the unfolded protein response. Sorcin is highly expressed in the heart and in the brain, and overexpressed in many cancer cells. Sorcin gene is in the same amplicon as other genes involved in the resistance to chemotherapeutics in cancer cells (multi-drug resistance, MDR) such as ABCB4 and ABCB1; its overexpression results in increased drug resistance to a number of chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of sorcin expression by sorcin-targeting RNA interference leads to reversal of drug resistance. Sorcin is increasingly considered a useful marker of MDR and may represent a therapeutic target for reversing tumor multidrug resistance.

  10. [The roles of epigenetics and protein post-translational modifications in bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Xie, Longxiang; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Guo, Siyao; Li, Ping; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The increasing antibiotic resistance is now threatening to take us back to a pre-antibiotic era. Bacteria have evolved diverse resistance mechanisms, on which in-depth research could help the development of new strategies to control antibiotic-resistant infections. Epigenetic alterations and protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in multiple cellular processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, protein degradation, DNA replication regulation and stress response. Recent studies demonstrated that epigenetics and PTMs also play vital roles in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize the regulatory roles of epigenetic factors including DNA methylation and regulatory RNAs as well as PTMs such as phosphorylation and succinylation in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which may provide innovative perspectives on selecting antibacterial targets and developing antibiotics.

  11. Skeletal muscle protein metabolism in the elderly: Interventions to counteract the 'anabolic resistance' of ageing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Age-related muscle wasting (sarcopenia) is accompanied by a loss of strength which can compromise the functional abilities of the elderly. Muscle proteins are in a dynamic equilibrium between their respective rates of synthesis and breakdown. It has been suggested that age-related sarcopenia is due to: i) elevated basal-fasted rates of muscle protein breakdown, ii) a reduction in basal muscle protein synthesis (MPS), or iii) a combination of the two factors. However, basal rates of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown are unchanged with advancing healthy age. Instead, it appears that the muscles of the elderly are resistant to normally robust anabolic stimuli such as amino acids and resistance exercise. Ageing muscle is less sensitive to lower doses of amino acids than the young and may require higher quantities of protein to acutely stimulate equivalent muscle protein synthesis above rest and accrue muscle proteins. With regard to dietary protein recommendations, emerging evidence suggests that the elderly may need to distribute protein intake evenly throughout the day, so as to promote an optimal per meal stimulation of MPS. The branched-chain amino acid leucine is thought to play a central role in mediating mRNA translation for MPS, and the elderly should ensure sufficient leucine is provided with dietary protein intake. With regards to physical activity, lower, than previously realized, intensity high-volume resistance exercise can stimulate a robust muscle protein synthetic response similar to traditional high-intensity low volume training, which may be beneficial for older adults. Resistance exercise combined with amino acid ingestion elicits the greatest anabolic response and may assist elderly in producing a 'youthful' muscle protein synthetic response provided sufficient protein is ingested following exercise. PMID:21975196

  12. Lipid transfer protein-mediated resistance to a trichothecene mycotoxin – Novel players in FHB resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lipid transfer proteins are a class of basic cysteine rich proteins characterized by an eight cysteine motif backbone with intrinsic antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Previously, we identified two type IV nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes (LTP4.4 and LTP...

  13. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1) confers resistance to arsenic compounds in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Carew, Micheal W; Hao, Wen Hui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X Chris

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is established as one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, as well as other types of malignant tumors. However, HL-60 cells are resistant to As(2)O(3), and little is known about the underlying resistance mechanism for As(2)O(3) and its biomethylation products, namely, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) on the treatment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying iAs(III) and its intermediate metabolite MMA(III)-induced anticancer effects in the HL-60 cells. Here, we show that the HL-60 cells exhibit resistance to inorganic iAs(III) (IC(50) = 10 μM), but are relatively sensitive to its intermediate MMA(III) (IC(50) = 3.5 μM). Moreover, we found that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), but not MRP2, is expressed in HL-60 cells, which reduced the intracellular arsenic accumulation, and conferred resistance to inorganic iAs(III) and MMA(III). Pretreatment of HL-60 with MK571, an inhibitor of MRP1, significantly increased iAs(III) and MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity and arsenic accumulations, suggesting that the expression of MRP1/4 may lead to HL-60 cells resistance to trivalent arsenic compounds.

  14. A de novo protein confers copper resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoegler, Kenric J; Hecht, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    To survive environmental challenges, biological systems rely on proteins that were selected by evolution to function in particular cellular and conditional settings. With the advent of protein design and synthetic biology, it is now possible to construct novel proteins that are not biased by eons of selection in natural hosts. The availability of these sequences prompts us to ask whether natural biological organisms can use naïve-non-biological-proteins to enhance fitness in stressful environments. To address this question, we transformed a library of DNA sequences encoding ∼1.5 × 10(6) binary patterned de novo proteins into E. coli, and selected for sequences that enable growth in concentrations of copper that would otherwise be toxic. Several novel sequences were discovered, and one of them, called Construct K (ConK), was studied in detail. Cells expressing ConK accumulate approximately 50% less copper than control cells. The function of ConK does not involve an oxidase, nor does it require two of the best characterized copper efflux systems. However, the ability of ConK to rescue cells from toxic concentrations of copper does require an active proton motive force. Further selections for growth in higher concentrations of copper led to the laboratory evolution of variants of ConK with enhanced levels of activity in vivo. These studies demonstrate that novel proteins, unbiased by evolutionary history in the natural world, can enhance the fitness of biological systems. Living systems evolve to adapt to potentially lethal environmental changes. This normally involves repurposing existing genetic information (i.e. sequences that were selected by billions of years of evolution). Here we show that a completely de novo protein, not derived from nature, can enable E. coli cells to grow in otherwise toxic concentrations of copper, demonstrating that living systems also have the capacity to incorporate and protopurpose entirely novel genetic information. © 2016 The

  15. Differential Expression of Salivary Proteins between Susceptible and Insecticide-Resistant Mosquitoes of Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Marie; Demettre, Edith; Seveno, Martial; Remoue, Franck; Corbel, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Background The Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito, a major pest and vector of filariasis and arboviruses in the tropics, has developed multiple resistance mechanisms to the main insecticide classes currently available in public health. Among them, the insensitive acetylcholinesterase (ace-1R allele) is widespread worldwide and confers cross-resistance to organophosphates and carbamates. Fortunately, in an insecticide-free environment, this mutation is associated with a severe genetic cost that can affect various life history traits. Salivary proteins are directly involved in human-vector contact during biting and therefore play a key role in pathogen transmission. Methods and Results An original proteomic approach combining 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was adopted to compare the salivary expression profiles of two strains of C. quinquefasciatus with the same genetic background but carrying either the ace-1R resistance allele or not (wild type). Four salivary proteins were differentially expressed (>2 fold, P<0.05) in susceptible (SLAB) and resistant (SR) mosquito strains. Protein identification indicated that the D7 long form, a major salivary protein involved in blood feeding success, presented lower expression in the resistant strain than the susceptible strain. In contrast, three other proteins, including metabolic enzymes (endoplasmin, triosephosphate isomerase) were significantly over-expressed in the salivary gland of ace-1R resistant mosquitoes. A catalogue of 67 salivary proteins of C. quinquefasciatus sialotranscriptome was also identified and described. Conclusion The “resistance”-dependent expression of salivary proteins in mosquitoes may have considerable impact on biting behaviour and hence on the capacity to transmit parasites/viruses to humans. The behaviour of susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes in the presence of vertebrate hosts and its impact on pathogen transmission urgently requires further investigation. Data

  16. Azide-resistant mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 are defective in protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-02-15

    Azide, an inhibitor of ATPase, and a specific inhibitor of protein export was used in order to select for protein secretion mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2. Two such mutants were isolated that were azide-resistant and defective in the general protein transport system. The mutation also conferred additional phenotypic changes, including an inability to grow on minimal media or at 40 degrees C. The existence of protein secretion mutants with a selectable phenotype may be useful for the genetic study of protein export.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel resistance-related proteins in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroya; Sakai, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoru; Kimura, Kosei; Miyamoto, Akiko; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used to treat various cancers; however, resistance to this drug is a major obstacle to breast cancer chemotherapy. To identify the proteins involved in paclitaxel resistance, the present study compared the proteomes of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and its paclitaxel-resistant subclone MCF-7/PTX. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, 11 upregulated and 12 downregulated proteins were identified in MCF-7/PTX cells compared with the parental cell line. These 23 proteins were functionally classified as stress-induced chaperones, metabolic enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. The anti-apoptotic proteins, stress-70 protein, 78-kD glucose-regulated protein, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H3, were also upregulated in MCF-7/PTX cells. Notably, knockdown of the stress-response chaperone PPIA using small interfering RNA in MCF-7/PTX cells restored their sensitivity to paclitaxel. These findings indicated that PPIA may have an important role in paclitaxel resistance in MCF-7/PTX cells. PMID:28123557

  18. Possibly similar genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of the sugarcane borer collected from Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Mao; Gowda, Anilkumar; Kerns, David L; Huang, Fangneng

    2016-11-08

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), is a major maize borer pest and a target of transgenic maize expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in South America and the mid-southern region of the United States. Evolution of resistance in target pest populations is a great threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt crops. In this study, we compared the genetic basis of resistance to Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of sugarcane borer established from field populations in Louisiana, USA. Responses of larvae to the Cry1Ab protein for the parental and 10 other cross colonies were assayed in a diet-incorporated bioassay. All 3 resistant colonies were highly resistant to the Cry1Ab protein with a resistance ratio of >555.6 fold. No maternal effect or sex linkage was evident for the resistance in the 3 colonies; and the resistance was functionally nonrecessive at the Cry1Ab concentrations of ≤ 3.16 μg/g, but it became recessive at ≥10 μg/g. In an interstrain complementation test for allelism, the F1 progeny from crosses between any 2 of the 3 resistant colonies exhibited the similar resistance levels as their parental colonies, indicating that the 3 colonies most likely shared a locus of Cry1Ab resistance. Results generated from this study should provide useful information in developing effective strategies for managing Bt resistance in the insect.

  19. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (1), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme’s catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor. PMID:27914058

  20. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  1. Widespread Genetic Switches and Toxicity Resistance Proteins for Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion. PMID:22194412

  2. Widespread genetic switches and toxicity resistance proteins for fluoride.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jenny L; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B; Breaker, Ronald R

    2012-01-13

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion.

  3. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo.

  4. Expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein predicts cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tan-Chen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Cho, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chiang, I-Ping; Ho, Shu-Peng

    2011-05-01

    DNA repair has been suggested to be a major cause of spontaneous drug resistance in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADC). Among the DNA repair-related proteins, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be essential for repairing cisplatin-induced interstrand cross-linkage. However, the role of other DNA repair-related proteins in drug resistance has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis to identify the DNA repair-related genes associated with cisplatin resistance. We focused on the association of XPC protein expression, which plays a pivotal role in the earliest response to global genomic repair, with the survival of LADC patients. Using suppression subtractive hybridization and a microarray analysis to identify drug resistance-associated DNA repair-related genes, we found that the mRNA levels of ERCC1, MSH-3, MSH-6 and XPC were significantly increased in LADC patients. Since the results of ERCC1 mRNA expression corresponded well with those in previous reports, in this study we focused on the clinical correlation between XPC expression and patient survival. The level of XPC protein was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses. We detected the XPC protein in 46 (43%) of 107 pathological LADC samples. XPC protein expression correlated with tumor stage, cigarette smoking and poor survival. In the in vitro experiments with LADC cell lines, increased XPC expression was associated with elevated drug resistance, and silencing of XPC expression reduced cisplatin resistance. Our results suggest that XPC expression predicts drug resistance in LADC.

  5. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  6. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells.

  7. Protein Interactions between Fe65, the LDL receptor-related protein and the amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Mulvihill, Melinda; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The adapter protein, Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that the AICD binds to the protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was solved recently all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding between these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms, however the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H/D exchange. Surprisingly, when the LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65-PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that is not supposed to be phosphorylation dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding providing further proof of the phosphorylation-dependence. The Fe65-PID1 domain thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PID domains and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding. PMID:21650223

  8. New insights into the roles of megalin/LRP2 and the regulation of its functional expression.

    PubMed

    Marzolo, María-Paz; Farfán, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and its association with familial hypercholesterolemia in the early 1980s, a family of structurally related proteins has been discovered that has apolipoprotein E as a common ligand, and the broad functions of its members have been described. LRP2, or megalin, is a member of the LDLR family and was initially called gp330. Megalin is an endocytic receptor expressed on the apical surface of several epithelial cells that internalizes a variety of ligands including nutrients, hormones and their carrier proteins, signaling molecules, morphogens, and extracellular matrix proteins. Once internalized, these ligands are directed to the lysosomal degradation pathway or transported by transcytosis from one side of the cell to the opposite membrane. The availability of megalin at the cell surface is controlled by several regulatory mechanisms, including the phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain by GSK3, the proteolysis of the extracellular domain at the cell surface (shedding), the subsequent intramembrane proteolysis of the transmembrane domain by the gamma-secretase complex, and exosome secretion. Based on the important roles of its ligands and its tissue expression pattern, megalin has been recognized as an important component of many pathological conditions, including diabetic nephropathy, Lowe syndrome, Dent disease, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and gallstone disease. In addition, the expression of megalin and some of its ligands in the central and peripheral nervous system suggests a role for this receptor in neural regeneration processes. Despite its obvious importance, the regulation of megalin expression is poorly understood. In this review, we describe the functions of megalin and its association with certain pathological conditions as well as the current understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the control of megalin expression.

  9. Protein promiscuity: drug resistance and native functions--HIV-1 case.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Tawfik, Dan S; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Sen, Taner; Jernigan, Bob

    2005-06-01

    The association of a drug with its target protein has the effect of blocking the protein activity and is termed a promiscuous function to distinguish from the protein's native function (Tawfik and associates, Nat. Genet. 37, 73-6, 2005). Obviously, a protein has not evolved naturally for drug association or drug resistance. Promiscuous protein functions exhibit unique traits of evolutionary adaptability, or evolvability, which is dependent on the induction of novel phenotypic traits by a small number of mutations. These mutations might have small effects on native functions, but large effects on promiscuous function; for example, an evolving protein could become increasingly drug resistant while maintaining its original function. Ariel Fernandez, in his opinion piece, notes that drug-binding "promiscuity" can hardly be dissociated from native functions; a dominant approach to drug discovery is the protein-native-substrate transition-state mimetic strategy. Thus, man-made ligands (e.g. drugs) have been successfully crafted to restrain enzymatic activity by focusing on the very same structural features that determine the native function. Using the successful inhibition of HIV-1 protease as an example, Fernandez illustrates how drug designers have employed naturally evolved features of the protein to suppress its activity. Based on these arguments, he dismisses the notion that drug binding is quintessentially promiscuous, even though in principle, proteins did not evolve to associate with man made ligands. In short, Fernandez argues that there may not be separate protein domains that one could term promiscuous domains. While acknowledging that drugs may bind promiscuously or in a native-like manner a la Fernandez, Tawfik maintains the role of evolutionary adaptation, even when a drug binds native-like. In the case of HIV-1 protease, drugs bind natively, and the initial onset of mutations results in drug resistance in addition to a dramatic decline in enzymatic

  10. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W.; Amin, Hesham M.; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Rosen, Steven T.; Pham, Lan V.; Ngo, Vu N.

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5–10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL. PMID:27713153

  11. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W; Amin, Hesham M; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Rosen, Steven T; Pham, Lan V; Ngo, Vu N

    2016-11-08

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5-10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL.

  12. Artificial TALE as a Convenient Protein Platform for Engineering Broad-Spectrum Resistance to Begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Li, Fangfang; Cai, Jianyu; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Nan; Sun, Yuqiang; Guo, Yushuang; Yang, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) are a class of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that utilize a simple and predictable modality to recognize target DNA. This unique characteristic allows for the rapid assembly of artificial TALEs, with high DNA binding specificity, to any target DNA sequences for the creation of customizable sequence-specific nucleases used in genome engineering. Here, we report the use of an artificial TALE protein as a convenient platform for designing broad-spectrum resistance to begomoviruses, one of the most destructive plant virus groups, which cause tremendous losses worldwide. We showed that artificial TALEs, which were assembled based on conserved sequence motifs within begomovirus genomes, could confer partial resistance in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana to all three begomoviruses tested. Furthermore, the resistance was maintained even in the presence of their betasatellite. These results shed new light on the development of broad-spectrum resistance against DNA viruses, such as begomoviruses. PMID:26308041

  13. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-22

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed.

  14. Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, T A; Casey, P J

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

  15. Whey Protein Supplementation Enhances Whole Body Protein Metabolism and Performance Recovery after Resistance Exercise: A Double-Blind Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Abou Sawan, Sidney; Mazzulla, Michael; Williamson, Eric; Moore, Daniel R

    2017-07-11

    No study has concurrently measured changes in free-living whole body protein metabolism and exercise performance during recovery from an acute bout of resistance exercise. We aimed to determine if whey protein ingestion enhances whole body net protein balance and recovery of exercise performance during overnight (10 h) and 24 h recovery after whole body resistance exercise in trained men. In a double-blind crossover design, 12 trained men (76 ± 8 kg, 24 ± 4 years old, 14% ± 5% body fat; means ± standard deviation (SD)) performed resistance exercise in the evening prior to consuming either 25 g of whey protein (PRO; MuscleTech 100% Whey) or an energy-matched placebo (CHO) immediately post-exercise (0 h), and again the following morning (~10 h of recovery). A third randomized trial, completed by the same participants, involving no exercise and no supplement served as a rested control trial (Rest). Participants ingested [(15)N]glycine to determine whole body protein kinetics and net protein balance over 10 and 24 h of recovery. Performance was assessed pre-exercise and at 0, 10, and 24 h of recovery using a battery of tests. Net protein balance tended to improve in PRO (P = 0.064; effect size (ES) = 0.61, PRO vs. CHO) during overnight recovery. Over 24 h, net balance was enhanced in PRO (P = 0.036) but not in CHO (P = 0.84; ES = 0.69, PRO vs. CHO), which was mediated primarily by a reduction in protein breakdown (PRO < CHO; P < 0.01. Exercise decreased repetitions to failure (REP), maximal strength (MVC), peak and mean power, and countermovement jump performance (CMJ) at 0 h (all P < 0.05 vs. Pre). At 10 h, there were small-to-moderate effects for enhanced recovery of the MVC (ES = 0.56), mean power (ES = 0.49), and CMJ variables (ES: 0.27-0.49) in PRO. At 24 h, protein supplementation improved MVC (ES = 0.76), REP (ES = 0.44), and peak power (ES = 0.55). In conclusion, whey protein supplementation enhances whole body anabolism, and may improve acute recovery of

  16. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and fatal thrombosis in a patient with activated protein C resistance.

    PubMed

    Gardyn, J; Sorkin, P; Kluger, Y; Kabili, S; Klausner, J M; Zivelin, A; Eldor, A

    1995-12-01

    We report a 20-year-old woman who developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) associated with devastating and fatal multiorgan thrombosis. The patient, her mother, and her brother were found to have resistance to activated protein C (APC), and the congenital thrombophilia in this family was verified by the finding of the Arg506 Gln mutation in factor V. This is the first case of HIT and APC resistance. The consequences of this association are discussed.

  17. Reduced resting skeletal muscle protein synthesis is rescued by resistance exercise and protein ingestion following short-term energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Crawshay, Siobhan; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2014-04-15

    The myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) response to resistance exercise (REX) and protein ingestion during energy deficit (ED) is unknown. In young men (n = 8) and women (n = 7), we determined protein signaling and resting postabsorptive MPS during energy balance [EB; 45 kcal·kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1)·day(-1)] and after 5 days of ED (30 kcal·kg FFM(-1)·day(-1)) as well as MPS while in ED after acute REX in the fasted state and with the ingestion of whey protein (15 and 30 g). Postabsorptive rates of MPS were 27% lower in ED than EB (P < 0.001), but REX stimulated MPS to rates equal to EB. Ingestion of 15 and 30 g of protein after REX in ED increased MPS ~16 and ~34% above resting EB (P < 0.02). p70 S6K Thr(389) phosphorylation increased above EB only with combined exercise and protein intake (~2-7 fold, P < 0.05). In conclusion, short-term ED reduces postabsorptive MPS; however, a bout of REX in ED restores MPS to values observed at rest in EB. The ingestion of protein after REX further increases MPS above resting EB in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that combining REX with increased protein availability after exercise enhances rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis during short-term ED and could in the long term preserve muscle mass.

  18. The outer membrane protein TolC from Sinorhizobium meliloti affects protein secretion, polysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobial resistance, and symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ana M; Becker, Anke; Santos, Mário R; Sharypova, Larissa A; Santos, Pedro M; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2008-07-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is capable of establishing a symbiotic nitrogen fixation relationship with Medicago sativa. During this process, it must cope with diverse environments and has evolved different types of transport systems that help its propagation in the plant roots. TolC protein family members are the outer-membrane components of several transport systems involved in the export of diverse molecules, playing an important role in bacterial survival. In this work, we have characterized the protein TolC from S. meliloti 2011. An insertional mutation in the tolC gene strongly affected the resistance phenotype to antimicrobial agents and induced higher susceptibility to osmotic and oxidative stresses. Immunodetection experiments and comparison of the extracellular proteins present in the supernatant of the wild-type versus tolC mutant strains showed that the calcium-binding protein ExpE1, the endoglycanase ExsH, and the product of open reading frame SMc04171, a putative hemolysin-type calcium-binding protein, are secreted by a TolC-dependent secretion system. In the absence of TolC, neither succinoglycan nor galactoglucan were detected in the culture supernatant. Moreover, S. meliloti tolC mutant induced a reduced number of nonfixing nitrogen nodules in M. sativa roots. Taken together, our results confirm the importance of TolC in protein secretion, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobials resistance, and symbiosis.

  19. Genetic Variants in LRP1 and ULK4 Are Associated with Acute Aortic Dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Grove, Megan L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Eriksson, Per; Hostetler, Ellen M; LeMaire, Scott A; Body, Simon C; Shalhub, Sherene; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Regalado, Ellen S; Zhou, Wei; Mathis, Michael R; Eagle, Kim A; Yang, Bo; Willer, Cristen J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic dissections are a preventable cause of sudden death if individuals at risk are identified and surgically repaired in a non-emergency setting. Although mutations in single genes can be used to identify at-risk individuals, the majority of dissection case subjects do not have evidence of a single gene disorder, but rather have the other major risk factor for dissections, hypertension. Initial genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified SNPs at the FBN1 locus associated with both thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Here, we used the Illumina HumanExome array to genotype 753 individuals of European descent presenting specifically with non-familial, sporadic thoracic aortic dissection (STAD) and compared them to the genotypes of 2,259 control subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study matched for age, gender, and, for the majority of cases, hypertension. SNPs in FBN1, LRP1, and ULK4 were identified to be significantly associated with STAD, and these results were replicated in two independent cohorts. Combining the data from all cohorts confirmed an inverse association between LRP1 rs11172113 and STAD (p = 2.74 × 10(-8); OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.89) and a direct association between ULK4 rs2272007 and STAD (p = 1.15 × 10(-9); OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.23-1.49). Genomic copy-number variation analysis independently confirmed that ULK4 deletions were significantly associated with development of thoracic aortic disease. These results indicate that genetic variations in LRP1 and ULK4 contribute to risk for presenting with an acute aortic dissection.

  20. Impaired Synaptic Development, Maintenance, and Neuromuscular Transmission in LRP4 Myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Ohkawara, Bisei; Shen, Xin-Ming; McEvoy, Kathleen; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders. Defining the phenotypic features, genetic basis, and pathomechanisms of a CMS is relevant to prognosis, genetic counseling, and therapy. OBJECTIVE To characterize clinical, structural, electrophysiologic, and genetic features of a CMS and search for optimal therapy. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS Two sisters, 34 and 20 years of age suffering from a CMS affecting the limb-girdle muscles were investigated at an academic medical center by clinical observation, in vitro analysis of neuromuscular transmission, cytochemical and electron microscopy studies of the neuromuscular junction, exome sequencing, expression studies in HEK293 and COS-7 cells, and for response to therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We identified the disease gene and mutation, confirmed pathogenicity of the mutation by expression studies, and instituted optimal pharmacotherapy. RESULTS Intercostal muscle endplates (EPs) were abnormally small with attenuated reactivities for the acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine esterase. Most EPs had poorly differentiated or degenerate junctional folds and some appeared denuded of nerve terminals. The amplitude of the EP potential (EPP), the miniature EPP, and the quantal content of the EPP were all markedly reduced. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous p.Glu1233Ala mutation in LRP4, a coreceptor for agrin to activate MuSK, required for EP development and maintenance. Expression studies indicate the mutation compromises ability of LRP4 to bind to, phosphorylate, and activate MuSK. Albuterol improved the patients’ symptoms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE We identify a second CMS kinship harboring mutations in LRP4, identify the mechanisms that impair neuromuscular transmission, and mitigate the disease by appropriate therapy. PMID:26052878

  1. LRP predicts smooth pursuit eye movement onset during the ocular tracking of self-generated movements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Valsecchi, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that human observers are very efficient at tracking self-generated hand movements with their gaze, yet it is not clear whether this is simply a by-product of the predictability of self-generated actions or if it results from a deeper coupling of the somatomotor and oculomotor systems. In a first behavioral experiment we compared pursuit performance as observers either followed their own finger or tracked a dot whose motion was externally generated but mimicked their finger motion. We found that even when the dot motion was completely predictable in terms of both onset time and kinematics, pursuit was not identical to that produced as the observers tracked their finger, as evidenced by increased rate of catch-up saccades and by the fact that in the initial phase of the movement gaze was lagging behind the dot, whereas it was ahead of the finger. In a second experiment we recorded EEG in the attempt to find a direct link between the finger motor preparation, indexed by the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) and the latency of smooth pursuit. After taking into account finger movement onset variability, we observed larger LRP amplitudes associated with earlier smooth pursuit onset across trials. The same held across subjects, where average LRP onset correlated with average eye latency. The evidence from both experiments concurs to indicate that a strong coupling exists between the motor systems leading to eye and finger movements and that simple top-down predictive signals are unlikely to support optimal coordination. PMID:27009159

  2. LRP predicts smooth pursuit eye movement onset during the ocular tracking of self-generated movements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Valsecchi, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have indicated that human observers are very efficient at tracking self-generated hand movements with their gaze, yet it is not clear whether this is simply a by-product of the predictability of self-generated actions or if it results from a deeper coupling of the somatomotor and oculomotor systems. In a first behavioral experiment we compared pursuit performance as observers either followed their own finger or tracked a dot whose motion was externally generated but mimicked their finger motion. We found that even when the dot motion was completely predictable in terms of both onset time and kinematics, pursuit was not identical to that produced as the observers tracked their finger, as evidenced by increased rate of catch-up saccades and by the fact that in the initial phase of the movement gaze was lagging behind the dot, whereas it was ahead of the finger. In a second experiment we recorded EEG in the attempt to find a direct link between the finger motor preparation, indexed by the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) and the latency of smooth pursuit. After taking into account finger movement onset variability, we observed larger LRP amplitudes associated with earlier smooth pursuit onset across trials. The same held across subjects, where average LRP onset correlated with average eye latency. The evidence from both experiments concurs to indicate that a strong coupling exists between the motor systems leading to eye and finger movements and that simple top-down predictive signals are unlikely to support optimal coordination. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  4. Colistin resistance associated with outer membrane protein change in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Béla; Kocsis, Béla; Tóth, Ákos; Kristóf, Katalin; Felső, Péter; Kocsis, Béla; Böddi, Katalin; Szabó, Dóra

    2017-06-01

    In this study, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae were analyzed. One colistin-susceptible and three colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 strains as well as one colistin-susceptible E. asburiae and its colistin-heteroresistant counterpart strain were involved in the study. OMP analysis of each strain was performed by microchip method. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) investigation was carried out after separation of OMPs by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and in-gel digestion. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of OMPs in the colistin-susceptible K. pneumoniae found 16 kDa proteins belonging to the LysM domain/BON superfamily, as well as DNA starvation proteins, whereas OmpX and OmpW were detected in the colistin-resistant counterpart strains. OmpC and OmpW were detected in the colistin-susceptible E. asburiae, whereas OmpA and OmpX were identified in the colistin-resistant counterpart. This study demonstrated that OMP differences were between colistin-susceptible and -resistant counterpart strains. The altered Gram-negative cell wall may contribute to acquired colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

  5. Correlation between penicillin-binding protein 2 mutations and carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Chika; Kamai, Yasuki; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that carbapenem-resistant mutations in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are not observed in most Gram-negative bacteria under either clinical or experimental conditions. To understand the mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, this study constructed a mutS- and tolC-deficient Escherichia coli strain, which was expected to have elevated mutation frequencies and to lack drug efflux. Using this mutant, carbapenem-resistant strains with target mutations were successfully and efficiently isolated. The mutations T547I/A, M574I and G601D were identified in the PBP2 gene. Meropenem (MEPM)-resistant strains with the PBP2 T547I mutation showed fourfold increased resistance to 1-β-methyl-substituted carbapenems, such as doripenem, MEPM and biapenem, but not to non-substituted carbapenems such as imipenem and panipenem and other β-lactams. In addition, resistance resulting from the G601D mutation was limited to MEPM, whilst the M574I mutation conferred resistance to MEPM, imipenem and panipenem. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, that E. coli also has a carbapenem-resistance mechanism as a result of PBP2 mutations, and it provides insight into the resistance profiles of PBP2 mutations to carbapenems with and without the 1-β-methyl group.

  6. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  7. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic