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Sample records for resistance protein lrp

  1. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  2. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  3. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  4. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective.

  5. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  6. The endocytic receptor protein LRP also mediates neuronal calcium signaling via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bacskai, B. J.; Xia, M. Q.; Strickland, D. K.; Rebeck, G. W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is an endocytic receptor that is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. We report that the LRP ligand, activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*), induces robust calcium influx in cultured primary neurons, but not in nonneuronal LRP-containing cells in the same culture. The calcium influx is mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channels, which explains the neuron specificity of the response. Microapplication of α2M* leads to a localized response at the site of application that dissipates rapidly, suggesting that the calcium signal is temporally and spatially discrete. Calcium influx to α2M* is blocked by the physiological LRP inhibitor, receptor-associated protein. Bivalent antibodies to the extracellular domain of LRP, but not Fab fragments of the same antibody, cause calcium influx, indicating that the response is specific to LRP and may require dimerization of the receptor. Thus, LRP is an endocytic receptor with a novel signaling role. PMID:11016955

  7. Combination of gambogic acid with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wendian; Zhou, Hechao; Yu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Li, Haiwen; Jiang, Danxian; Chen, Zihong; Yang, Donghong; Xu, Zumin; Yu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a main clinical problem of lung cancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA) could prohibit the proliferation of a variety of human cancer cells. However, the effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to find out the antitumor effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer A549/DDP cells and further explore its underlying mechanisms. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay was used to observe the impacts of GA and/or cisplatin on the proliferation of lung cancer cells; flow cytometry was used to detect the effects of GA on cell cycle and apoptosis; Western blot was used to examine the effects of GA on the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) protein in A549/DDP cells. Our results showed that GA dose- and time-dependently prohibited the proliferation and induced significant cell apoptosis in A549 and A549/DDP cells. GA also induced G0/G1 arrest in both A549/DDP and A549 cells. Moreover, GA upregulated protein expression level of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax and downregulated protein expression level of pro-caspase-9 and Bcl-2 in time- and dose-dependent way in A549/DDP cells. GA combined with cisplatin enhanced the cells apoptotic rate and reduced the cisplatin resistance index in A549/DDP cells. In addition, GA reduced the MRP2 and LRP protein expression level in A549/DDP cells. GA inhibits the proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/DDP cells. Combination of GA with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression. PMID:27330316

  8. Expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα and intrinsic resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Jinhui; Zhang, Lichuan; Zhao, Long; Fan, Sufang; Yang, Zhonghai; Gao, Fei; Kong, Ying; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between the endogenous levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathione-s-transferase-π (GST‑π) and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) and intrinsic drug resistance in four human lung cancer cell lines, SK-MES-1, SPCA-1, NCI-H-460 and NCI-H-446, of different histological types. The expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was measured by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Drug resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 was determined using MTT assays. The correlation between expression of the resistance-related proteins and their roles in the resistance to drugs in these cancer cell lines was analyzed. We found that the endogenous levels of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα in the four cell lines varied. The level of GST-π in the SK-MES-1 cells was the highest, whereas the level of P-gp in the SPCA-1 cells was the lowest. The chemoresistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 in the four cell lines was different. The SPCA-1 cell line was most resistance to cisplatin; SK-MES-1 was most resistance to VP-16; whereas SK-MES-1 was most sensitive to doxorubicin. There was a positive correlation between GST-π expression and resistance to cisplatin, between TopoIIα expression and resistance to VP-16; and a negative correlation was noted between TopoIIα expression and resistance to doxorubicin. In summary, the endogenous expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was different in the four human lung cancer cell lines of different histological types, and this variance may be associated with the variation in chemosensitivity to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16. Among the related proteins, GST-π may be useful for the prediction of the intrinsic resistance to cisplatin, whereas TopoIIα may be useful to predict resistance to doxorubicin and VP-16 in human lung cancer cell lines.

  9. Binding of α2ML1 to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP1) Reveals a New Role for LRP1 in the Human Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Galliano, Marie-Florence; Toulza, Eve; Jonca, Nathalie; Gonias, Steven L.; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Background The multifunctional receptor LRP1 has been shown to bind and internalize a large number of protein ligands with biological importance such as the pan-protease inhibitor α2-macroglobulin (α2M). We recently identified Α2ML1, a new member of the α2M gene family, expressed in epidermis. α2ML1 might contribute to the regulation of desquamation through its inhibitory activity towards proteases of the chymotrypsin family, notably KLK7. The expression of LRP1 in epidermis as well as its ability to internalize α2ML1 was investigated. Methods and Principal Findings In human epidermis, LRP1 is mainly expressed within the granular layer of the epidermis, which gathers the most differentiated keratinocytes, as shown by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence using two different antibodies. By using various experimental approaches, we show that the receptor binding domain of α2ML1 (RBDl) is specifically internalized into the macrophage-like cell line RAW and colocalizes with LRP1 upon internalization. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that RBDl binds LRP1 at the cell surface. Addition of RAP, a universal inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP1, prevents RBDl binding at the cell surface as well as internalization into RAW cells. Silencing Lrp1 expression with specific siRNA strongly reduces RBDl internalization. Conclusions and Significance Keratinocytes of the upper differentiated layers of epidermis express LRP1 as well as α2ML1. Our study also reveals that α2ML1 is a new ligand for LRP1. Our findings are consistent with endocytosis by LRP1 of complexes formed between α2ML1 and proteases. LRP1 may thus control desquamation by regulating the biodisponibility of extracellular proteases. PMID:18648652

  10. LRP6 protein regulates low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-mediated LDL uptake.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-jia; Go, Gwang-Woong; Singh, Rajvir; Liu, Wenzhong; Keramati, Ali Reza; Mani, Arya

    2012-01-06

    Genetic variations in LRP6 gene are associated with high serum LDL cholesterol levels. We have previously shown that LDL clearance in peripheral B-lymphocytes of the LRP6(R611C) mutation carriers is significantly impaired. In this study we have examined the role of wild type LRP6 (LRP6(WT)) and LRP6(R611C) in LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated LDL uptake. LDL binding and uptake were increased when LRP6(WT) was overexpressed and modestly reduced when it was knocked down in LDLR-deficient CHO (ldlA7) cells. These findings implicated LRP6 in LDLR-independent cellular LDL binding and uptake. However, LRP6 knockdown in wild type CHO cells resulted in a much greater decline in LDL binding and uptake compared with CHO-ldlA7 cells, suggesting impaired function of the LDLR. LDLR internalization was severely diminished when LRP6 was knocked down and was restored after LRP6 was reintroduced. Further analysis revealed that LRP6(WT) forms a complex with LDLR, clathrin, and ARH and undergoes a clathrin-mediated internalization after stimulation with LDL. LDLR and LRP6 internalizations as well as LDL uptake were all impaired in CHO-k1 cells expressing LRP6(R611C). These studies identify LRP6 as a critical modulator of receptor-mediated LDL endocytosis and introduce a mechanism by which variation in LRP6 may contribute to high serum LDL levels.

  11. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein

    PubMed Central

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G.

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5′-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the −105/−100 and −148/−143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the −160/−100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  12. Molecular cloning and partial characterization of a low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 13 (Lrp13) involved in vitellogenin uptake in the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki).

    PubMed

    Mushirobira, Yuji; Mizuta, Hiroko; Luo, Wenshu; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko; Reading, Benjamin J; Sullivan, Craig V; Hiramatsu, Naoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ovarian membrane proteins that bind vitellogenin (Vtg) have been detected in teleosts. One of these Vtg receptors was recently identified as low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 13 (lrp13/Lrp13) in perciform species, but little is known about this Vtg receptor in salmonid fish. In this study, a cDNA encoding a putative Vtg receptor with 13+1 ligand binding repeats (lr13+1) was cloned from the ovary, and identified as an lrp13 ortholog for cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki). This lrp13 was predominantly expressed in the pre-vitellogenic stage ovary, and its expression decreased during vitellogenesis. Ovarian localization of Lrp13 was observed by immunohistochemistry using specific antiserum against recombinant Lrp13. Lrp13 immunoreactivity was observed at the oolemma, throughout the zona radiata, and within the perivitelline space between the zona radiata and granulosa cells in ovarian follicles at both the lipid-droplet and vitellogenic stages of growth-an expression pattern that mimics that of a lr8/LR8-type Vtg receptor in this species and of lrp13/Lrp13 in Morone species. Six discrete Vtg-binding proteins were detected in cutthroat trout ovarian membrane proteins when probing with a digoxygenin-labeled salmonid A-type Vtg (VtgAs) followed by chemiluminescent ligand detection. Western blotting using the anti-Lrp13 serum revealed a broad signal consisting of two proteins with masses ranging from ∼190 to ∼210 kDa, which corresponded with some of the VtgA-binding proteins. These findings suggest that, in addition to lr8/LR8, lrp13/Lrp13 acts as a VtgA receptor in trout.

  13. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-dependent Intracellular Signaling and NMDA-induced Regulation of Postsynaptic Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Kulik, Akos; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Schäfer, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 is essential in neurons of the central nervous system, as was revealed by the analysis of conditional Lrp1-deficient mouse models. The molecular basis of its neuronal functions, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we show by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and postsynaptic density preparation that LRP1 is located postsynaptically. Basal and NMDA-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as NMDA target gene transcription are reduced in LRP1-deficient neurons. In control neurons, NMDA promotes γ-secretase-dependent release of the LRP1 intracellular domain (LRP1-ICD). However, pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed no direct interaction between the LRP1-ICD and either CREB or target gene promoters. On the other hand, NMDA-induced degradation of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 was impaired in the absence of LRP1, whereas its ubiquitination was increased, indicating that LRP1 influences the composition of postsynaptic protein complexes. Accordingly, NMDA-induced internalization of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 was impaired in LRP1-deficient neurons. These results show a role of LRP1 in the regulation and turnover of synaptic proteins, which may contribute to the reduced dendritic branching and to the neurological phenotype observed in the absence of LRP1. PMID:23760271

  14. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan C; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We found that glutamate release in the brain was impaired in mice lacking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein that is critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies revealed compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppressed glutamatergic transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose level was elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice were impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and were resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by blocking the adenosine A1 receptor. The results reveal a critical role for Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our findings provide insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity.

  15. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan. C.; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W.; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we report that glutamate release in the brain is impaired in mice lacking low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies indicate compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppress glutamate transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose levels are elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice are impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and are resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. The results reveal a critical role of Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our study provides insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity. PMID:27294513

  16. Immunization with individual proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family induces protection against Brucella melitensis 16M challenges in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinhui; An, Chang; Yang, Mingjuan; Li, Xinran; Ke, Yuehua; Lei, Shuangshuang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jiuxuan; Ren, Hang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Qiu, Yefeng; Liu, Bo; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses worldwide. Subunit vaccines are promising for the prevention of human brucellosis. In our previous protective antigen screening studies, we identified a new protective antigen, BMEI0357, which belongs to the Lrp/asnC protein family, a conserved transcriptional regulator in bacteria that is absent in eukaryotes. In the present study, the Brucella genome annotation was screened and a total of six proteins were identified as members of the Lrp/AsnC family. Lrp/AsnC proteins have two domains that are conserved among the family members. However, sequence similarities between these proteins ranged from 9 to 50%, indicating high sequence heterogeneity. To test whether proteins of this family have similar characteristics, all six proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were purified and their protective efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged with Brucella melitensis 16M. The results show that all six Lrp/AsnC proteins could induce a protective immune response against Brucella melitensis 16M. Antibodies against the Lrp/AsnC proteins were detected in the immunized mice. However, levels of antibodies against these proteins were relatively variable in human brucellosis sera. Taken together, our results show that these six proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family in Brucella could induce protective immune responses in mice. PMID:26579099

  17. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) expression in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María C; Barcelona, Pablo F; Luna, Jose D; Ortiz, Susana G; Juarez, Patricio C; Riera, Clelia M; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2006-12-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a high-molecular weight receptor of the LDL receptor gene family. Its ability to bind and internalize both proteinases and proteinase-inhibitor complexes from the extracellular space suggests that it has a major role in modulating uncontrolled retinal cell proliferation. In order to test this assumption, we investigated the expression of LRP-1 and receptor-associated ligands in a rat model of oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization. Wistar albino rats were placed into incubators at birth and exposed to an atmosphere alternating between 50% and 10% of oxygen every 24 h. After 14 days, the animals were allowed to recover in room air and sacrificed at postnatal day 20 (P20). The protein expression of LRP-1 and alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) in the retina from unexposed and hyperoxia-exposed rats was investigated by Western blot. The localization of LRP-1 after neovascularization was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The activity of metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by zymography. Histological analysis was done to quantitate the neovascular response in these animals. Western blot analysis showed that LRP-1 was expressed, along with alpha2M, in the retina of rats with oxygen-induced neovascularization at P20. By immunohistochemical analysis, positive staining for LRP-1 appeared in cells extending from the inner limiting membrane (ILM) to the outer limiting membrane (OLM). The cells of the retina that expressed LRP-1 were identified by immunofluorescence as Müller cells. Zymographic analysis demonstrated increased activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 under neovascular conditions. This is the first demonstration of the involvement of LRP-1 in retinal neovascularization. In retinas of rats with oxygen-induced neovascularization, the expression of LRP-1 and alpha2M was increased along with an enhanced activity of MMPs, suggesting that LRP-1 expression may play a role in modulating retinal

  18. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  19. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) can mediate degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1).

    PubMed

    Canuel, Maryssa; Sun, Xiaowei; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Paramithiotis, Eustache; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated LDL-cholesterol (LDLc) levels are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. LDLc is cleared from circulation by the LDL receptor (LDLR). Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) enhances the degradation of the LDLR in endosomes/lysosomes, resulting in increased circulating LDLc. PCSK9 can also mediate the degradation of LDLR lacking its cytosolic tail, suggesting the presence of as yet undefined lysosomal-targeting factor(s). Herein, we confirm this, and also eliminate a role for the transmembrane-domain of the LDLR in mediating its PCSK9-induced internalization and degradation. Recent findings from our laboratory also suggest a role for PCSK9 in enhancing tumor metastasis. We show herein that while the LDLR is insensitive to PCSK9 in murine B16F1 melanoma cells, PCSK9 is able to induce degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1), suggesting distinct targeting mechanisms for these receptors. Furthermore, PCSK9 is still capable of acting upon the LDLR in CHO 13-5-1 cells lacking LRP-1. Conversely, PCSK9 also acts on LRP-1 in the absence of the LDLR in CHO-A7 cells, where re-introduction of the LDLR leads to reduced PCSK9-mediated degradation of LRP-1. Thus, while PCSK9 is capable of inducing degradation of LRP-1, the latter is not an essential factor for LDLR regulation, but the LDLR effectively competes with LRP-1 for PCSK9 activity. Identification of PCSK9 targets should allow a better understanding of the consequences of PCSK9 inhibition for lowering LDLc and tumor metastasis.

  20. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-03-27

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of Wnt co-receptor LRP6 and RNA-binding protein HuR by miR-29b in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwu; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jun-Yao; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression by binding to their target mRNAs for degradation and/or translation repression and are implicated in many aspects of cellular physiology. Our previous study shows that miR-29b acts as a biological repressor of intestinal mucosal growth, but its exact downstream targets remain largely unknown. In the present study, we found that mRNAs, encoding Wnt co-receptor LRP6 (low-density lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 6) and RNA-binding protein (RBP) HuR, are novel targets of miR-29b in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that expression of LRP6 and HuR is tightly regulated by miR-29b at the post-transcriptional level. miR-29b interacted with both Lrp6 and HuR mRNAs via their 3′-UTRs and inhibited LRP6 and HuR expression by destabilizing Lrp6 and HuR mRNAs and repressing their translation. Studies using heterologous reporter constructs revealed a greater repressive effect of miR-29b through a single binding site in the Lrp6 or HuR 3′-UTR, whereas deletion mutation of this site prevented miR-29b-induced repression of LRP6 and HuR expression. Repression of HuR by miR-29b in turn also contributed to miR-29b-induced LRP6 inhibition, since ectopic overexpression of HuR in cells overexpressing miR-29b restored LRP6 expression to near normal levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29b inhibits expression of LRP6 and HuR post-transcriptionally, thus playing a role in the regulation of IEC proliferation and intestinal epithelial homoeostasis. PMID:27089893

  2. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) has two high-affinity binding sites for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP): consequences for the chaperone functions of RAP.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Schar, Christine; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-06-26

    RAP (receptor-associated protein) is a three domain 38 kDa ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-resident protein that is a chaperone for the LRP (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein). Whereas RAP is known to compete for binding of all known LRP ligands, neither the location, the number of binding sites on LRP, nor the domains of RAP involved in binding is known with certainty. We have systematically examined the binding of each of the three RAP domains (D1, D2 and D3) to tandem and triple CRs (complement-like repeats) that span the principal ligand-binding region, cluster II, of LRP. We found that D3 binds with low nanomolar affinity to all (CR)2 species examined. Addition of a third CR domain increases the affinity for D3 slightly. A pH change from 7.4 to 5.5 gave only a 6-fold increase in Kd for D3 at 37 degrees C, whereas temperature change from 22 degrees C to 37 degrees C has a similar small effect on affinity, raising questions about the recently proposed D3-destabilization mechanism of RAP release from LRP. Surprisingly, and in contrast to literature suggestions, D1 and D2 also bind to most (CR)2 and (CR)3 constructs with nanomolar affinity. Although this suggested that there might be three high-affinity binding sites in RAP for LRP, studies with intact RAP showed that only two binding sites are available in the intact chaperone. These findings suggest a new model for RAP to function as a folding chaperone and also for the involvement of YWTD domains in RAP release from LRP in the Golgi.

  3. Six Novel Missense Mutations in the LDL Receptor-Related Protein 5 (LRP5) Gene in Different Conditions with an Increased Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Van Wesenbeeck, Liesbeth; Cleiren, Erna; Gram, Jeppe; Beals, Rodney K.; Bénichou, Olivier; Scopelliti, Domenico; Key, Lyndon; Renton, Tara; Bartels, Cindy; Gong, Yaoqin; Warman, Matthew L.; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Bollerslev, Jens; Van Hul, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is subject to the balanced processes of bone formation and bone resorption. Imbalance can give rise to skeletal pathologies with increased bone density. In recent years, several genes underlying such sclerosing bone disorders have been identified. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene has been shown to be involved in both osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and the high–bone-mass phenotype and turned out to be an important regulator of peak bone mass in vertebrates. We performed mutation analysis of the LRP5 gene in 10 families or isolated patients with different conditions with an increased bone density, including endosteal hyperostosis, Van Buchem disease, autosomal dominant osteosclerosis, and osteopetrosis type I. Direct sequencing of the LRP5 gene revealed 19 sequence variants. Thirteen of these were confirmed as polymorphisms, but six novel missense mutations (D111Y, G171R, A214T, A214V, A242T, and T253I) are most likely disease causing. Like the previously reported mutation (G171V) that causes the high–bone-mass phenotype, all mutations are located in the aminoterminal part of the gene, before the first epidermal growth factor–like domain. These results indicate that, despite the different diagnoses that can be made, conditions with an increased bone density affecting mainly the cortices of the long bones and the skull are often caused by mutations in the LRP5 gene. Functional analysis of the effects of the various mutations will be of interest, to evaluate whether all the mutations give rise to the same pathogenic mechanism. PMID:12579474

  4. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  5. Up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: a possible novel mechanism of antiatherogenic activity of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor Atorvastatin and hepatic LRP1 expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Kang, Saet Byol; Park, Jong Suk; Lee, Byung Wan; Kang, Eun Seok; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2011-07-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) binds to apolipoprotein E and serves as a receptor for remnant lipoproteins in the liver, thus playing an important role in clearing these atherogenic particles. In this study, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, on hepatic LRP1 expression. We used HepG2 and Hep3B cells for in vitro study, and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty and Sprague-Dawley rats for in vivo study. We used relatively high pharmacologic dose of atorvastatin in this study (in vitro, 0.5 μmol/L in culture media, for 48 hours; in vivo, 20 mg/[kg d], for 6 weeks). Atorvastatin increased LRP1 and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in HepG2 and Hep3B cells and induced hepatic LRP1 and LDL receptor expression in chow diet-fed Sprague-Dawley rats and high-fat diet-fed Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rats. Atorvastatin decreased intracellular sterol level and increased the amount of the nuclear form of sterol response element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) in both HepG2 and Hep3B cells as well as in two animal models. Treatment of HepG2 cells with LDL increased intracellular sterol level and reduced LRP1, LDL receptor, and SREBP-2. When SREBP-2 in HepG2 cells was knocked down by small interfering RNA, the induction of LRP1 expression by atorvastatin did not take place. In conclusion, up-regulation of hepatic LRP1 might be a novel mechanism by which statin treatment decreases remnant lipoproteins. In addition, SREBP-2 acts as a mediator of atorvastatin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LRP1. Future studies using standard doses of atorvastatin in humans are needed to elucidate clinical relevance of these findings.

  6. LRP1 regulates remodeling of the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Hollister, Margaret; Reynolds, Irene; Hsieh, En-hui; Gonias, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor for diverse proteases, protease inhibitors, and other plasma membrane proteins, including the urokinase receptor (uPAR). LRP1 also functions in cell-signaling and regulates gene expression. The goal of this study was to determine whether LRP1 regulates remodeling of provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) by fibroblasts. To address this problem, we utilized an in vitro model in which type I collagen was reconstituted and overlaid with fibronectin. Either the collagen or fibronectin was fluorescently-labeled. ECM remodeling by fibroblasts deficient in LRP1, uPAR, or MT1-MMP was studied. MT1-MMP was required for efficient remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not involved in fibronectin remodeling. Instead, fibronectin was remodeled by a system that required urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPAR, and exogenously-added plasminogen. LRP1 markedly inhibited fibronectin remodeling by regulating cell-surface uPAR and plasminogen activation. LRP1 also regulated remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not by controlling MT1-MMP. Instead, LRP1 deficiency or inhibition de-repressed a secondary pathway for collagen remodeling, which was active in MT1-MMP-deficient cells but not in uPAR-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that LRP1 regulates ECM remodeling principally by repressing pathways that require plasminogen activation by uPA in association with uPAR. PMID:19699300

  7. Quantitative dissection of the binding contributions of ligand lysines of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1).

    PubMed

    Dolmer, Klavs; Campos, Andres; Gettins, Peter G W

    2013-08-16

    Although lysines are known to be critical for ligand binding to LDL receptor family receptors, relatively small reductions in affinity have been found when such lysines have been mutated. To resolve this paradox, we have examined the specific binding contributions of four lysines, Lys-253, Lys-256, Lys-270, and Lys-289, in the third domain (D3) of receptor-associated protein (RAP), by eliminating all other lysine residues. Using D3 variants containing lysine subsets, we examined binding to the high affinity fragment CR56 from LRP1. With this simplification, we found that elimination of the lysine pairs Lys-253/Lys-256 and Lys-270/Lys-289 resulted in increases in Kd of 1240- and 100,000-fold, respectively. Each pair contributed additively to overall affinity, with 61% from Lys-270/Lys-289 and 39% from Lys-253/Lys-256. Furthermore, the Lys-270/Lys-289 pair alone could bind different single CR domains with similar affinity. Within the pairs, binding contributions of Lys-270 ≫ Lys-256 > Lys-253 ∼ Lys-289 were deduced. Importantly, however, Lys-289 could significantly compensate for the loss of Lys-270, thus explaining how previous studies have underestimated the importance of Lys-270. Calorimetry showed that favorable enthalpy, from Lys-256 and Lys-270, overwhelmingly drives binding, offset by unfavorable entropy. Our findings support a mode of ligand binding in which a proximal pair of lysines engages the negatively charged pocket of a CR domain, with two such pairs of interactions (requiring two CR domains), appropriately separated, being alone sufficient to provide the low nanomolar affinity found for most protein ligands of LDL receptor family members.

  8. Sclerostin inhibition reverses skeletal fragility in an Lrp5-deficient mouse model of OPPG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Veera, Shreya; Horan, Daniel J; Moss, Rachel E; Ayturk, Ugur M; Jacobsen, Christina M; Bowen, Margot E; Paszty, Chris; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2013-11-13

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare genetic disease that produces debilitating effects in the skeleton. OPPG is caused by mutations in LRP5, a WNT co-receptor that mediates osteoblast activity. WNT signaling through LRP5, and also through the closely related receptor LRP6, is inhibited by the protein sclerostin (SOST). It is unclear whether OPPG patients might benefit from the anabolic action of sclerostin neutralization therapy (an approach currently being pursued in clinical trials for postmenopausal osteoporosis) in light of their LRP5 deficiency and consequent osteoblast impairment. To assess whether loss of sclerostin is anabolic in OPPG, we measured bone properties in a mouse model of OPPG (Lrp5(-/-)), a mouse model of sclerosteosis (Sost(-/-)), and in mice with both genes knocked out (Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-)). Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-) mice have larger, denser, and stronger bones than do Lrp5(-/-) mice, indicating that SOST deficiency can improve bone properties via pathways that do not require LRP5. Next, we determined whether the anabolic effects of sclerostin depletion in Lrp5(-/-) mice are retained in adult mice by treating 17-week-old Lrp5(-/-) mice with a sclerostin antibody for 3 weeks. Lrp5(+/+) and Lrp5(-/-) mice each exhibited osteoanabolic responses to antibody therapy, as indicated by increased bone mineral density, content, and formation rates. Collectively, our data show that inhibiting sclerostin can improve bone mass whether LRP5 is present or not. In the absence of LRP5, the anabolic effects of SOST depletion can occur via other receptors (such as LRP4/6). Regardless of the mechanism, our results suggest that humans with OPPG might benefit from sclerostin neutralization therapies.

  9. Importance of detecting multidrug resistance proteins in acute leukemia prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello; Maranho, Caroline Klein; Rauber, Gabriela Schneider; Santos-Silva, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a multifactorial phenomenon and the role of these proteins in generating the MDR phenotype is controversial. With this in mind, this review compiled the current data on the role of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP proteins in the prognosis of hematologic neoplasms and their influence on the choice of therapy. Literature showed that the detection of these proteins, mainly ABCB1, is important in the AL prognosis. However, there is controversy regarding the methodology used for their detection. In summary, the expression and activity profiles of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP, proteins capable of promoting the efflux of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents from the cell cytoplasm represent one of the greatest causes of failure in AL treatment.

  10. LRP2 mediates folate uptake in the developing neural tube.

    PubMed

    Kur, Esther; Mecklenburg, Nora; Cabrera, Robert M; Willnow, Thomas E; Hammes, Annette

    2014-05-15

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell-surface receptor expressed in the embryonic neuroepithelium. Loss of LRP2 in the developing murine central nervous system (CNS) causes impaired closure of the rostral neural tube at embryonic stage (E) 9.0. Similar neural tube defects (NTDs) have previously been attributed to impaired folate metabolism in mice. We therefore asked whether LRP2 might be required for the delivery of folate to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Uptake assays in whole-embryo cultures showed that LRP2-deficient neuroepithelial cells are unable to mediate the uptake of folate bound to soluble folate receptor 1 (sFOLR1). Consequently, folate concentrations are significantly reduced in Lrp2(-/-) embryos compared with control littermates. Moreover, the folic-acid-dependent gene Alx3 is significantly downregulated in Lrp2 mutants. In conclusion, we show that LRP2 is essential for cellular folate uptake in the developing neural tube, a crucial step for proper neural tube closure.

  11. Inflammatory mediators promote production of shed LRP1/CD91, which regulates cell signaling and cytokine expression by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Gaultier, Alban; Campana, W. Marie; Firestein, Gary S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LRP1 is a type-1 transmembrane receptor that mediates the endocytosis of diverse ligands. LRP1 β-chain proteolysis results in release of sLRP1 that is present in human plasma. In this study, we show that LPS and IFN-γ induce shedding of LRP1 from RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs in vitro. ADAM17 was principally responsible for the increase in LRP1 shedding. sLRP1 was also increased in vivo in mouse plasma following injection of LPS and in plasma from human patients with RA or SLE. sLRP1, which was purified from human plasma, and full-length LRP1, purified from mouse liver, activated cell signaling when added to cultures of RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs. Robust activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was observed. The IKK-NF-κB pathway was transiently activated. Proteins that bind to the ligand-binding clusters in LRP1 failed to inhibit sLRP1-initiated cell signaling, however an antibody that targets the sLRP1 N terminus was effective. sLRP1 induced expression of regulatory cytokines by RAW 264.7 cells, including TNF-α, MCP-1/CCL2, and IL-10. These results demonstrate that sLRP1 is generated in inflammation and may regulate inflammation by its effects on macrophage physiology. PMID:20610799

  12. Level of receptor-associated protein moderates cellular susceptibility to pseudomonas exotoxin A.

    PubMed Central

    Mucci, D; Forristal, J; Strickland, D; Morris, R; Fitzgerald, D; Saelinger, C B

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) enters mammalian cells via a receptor-mediated endocytic pathway. The initial step in this pathway is binding to the multiligand receptor termed the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Binding of toxin, and of the many other ligands that bind to LRP, is blocked by the addition of a 39-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP). Here we show that approximately 40% of the cell-associated LRP is on the surface of toxin-sensitive mouse LM fibroblasts and thus accessible for toxin internalization. The remainder is located intracellularly, primarily in the Golgi region. Mammalian cells exhibit a wide range of sensitivity to PE. To investigate possible reasons for this, we examined the expression levels of both LRP and RAP. Results from a variety of cell lines indicated that there was a positive correlation between LRP expression and toxin sensitivity. In the absence of LRP, cells were as much as 200-fold more resistant to PE compared with sensitive cells. A second group of resistant cells expressed LRP but had a high level of RAP. Thus, a toxin-resistant phenotype would be expected when cells expressed either low levels of LRP or high levels of LRP in the presence of high levels of RAP. We hypothesize that RAP has a pivotal role in moderating cellular susceptibility to PE. PMID:7622212

  13. Well-Defined Protein/Peptide-Polymer Conjugates by Aqueous Cu-LRP: Synthesis and Controlled Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Muxiu; Zhu, Chongyu; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Li, Zaidong; Wilson, Paul; Kempe, Kristian; Haddleton, David M

    2015-07-29

    The synthesis of well-defined protein/peptide-polymer conjugates with interesting self-assembly behavior via single electron transfer living radical polymerization in water is described. A range of protein/peptides with different physical and chemical properties have been modified to macroinitiators and optimized polymerization conditions ensure successful polymerization from soluble, insoluble, and dispersed protein/peptide molecules or protein aggregates. This powerful strategy tolerates a range of functional monomers and mediates efficient homo or block copolymerization to generate hydrophilic polymers with controlled molecular weight (MW) and narrow MW distribution. The polymerizations from bovine insulin macroinitiators follow surface-initiated "grafting from" polymerization mechanism and may involve a series of self-assembly and disassembly processes. Synthesized insulin-polymer conjugates form spheres in water, and the self-assembly behavior could be controlled via thermal control, carbohydrate-protein interaction, and protein denaturation.

  14. Activation of Wnt Signaling by Chemically Induced Dimerization of LRP5 Disrupts Cellular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Adam C.; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Chiou, Shin-Heng; Cho, Kyucheol; Carstens, Julienne L.; Decker, William K.; McCrea, Pierre D.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling is crucial for a variety of biological processes, including body axis formation, planar polarity, stem cell maintenance and cellular differentiation. Therefore, targeted manipulation of Wnt signaling in vivo would be extremely useful. By applying chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) technology, we were able to modify the Wnt co-receptor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), to generate the synthetic ligand inducible Wnt switch, iLRP5. We show that iLRP5 oligomerization results in its localization to disheveled-containing punctate structures and sequestration of scaffold protein Axin, leading to robust β-catenin-mediated signaling. Moreover, we identify a novel LRP5 cytoplasmic domain critical for its intracellular localization and casein kinase 1-dependent β-catenin signaling. Finally, by utilizing iLRP5 as a Wnt signaling switch, we generated the Ubiquitous Activator of β-catenin (Ubi-Cat) transgenic mouse line. The Ubi-Cat line allows for nearly ubiquitous expression of iLRP5 under control of the H-2Kb promoter. Activation of iLRP5 in isolated prostate basal epithelial stem cells resulted in expansion of p63+ cells and development of hyperplasia in reconstituted murine prostate grafts. Independently, iLRP5 induction in adult prostate stroma enhanced prostate tissue regeneration. Moreover, induction of iLRP5 in male Ubi-Cat mice resulted in prostate tumor progression over several months from prostate hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma. We also investigated iLRP5 activation in Ubi-Cat-derived mammary cells, observing that prolonged activation results in mammary tumor formation. Thus, in two distinct experimental mouse models, activation of iLRP5 results in disruption of tissue homeostasis, demonstrating the utility of iLRP5 as a novel research tool for determining the outcome of Wnt activation in a precise spatially and temporally determined fashion. PMID:22303459

  15. Renal LRP2 expression in man and chicken is estrogen-responsive

    PubMed Central

    Plieschnig, Julia A.; Gensberger, Eva T.; Bajari, Tarek M.; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Hermann, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP2) is an endocytic receptor that binds multiple ligands and is essential for a wide range of physiological processes. To gain new insights into the biology of this complex protein, we have initiated the molecular characterization of the LRP2 homolog from an oviparous species, the chicken (Gallus gallus). The galline LRP2 cDNA encodes a membrane protein of 4658 residues. Overall, the galline and human proteins are 73% identical, indicating that the avian gene has been well conserved over 300 million years. Unexpectedly, LRP2 transcript and protein levels in the kidney of females and estrogen-treated roosters were significantly higher than those in untreated males. The estrogen-responsiveness of avian LRP2 may be related to the dramatic differences in lipoprotein metabolism between mature roosters and laying hens. Newly identified potential estrogen-responsive elements (ERE) in the human and galline LRP2 gene, and additional Sp1 sites present in the promoter of the chicken gene, are compatible with both direct estrogen induction via the classical ligand-induced ERE pathway and the indirect transcription factor crosstalk pathway engaging the Sp1 sites. In agreement with this assumption, estrogen induction of LRP2 was observed not only in primary cultured chicken kidney cells, but also human kidney cell lines. These findings point to novel regulatory features of the LRP2 gene resulting in sex-specific receptor expression. PMID:22868208

  16. The Lrp family of transcription regulators in archaea.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    Archaea possess a eukaryotic-type basal transcription apparatus that is regulated by bacteria-like transcription regulators. A universal and abundant family of transcription regulators are the bacterial/archaeal Lrp-like regulators. The Lrp family is one of the best studied regulator families in archaea, illustrated by investigations of proteins from the archaeal model organisms: Sulfolobus, Pyrococcus, Methanocaldococcus, and Halobacterium. These regulators are extremely versatile in their DNA-binding properties, response to effector molecules, and molecular regulatory mechanisms. Besides being involved in the regulation of the amino acid metabolism, they also regulate central metabolic processes. It appears that these regulatory proteins are also involved in large regulatory networks, because of hierarchical regulations and the possible combinatorial use of different Lrp-like proteins. Here, we discuss the recent developments in our understanding of this important class of regulators.

  17. The association between LRP-1 variants and chylomicron uptake after a high fat meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro studies suggest that low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) plays a role in the secondary uptake of chylomicrons. In addition, in vivo studies using LRP-1 knockout mice show these animals exhibit delayed chylomicron clearance. Whether this is true in humans is unknown. We...

  18. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Vassart, Amelia; Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role. PMID:23255531

  19. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Vassart, Amelia; Van Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role.

  20. Adiponectin inhibits Lrp6 phosphorylation and β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Lauren; Lam, Anna P.; Flozak, Annette S.; Varga, John; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is a pleiotropic adipokine implicated in obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have identified adiponectin as a negative regulator of tissue fibrosis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling has also been implicated in metabolic syndrome and can promote tissue fibrosis, but the extent to which adiponectin cross-regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling is unknown. Using primary human dermal fibroblasts and recombinant purified proteins, we show that adiponectin can limit β-catenin accumulation and downstream gene activation by inhibiting Lrp6 phosphorylation, a key activation step in canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Wnt3a-mediated Lrp6 phospho-activation is relatively rapid (e.g., by 30 minutes), and is not dependent on established adiponectin G-protein coupled receptors, AdipoR1 and R2, suggesting a more direct relationship to Lrp6 signaling. In contrast, the ability of adiponectin to limit Wnt-induced and baseline collagen production in fibroblasts requires AdipoR1/R2. These results suggest the possibility that the pleiotropic effects of adiponectin may be mediated through distinct cell surface receptor complexes. Accordingly, we propose that the anti-fibrotic activity of adiponectin may be mediated through AdipoR1/R2 receptors, while the ability of adiponectin to inhibit Lrp6 phospho-activation may be relevant to other recently established roles for Lrp6 signaling in glucose metabolism and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26797284

  1. LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Swanberg, Maria; McGuigan, Fiona; Callreus, Mattias; Gerdhem, Paul; Akesson, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.

  2. Mice with a heterozygous Lrp6 deletion have impaired fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Travis A; Vivanco, Juan F; Zahatnansky, Juraj; Moren, Andrew J Vander; Mason, James J; Williams, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Bone fracture non-unions, the failure of a fracture to heal, occur in 10%–20% of fractures and are a costly and debilitating clinical problem. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critical in bone development and fracture healing. Polymorphisms of linking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), a Wnt-binding receptor, have been associated with decreased bone mineral density and fragility fractures, although this remains controversial. Mice with a homozygous deletion of Lrp6 have severe skeletal abnormalities and are not viable, whereas mice with a heterozygous deletion have a combinatory effect with Lrp5 to decrease bone mineral density. As fracture healing closely models embryonic skeletal development, we investigated the process of fracture healing in mice heterozygous for Lrp6 (Lrp6 +/−) and hypothesized that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 would impair fracture healing. Mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were induced in Lrp6 +/− mice and wild-type controls (Lrp6 +/+). Fractures were analyzed using micro-computed tomography (μCT) scans, biomechanical testing, and histological analysis. Lrp6 +/− mice had significantly decreased stiffness and strength at 28 days post fracture (PF) and significantly decreased BV/TV, total density, immature bone density, and mature area within the callus on day-14 and -21 PF; they had significantly increased empty callus area at days 14 and 21 PF. Our results demonstrate that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 impairs fracture healing, which suggests that Lrp6 has a role in fracture healing. PMID:27635281

  3. A cell-free biochemical complementation assay reveals complex and redundant cytosolic requirements for LRP endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Miwako, Ishido; Schmid, Sandra L

    2006-05-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) binds multiple, distinct ligands and participates in constitutive endocytosis and signal transduction. Using an in vitro reconstitution system and a new biochemical complementation assay, we have explored the limiting cytosolic requirements for endocytosis of LRP from isolated plasma membranes. We find that clathrin, AP2 and dynamin do not support efficient LRP uptake and that additional factors present in a 30% ammonium sulfate supernatant fraction of bovine brain cytosol (AS supt) are required. Fractionation of the AS supt revealed that multiple and redundant factors are required to support LRP endocytosis. Among these, we identified Hsc70, synaptojanin1 and CRMP-2 by mass spectrometry. Our data suggest that LRP, which bears several distinct endocytic motifs in its cytoplasmic domain, may use multiple pathways for endocytosis in vitro.

  4. MESD is essential for apical localization of megalin/LRP2 in the visceral endoderm.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Zhang, Liqun; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Rosenquist, Thomas; Holdener, Bernadette C

    2011-03-01

    Deletion of the Mesd gene region blocks gastrulation and mesoderm differentiation in mice. MESD is a chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors: low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and 6 (LRP5/6). We hypothesized that loss of Wnt signaling is responsible for the polarity defects observed in Mesd-deficient embryos. However, because the Mesd-deficient embryo is considerably smaller than Lrp5/6 or Wnt3 mutants, we predicted that MESD function extends more broadly to the LRP family of receptors. Consistent with this prediction, we demonstrated that MESD function in vitro was essential for maturation of the β-propeller/EGF domain common to LRPs. To begin to understand the role of MESD in LRP maturation in vivo, we generated a targeted Mesd knockout and verified that loss of Mesd blocks WNT signaling in vivo. Mesd mutants continue to express the pluripotency markers Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2, suggesting that Wnt signaling is essential for differentiation of the epiblast. Moreover, we demonstrated that MESD was essential for the apical localization of the related LRP2 (Megalin/MEG) in the visceral endoderm, resulting in impaired endocytic function. Combined, our results provide evidence that MESD functions as a general LRP chaperone and suggest that the Mesd phenotype results from both signaling and endocytic defects resulting from misfolding of multiple LRP receptors.

  5. MESD is Essential for Apical Localization of Megalin/LRP2 in the Visceral Endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lighthouse, Janet K.; Zhang, Liqun; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Rosenquist, Thomas; Holdener, Bernadette C.

    2010-01-01

    Deletion of the Mesd gene region blocks gastrulation and mesoderm differentiation in mice. MESD is a chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors: low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and 6 (LRP5/6). We hypothesized that loss of Wnt signaling is responsible for the polarity defects observed in Mesd deficient embryos. However, because the Mesd deficient embryo is considerably smaller than Lrp5/6 or Wnt3 mutants, we predicted that MESD function extends more broadly to the LRP family of receptors. Consistent with this prediction, we demonstrated that MESD function in vitro was essential for maturation of the β-propeller/EGF domain common to LRPs. To begin to understand the role of MESD in LRP maturation in vivo, we generated a targeted Mesd knockout and verified that loss of Mesd blocks WNT signaling in vivo. Mesd mutants continue to express pluripotency markers, Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2, suggesting that Wnt signaling is essential for differentiation of the epiblast. Moreover, we demonstrated that MESD was essential for the apical localization of the related LRP2 (Megalin/MEG) in the visceral endoderm, resulting in impaired endocytic function. Combined, our results provide evidence that MESD functions as a general LRP chaperone, and suggest that the Mesd phenotype results from both signaling and endocytic defects resulting from mis-folding of multiple LRP receptors. PMID:21337463

  6. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  7. Vascular Smooth Muscle LRP6 Limits Arteriosclerotic Calcification in Diabetic LDLR-/- Mice by Restraining Noncanonical Wnt Signals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Su-Li; Ramachandran, Bindu; Behrmann, Abraham; Shao, Jian-Su; Mead, Megan; Smith, Carolyn; Krchma, Karen; Arredondo, Yoanna Bello; Kovacs, Attila; Kapoor, Kapil; Brill, Laurence M.; Perera, Ranjan; Williams, Bart O.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Wnt signaling regulates key aspects of diabetic vascular disease. Objective We generated SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- mice to determine contributions of Wnt co-receptor LRP6 in the vascular smooth muscle lineage (VSM) of male LDLR-null mice, a background susceptible to diet (HFD) - induced diabetic arteriosclerosis. Methods and Results As compared to LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- controls, SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- (LRP6-VKO) siblings exhibited increased aortic calcification on HFD without changes in fasting glucose, lipids, or body composition. Pulse wave velocity (index of arterial stiffness) was also increased. Vascular calcification paralleled enhanced aortic osteochondrogenic programs and circulating osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular regulator of arteriosclerosis. Survey of ligands and Frizzled (Fzd) receptor profiles in LRP6-VKO revealed upregulation of canonical and noncanonical Wnts alongside Fzd10. Fzd10 stimulated noncanonical signaling and OPN promoter activity via an USF-activated cognate inhibited by LRP6. RNAi revealed that USF1 but not USF2 supports OPN expression in LRP6-VKO VSM, and immunoprecipitation confirmed increased USF1 association with OPN chromatin. ML141, an antagonist of cdc42/Rac1 noncanonical signaling, inhibited USF1 activation, osteochondrogenic programs, alkaline phosphatase, and VSM calcification. Mass spectrometry identified LRP6 binding to protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) - 1, and nuclear asymmetric dimethylarginine modification was increased with LRP6-VKO. RNAi demonstrated that PRMT1 inhibits OPN and TNAP while PRMT4 supports expression. USF1 complexes containing the H3R17Me2a signature of PRMT4 are increased with LRP6-VKO. Jmjd6, a demethylase downregulated with LRP6 deficiency, inhibits OPN and TNAP expression, USF1:H3R17Me2a complex formation and transactivation. Conclusions LRP6 restrains VSM noncanonical signals that promote osteochondrogenic differentiation, mediated in part via USF1- and arginine methylation

  8. Initiation of Wnt signaling: control of Wnt coreceptor Lrp6 phosphorylation/activation via frizzled, dishevelled and axin functions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xin; Huang, He; Tamai, Keiko; Zhang, Xinjun; Harada, Yuko; Yokota, Chika; Almeida, Karla; Wang, Jianbo; Doble, Brad; Woodgett, Jim; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hsieh, Jen-Chieh; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling has central roles in development and diseases, and is initiated by the action of the frizzled (Fz) receptor, its coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), and the cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dvl) protein. The functional relationships among Fz, Lrp6 and Dvl have long been enigmatic. We demonstrated previously that Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation via glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3) initiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Here we show that both Fz and Dvl functions are critical for Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation through Fz-Lrp6 interaction. We also show that axin, a key scaffolding protein in the Wnt pathway, is required for Lrp6 phosphorylation via its ability to recruit Gsk3, and inhibition of Gsk3 at the plasma membrane blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our results suggest a model that upon Wnt-induced Fz-Lrp6 complex formation, Fz recruitment of Dvl in turn recruits the axin-Gsk3 complex, thereby promoting Lrp6 phosphorylation to initiate β-catenin signaling. We discuss the dual roles of the axin-Gsk3 complex and signal amplification by Lrp6-axin interaction during Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:18077588

  9. LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta is inhibited by KPI-containing isoforms of APP.

    PubMed

    Moir, Robert D; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2005-04-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the abnormal accumulation and deposition of beta-amyloid in cerebral blood vessels and in the brain parenchyma. Critical in modulating beta-amyloid deposition in brain is the flux of Abeta across the blood brain barrier. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), is a large endocytic receptor that mediates the efflux of Abeta out of brain and into the periphery. The first step in the LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta involves the formation of a complex between Abeta and the LRP ligands apolipoprotein E (apoE) or alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M). The Abeta/chaperone complexes then bind to LRP via binding sites on apoE or alpha(2)M. The efflux of Abeta/chaperone complexes out of the neuropil and into the periphery may be attenuated by LRP-ligands that compete with apoE or alpha(2)M for LRP binding. LRP is also the cell surface receptor for Kunitz Protease Inhibitor (KPI) containing isoforms of Abeta's parent protein, the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Protein and mRNA levels of KPI-containing APP isoforms (APP-KPI) are elevated in AD brain and are associated with increased Abeta production. In this study we show that soluble non-amyloidogenic APP-KPI can also inhibit the uptake of Abeta/alpha(2)M in a cell culture model of LRP mediated Abeta clearance. Clearance of Abeta/apoE complexes was not inhibited by APP-KPI. Our findings are consistent with studies showing that apoE and alpha(2)M have discrete binding sites on LRP. Most significantly, our data suggests that the elevated levels of APP-KPI in AD brain may attenuate the clearance of Abeta, the proteins own amyloidogenic catabolic product.

  10. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Baardman, Maria E.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development of Lrp2 KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. The Lrp2 KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in the Lrp2 KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans with LRP2 mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis. PMID:26822476

  11. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Baardman, Maria E; Zwier, Mathijs V; Wisse, Lambertus J; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Hofstra, Robert M W; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Berger, Rolf M F; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2016-04-01

    Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts ofLrp2knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development ofLrp2KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. TheLrp2KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in theLrp2KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans withLRP2mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis.

  12. Role of LRP-1 in cancer cell migration in 3-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Bennasroune, Amar; Jeannesson, Pierre; Terryn, Christine; Fuhrmann, Guy; Morjani, Hamid; Dedieu, Stéphane

    2016-07-27

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a member of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) family, which is ubiquitously expressed and which is described as a multifunctional endocytic receptor which mediates the clearance of various extracellular matrix molecules including serine proteinases, proteinase-inhibitor complexes, and matricellular proteins. Several studies showed that high LRP-1 expression promotes breast cancer cell invasiveness, and LRP-1 invalidation leads to cell motility abrogation in both tumor and non-tumor cells. Furthermore, our group has reported that LRP-1 silencing prevents the invasion of a follicular thyroid carcinoma despite increased pericellular proteolytic activities from MMP2 and uPA using a 2D-cell culture model. As the use of 3D culture systems is becoming more and more popular due to their promise as enhanced models of tissue physiology, the aim of the present work is to characterize for the first time how the 3D collagen type I matrix may impact the ability of LRP-1 to regulate the migratory properties of thyroid carcinoma using as a model FTC-133 cells. Our results show that inhibition of LRP-1 activity or expression leads to morphological changes affecting cell-matrix interactions, reorganizations of the actin-cytoskeleton especially by inhibiting FAK activation and increasing RhoA activity and MLC-2 phosphorylation, thus preventing cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that LRP-1 silencing leads to a decrease of cell migratory capacity in a 3D configuration.

  13. Lrp4 Modulates Extracellular Integration of Cell Signaling Pathways in Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Johnson, Eric B.; Ota, Masato S.; Choi, Hong J.; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Oommen, Shelly; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Herz, Joachim; Sharpe, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which cell signaling is integrated outside the cell is not currently appreciated. We show that a member of the low-density receptor-related protein family, Lrp4 modulates and integrates Bmp and canonical Wnt signalling during tooth morphogenesis by binding the secreted Bmp antagonist protein Wise. Mouse mutants of Lrp4 and Wise exhibit identical tooth phenotypes that include supernumerary incisors and molars, and fused molars. We propose that the Lrp4/Wise interaction acts as an extracellular integrator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell signaling. Wise, secreted from mesenchyme cells binds to BMP's and also to Lrp4 that is expressed on epithelial cells. This binding then results in the modulation of Wnt activity in the epithelial cells. Thus in this context Wise acts as an extracellular signaling molecule linking two signaling pathways. We further show that a downstream mediator of this integration is the Shh signaling pathway. PMID:19116665

  14. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Khumalo, Thandokuhle; Ferreira, Eloise; Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment.

  15. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B.; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment. PMID:26427016

  16. Role of Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinlu; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Xu, Bo; Li, Yonghe

    2017-03-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Although studies have shown an increased expression of LRP6 in several types of cancer, its function in tumor development and progression remains to be elucidated. We herein demonstrated that LRP6 expression is up-regulated in human triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients and human TNBC cell lines, and that knockdown of LRP6 expression and treatment of recombinant Mesd protein (a specific inhibitor of LRP6) significantly decreased cell migration and invasion of TNBC MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Interestingly, the effects of LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment on TNBC cell migration and invasion were more prominent than on TNBC cell proliferation/viability. Mechanistically, LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling and decreased the expression of S100A4, a mediator of cancer metastasis and a specific target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in TNBC cells. Together, our data suggest that LRP6 promotes TNBC cell migration and invasion by regulating the expression and function of S100A4 via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Loss of Lrp2 in zebrafish disrupts pronephric tubular clearance but not forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Esther; Christa, Anna; Veth, Kerry N.; Gajera, Chandresh R.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Willer, Jason R.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bachmann, Sebastian; Link, Brian A.; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor conserved from nematodes to humans. In mammals, it acts as regulator of sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein pathways in patterning of the embryonic forebrain and as a clearance receptor in the adult kidney. Little is known about activities of this LRP in other phyla. Here, we extend the functional elucidation of LRP2 to zebrafish as model organism of receptor (dys)function. We demonstrate that expression of Lrp2 in embryonic and larval fish recapitulates the patterns seen in mammalian brain and kidney. Furthermore, we studied the consequence of receptor deficiencies in lrp2 and in lrp2b, a homologue unique to fish, using ENU mutagenesis or morpholino knockdown. While receptor-deficient zebrafish suffer from overt renal resorption deficiency, their brain development proceeds normally, suggesting evolutionary conservation of receptor functions in pronephric duct clearance but not in patterning of the teleost forebrain. PMID:21455927

  18. Tyrosine-based signal mediates LRP6 receptor endocytosis and desensitization of Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Roth, Barbara; Bu, Guojun

    2014-10-03

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling orchestrates a number of critical events including cell growth, differentiation, and cell survival during development. Misregulation of this pathway leads to various human diseases, specifically cancers. Endocytosis and phosphorylation of the LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an essential co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, play a vital role in mediating Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction. However, its regulatory mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we define the mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytic trafficking regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. We show that LRP6 mutant with defective tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail has an increased cell surface distribution and decreased endocytosis rate. These changes in LRP6 endocytosis coincide with an increased distribution to caveolae, increased phosphorylation, and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We further demonstrate that treatment of Wnt3a ligands or blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LRP6 leads to a redistribution of wild-type receptor to lipid rafts. The LRP6 tyrosine mutant also exhibited an increase in signaling activation in response to Wnt3a stimulation when compared with wild-type LRP6, and this activation is suppressed when caveolae-mediated endocytosis is blocked. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytosis routes regulate its phosphorylation and the strength of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and have implications on how this pathway can be modulated in human diseases.

  19. Astrocytic LRP1 Mediates Brain Aβ Clearance and Impacts Amyloid Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jian; Na, Wang; Cirrito, John R; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Holtzman, David M; Bu, Guojun

    2017-03-08

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain represents an early and perhaps necessary step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ accumulation leads to the formation of Aβ aggregates which may directly and indirectly lead to eventual neurodegeneration. While Aβ production is accelerated in many familial forms of early-onset AD, increasing evidence indicates that impaired clearance of Aβ is more evident in late-onset AD. To uncover the mechanisms underlying impaired Aβ clearance in AD, we examined the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in astrocytes. Although LRP1 has been shown to play critical roles in brain Aβ metabolism in neurons and vascular mural cells, its role in astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain responsible for maintaining neuronal homeostasis, remains unclear. Here, we show that astrocytic LRP1 plays a critical role in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 knockdown in primary astrocytes resulted in decreased cellular Aβ uptake and degradation. In addition, silencing of LRP1 in astrocytes led to down-regulation of several major Aβ-degrading enzymes, including matrix metalloproteases MMP2, MMP9 and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). More important, conditional knockout of the Lrp1 gene in astrocytes in the background of APP/PS1 mice impaired brain Aβ clearance, exacerbated Aβ accumulation and accelerated amyloid plaque deposition without affecting its production. Together, our results demonstrate that astrocytic LRP1 plays an important role in Aβ metabolism and that restoring LRP1 expression and function in the brain could be an effective strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance and counter amyloid pathology in AD.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAstrocytes represent a major cell type regulating brain homeostasis; however, their roles in brain clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) and underlying mechanism are not clear. In this study, we used both cellular models and conditional knockout mouse models to

  20. Dissection of RAP-LRP interactions: binding of RAP and RAP fragments to complement-like repeats 7 and 8 from ligand binding cluster II of LRP.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Ana; Dolmer, Klavs; Strickland, Dudley K; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-06-15

    The receptor associated protein (RAP) is a three domain 38kDa ER-resident chaperone that helps folding of LRP and other LDL receptor family members and prevents premature binding of protein ligands. It competes strongly with all known LRP ligands. To further understanding of the specificity of RAP-LRP interactions, the binding of RAP and RAP fragments to two domains (CR7-CR8) from one of the main ligand-binding regions of LRP has been examined by 2D HSQC NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that RAP contains two binding sites for CR7-CR8, with the higher affinity site (K(d) approximately 1microM) located in the C-terminal two-thirds and the weaker site (K(d) approximately 5microM) in the N-terminal third of RAP. Residues from both CR7 and CR8 are involved in binding at each RAP site. The presence of more than one binding site on RAP for CR domains from LRP, together with the previous demonstration by others that RAP can bind to CR5-CR6 with comparably low affinities suggest an explanation for the dual roles of RAP as a folding chaperone and a tight competitive inhibitor of ligand binding.

  1. Targeting the LRP5 pathway improves bone properties in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Christina M; Barber, Lauren A; Ayturk, Ugur M; Roberts, Heather J; Deal, Lauren E; Schwartz, Marissa A; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G; Warman, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    The cell surface receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a key regulator of bone mass and bone strength. Heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5 cause autosomal dominant high bone mass (HBM) in humans by reducing binding to LRP5 by endogenous inhibitors, such as sclerostin (SOST). Mice heterozygous for a knockin allele (Lrp5(p.A214V) ) that is orthologous to a human HBM-causing mutation have increased bone mass and strength. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal fragility disorder predominantly caused by mutations that affect type I collagen. We tested whether the LRP5 pathway can be used to improve bone properties in animal models of OI. First, we mated Lrp5(+/p.A214V) mice to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice, which model human type IV OI. We found that Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/p.A214V) offspring had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/+) littermates. The improved bone properties were not a result of altered mRNA expression of type I collagen or its chaperones, nor were they due to changes in mutant type I collagen secretion. Second, we treated Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits sclerostin activity (Scl-Ab). We found that antibody-treated mice had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to vehicle-treated littermates. These findings indicate increasing bone formation, even without altering bone collagen composition, may benefit patients with OI.

  2. Targeting the LRP5 pathway improves bone properties in a mouse model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Christina M.; Barber, Lauren A.; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Roberts, Heather J.; Deal, Lauren E.; Schwartz, Marissa A.; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    The cell surface receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a key regulator of bone mass and bone strength. Heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5 cause autosomal dominant high bone mass (HBM) in humans by reducing binding to LRP5 by endogenous inhibitors, such as sclerostin (SOST). Mice heterozygous for a knockin allele (Lrp5p.A214V) that is orthologous to a human HBM-causing mutation have increased bone mass and strength. Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal fragility disorder predominantly caused by mutations that affect type I collagen. We tested whether the LRP5 pathway can be used to improve bone properties in animal models of OI. First, we mated Lrp5+/p.A214V mice to Col1a2+/p.G610C mice, which model human type IV OI. We found that Col1a2+/p.G610C;Lrp5+/p.A214V offspring had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to Col1a2+/p.G610C;Lrp5+/+ littermates. The improved bone properties were not due to altered mRNA expression of type I collagen or its chaperones, nor were they due to changes in mutant type I collagen secretion. Second, we treated Col1a2+/p.G610C mice with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits sclerostin activity (Scl-Ab). We found that antibody treated mice had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to vehicle treated littermates. These findings indicate increasing bone formation, even without altering bone collagen composition, may benefit patients with OI. PMID:24677211

  3. Wise Regulates Bone Deposition through Genetic Interactions with Lrp5

    PubMed Central

    Ellies, Debra L.; Economou, Androulla; Viviano, Beth; Rey, Jean-Philippe; Paine-Saunders, Stephenie; Krumlauf, Robb; Saunders, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In this study using genetic approaches in mouse we demonstrate that the secreted protein Wise plays essential roles in regulating early bone formation through its ability to modulate Wnt signaling via interactions with the Lrp5 co-receptor. In Wise−/− mutant mice we find an increase in the rate of osteoblast proliferation and a transient increase in bone mineral density. This change in proliferation is dependent upon Lrp5, as Wise;Lrp5 double mutants have normal bone mass. This suggests that Wise serves as a negative modulator of Wnt signaling in active osteoblasts. Wise and the closely related protein Sclerostin (Sost) are expressed in osteoblast cells during temporally distinct early and late phases in a manner consistent with the temporal onset of their respective increased bone density phenotypes. These data suggest that Wise and Sost may have common roles in regulating bone development through their ability to control the balance of Wnt signaling. We find that Wise is also required to potentiate proliferation in chondrocytes, serving as a potential positive modulator of Wnt activity. Our analyses demonstrate that Wise plays a key role in processes that control the number of osteoblasts and chondrocytes during bone homeostasis and provide important insight into mechanisms regulating the Wnt pathway during skeletal development. PMID:24789067

  4. LRP12 silencing during brain development results in cortical dyslamination and seizure sensitization.

    PubMed

    Grote, Alexander; Robens, Barbara K; Blümcke, Ingmar; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Gembé, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Correct positioning and differentiation of neurons during brain development is a key precondition for proper function. Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are increasingly recognized as causes of therapy refractory epilepsies. Neuropathological analyses of respective surgical specimens from neurosurgery for seizure control often reveal aberrant cortical architecture and/or aberrantly shaped neurons in FCDs. However, the molecular pathogenesis particularly of FCDs with aberrant lamination (so-called FCD type I) is largely unresolved. Lipoproteins and particularly low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 12 (LRP12) are involved in brain development. Here, we have examined a potential role of LRP12 in the pathogenesis of FCDs. In vitro knockdown of LRP12 in primary neurons results in impaired neuronal arborization. In vivo ablation of LRP12 by intraventricularly in utero electroporated shRNAs elicits cortical maldevelopment, i.e. aberrant lamination by malpositioning of upper cortical layer neurons. Subsequent epilepsy phenotyping revealed pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures to be aggravated in cortical LRP12-silenced mice. Our data demonstrates IUE mediated cortical gene silencing as an excellent approach to study the role of distinct molecules for epilepsy associated focal brain lesions and suggests LRP12 and lipoprotein homeostasis as potential molecular target structures for the emergence of epilepsy-associated FCDs.

  5. Prognostic significance of miR-23b in combination with P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Janikova, M; Zizkova, V; Skarda, J; Kharaishvili, G; Radova, L; Kolar, Z

    2016-01-01

    Recently, miR-23b has emerged as a promising new cancer biomarker but its role in lung cancer has not been established yet. Patients still do not respond well to available treatments, probably due to expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, such as P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP. The aim of this study was to determine the role of miR-23b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its relationship to the patient outcome together with MDR transporter proteins. We immunohistochemically evaluated expression of P-gp, MRP and LRP/MVP and quantified the relative levels of miR-23b in 62 NSCLC patients´ samples. The prognostic significance of miR-23b and MDR proteins was tested by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. Our results showed that miR-23b is mostly downregulated in NSCLC samples (57/62) and that its upregulation in tumors is connected with longer progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.065) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.048). The Cox proportional hazard model revealed that the risk of death or relapse in NSCLC patients with miR-23b downregulation increases together with LRP/MVP expression and both risks decrease with miR-23b upregulation (HRPFS = 4.342, PPFS = 0.022; HROS = 4.408, POS = 0.015). Our findings indicate that miR-23b, especially in combination with LRP/MVP expression, might serve as a suitable prognostic biomarker for NSCLC patients.

  6. Effects of standard chemotherapy on tumor growth and regulation of multidrug resistance genes and proteins in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Guido; Warmann, Steven W; Vokuhl, Christian O; Heitmann, Heike; Treuner, Claudia; Leuschner, Ivo; Fuchs, Jörg

    2007-05-01

    The prognosis of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in advanced stages is still sobering. Therapy is limited due to local tumor recurrence, development of metastases and multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of multidrug resistance in cell lines and in xenografts of alveolar and embryonal RMS treated according to the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study (CWS). Alveolar and embryonal RMS cell lines were treated with Vincristine, Topotecan, Carboplatin, Actinomycin D, or Ifosfamide. Expression levels of resistance-associated genes were assessed using Real time-PCR. Nude mice (NMRI nu/nu, n = 10 per group) underwent xenotransplantation of human embryonal or alveolar RMS. Animals were treated with standard chemotherapeutic drugs Vincristine, Topotecan, Carboplatin, Actinomycin D, or Ifosfamide according to treatment schedules of the CWS-study. Tumor sizes were measured and relative tumor volumes were calculated. Animals were sacrificed after 20 days and standard histology, Real-time-PCR for MDR1-, MRP-, LRP- and MDM2-gene as well as immunohistochemistry for MDR1-, LRP-, and MRP-protein were performed. In the cell lines, an up-regulation of MDR-1 gene was found in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, an up-regulation of LRP and MRP was found. Standard chemotherapy of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth (P < 0.05) in all groups. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma strongest effects were found after treatment with Ifosfamide, Vincristine and Carboplatin (P < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed a MDR1-dependent mechanism in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, MDR1 occurred to a lower degree. Immunohistochemistry revealed correlating expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated proteins. The use of established chemotherapy on human RMS in vivo had strong effects on xenografts compared to their controls. In all cases, there was only a reduction of tumor growth, but not a

  7. Wnt3a-stimulated LRP6 phosphorylation is dependent upon arginine methylation of G3BP2

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Malbon, Craig C.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling is initiated upon binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled proteins and their co-receptors LRP5 and 6. The signal is then propagated to several downstream effectors, mediated by the phosphoprotein scaffold, dishevelled. We report a novel role for arginine methylation in regulating Wnt3a-stimulated LRP6 phosphorylation. G3BP2, a dishevelled-associated protein, is methylated in response to Wnt3a. The Wnt3a-induced LRP6 phosphorylation is attenuated by G3BP2 knockdown, chemical inhibition of methyl transferase activity or expression of methylation-deficient mutants of G3BP2. Arginine methylation of G3BP2 appears to be a Wnt3a-sensitive ‘switch’ regulating LRP6 phosphorylation and canonical Wnt–β-catenin signaling. PMID:22357953

  8. Use of an in vivo titration method to study a global regulator: effect of varying Lrp levels on expression of gltBDF in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Borst, D W; Blumenthal, R M; Matthews, R G

    1996-01-01

    Most studies of global regulatory proteins are performed in vitro or involve phenotypic comparisons between wild-type and mutant strains. We report the use of strains in which the gene for the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (lrp) is transcribed from isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoters for the purpose of continuously varying the in vivo concentration of Lrp. To obtain a broad range of Lrp concentrations, strains were employed that contained the lrp fusion either in the chromosome (I. C. Blomfield, P. J. Calie, K. J. Eberhardt, M. S. McClain, and B. I. Eisenstein, J. Bacteriol. 175:27-36, 1993) or on a multicopy plasmid. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with polyclonal antiserum to Lrp confirmed that Lrp levels could be varied more than 70-fold by growing the strains in glucose minimal 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) medium containing different amounts of IPTG. Expression of an Lrp-regulated gltB::lacZ operon fusion was measured over this range of Lrp concentrations. beta-Galactosidase activity rose with increasing Lrp levels up to the level of Lrp found in wild-type strains, at which point expression is maximal. The presence of leucine in the medium increased the level of Lrp necessary to achieve half-maximal expression of the gltB::lacZ fusion, as predicted by earlier in vitro studies (B. R. Ernsting, J. W. Denninger, R. M. Blumenthal, and R. G. Matthews, J. Bacteriol. 175:7160-7169, 1993). Interestingly, levels of Lrp greater than those in wild-type cells interfered with activation of gltB::lacZ expression. The growth rate of cultures correlated with the intracellular Lrp concentration: levels of Lrp either lower or higher than wild-type levels resulted in significantly slower growth rates. Thus, the level of Lrp in the cell appears to be optimal for rapid growth in minimal medium, and the gltBDF control region is designed to give maximal expression at this Lrp level. PMID:8955313

  9. LRP/LR as an alternative promising target in therapy of prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vana, Karen; Zuber, Chantal; Pflanz, Heike; Kolodziejczak, Dominika; Zemora, Georgeta; Bergmann, Ann-Katrin; Weiss, Stefan

    2009-02-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) represents a key player for cell adhesion, is associated with the metastatic potential of solid tumors and is required for maintenance of cell viability by preventing apoptosis. LRP/LR acts as a receptor for viruses such as Sindbis virus, Venezuelean Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, Adeno-associated-viruses (AAV) and Dengue Virus, the latter causing 50 to 100 million infections in humans per year. LRP/LR acts further as a receptor for prions and represents a multifunctional protein subcellularly located to the nucleus, the cytoplasm and the cell surface. The receptor represents an alternative target for therapy of viral infections, cancer and prion disorders and might play additional roles in further neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The species barrier in prion disorders might be at least in part determined by the presence of LRP/LR in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium. Anti-LRP/LR antibodies, siRNAs directed against LRP mRNA, polysulfated glycanes such as pentosan polysulfate and heparan mimetics and LRP decoy mutants are promising tools for blocking or downregulating the receptor and may represent alternative therapeutics for the treatment of prion disorders, Alzheimer's Disease and metastatic cancer.

  10. Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Fanben; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-12-09

    Resistive switching memory constitutes a prospective candidate for next-generation data storage devices. Meanwhile, naturally occurring biomaterials are promising building blocks for a new generation of environmentally friendly, biocompatible, and biodegradable electronic devices. Recent progress in using proteins to construct resistive switching memory devices is highlighted. The protein materials selection, device engineering, and mechanism of such protein-based resistive switching memory are discussed in detail. Finally, the critical challenges associated with protein-based resistive switching memory devices are presented, as well as insights into the future development of resistive switching memory based on natural biomaterials.

  11. LRP-1 and LRP-2 receptors function in the membrane neuron. Trafficking mechanisms and proteolytic processing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Ortolano, Saida; Navarro, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) belongs to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, generally recognized as cell surface endocytic receptors, which bind and internalize extracellular ligands for degradation in lysosomes. Neurons require cholesterol to function and keep the membrane rafts stable. Cholesterol uptake into the neuron is carried out by ApoE via LRPs receptors on the cell surface. In neurons the most important are LRP-1 and LRP-2, even it is thought that a causal factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the malfunction of this process which cause impairment intracellular signaling as well as storage and/or release of nutrients and toxic compounds. Both receptors are multifunctional cell surface receptors that are widely expressed in several tissues including neurons and astrocytes. LRPs are constituted by an intracellular (ICD) and extracellular domain (ECD). Through its ECD, LRPs bind at least 40 different ligands ranging from lipoprotein and protease inhibitor complex to growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins. These receptors has also been shown to interact with scaffolding and signaling proteins via its ICD in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and to function as a co-receptor partnering with other cell surface or integral membrane proteins. Thus, LRPs are implicated in two major physiological processes: endocytosis and regulation of signaling pathways, which are both involved in diverse biological roles including lipid metabolism, cell growth processes, degradation of proteases, and tissue invasion. Interestingly, LRPs were also localized in neurons in different stages, suggesting that both receptors could be implicated in signal transduction during embryonic development, neuronal outgrowth or in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22934024

  12. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  13. The Bacterial Two-Hybrid System Uncovers the Involvement of Acetylation in Regulating of Lrp Activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ran; Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qiufen; Li, Shuxian; Cui, Zhongli; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    N𝜀-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat – or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (de)acetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36) in helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:27909434

  14. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG)

    PubMed Central

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations. PMID:21407258

  15. Chromosomal localization of human genes for the LDL receptor family member glycoprotein 330 (LRP2) and its associated protein RAP (LRPAP1)

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Argraves, K.M.

    1994-07-01

    Glycoprotein 330 (gp330) is a member of a family of receptors with structural similarities to the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Gp330 is expressed by a number of specialized epithelia, including renal proximal tubules, where it can mediate endocytosis of ligands such as complexes of urokinase and the serpin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Gp330 has also been shown to bind in vitro to lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein E-enriched {beta}VLDL, suggesting a role for this receptor in lipoprotein metabolism. The 39-kDa protein, referred to as receptor associated protein (RAP), binds to and copurifies with gp330 and antagonizes the ligand binding activity of gp330. In this paper, the authors report the use of homology-PCR cloning to isolate cDNAs encoding human gp330. Using gp330 cDNA and previously isolated human RAP cDNA probes, they performed fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the human chromosomal location of the genes for these proteins. The gene for gp330 was mapped at a single site on the long arm of human chromosome 2 on the border of bands 2q24-q31. The gene for RAP was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 4 at position 4q16.3, which is in the region of the chromosomal deletion causing Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The assignment of chromosomal map positions for gp330 and RAP genes will aid in the evaluation of their potential roles in human diseases such as Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, such as atherosclerosis. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Preliminary evidence for an association between LRP-1 genotype and body mass index in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The LDL receptor-related protein-1 gene (LRP-1) has been associated with obesity in animal models, but no such association has yet been reported in humans. As data suggest this increase in fat mass may be mediated through a mechanism involving the clearance of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (...

  17. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-03-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5(A214V)) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5(A214V) mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1(CAosb)), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5(A214V) mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  18. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5A214V) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5A214V mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1CAosb), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5A214V mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. PMID:26681532

  19. Anti-LRP/LR specific antibody IgG1-iS18 and knock-down of LRP/LR by shRNAs rescue cells from Aβ42 induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Penny, Clement; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles, senile plaques and neuronal loss. Amyloid beta (Aβ) is proposed to elicit neuronal loss through cell surface receptors. As Aβ shares common binding partners with the 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR), we investigated whether these proteins interact and the pathological significance of this association. An LRP/LR-Αβ42 interaction was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and pull down assays. The cell biological effects were investigated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthaizol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Bromodeoxyuridine assays. LRP/LR and Αβ42 co-localised on the cell surface and formed immobilized complexes suggesting an interaction. Antibody blockade by IgG1-iS18 and shRNA mediated down regulation of LRP/LR significantly enhanced cell viability and proliferation in cells co-treated with Αβ42 when compared to cells incubated with Αβ42 only. Results suggest that LRP/LR is implicated in Αβ42 mediated cytotoxicity and that anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs may serve as potential therapeutic tools for AD. PMID:24048171

  20. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Bernd; Tao, Shijie; Yu, Tingsheng; Huysseune, Ann; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26121341

  1. Structural basis of agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, Yinong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Shenyan; Lee, Kwangkook; Zhou, Jie; Yao, Guorui; Figueiredo, Dwight; Perry, Kay; Mei, Lin; Jin, Rongsheng

    2012-06-27

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neural circuits that enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a synapse formed between a motoneuron and a muscle fiber, has contributed greatly to understanding of the general principles of synaptogenesis as well as of neuromuscular disorders. NMJ formation requires neural agrin, a motoneuron-derived protein, which interacts with LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase). However, little is known of how signals are transduced from agrin to MuSK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an agrin-LRP4 complex, consisting of two agrin-LRP4 heterodimers. Formation of the initial binary complex requires the z8 loop that is specifically present in neuronal, but not muscle, agrin and that promotes the synergistic formation of the tetramer through two additional interfaces. We show that the tetrameric complex is essential for neuronal agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Collectively, these results provide new insight into the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling cascade and NMJ formation and represent a novel mechanism for activation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  2. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  3. Anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs impede amyloid beta shedding in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Penny, Clement; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia. The amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide is the predominant candidate aetiological agent and is generated through the sequential proteolytic cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by beta (β) and gamma (γ) secretases. Since the cellular prion protein (PrPc) has been shown to regulate Aβ shedding, we investigated whether the cellular receptor for PrPc, namely the 37 kDa/67 kDa Laminin Receptor (LRP/LR) played a role in Aβ shedding. Here we show that LRP/LR co-localises with the AD relevant proteins APP, β- and γ-secretase, respectively. Antibody blockage and shRNA knock-down of LRP/LR reduces Aβ shedding, due to impediment of β-secretase activity, rather than alteration of APP, β- and γ-secretase levels. These findings indicate that LRP/LR contributes to Aβ shedding and recommend anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs as novel therapeutic tools for AD treatment. PMID:24048412

  4. A mutagenesis-derived Lrp5 mouse mutant with abnormal retinal vasculature and low bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Jeremy R.; Earp, Sarah E.; Bell, Brent A.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Godfrey, Dana A.; Rao, Sujata; Anand-Apte, Bela; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is caused by mutations in the genes encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP5) or its interacting partners, namely frizzled class receptor 4 (FZD4) and norrin cystine knot growth factor (NDP). Mouse models for Lrp5, Fzd4, and Ndp have proven to be important for understanding the retinal pathophysiology underlying FEVR and systemic abnormalities related to defective Wnt signaling. Here, we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm111B, which was identified by electroretinogram (ERG) screening of mice generated in the Jackson Laboratory Translational Vision Research Models (TVRM) mutagenesis program. Methods ERGs were used to examine outer retinal physiology. The retinal vasculature was examined by in vivo retinal imaging, as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. The tvrm111B locus was identified by genetic mapping of mice generated in a cross to DBA/2J, and subsequent sequencing analysis. Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR of retinal RNA. Bone mineral density (BMD) was examined by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The tvrm111B allele is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Genetic mapping of the decreased ERG b-wave phenotype of tvrm111B mice localized the mutation to a region on chromosome 19 that included Lrp5. Sequencing of Lrp5 identified the insertion of a cytosine (c.4724_4725insC), which is predicted to cause a frameshift that disrupts the last three of five conserved PPPSPxS motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of LRP5, culminating in a premature termination. In addition to a reduced ERG b-wave, Lrp5tvrm111B homozygotes have low BMD and abnormal features of the retinal vasculature that have been reported previously in Lrp5 mutant mice, including persistent hyaloid vessels, leakage on fluorescein angiography, and an absence of the deep retinal capillary bed. Conclusions The phenotype of the Lrp5tvrm111B mutant includes abnormalities of the retinal

  5. Novel mutations in LRP6 highlight the role of WNT signaling in tooth agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Sullivan, Robert; van Rooij, Iris A.L.M.; Thonissen, Michelle; Swinnen, Steven; Phan, Milien; Conte, Federica; Ishorst, Nina; Gilissen, Christian; RoaFuentes, Laury; van de Vorst, Maartje; Henkes, Arjen; Steehouwer, Marloes; van Beusekom, Ellen; Bloemen, Marjon; Vankeirsbilck, Bruno; Bergé, Stefaan; Hens, Greet; Schoenaers, Joseph; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Roosenboom, Jasmien; Verdonck, An; Devriendt, Koen; Roeleveldt, Nel; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Lupski, James R.; de Ligt, Joep; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Pfundt, Rolph; Brunner, Han G.; Zhou, Huiqing; Dixon, Jill; Mangold, Elisabeth; van Bokhoven, Hans; Dixon, Michael J.; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Here we aimed to identify a novel genetic cause of tooth agenesis (TA) and/or orofacial clefting (OFC) by combining whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted re-sequencing in a large cohort of TA and OFC patients. Methods WES was performed in two unrelated patients, one with severe TA and OFC and another with severe TA only. After identifying deleterious mutations in a gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), all its exons were re-sequenced with molecular inversion probes, in 67 patients with TA, 1,072 patients with OFC and in 706 controls. Results We identified a frameshift (c.4594delG, p.Cys1532fs) and a canonical splice site mutation (c.3398-2A>C, p.?) in LRP6 respectively in the patient with TA and OFC, and in the patient with severe TA only. The targeted re-sequencing showed significant enrichment of unique LRP6 variants in TA patients, but not in nonsyndromic OFC. From the 5 variants in patients with TA, 2 affect the canonical splice site and 3 were missense variants; all variants segregated with the dominant phenotype and in 1 case the missense mutation occurred de novo. Conclusion Mutations in LRP6 cause tooth agenesis in man. PMID:26963285

  6. LRP2, an auxiliary receptor that controls sonic hedgehog signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Christ, Annabel; Herzog, Katja; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    To fulfill their multiple roles in organ development and adult tissue homeostasis, hedgehog (HH) morphogens act through their receptor Patched (PTCH) on target cells. However, HH actions also require HH binding proteins, auxiliary cell surface receptors that agonize or antagonize morphogen signaling in a context-dependent manner. Here, we discuss recent findings on the LDL receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2), an exemplary HH binding protein that modulates sonic hedgehog activities in stem and progenitor cell niches in embryonic and adult tissues. LRP2 functions are crucial for developmental processes in a number of tissues, including the brain, the eye, and the heart, and defects in this receptor pathway are the cause of devastating congenital diseases in humans. Developmental Dynamics 245:569-579, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sequencing of the coding exons of the LRP1 and LDLR genes on individual DNA samples reveals novel mutations in both genes.

    PubMed

    Van Leuven, F; Thiry, E; Lambrechts, M; Stas, L; Boon, T; Bruynseels, K; Muls, E; Descamps, O

    2001-02-15

    Five coding polymorphisms in de LRP1 gene, i.e. A217V, A775P, D2080N, D2632E and G4379S were discovered by sequencing its 89 exons in three test-groups of 22 healthy individuals, 29 Alzheimer patients and 18 individuals with different clinical and molecularly uncharacterized lipid metabolism problems. No genetic defect was evident in the LRP1 gene of any of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, further excluding LRP1 as a major genetic problem in AD. Lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) A217V (exon 6) was clearly present in all groups as a polymorphism, while D2632E was observed only once in a healthy volunteer. On the other hand, LRP1 alleles A775P, D2080N, and G4379 were encountered only in patients with FH or with undefined problems of lipid metabolism. This finding forced one to also analyze the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene, for which a method was devised to sequence the entire region comprising LDLR exons 2-18. The resulting sequence contig of 33567 nucleotides yielded finally an exact physical map that corrects published and listed LDLR gene maps in many positions. In addition, next to known mutations in LDLR that cause FH, four novel LDLR defects were defined, i.e. del e7-10, exon 9 mutation N407T, a 20 bp insertion in exon 4, and a double mutation C292W/K290R in exon 6. No evidence for pathology connected to the LRP1 'mutations' was obtained by subsequent screening for the five LRP1 variants in larger groups of 110 FH patients and 118 patients with molecularly undefined, clinical problems of cholesterol and/or lipid metabolism. In three individuals with a mutant LDLR gene a variant LRP1 allele was also present, but without direct, obvious clinical compound effects, indicating that the variant LRP1 alleles must, for the present, be considered polymorphisms.

  8. Association of LRP5 gene polymorphism with type 2 diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Miao; Wang, Yonglan; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Jun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    This study was to explore the association of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5 (LRP5) gene polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover markers and glycometabolism in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and/or osteoporosis (OP) in Shanghai. 354 unrelated Han Chinese post-menopausal women were recruited from Shanghai and divided into 4 groups: OP group (n=90), T2DM group (n=96), T2DM + OP group (n=90) and control group (n=78). The LRP5 genotypes were determined by DNA sequencing. The BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The bone transformation indicators and glycometabolism index (HbA1c and Fasting insulin) were also detected. The association of LRP5 polymorphism with BMD, bone turnover markers and glycometabolism was evaluated. Result showed that, In OP group, the BMD of L2-4 was higher in patients with rs3736228 CC genotype than those with CT/TT genotypes (P<0.05). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI) and years of menopause, rs3736228 polymorphism was still associated with BMD of L2-4 (P<0.01). In the control group, HbA1c was significantly higher in patients with rs3736228 CC genotype than those with CT/TT genotypes (P<0.05), but no significant difference was found after adjustment for BMI, age and years of menopause (P>0.05). Thus, LRP5 gene is an impressionable gene in postmenopausal women with OP in Shanghai. T2DM patients have a high BMD when compared with controls, which may be related to BMI and fasting insulin (FINS). LRP5 genotype is not an impressionable gene in postmenopausal women with T2DM in Shanghai. PMID:24482712

  9. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S.; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W. Marie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  10. The Proline Rich Homeodomain Protein PRH/Hhex Forms Stable Oligomers That Are Highly Resistant to Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anshuman; Burton, Nicholas M.; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Gaston, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background Many transcription factors control gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences at or near the genes that they regulate. However, some transcription factors play more global roles in the control of gene expression by altering the architecture of sections of chromatin or even the whole genome. The ability to form oligomeric protein assemblies allows many of these proteins to manipulate extensive segments of DNA or chromatin via the formation of structures such as DNA loops or protein-DNA fibres. Principal Findings Here we show that the proline rich homeodomain protein PRH/Hhex forms predominantly octameric and/or hexadecameric species in solution as well as larger assemblies. We show that these assemblies are highly stable resisting denaturation by temperature and chemical denaturants. Conclusion These data indicate that PRH is functionally and structurally related to the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, a group of proteins that are known to act globally to control gene expression in bacteria and archaea. PMID:22540015

  11. LRP4 Is Critical for Neuromuscular Junction Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei; Xiong, Wen-cheng

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critical for NMJ maintenance because null mutation of any of the three genes is perinatal lethal. In this study, we generated imKO mice, a mutant strain whose LRP4 gene can be deleted in muscles by doxycycline (Dox) treatment. Ablation of the LRP4 gene in adult muscle enabled studies of its role in NMJ maintenance. We demonstrate that Dox treatment of P30 mice reduced muscle strength and compound muscle action potentials. AChR clusters became fragmented with diminished junctional folds and synaptic vesicles. The amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials were reduced, indicating impaired neuromuscular transmission and providing cellular mechanisms of adult LRP4 deficiency. We showed that LRP4 ablation led to the loss of synaptic agrin and the 90 kDa fragments, which occurred ahead of other prejunctional and postjunctional components, suggesting that LRP4 may regulate the stability of synaptic agrin. These observations demonstrate that LRP4 is essential for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the NMJ and that loss of muscle LRP4 in adulthood alone is sufficient to cause myasthenic symptoms. PMID:25319686

  12. Osteoblast-Specific Krm2 Overexpression and Lrp5 Deficiency Have Different Effects on Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liedert, Astrid; Röntgen, Viktoria; Schinke, Thorsten; Benisch, Peggy; Ebert, Regina; Jakob, Franz; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Lennerz, Jochen K.; Amling, Michael; Ignatius, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays a key role in the regulation of bone remodeling in mice and humans. Two transmembrane proteins that are involved in decreasing the activity of this pathway by binding to extracellular antagonists, such as Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1), are the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5 (Lrp5) and Kremen 2 (Krm2). Lrp 5 deficiency (Lrp5−/−) as well as osteoblast-specific overexpression of Krm2 in mice (Col1a1-Krm2) result in severe osteoporosis occurring at young age. In this study, we analyzed the influence of Lrp5 deficiency and osteoblast-specific overexpression of Krm2 on fracture healing in mice using flexible and semi-rigid fracture fixation. We demonstrated that fracture healing was highly impaired in both mouse genotypes, but that impairment was more severe in Col1a1-Krm2 than in Lrp5−/− mice and particularly evident in mice in which the more flexible fixation was used. Bone formation was more reduced in Col1a1-Krm2 than in Lrp5−/− mice, whereas osteoclast number was similarly increased in both genotypes in comparison with wild-type mice. Using microarray analysis we identified reduced expression of genes mainly involved in osteogenesis that seemed to be responsible for the observed stronger impairment of healing in Col1a1-Krm2 mice. In line with these findings, we detected decreased expression of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) and less active β-catenin in the calli of Col1a1-Krm2 mice. Since Krm2 seems to play a significant role in regulating bone formation during fracture healing, antagonizing KRM2 might be a therapeutic option to improve fracture healing under compromised conditions, such as osteoporosis. PMID:25061805

  13. LRP1 influences trafficking of N-type calcium channels via interaction with the auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kadurin, Ivan; Rothwell, Simon W.; Lana, Beatrice; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit, which determines the main functional and pharmacological attributes of the channel. The CaV1 and CaV2 channels are associated with auxiliary β- and α2δ-subunits. The molecular mechanisms involved in α2δ subunit trafficking, and the effect of α2δ subunits on trafficking calcium channel complexes remain poorly understood. Here we show that α2δ-1 is a ligand for the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-related Protein-1 (LRP1), a multifunctional receptor which mediates trafficking of cargoes. This interaction with LRP1 is direct, and is modulated by the LRP chaperone, Receptor-Associated Protein (RAP). LRP1 regulates α2δ binding to gabapentin, and influences calcium channel trafficking and function. Whereas LRP1 alone reduces α2δ-1 trafficking to the cell-surface, the LRP1/RAP combination enhances mature glycosylation, proteolytic processing and cell-surface expression of α2δ-1, and also increase plasma-membrane expression and function of CaV2.2 when co-expressed with α2δ-1. Furthermore RAP alone produced a small increase in cell-surface expression of CaV2.2, α2δ-1 and the associated calcium currents. It is likely to be interacting with an endogenous member of the LDL receptor family to have these effects. Our findings now provide a key insight and new tools to investigate the trafficking of calcium channel α2δ subunits. PMID:28256585

  14. Rescuing effects of RXR agonist bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss depend on neuronal LRP1.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaya; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Yu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Rogers, Justin; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic integrity by transporting cholesterol to neurons through the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1). Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, has been reported to have potential beneficial effects on cognition by increasing brain apoE levels and lipidation. To investigate the effects of bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss and the contribution of neuronal LRP1 to the pathway, forebrain neuron-specific LRP1 knockout (nLrp1(-/-)) and littermate control mice were administered with bexarotene-formulated diet (100mg/kg/day) or control diet at the age of 20-24 months for 8 weeks. Upon bexarotene treatment, levels of brain apoE and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) were significantly increased in both mice. While levels of PSD95, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit (NR1), which are key postsynaptic proteins that regulate synaptic plasticity, were decreased with aging, they were restored by bexarotene treatment in the brains of control but not nLrp1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of bexarotene on synaptic integrity depend on the presence of neuronal LRP1. However, we also found that bexarotene treatment led to the activation of glial cells, weight loss and hepatomegaly, which are likely due to hepatic failure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE-targeted treatment through the RXR pathway has a potential beneficial effect on synapses during aging; however, the therapeutic application of bexarotene requires extreme caution due to its toxic side effects.

  15. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  16. Resisting protein adsorption on biodegradable polyester brushes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinfang; Gorman, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    The protein adsorption and degradation behaviors of poly(lactic acid), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) brushes and their co-polymer brushes with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) were studied. Both brush structure and relative amount of OEG and polyester were found to be important to the protein resistance of the brushes. A protein-resisting surface can be fabricated either by using OEG as the top layer of a copolymer brush or by increasing the amount of OEG relative to polyester when using a hydroxyl terminated OEG (OEG-OH) and a methoxy terminated OEG (OEG-OMe) mixture as the substrate layer. The degradation of single polyester brushes and their co-polymer brushes using OEG-OH as a substrate layer or using OEG as a top layer was hindered. This phenomenon was rationalized by the inhibition of the proposed back-biting process as the hydroxy end groups of polyester were blocked by OEG molecules. Among these brushes tested, PGA co-polymer brushes using the methoxy/hydroxyl OEG mixture as the substrate layer proved to be both protein-resistant and degradable due to the relatively large amount of OEG moieties and the good biodegradability of PGA.

  17. Expression of the alaE gene is positively regulated by the global regulator Lrp in response to intracellular accumulation of l-alanine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kohei; Sato, Kazuki; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Makino, Yumiko; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The alaE gene in Escherichia coli encodes an l-alanine exporter that catalyzes the active export of l-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. In our previous study, alaE expression was shown to increase in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (Ala-Ala). In this study, the global regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) was identified as an activator of the alaE gene. A promoter less β-galactosidase gene was fused to an alaE upstream region (240 nucleotides). Cells that were lacZ-deficient and harbored this reporter plasmid showed significant induction of β-galactosidase activity (approximately 17-fold) in the presence of 6 mM l-alanine, l-leucine, and Ala-Ala. However, a reporter plasmid possessing a smaller alaE upstream region (180 nucleotides) yielded transformants with strikingly low enzyme activity under the same conditions. In contrast, lrp-deficient cells showed almost no β-galactosidase induction, indicating that Lrp positively regulates alaE expression. We next performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a DNase I footprinting assay using purified hexahistidine-tagged Lrp (Lrp-His). Consequently, we found that Lrp-His binds to the alaE upstream region spanning nucleotide -161 to -83 with a physiologically relevant affinity (apparent KD, 288.7 ± 83.8 nM). Furthermore, the binding affinity of Lrp-His toward its cis-element was increased by l-alanine and l-leucine, but not by Ala-Ala and d-alanine. Based on these results, we concluded that the gene expression of the alaE is regulated by Lrp in response to intracellular levels of l-alanine, which eventually leads to intracellular homeostasis of l-alanine concentrations.

  18. sRNA roles in regulating transcriptional regulators: Lrp and SoxS regulation by sRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors contributes to regulatory circuits. We created translational reporter fusions for multiple central regulators in Escherichia coli and examined the effect of Hfq-dependent non-coding RNAs on these fusions. This approach yields an ‘RNA landscape,’ identifying Hfq-dependent sRNAs that regulate a given fusion. No significant sRNA regulation of crp or fnr was detected. hns was regulated only by DsrA, as previously reported. Lrp and SoxS were both found to be regulated post-transcriptionally. Lrp, ‘leucine-responsive regulatory protein,’ regulates genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism and other cellular functions. sRNAs DsrA, MicF and GcvB each independently downregulate the lrp translational fusion, confirming previous reports for MicF and GcvB. MicF and DsrA interact with an overlapping site early in the lrp ORF, while GcvB acts upstream at two independent sites in the long lrp leader. Surprisingly, GcvB was found to be responsible for significant downregulation of lrp after oxidative stress; MicF also contributed. SoxS, an activator of genes used to combat oxidative stress, is negatively regulated by sRNA MgrR. This study demonstrates that while not all global regulators are subject to sRNA regulation, post-transcriptional control by sRNAs allows multiple environmental signals to affect synthesis of the transcriptional regulator. PMID:27137887

  19. Polarized Traffic of LRP1 Involves AP1B and SNX17 Operating on Y-dependent Sorting Motifs in Different Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, Maribel; Cancino, Jorge; Lee, Jiyeon; van Kerkhof, Peter; Retamal, Claudio; Bu, Guojun; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic recycling receptor with two cytoplasmic tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signals. Here we show that during biosynthetic trafficking LRP1 uses AP1B adaptor complex to move from a post-TGN recycling endosome (RE) to the basolateral membrane. Then it recycles basolaterally from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE) involving recognition by sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). In the biosynthetic pathway, Y29 but not N26 from a proximal NPXY directs LRP1 basolateral sorting from the TGN. A N26A mutant revealed that this NPXY motif recognized by SNX17 is required for the receptor's exit from BSE. An endocytic Y63ATL66 motif also functions in basolateral recycling, in concert with an additional endocytic motif (LL86,87), by preventing LRP1 entry into the transcytotic apical pathway. All this sorting information operates similarly in hippocampal neurons to mediate LRP1 somatodendritic distribution regardless of the absence of AP1B in neurons. LRP1 basolateral distribution results then from spatially and temporally segregation steps mediated by recognition of distinct tyrosine-based motifs. We also demonstrate a novel function of SNX17 in basolateral/somatodendritic recycling from a different compartment than AP1B endosomes. PMID:19005208

  20. Characterization of genetically engineered mouse models carrying Col2a1-cre-induced deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Cassie A; Joiner, Danese M; Less, Kennen D; Drewry, Melissa Oosterhouse; Williams, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Mice carrying Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6 were created and characterized. Mice lacking either gene alone were viable and fertile with normal knee morphology. Mice in which both Lrp5 and Lrp6 were conditionally ablated via Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletion displayed severe defects in skeletal development during embryogenesis. In addition, adult mice carrying Collagen2a1-cre-mediated deletions of Lrp5 and/or Lrp6 displayed low bone mass suggesting that the Collagen2a1-cre transgene was active in cells that subsequently differentiated into osteoblasts. In both embryonic skeletal development and establishment of adult bone mass, Lrp5 and Lrp6 carry out redundant functions. PMID:26962465

  1. Analysis of the effect of LRP-1 silencing on the invasive potential of cancer cells by nanomechanical probing and adhesion force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cigne, A.; Chièze, L.; Beaussart, A.; El-Kirat-Chatel, S.; Dufrêne, Y. F.; Dedieu, S.; Schneider, C.; Martiny, L.; Devy, J.; Molinari, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies that target LRP-1 to modulate proteolysis could also affect adhesion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Here, we investigated the effect of LRP-1 silencing on parameters reflecting cancer cells' invasiveness by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that LRP-1 silencing induces changes in the cells' adhesion behavior, particularly the dynamics of cell attachment. Clear alterations in morphology, such as more pronounced stress fibers and increased spreading, leading to increased area and circularity, were also observed. The determination of the cells' mechanical properties by AFM showed that these differences are correlated with an increase in Young's modulus. Moreover, the measurements show an overall decrease in cell motility and modifications of directional persistence. An overall increase in the adhesion force between the LRP-1-silenced cells and a gelatin-coated bead was also observed. Ultimately, our AFM-based force spectroscopy data, recorded using an antibody directed against the β1 integrin subunit, provide evidence that LRP-1 silencing modifies the rupture force distribution. Together, our results show that techniques traditionally used for the investigation of cancer cells can be coupled with AFM to gain access to complementary phenotypic parameters that can help discriminate between specific phenotypes associated with different degrees of invasiveness.Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) can internalize proteases involved in cancer progression and is thus considered a promising therapeutic target. However, it has been demonstrated that LRP-1 is also able to regulate the endocytosis of membrane-anchored proteins. Thus, strategies

  2. Crystal structures of the extracellular domain of LRP6 and its complex with DKK1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhihong; Biechele, Travis; Wei, Zhiyi; Morrone, Seamus; Moon, Randall T.; Wang, Liguo; Xu, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    LRP5 and LRP6 are Wnt co-receptors essential for Wnt/β-catenin signaling. DKK1 inhibits Wnt signaling by interacting with the extracellular domain of LRP5/6, and is a drug target for multiple diseases. Here we present the crystal structures of the first and second halves of LRP6’s four propeller–EGF pairs (LRP6-E1E2 and LRP6-E3E4), and a LRP6-E3E4/DKK1 complex. Combined with EM analysis, these data demonstrate that LRP6-E1E2 and LRP6-E3E4 form two rigid structural blocks, with a short intervening hinge that restrains their relative orientation. DKK1c interacts with the top surface of the LRP6-E3 YWTD propeller, and likely also that of the LRP6-E1 propeller due to structural similarity, through conserved hydrophobic patches buttressed by a network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. Our work provides key insights for understanding LRP5/6 structure and the interaction of LRP5/6 with DKK, as well as for drug discovery. PMID:21984209

  3. Calcipotriol Targets LRP6 to Inhibit Wnt Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Nguyen, Phillip; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Lay, Anna R.; Ostertag-Hill, Claire A.; Sherman, Mara H.; Downes, Michael; Liddle, Christopher; Evans, Ronald M.; Dawson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive malignancy in need of more effective treatment approaches. One potential therapeutic target is Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which plays important roles in PDAC tumor initiation and progression. Among Wnt inhibitors with suitable in vivo biological activity is vitamin D, which is known to antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer and have anti-tumor activity in PDAC. For this study the relationship between vitamin D signaling, Wnt/β-catenin activity and tumor cell growth in PDAC was investigated through the use of calcipotriol, a potent non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analog. PDAC tumor cell growth inhibition by calcipotriol was positively correlated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression and Wnt/β-catenin activity. Furthermore, vitamin D and Wnt signaling activity were found to be reciprocally linked through feedback regulation. Calcipotriol inhibited autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling in PDAC cell lines in parallel with decreased protein levels of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), a requisite co-receptor for ligand-dependent canonical Wnt signaling. Decrease in LRP6 protein seen with calcipotriol was mediated through a novel mechanism involving transcriptional upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1 (LDLRAP1). Finally, changes in LRP6 or LDLRAP1 expression directly altered Wnt reporter activity, supporting their roles as regulators of ligand-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Implications This study provides a novel biochemical target through which vitamin D signaling exerts inhibitory effects on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as potential biomarkers for predicting and following tumor response to vitamin D-based therapy. PMID:26224368

  4. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  5. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  6. 42 CFR 68a.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT... participate in the CR-LRP? An application for participation in the CR-LRP shall be submitted to the NIH...

  7. Resistant mechanisms of anthracyclines--pirarubicin might partly break through the P-glycoprotein-mediated drug-resistance of human breast cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Furukawa, T; Tanino, H; Suto, A; Otan, Y; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, T; Kitajima, M

    2001-01-01

    Juliano and Ling initially reported the expression of a 170 kDa glycoprotein in the membrane of Chinese hamster ovarian cells in 1976, and named this glycoprotein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) based on its predicted role of causing "permeability" of the cell membrane. After much research on anthracycline-resistance, this P-gp was finally characterized as a multidrug-resistant protein coded by the mdr1 gene. Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) was initially cloned from H69AR, a human small cell-lung carcinoma cell line which is resistant to doxorubicin (DXR) but does not express P-gp. MRP also excretes substrates through the cell membrane using energy from ATP catabolism. The substrate of MRP is conjugated with glutathione before active efflux from cell membrane. Recently, membrane transporter proteins were re-categorized as members of "ATP-Binding Cassette transporter"(ABC-transporter) superfamily, as shown at http://www.med.rug.nl/mdl/humanabc.htm and http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/genefamily/abc.html. A total of ABC transporters have been defined, and MDR1 and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) were reclassified as ABCB1 and ABCC1, respectively. Their associated superfamilies include 11 and 13 other protein, in addition to ABCB and ABCC, respectively. Lung resistance-related protein (LRP) is not a member of the superfamily of ABC transporter proteins, because it shows nuclear membrane expression and transports substrate between nucleus and cytoplasm. LRP was initially cloned from a non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line, SW1573/2R120 which is resistant to DXR, vincristine, etoposide and gramicidin D and does not express P-gp. The mechanisms of resistance remains unclear, and why some resistant cell lines express P-gp and others express MRP and/or LRP is likewise unclear.

  8. Rare nonconservative LRP6 mutations are associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajvir; Smith, Emily; Fathzadeh, Mohsen; Liu, Wenzhong; Go, Gwang-Woong; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Faramarzi, Saeed; McKenna, William; Mani, Arya

    2013-09-01

    A rare mutation in LRP6 has been shown to underlie autosomal dominant coronary artery disease (CAD) and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian kindred. The prevalence and spectrum of LRP6 mutations in the disease population of the United States is not known. Two hundred white Americans with early onset familial CAD and metabolic syndrome and 2,000 healthy Northern European controls were screened for nonconservative mutations in LRP6. Three novel mutations were identified, which cosegregated with the metabolic traits in the kindreds of the affected subjects and none in the controls. All three mutations reside in the second propeller domain, which plays a critical role in ligand binding. Two of the mutations substituted highly conserved arginines in the second YWTD domain and the third substituted a conserved glycosylation site. The functional characterization of one of the variants showed that it impairs Wnt signaling and acts as a loss of function mutation.

  9. Ubiquitin-dependent folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Perrody, Elsa; Abrami, Laurence; Feldman, Michal; Kunz, Beatrice; Urbé, Sylvie; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-01-01

    Many membrane proteins fold inefficiently and require the help of enzymes and chaperones. Here we reveal a novel folding assistance system that operates on membrane proteins from the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that folding of the Wnt signaling coreceptor LRP6 is promoted by ubiquitination of a specific lysine, retaining it in the ER while avoiding degradation. Subsequent ER exit requires removal of ubiquitin from this lysine by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP19. This ubiquitination-deubiquitination is conceptually reminiscent of the glucosylation-deglucosylation occurring in the ER lumen during the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle. To avoid infinite futile cycles, folded LRP6 molecules undergo palmitoylation and ER export, while unsuccessfully folded proteins are, with time, polyubiquitinated on other lysines and targeted to degradation. This ubiquitin-dependent folding system also controls the proteostasis of other membrane proteins as CFTR and anthrax toxin receptor 2, two poor folders involved in severe human diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19083.001 PMID:27751231

  10. Reversal of cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells by Taxus chinensis var.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y Q; Xu, X P; Guo, Q M; Xu, X C; Liu, Q Y; An, S H; Xu, J L; Su, F; Tai, J B

    2016-09-02

    Drug resistance in cells is a major impedance to successful treatment of lung cancer. Taxus chinensis var. inhibits the growth of tumor cells and promotes the synthesis of interleukins 1 and 2 and tumor necrosis factor, enhancing immune function. In this study, T. chinensis var.-induced cell death was analyzed in lung cancer cells (H460) enriched for stem cell growth in a defined serum-free medium. Taxus-treated stem cells were also analyzed for Rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) expression by flow cytometry, and used as a standard functional indicator of MDR. The molecular basis of T. chinensis var.-mediated drug resistance was established by real-time PCR analysis of ABCC1, ABCB1, and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) mRNA, and western blot analysis of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP. Our results revealed that stem cells treated with higher doses of T. chinensis var. showed significantly lower growth inhibition rates than did H460 cells (P < 0.05). The growth of stem and H460 cells treated with a combination of T. chinensis var. and cisplatin was also significantly inhibited (P < 0.05). Rh-123 was significantly accumulated in the intracellular region and showed delayed efflux in stem cells treated with T. chinensis var. (P < 0.05), compared to those treated with verapamil. T. chinensis var.-treated stem cells showed significant downregulation of the ABCC1, ABCB1, and LRP mRNA and MRP1, MDR1, and LRP (P < 0.05) compared to H460 cells. Thus, T. chinensis var.-mediated downregulation of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP might contribute to the reversal of drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells.

  11. A sorting nexin 17-binding domain within the LRP1 cytoplasmic tail mediates receptor recycling through the basolateral sorting endosome.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Pamela; Lee, Jiyeon; Larios, Jorge; Sotelo, Pablo; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2013-07-01

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is an adaptor protein present in early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive sorting endosomes that promotes the efficient recycling of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to the plasma membrane through recognition of the first NPxY motif in the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor. The interaction of LRP1 with SNX17 also regulates the basolateral recycling of the receptor from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE). In contrast, megalin, which is apically distributed in polarized epithelial cells and localizes poorly to EEA1-positive sorting endosomes, does not interact with SNX17, despite containing three NPxY motifs, indicating that this motif is not sufficient for receptor recognition by SNX17. Here, we identified a cluster of 32 amino acids within the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for SNX17 binding. To delineate the function of this SNX17-binding domain, we generated chimeric proteins in which the SNX17-binding domain was inserted into the cytoplasmic tail of megalin. This insertion mediated the binding of megalin to SNX17 and modified the cell surface expression and recycling of megalin in non-polarized cells. However, the polarized localization of chimeric megalin was not modified in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These results provide evidence regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the specificity of SNX17-binding receptors and the restricted function of SNX17 in the BSE.

  12. A sorting nexin 17-binding domain within the LRP1 cytoplasmic tail mediates receptor recycling through the basolateral sorting endosome

    PubMed Central

    Farfán, Pamela; Lee, Jiyeon; Larios, Jorge; Sotelo, Pablo; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2013-01-01

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is an adaptor protein present in EEA1-positive sorting endosomes that promotes the efficient recycling of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to the plasma membrane through recognition of the first NPxY motif in the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor. The interaction of LRP1 with SNX17 also regulates the basolateral recycling of the receptor from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE). In contrast, megalin, which is apically distributed in polarized epithelial cells and localizes poorly to EEA1-positive sorting endosomes, does not interact with SNX17, despite containing three NPxY motifs, indicating that this motif is not sufficient for receptor recognition by SNX17. Here, we identified a cluster of 32 amino acids within the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for SNX17 binding. To delineate the function of this SNX17-binding domain, we generated chimeric proteins in which the SNX17-binding domain was inserted into the cytoplasmic tail of megalin. This insertion mediated the binding of megalin to SNX17 and modified the cell surface expression and recycling of megalin in non-polarized cells. However, the polarized localization of chimeric megalin was not modified in polarized MDCK cells. These results provide evidence regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the specificity of SNX17-binding receptors and the restricted function of SNX17 in the BSE. PMID:23593972

  13. Cytotoxicity mechanism of α-MMC in normal liver cells through LRP1 mediated endocytosis and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Shen, Fubing; Zhang, Min; He, Qianchuan; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xiaoping; Yang, Shuxia; Liu, Yang; Deng, Nianhua; Zheng, Juecun; Zhu, Lixia; Liu, Xiaolan

    2016-05-16

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein isolated from Momordica charantia, is a potential drug candidate with strong anti-tumor activity. However, α-MMC has a severe hepatotoxicity when applied in vivo, which may greatly hinders its use in clinic in the future. The biological mechanism of hepatotoxicity induced by α-MMC is largely unknown, especially the mechanism by which α-MMC enters the hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity in normal liver L02 cell line as well as the mechanism underlying it. As expected, α-MMC is more toxic in L02 cells than in various normal cells from other organs. The cytotoxic effect of α-MMC on L02 cells is found to be mediated through cell apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Importantly, α-MMC was shown to bind to a specific receptor on cell membrane, as the density of the cell membrane receptor is closely related to both the amount of α-MMC endocytosed and the cytotoxicity in different cell lines. By using LRP1 competitive inhibitor α2-M or siRNA targeting LRP1, we further identified that LRP1 protein served as the membrane receptor for α-MMC. Both α2-M and siRNA targeting LRP1 can significantly inhibit α-MMC's endocytosis as well as its cytotoxicity in L02 cells. In addition, it was found that α-MMC can activate the JNK signalling pathways via LRP1 in L02 cells. As JNK activation often leads to cell apoptosis, the activation of JNK may play an important role in α-MMC-induced cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that LRP1 mediates the cytotoxicity of α-MMC through (1) endocytosis and induced apoptosis and (2) the activation of the JNK pathway. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of hepatotoxicity of α-MMC and offer reference to understand its mechanism of lymphocytotoxicity and neurotoxicity.

  14. The Extracellular Domain of Lrp5/6 Inhibits Noncanonical Wnt Signaling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emma R.; Schambony, Alexandra; Esner, Milan; Bryjová, Lenka; Biris, Kristin K.; Hall, Anita C.; Kraft, Bianca; Cajanek, Lukas; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Buckingham, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Lrp5/6 are crucial coreceptors for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a pathway biochemically distinct from noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. Here, we examined the possible participation of Lrp5/6 in noncanonical Wnt signaling. We found that Lrp6 physically interacts with Wnt5a, but that this does not lead to phosphorylation of Lrp6 or activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Overexpression of Lrp6 blocks activation of the Wnt5a downstream target Rac1, and this effect is dependent on intact Lrp6 extracellular domains. These results suggested that the extracellular domain of Lrp6 inhibits noncanonical Wnt signaling in vitro. In vivo, Lrp6−/− mice exhibited exencephaly and a heart phenotype. Surprisingly, these defects were rescued by deletion of Wnt5a, indicating that the phenotypes resulted from noncanonical Wnt gain-of-function. Similarly, Lrp5 and Lrp6 antisense morpholino-treated Xenopus embryos exhibited convergent extension and heart phenotypes that were rescued by knockdown of noncanonical XWnt5a and XWnt11. Thus, we provide evidence that the extracellular domains of Lrp5/6 behave as physiologically relevant inhibitors of noncanonical Wnt signaling during Xenopus and mouse development in vivo. PMID:19056682

  15. New Insights into Wnt–Lrp5/6–β-Catenin Signaling in Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Shin; Robling, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading is essential to maintain normal bone metabolism and the balance between bone formation and resorption. The cellular mechanisms that control mechanotransduction are not fully defined, but several key pathways have been identified. We discuss the roles of several components of the Wnt signaling cascade, namely Lrp5, Lrp6, and β-catenin in mechanical loading-induced bone formation. Lrp5 is an important Wnt co-receptor for regulating bone mass and mechanotransduction, and appears to function principally by augmenting bone formation. Lrp6 also regulates bone mass but its action might involve resorption as well as formation. The role of Lrp6 in mechanotransduction is unclear. Studies addressing the role of β-catenin in bone metabolism and mechanotransduction highlight the uncertainties in downstream modulators of Lrp5 and Lrp6. Taken together, these data indicate that mechanical loading might affect bone regulation triggering the canonical Wnt signaling (and perhaps other pathways) not only via Lrp5 but also via Lrp6. Further work is needed to clarify the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in Lrp5 and/or Lrp6-mediated mechanotransduction, which could eventually lead to powerful therapeutic agents that might mimic the anabolic effects of mechanical stimulation. PMID:25653639

  16. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Veth, Kerry N; Willer, Jason R; Collery, Ross F; Gray, Matthew P; Willer, Gregory B; Wagner, Daniel S; Mullins, Mary C; Udvadia, Ava J; Smith, Richard S; John, Simon W M; Gregg, Ronald G; Link, Brian A

    2011-02-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  17. Mutations in Zebrafish lrp2 Result in Adult-Onset Ocular Pathogenesis That Models Myopia and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Veth, Kerry N.; Willer, Jason R.; Collery, Ross F.; Gray, Matthew P.; Willer, Gregory B.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Mullins, Mary C.; Udvadia, Ava J.; Smith, Richard S.; John, Simon W. M.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Link, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, Bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals—but not all—develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease. PMID:21379331

  18. Double Seronegative Myasthenia Gravis with Anti-LRP4 Antibodies Presenting with Dropped Head and Acute Respiratory Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Goichi; Yabumoto, Taiki; Baba, Kousuke; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Higuchi, Osamu; Matsuo, Hidenori; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 72-year-old man demonstrating myasthenia gravis (MG) with a dropped head and acute respiratory insufficiency. There was no ocular, bulbar, or limb involvement. The patient was seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies. Subsequent tests showed seropositivity for anti-low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) antibodies. The addition of steroid pulse therapy resulted in a full remission of his respiratory symptoms. This presentation suggests that LRP4-positive MG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory insufficiency without either cranial or limb involvement. PMID:27853084

  19. miR-375-3p negatively regulates osteogenesis by targeting and decreasing the expression levels of LRP5 and β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianhao; Li, Chen-Tian; Xiong, Lifeng; Ning, Ziyu; Leung, Frankie; Peng, Songlin

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways are essential for bone formation. Previous studies showed that Wnt signaling pathways were regulated by miR-375. Thus, we aim to explore whether miR-375 could affect osteogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the roles of miR-375 and its downstream targets. Firstly, we revealed that miR-375-3p negatively modulated osteogenesis by suppressing positive regulators of osteogenesis and promoting negative regulators of osteogenesis. In addition, the results of TUNEL cell apoptosis assay showed that miR-375-3p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis. Secondly, miR-375-3p targeted low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), a co-receptor of the Wnt signaling pathways, and β-catenin as determined by luciferase activity assay, and it decreased the expression levels of LRP5 and β-catenin. Thirdly, the decline of protein levels of β-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Finally, silence of LRP5 in osteoblast precursor cells resulted in diminished cell viability and cell proliferation as detected by WST-1-based colorimetric assay. Additionally, all the parameters including the relative bone volume from μCT measurement suggested that LRP5 knockout in mice resulted in a looser and worse-connected trabeculae. The mRNA levels of important negative modulators relating to osteogenesis increased after the functions of LRP5 were blocked in mice. Last but not least, the expression levels of LRP5 increased during the osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1, while the levels of β-catenin decreased in bone tissues from osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures. In conclusion, we revealed miR-375-3p negatively regulated osteogenesis by targeting LRP5 and β-catenin. In addition, loss of functions of LRP5 damaged bone formation in vivo. Clinically, miR-375-3p and its targets might be used as diagnostic biomarkers for osteoporosis and might be also as novel therapeutic agents in osteoporosis treatment. The relevant

  20. LRP-1-mediated intracellular antibody delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohe; Nyberg, Sophie; S. Sharp, Paul; Madsen, Jeppe; Daneshpour, Nooshin; Armes, Steven P.; Berwick, Jason; Azzouz, Mimoun; Shaw, Pamela; Abbott, N. Joan; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is by far the most important target in developing new approaches to improve delivery of drugs and diagnostic tools into the Central Nervous System (CNS). Here we report the engineering of pH- sensitive polymersomes (synthetic vesicles formed by amphiphilic copolymers) that exploit endogenous transport mechanisms to traverse the BBB, enabling delivery of large macromolecules into both the CNS parenchyma and CNS cells. We achieve this by targeting the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor. We show that LRP-1 is associated with endothelial transcytosis that does not involve acidification of cargo in membrane-trafficking organelles. By contrast, this receptor is also associated with traditional endocytosis in CNS cells, thus aiding the delivery of relevant cargo within their cytosol. We prove this using IgG as a model cargo, thus demonstrating that the combination of appropriate targeting combined with pH-sensitive polymersomes enables the efficient delivery of macromolecules into CNS cells. PMID:26189707

  1. LRP-1-mediated intracellular antibody delivery to the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaohe; Nyberg, Sophie; S. Sharp, Paul; Madsen, Jeppe; Daneshpour, Nooshin; Armes, Steven P.; Berwick, Jason; Azzouz, Mimoun; Shaw, Pamela; Abbott, N. Joan; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is by far the most important target in developing new approaches to improve delivery of drugs and diagnostic tools into the Central Nervous System (CNS). Here we report the engineering of pH- sensitive polymersomes (synthetic vesicles formed by amphiphilic copolymers) that exploit endogenous transport mechanisms to traverse the BBB, enabling delivery of large macromolecules into both the CNS parenchyma and CNS cells. We achieve this by targeting the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor. We show that LRP-1 is associated with endothelial transcytosis that does not involve acidification of cargo in membrane-trafficking organelles. By contrast, this receptor is also associated with traditional endocytosis in CNS cells, thus aiding the delivery of relevant cargo within their cytosol. We prove this using IgG as a model cargo, thus demonstrating that the combination of appropriate targeting combined with pH-sensitive polymersomes enables the efficient delivery of macromolecules into CNS cells.

  2. Severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by loss of LRP4 function.

    PubMed

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Stollfuß, Barbara; Li, Yun; Bögershausen, Nina; Boss, Karin; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-06-01

    Limb patterning and growth are complex embryonic processes in which the elaborately orchestrated interplay of diverse endocrine and paracrine factors is crucial to limb integrity. LRP4 is a lipoprotein receptor known for its regulatory effects on LRP5- and LRP6-mediated Wnt signaling, a pathway that plays a pivotal role in limb development. Recessive mutations in LRP4 have been shown to cause Cenani-Lenz syndrome, which is characterized by severe limb malformations, an unusual face, and renal abnormalities. We report on a child with severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in LRP4. The severity of the phenotype in a patient with absent residual LRP4 function may point to a genotype-phenotype correlation.

  3. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition.

  4. Integrative mutation, haplotype and G × G interaction evidence connects ABGL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 genes to cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Yao, Li-Mei; Huang, Feng; Pan, Ling; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Yang, De-Zhai; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2016-01-01

    This study is expected to investigate the association of ATP/GTP binding protein-like 4 (AGBL4), LDL receptor related protein 8 (LRP8) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with lipid metabolism in 2,552 individuals (Jing, 1,272 and Han, 1,280). We identified 12 mutations in this motif. The genotype and allele frequencies of these variants were different between the two populations. Multiple-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) elucidated the detected sites are not statistically independent. Possible integrative haplotypes and gene-by-gene (G × G) interactions, comprising mutations of the AGBL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 associated with total cholesterol (TC, AGBL4 G-G-A, PCSK9 C-G-A-A and G-G-A-A-C-A-T-T-T-G-G-A), triglyceride (TG, AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, AGBL4 A-A-G and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and the apolipoprotein(Apo)A1/ApoB ratio (A1/B, PCSK9 C-A-A-G) in Jing minority. However, in the Hans, with TG (AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C), LDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and A1/B (LRP8 A-C-A-T-T and PCSK9 C-A-A-G). Association analysis based on haplotype clusters and G × G interactions probably increased power over single-locus tests especially for TG. PMID:27853278

  5. Integrative mutation, haplotype and G × G interaction evidence connects ABGL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 genes to cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Yao, Li-Mei; Huang, Feng; Pan, Ling; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Yang, De-Zhai; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2016-11-17

    This study is expected to investigate the association of ATP/GTP binding protein-like 4 (AGBL4), LDL receptor related protein 8 (LRP8) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with lipid metabolism in 2,552 individuals (Jing, 1,272 and Han, 1,280). We identified 12 mutations in this motif. The genotype and allele frequencies of these variants were different between the two populations. Multiple-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) elucidated the detected sites are not statistically independent. Possible integrative haplotypes and gene-by-gene (G × G) interactions, comprising mutations of the AGBL4, LRP8 and PCSK9 associated with total cholesterol (TC, AGBL4 G-G-A, PCSK9 C-G-A-A and G-G-A-A-C-A-T-T-T-G-G-A), triglyceride (TG, AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, AGBL4 A-A-G and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and the apolipoprotein(Apo)A1/ApoB ratio (A1/B, PCSK9 C-A-A-G) in Jing minority. However, in the Hans, with TG (AGBL4 G-G-A, LRP8 G-A-G-C-C, PCSK9 C-A-A-G, A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-A-A-G and A-A-G-G-A-G-C-C-C-G-A-A), HDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C), LDL-C (LRP8 A-A-G-T-C and A-A-G-A-A-G-T-C-C-A-A-G) and A1/B (LRP8 A-C-A-T-T and PCSK9 C-A-A-G). Association analysis based on haplotype clusters and G × G interactions probably increased power over single-locus tests especially for TG.

  6. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species’ resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta

  7. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species' resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta-isomerase family.

  8. The rs3736228 polymorphism in the LRP5 gene is associated with calcaneal ultrasound parameter but not with body composition in a cohort of young Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rodríguez, María; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Rueda-Medina, Blanca

    2016-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and sclerostin (SOST) genes as genetic factors contributing to calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and body composition variables in a population of young Caucasian adults. The study population comprised a total of 575 individuals (mean age 20.41years; SD 2.36) whose bone mass was assessed through QUS to determine broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz). Body composition measurements were performed using a body composition analyser. Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of LRP5 (rs2306862, rs599083, rs556442 and rs3736228) and SOST (rs4792909, rs851054 and rs2023794) were selected as genetic markers and genotyped using TaqMan OpenArray(®) technology. Linear regression analysis was used to test the possible association of the tested SNPs with QUS and body composition parameters. Linear regression analysis revealed that the rs3736228 SNP of LPR5 was significantly associated with BUA after adjustment for age, sex, weight, height, physical activity and calcium intake (P = 0.028, β (95% CI) = 0.089 (0.099-1.691). For the remaining SNPs, no significant association with the QUS measurement was observed. Regarding body composition, no significant association was found between LRP5 and SOST polymorphisms and body mass index, total fat mass and total lean mass after adjustment for age and sex as covariates. We concluded that the rs3736228 LRP5 genetic polymorphism influences calcaneal QUS parameter in a population of young Caucasian adults. This finding suggests that LRP5 might be an important genetic marker contributing to bone mass accrual early in life.

  9. Effect and mechanism of resveratrol on drug resistance in human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Qian; Xie, Qing; Zhang, Man

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant barrier to the effective treatment of bladder cancer. In order to improve the management of bladder cancer, it is crucial to identify strategies that may reverse MDR. The effects of three herbal medicines, ginsenoside Rh2, (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol (RES) on bladder cancer were determined. The effect of these three herbal medicines against the drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM)-resistant pumc-91 cells (pumc-91/ADM) was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit-8 cell proliferation assay system. Cell cycle distribution analysis was performed using flow cytometry following treatment with RES. The mRNA and protein expression levels of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), lung resistance protein (LRP), glutathione S-transferase (GST), B cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) and topoisomerase-II (Topo-II) were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence, respectively. RES enhanced the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on pumc-91/ADM cells; however, Rh2 and EGCG were unable to induce a similar effect. Additionally, RES treatment led to S phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by a decrease in the number of cells in the G1 phase. A significant decrease of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL-2 levels and an increase of Topo-II levels were observed in RES groups compared with the control group. RES effectively reversed ADM resistance in pumc-91/ADM cells and the underlying molecular mechanism may be associated with the alteration of MRP1, LRP, GST, BCL-2 and Topo-II expression levels. Therefore, RES may be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28098863

  10. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system.

  11. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  12. Tween surfactants: Adsorption, self-organization, and protein resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Guo, Athena; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2011-03-01

    Tween surfactants, each containing hydrophilic ethylene glycol head groups and a hydrophobic alkyl tail, are being actively explored as protein-resistant surface coatings, but little is known about how they adsorb on surfaces. We carry out a comparative study of the adsorption of two Tween molecules (same hydrophilic head group, but a shorter dodecyl tail for Tween 20 and a longer octadecyl tail for Tween 40) on Au and polystyrene surfaces. Despite the similarity between these two molecules, there is a drastic difference in their protein resistance: a monolayer of Tween 20 on a hydrophobic surface is repulsive against protein adsorption but that of Tween 40 is not. The difference in protein resistance can be attributed to two distinctly different adsorption mechanisms. While the adsorption of Tween 40 is described by a simple first-order mechanism, that of Tween 20 consists of a fast adsorption step and a slower reorganization process at a high surface coverage. The latter leads to the formation of a high-density and self-organized monolayer, which is responsible for the enhanced stability and resistance against non-specific protein adsorption.

  13. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein and Apolipoprotein E Expression is Altered in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Our recent microarray study reported altered mRNA expression of several low density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP) associated with the first 4 years following diagnosis with schizophrenia. Whilst this finding is novel, apolipoprotein E (APOE), which mediates its activity through LRPs, has been reported by several studies to be altered in brains of subjects with schizophrenia. We used qPCR to measure the expression of LRP2, LRP4, LRP6, LRP8, LRP10 and LRP12 mRNA in Brodmann's area (BA) 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 15 subjects with short duration of illness schizophrenia (SDS) and 15 pair matched controls. We also used Western blotting to measure APOE protein expression in BA46 from these subjects. Amongst the LRPs examined, LRP10 expression was significantly increased (P = 0.03) and LRP12 was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in SDS. APOE protein expression was also increased in SDS (P = 0.01). No other marker examined in this study was altered with diagnosis. Our data supports a role for distinct members of the LRP family in the pathology of schizophrenia and adds weight to the hypothesis that aberrant apolipoprotein signaling is involved in the early stages of schizophrenia. PMID:21423430

  14. Smooth Muscle Cell Deletion of LDL Receptor Related Protein-1 Augments AngII-Induced Superior Mesenteric Arterial and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Frank M.; Rateri, Debra L.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Strickland, Dudley K.; Muratoglu, Selen C.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective LRP1, a multifunctional protein involved in endocytosis and cell signaling pathways, leads to a range of vascular pathologies when deleted in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether LRP1 deletion in SMCs influenced AngII-induced arterial pathologies. Approach and Results LRP1 protein abundance was equivalent in selected arterial-regions, but SMC-specific LRP1 depletion had no effect on abdominal and ascending aortic diameters in young mice. To determine the effects of LRP1 deficiency on AngII vascular responses, SMC-specific LRP1 (smLRP1) +/+ and -/- mice were infused with saline, AngII, or norepinephrine (NE). Several smLRP-/- mice died of superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) rupture during AngII infusion. In surviving mice, AngII profoundly augmented SMA dilation in smLRP1-/- mice. SMA dilation was blood pressure-dependent as demonstrated by a similar response during NE infusion. SMA dilation was also associated with profound macrophage accumulation, but minimal elastin fragmentation. AngII infusion led to no significant differences in abdominal aorta diameters between smLRP1+/+ and -/- mice. In contrast, ascending aortic dilation was exacerbated markedly in AngII-infused smLRP1-/- mice, but NE had no significant effect on either aortic region. Ascending aortas of smLRP1-/- mice infused with AngII had minimal macrophage accumulation but significantly increased elastin fragmentation and mRNA abundance of several LRP1 ligands including MMP-2 and uPA. Conclusions smLRP1 deficiency had no effect on AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation. Conversely, AngII infusion in smLRP1-/- mice exacerbated SMA and ascending aorta dilation. Dilation in these two regions had differential association with blood pressure and divergent pathologic characteristics. PMID:25395615

  15. Frameshift Mutation Confers Function as Virulence Factor to Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein from Acidovorax avenae

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Machiko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Takehito; Yoshida, Yuki; Suzuki, Aika; Kawaguchi, Takemasa; Che, Fang-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Many plant pathogens inject type III (T3SS) effectors into host cells to suppress host immunity and promote successful infection. The bacterial pathogen Acidovorax avenae causes brown stripe symptom in many species of monocotyledonous plants; however, individual strains of each pathogen infect only one host species. T3SS-deleted mutants of A. avenae K1 (virulent to rice) or N1141 (virulent to finger millet) caused no symptom in each host plant, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in the symptom formation. To identify T3SS effectors as virulence factors, we performed whole-genome and predictive analyses. Although the nucleotide sequence of the novel leucine-rich repeat protein (Lrp) gene of N1141 had high sequence identity with K1 Lrp, the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins were quite different due to a 1-bp insertion within the K1 Lrp gene. An Lrp-deleted K1 strain (KΔLrp) did not cause brown stripe symptom in rice (host plant for K1); by contrast, the analogous mutation in N1141 (NΔLrp) did not interfere with infection of finger millet. In addition, NΔLrp retained the ability to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI), including hypersensitive response cell death and expression of ETI-related genes. These data indicated that K1 Lrp functions as a virulence factor in rice, whereas N1141 Lrp does not play a similar role in finger millet. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that K1 Lrp interacts with oryzain α, a pathogenesis-related protein of the cysteine protease family, whereas N1141 Lrp, which contains LRR domains, does not. This specific interaction between K1 Lrp and oryzain α was confirmed by Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in rice cells. Thus, K1 Lrp protein may have acquired its function as virulence factor in rice due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:28101092

  16. [ABC transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-08-01

    The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family includes membrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes. These proteins play an essential role in the protection of cells from toxic compounds/metabolites. Their overexpression which leads to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in pathogens and enables cancer cells to survive chemotherapy is of major concern for human health. Mutations in ABC transporters are implicated in a number of Mendelian disorders such as cystic fibrosis, adrenoleukodystrophy and cholesterol and bile transport defects. In microbial cells, several homologues of human ABC transporters were identified. Their further molecular biological study can contribute to better understanding and treatment of MDR or diseases caused by dysfunction of ABC transporter proteins. A review is presented of the state of the art in ABC transporter proteins in both prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells. The role of microbial ABC transporters in the development of drug resistance is analyzed.

  17. N-cadherin restrains PTH repressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTH1R interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Dong, Jinbo; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Zhong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Feng

    2016-12-01

    Sclerostin/SOST is a robust negative regulator of bone formation. Loss-of-function mutations of the sclerostin gene (SOST) cause sclerosteosis and Van Buchem disease characterized by bone overgrowth. Mediated by myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors, parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses SOST expression through formation of complexes of parathyroid hormone-parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor 1 (PTH1R) and lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). N-cadherin has been shown to negatively regulate Wnt/β-catenin and PTH induced, protein kinase-dependent β-catenin signaling. Here, we investigated whether N-cadherin mediates the inhibitory effects of PTH on sclerostin/SOST. In vitro, overexpression of N-cadherin resulted in blunted PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST expression, as detected by immunoblot and qPCR analysis; PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2A, C, and D was impaired by N-cadherin; and N-cadherin reduced LRP6-PTHR1 interaction and endocytosis in response to PTH. In vivo, intermittent PTH (iPTH)-induced suppression of sclerostin/SOST was accentuated in Dmp1-cre; Cdh2(f/f) (Cdh2(ΔDmp1) ) mice, compared with Cdh2(f/f) mice. Additionally, iPTH had greater bone anabolic effects in Cdh2(ΔDmp1) mice compared to Cdh2(f/f) mice. These data indicate that N-cadherin negatively mediates PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTHR1 interaction, ultimately influencing PTH anabolic effects on bone.

  18. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  19. Drug resistance features and S-phase fraction as possible determinants for drug response in a panel of human ovarian cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kolfschoten, G M; Hulscher, T M; Pinedo, H M; Boven, E

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and more specifically the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) have been studied extensively in vitro. Unfortunately, it appears that the predictive value of MDR recognized in vitro is mostly an incorrect measure to determine the responsiveness of a particular tumour in the clinic. This misunderstood or overvalued role of MDR might explain the failure of strategies to reverse Pgp function by the use of modulators in solid tumours. To obtain more insight in in vivo drug resistance we investigated a panel of 15 human ovarian cancer xenografts consisting of the most common histological subtypes known in ovarian cancer patients. The response rate to cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin in the xenografts resembled the results of phase II trials with these agents in ovarian cancer patients. This resemblance justifies drug resistance studies in this experimental in vivo human tumour system. We determined the expression levels of MDR 1, MRP 1, LRP and topoisomerase IIα mRNA by the RNase protection assay and the presence of MRP1 and LRP proteins by immunohistochemistry. The S-phase fraction was investigated as a separate parameter by flow cytometry. In none of the 15 ovarian cancer xenografts was MDR 1 expression detectable. The expression levels of MRP 1 and LRP were low to moderate and resembled the presence of the MRP1 and LRP proteins. There was a weak, inverse relationship between the expression levels of LRP and sensitivity to cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (r = –0.44 and –0.45), but not to doxorubicin. The levels of topoisomerase IIα varied among the xenografts (0.73–2.66) and failed to correlate with doxorubicin resistance (r = 0.14). The S-phase fraction, however, showed a relation with the sensitivity to cisplatin (r = 0.66). Among the determinants studied in ovarian cancer in vivo, LRP mRNA and the S-phase fraction were the best predictive factors for drug response and most specifically for the activity of cisplatin.

  20. Interferon-induced human protein with homology to protein Mx of influenza virus-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, P; Haller, O

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies with specificity for protein Mx (a karyophilic 75,000-dalton protein induced by interferon [IFN] in mouse cells carrying the influenza virus resistance allele Mx+) detected an IFN-induced 80,000-dalton protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in fibroblasts of healthy human donors. The human protein, like protein Mx, was induced by IFN-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Unlike the mouse protein, it was predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. Images PMID:3939324

  1. Targeting Protein Kinases to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  2. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  3. Wingless/Wnt signal transduction requires distinct initiation and amplification steps that both depend on Arrow/LRP

    PubMed Central

    Baig-Lewis, Shahana; Peterson-Nedry, Wynne; Wehrli, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Members of the Wg/Wnt family provide key intercellular signals during embryonic development and in the maintenance of homeostatic processes, but critical aspects of their signal transduction pathways remain controversial. We have found that canonical Wg signaling in Drosophila involves distinct initiation and amplification steps, both of which require Arrow/LRP. Expressing a chimeric Frizzled2-Arrow protein in flies that lack endogenous Wg or Arrow showed that this construct functions as an activated Wg receptor but is deficient in signal amplification. In contrast, a chimeric Arrow protein containing the dimerization domain of Torso acted as a potent amplifier of Wg signaling but could not initiate Wg signaling on its own. The two chimeric proteins synergized, so that their co-expression largely reconstituted the signaling levels achieved by expressing Wg itself. The amplification function of Arrow/LRP appears to be particularly important for long-range signaling, and may reflect a general mechanism for potentiating signals in the shallow part of a morphogen gradient. PMID:17433287

  4. A common LRP4 haplotype is associated with bone mineral density and hip geometry in men-data from the Odense Androgen Study (OAS).

    PubMed

    Boudin, Eveline; Steenackers, Ellen; de Freitas, Fenna; Nielsen, Torben Leo; Andersen, Marianne; Brixen, Kim; Van Hul, Wim; Piters, Elke

    2013-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by an increased susceptibility to fracture. It is a complex disorder resulting from the interaction of several polymorphisms in different genes and environmental factors. Since we recently reported a role for low density lipoprotein-related protein (LRP)-4 in monogenic disorders with bone overgrowth, we now wanted to evaluate whether genetic variation in the LRP4 gene has an effect on the susceptibility to osteoporosis in a population based cohort from the Odense Androgen Study. We chose to genotype four common (minor allele frequency (MAF)≥0.05) and non-synonymous coding polymorphisms located in the extracellular region of the LRP4 protein: rs3816614 (A/g), rs2306029 (G/a), rs2306033 (C/t) and rs6485702 (G/a) (large and small characters indicate major and minor alleles, respectively). Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the hip, the spine and whole body as well as different hip geometry parameters were available for a total of 1404 Danish men from two age groups ([20-29 years]: n=804; [60-74 years]: n=600). Using linear regression analysis adjusted for age, height and weight, we found significant associations between both rs2306029 and rs6485702 and BMD at all sites except the lumbar spine. The most significant association was found with whole body BMD (p=4.7×10(-5)). In addition, we found these two polymorphisms to be associated with different geometry parameters especially of the femoral shaft. Analysis of the two associated SNPs in the separate age groups demonstrated that most associations are only present in the youngest group of Danish men. In the group of elderly men, one Bonferroni corrected association between whole body BMD and rs6485702 was found to be significant. Subsequently, all polymorphisms were included in haplotype analyses using the PLINK software (v1.07). After adjusting for age, height and weight, two out of five common haplotypes (MAF≥0.01) were found to be of particular interest in

  5. M. tuberculosis Hypothetical Proteins and Proteins of Unknown Function: Hope for Exploring Novel Resistance Mechanisms as well as Future Target of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in tuberculosis predominantly, mono-resistance, multi drug resistance, extensively drug resistance and totally drug resistance have emerged as a major problem in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Failures of first and second line anti-tuberculosis drugs treatment leads to emergence of resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Few genes are reported as the principal targets of the resistance and apart from the primary targets many explanations have been proposed for drug resistance but still some resistance mechanisms are unknown. As proteins involved in most of the biological processes, these are potentially explored the unknown mechanism of drug resistance and attractive targets for diagnostics/future therapeutics against drug resistance. In last decade a panel of studies on expression proteomics of drug resistant M. tuberculosis isolates reported the differential expression of uncharacterized proteins and suggested these might be involved in resistance. Here we emphasize that detailed bioinformatics analysis (like molecular docking, pupylation, and proteins-proteins interaction) of these uncharacterized and hypothetical proteins might predict their interactive partners (other proteins) which are involved in various pathways of M. tuberculosis system biology and might give a clue for novel mechanism of drug resistance or future drug targets. In future these uncharacterized targets might be open the new resistance mechanism and used as potential drug targets against drug resistant tuberculosis. PMID:28377758

  6. The rLrp of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and downregulates APC function in mouse macrophages via a TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway activation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Jia-Yun; Chen, Su-Ting; Huang, Hai-Rong; Cai, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant leucine-responsive regulatory protein (rLrp) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-12 production and blocks the nuclear translocation of subunits of the nuclear-receptor transcription factor NF-κB (Nuclear factor-kappa B). Moreover, rLrp attenuated LPS-induced DNA binding and NF-κB transcriptional activity, which was accompanied by the degradation of inhibitory IκBα and a consequent decrease in the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. RLrp interfered with the LPS-induced clustering of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 binding to TAK1. Furthermore, rLrp did not attenuate proinflammatory cytokines or the expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class-II induced by interferon-gamma in the macrophages of Toll-like receptor 2 deletion (TLR2(-/-)) mice and in protein kinase b (Akt)-depleted mouse cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of rLrp were dependent on TLR2-mediated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. RLrp could also activate the PI3K/Akt pathway by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in macrophages. In addition, 19 amino acid residues in the N-terminus of rLrp were determined to be important and required for the inhibitory effects mediated by TLR2. The inhibitory function of these 19 amino acids of rLrp raises the possibility that mimetic inhibitory peptides could be used to restrict innate immune responses in situations in which prolonged TLR signaling has deleterious effects. Our study offers new insight into the inhibitory mechanisms by which the TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway ensures the transient expression of potent inflammatory mediators.

  7. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 is required for parathyroid hormone-induced Sost suppression.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Wang, Weishan; Xie, Liang; Luo, Xianghang; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses the expression of the bone formation inhibitor sclerostin (Sost) in osteocytes by inducing nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to inhibit the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent Sost bone enhancer. Previous studies revealed that lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) mediates the intracellular signaling activation and the anabolic bone effect of PTH. Here, we investigated whether LRP6 mediates the inhibitory effect of PTH on Sost using an osteoblast-specific Lrp6-knockout (LRP6-KO) mouse model. An increased level of Sost mRNA expression was detected in femur tissue from LRP6-KO mice, compared to wild-type littermates. The number of osteocytes expressing sclerostin protein was also increased in bone tissue of LRP6-KO littermates, indicating a negative regulatory role of LRP6 on Sost/sclerostin. In wild-type littermates, intermittent PTH treatment significantly suppressed Sost mRNA expression in bone and the number of sclerostin(+) osteocytes, while the effect of PTH was much less significant in LRP6-KO mice. Additionally, PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2C and 2D, as well as HDAC changes in osteocytes, were abrogated in LRP6-KO mice. These data indicate that LRP6 is required for PTH suppression of Sost expression.

  8. Origins of the protein synthesis cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Largely derived from experiments in molecular evolution, a theory of protein synthesis cycles has been constructed. The sequence begins with ordered thermal proteins resulting from the self-sequencing of mixed amino acids. Ordered thermal proteins then aggregate to cell-like structures. When they contained proteinoids sufficiently rich in lysine, the structures were able to synthesize offspring peptides. Since lysine-rich proteinoid (LRP) also catalyzes the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphate to polynucleotides, the same microspheres containing LRP could have synthesized both original cellular proteins and cellular nucleic acids. The LRP within protocells would have provided proximity advantageous for the origin and evolution of the genetic code.

  9. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties.

  10. Protein design algorithms predict viable resistance to an experimental antifolate.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Stephanie M; Gainza, Pablo; Frey, Kathleen M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Donald, Bruce R; Anderson, Amy C

    2015-01-20

    Methods to accurately predict potential drug target mutations in response to early-stage leads could drive the design of more resilient first generation drug candidates. In this study, a structure-based protein design algorithm (K* in the OSPREY suite) was used to prospectively identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms that confer resistance to an experimental inhibitor effective against dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Staphylococcus aureus. Four of the top-ranked mutations in DHFR were found to be catalytically competent and resistant to the inhibitor. Selection of resistant bacteria in vitro reveals that two of the predicted mutations arise in the background of a compensatory mutation. Using enzyme kinetics, microbiology, and crystal structures of the complexes, we determined the fitness of the mutant enzymes and strains, the structural basis of resistance, and the compensatory relationship of the mutations. To our knowledge, this work illustrates the first application of protein design algorithms to prospectively predict viable resistance mutations that arise in bacteria under antibiotic pressure.

  11. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cherigo, Lilia; Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters. PMID:25854646

  12. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  13. LRP5 associates with specific subsets of macrophages: Molecular and functional effects.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, M; Romero, J C; Crespo, J; Juan-Babot, O; Badimon, L

    2016-01-01

    Innate and acquired immunity is involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanisms ruling monocyte to macrophage (Mø) differentiation are not yet fully understood. Different subtypes of plaque macrophages that have differentiated from monocytes recruited from circulating blood, have been characterized based on surface epitopes. We have recently shown that LRP5, a member of the LDL receptor superfamily supporting Wnt signalling, has an important role in monocyte to macrophage differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the CD16- and CD16+ macrophage subsets found in human atherosclerotic plaques have a differential LRP5 expression/function and Wnt signalling potential. We show for the first time that LRP5 expression is significantly higher in human CD16+Mø derived from CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes than in CD16-Mø macrophages derived from CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes. LRP5 is not found in human healthy vessel or arterial intimal thickening but is found in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions co-localizing only with the CD16+Mø macrophage subset. LRP5 expressing macrophages infiltrate the deep layers of atherosclerotic plaques towards the intima-media boundaries showing increased migratory activity and higher phagocytic activity. The equivalent for human patrolling CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in mice, CD115(+)GR1(low) monocytes, also show an increased expression of LRP5. In summary, classical CD14(+)CD16(-)monocytes that differentiate into CD16-Mø do not express LRP5. Instead, human monocytes expressing LRP5 differentiate into CD16+Mø antiinflammatory macrophages. These antiinflammatory macrophages are found in advanced atherosclerotic human plaques. Thus LRP5 is a signature of the anti-inflammatory defensive phenotype of macrophages.

  14. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  15. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  16. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  17. Structure and functional properties of Norrin mimic Wnt for signalling with Frizzled4, Lrp5/6, and proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Zebisch, Matthias; Harlos, Karl; Elegheert, Jonathan; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates multiple processes including angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Norrin (Norrie Disease Protein) is a cystine-knot like growth factor. Although unrelated to Wnt, Norrin activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Signal complex formation involves Frizzled4 (Fz4), low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5/6 (Lrp5/6), Tetraspanin-12 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we report crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses of Norrin in complex with Fz4 cysteine-rich domain (Fz4CRD), of this complex bound with GAG analogues, and of unliganded Norrin and Fz4CRD. Our structural, biophysical and cellular data, map Fz4 and putative Lrp5/6 binding sites to distinct patches on Norrin, and reveal a GAG binding site spanning Norrin and Fz4CRD. These results explain numerous disease-associated mutations. Comparison with the Xenopus Wnt8–mouse Fz8CRD complex reveals Norrin mimics Wnt for Frizzled recognition. The production and characterization of wild-type and mutant Norrins reported here open new avenues for the development of therapeutics to combat abnormal Norrin/Wnt signalling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06554.001 PMID:26158506

  18. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Falu; Liu, Junyong; Qiao, Tingting; Li, Ting; Shen, Qi; Peng, Fang

    2016-06-28

    The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC) and defatted extract (PADF) from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP); PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π), but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC). Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1); PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing) the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes.

  19. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  20. Aerobic Exercise Recovers Disuse-induced Atrophy Through the Stimulus of the LRP130/PGC-1α Complex in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vechetti-Junior, Ivan J; Bertaglia, Raquel S; Fernandez, Geysson J; de Paula, Tassiana G; de Souza, Rodrigo W A; Moraes, Leonardo N; Mareco, Edson A; de Freitas, Carlos E A; Aguiar, Andreo F; Carvalho, Robson F; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2016-05-01

    Physical training has been shown to be important to the control of muscle mass during aging, through the activation of several pathways including, IGF1-AKT and PGC-1α. Also, it was demonstrated that LRP130, a component of the PGC-1α complex, is important for the PGC-1α-dependent transcription of several mitochondrial genes in vivo. To explore the role of physical training during aging, we investigated the effects on muscle recovery after short-term immobilization followed by 3 or 7 days with aerobic or resistance training. Using morphological (myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase activity, to assess the total muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and the frequency of specific fiber types), biochemical (myosin heavy chain), and molecular analyses (quantitative real-time PCR, functional pathways analyses, and Western blot), our results indicated that after an atrophic stimulus, only animals subjected to aerobic training showed entire recovery of cross-sectional area; aerobic training reduced the ubiquitin-proteasome system components involved in muscle atrophy after 3 days of recovery, and the upregulation in PGC-1α expression enhanced the process of muscle recovery by inhibiting the FoxO pathway, with the possible involvement of LRP130. These results suggest that aerobic training enhanced the muscle regeneration process after disuse-induced atrophy in aged rats possibly through of the LRP130/PGC-1α complex by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  1. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  2. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  3. Salinomycin suppresses LRP6 expression and inhibits both Wnt/β-catenin and mTORC1 signaling in breast and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling at the cell surface results in inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), leading to activation of mTORC1 signaling in cancer cells. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Salinomycin is a novel small molecule inhibitor of LRP6. In the present study, we found that LRP6 overexpression induced mTORC1 signaling activation in cancer cells, and that salinomycin was not only a potent Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, but also a strong mTORC1 signaling antagonist in breast and prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, salinomycin activated GSK3β in cancer cells. Moreover, salinomycin was able to suppress the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, two targets of both Wnt/β-catenin and mTORC1 signaling, in prostate and breast cancer cells, and displayed remarkable anticancer activity. Our results present novel mechanisms underlying salinomycin-mediated cancer cell death.

  4. Diverging roles for Lrp4 and Wnt signaling in neuromuscular synapse development during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Katherine D.; Lee, Jennifer K.; Kim, Natalie; Hallock, Peter T.; Delestrée, Nicolas; Mentis, George Z.; Froemke, Robert C.; Granato, Michael; Burden, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Motor axons approach muscles that are prepatterned in the prospective synaptic region. In mice, prepatterning of acetylcholine receptors requires Lrp4, a LDLR family member, and MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase. Lrp4 can bind and stimulate MuSK, strongly suggesting that association between Lrp4 and MuSK, independent of additional ligands, initiates prepatterning in mice. In zebrafish, Wnts, which bind the Frizzled (Fz)-like domain in MuSK, are required for prepatterning, suggesting that Wnts may contribute to prepatterning and neuromuscular development in mammals. We show that prepatterning in mice requires Lrp4 but not the MuSK Fz-like domain. In contrast, prepatterning in zebrafish requires the MuSK Fz-like domain but not Lrp4. Despite these differences, neuromuscular synapse formation in zebrafish and mice share similar mechanisms, requiring Lrp4, MuSK, and neuronal Agrin but not the MuSK Fz-like domain or Wnt production from muscle. Our findings demonstrate that evolutionary divergent mechanisms establish muscle prepatterning in zebrafish and mice. PMID:27151977

  5. Proteomic Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals an Essential Role for gp96 in the Cell Surface Expression of LDLR Family Members, Including the LDL Receptor and LRP6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96. PMID:22292497

  6. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  7. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  8. Pyramiding and evaluation of both a foreign Bacillus thuringiensis and a Lysine-rich protein gene in the elite indica rice 9311

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Cuicui; Li, Xiaogang; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Gene pyramiding is an efficient approach for the genetic improvement of multiple agronomic traits simultaneously. In this study, we pyramided two foreign genes, cry1Ac driven by the rice Actin I promoter, and lysine-rich protein (LRP), driven by the endosperm-specific GLUTELIN1 (GT1) promoter, into the elite indica cultivar 9311. These two genes were chosen in an attempt to enhance insect-resistance and Lysine (Lys) content. In the pyramided line, the foreign gene cry1Ac was efficiently expressed in the leaves and stems, and exhibited highly efficient resistance to striped stem borer (SSB, Chilo suppressalis Walker) in the laboratory and rice leaf folder (RLF, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee) in the field. Furthermore, the LRP gene was highly expressed in the endosperm and produced a remarkable increase of Lys content in the seeds of the pyramided line. The data from field trials demonstrated that most of the agronomic traits including yield were well maintained in the pyramided line compared to the parental control. These results strongly suggest that the foreign cry1Ac and LRP genes have remarkable application potential in rice, and the resultant pyramided line serves as an ideal bridge material for the improvement of insect-resistance and high Lys rice in the future. PMID:27795684

  9. Blast resistance of CC-NB-LRR protein Pb1 is mediated by WRKY45 through protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Matsushita, Akane; Xinqiong, Liu; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-06-04

    Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) is a panicle blast resistance gene derived from the indica rice cultivar "Modan." Pb1 encodes a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein and confers durable, broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae races. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Pb1-mediated blast resistance. The Pb1 protein interacted with WRKY45, a transcription factor involved in induced resistance via the salicylic acid signaling pathway that is regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome system. Pb1-mediated panicle blast resistance was largely compromised when WRKY45 was knocked down in a Pb1-containing rice cultivar. Leaf-blast resistance by Pb1 overexpression (Pb1-ox) was also compromised in WRKY45 knockdown/Pb1-ox rice. Blast infection induced higher accumulation of WRKY45 in Pb1-ox than in control Nipponbare rice. Overexpression of Pb1-Quad, a coiled-coil domain mutant that had weak interaction with WRKY45, resulted in significantly weaker blast resistance than that of wild-type Pb1. Overexpression of Pb1 with a nuclear export sequence failed to confer blast resistance to rice. These results suggest that the blast resistance of Pb1 depends on its interaction with WRKY45 in the nucleus. In a transient system using rice protoplasts, coexpression of Pb1 enhanced WRKY45 accumulation and increased WRKY45-dependent transactivation activity, suggesting that protection of WRKY45 from ubiquitin proteasome system degradation is possibly involved in Pb1-dependent blast resistance.

  10. Rapid hepatic clearance of full length CCN-2/CTGF: a putative role for LRP1-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, K G F; Bovenschen, N; Nguyen, T Q; Sprengers, D; Koeners, M P; van Koppen, A N; Joles, J A; Goldschmeding, R; Kok, R J

    2016-12-01

    CCN-2 (connective tissue growth factor; CTGF) is a key factor in fibrosis. Plasma CCN-2 has biomarker potential in numerous fibrotic disorders, but it is unknown which pathophysiological factors determine plasma CCN-2 levels. The proteolytic amino-terminal fragment of CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the kidney. Here, we investigated elimination and distribution profiles of full length CCN-2 by intravenous administration of recombinant CCN-2 to rodents. After bolus injection in mice, we observed a large initial distribution volume (454 mL/kg) and a fast initial clearance (120 mL/kg/min). Immunosorbent assay and immunostaining showed that CCN-2 distributed mainly to the liver and was taken up by hepatocytes. Steady state clearance in rats, determined by continuous infusion of CCN-2, was fast (45 mL/kg/min). Renal CCN-2 clearance, determined by arterial and renal vein sampling, accounted for only 12 % of total clearance. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with receptor-associated protein (RAP), an antagonist of LDL-receptor family proteins, showed that RAP prolonged CCN-2 half-life and completely prevented CCN-2 internalization by hepatocytes. This suggests that hepatic uptake of CCN-2 is mediated by a RAP-sensitive mechanism most likely involving LRP1, a member of the LDL-receptor family involved in hepatic clearance of various plasma proteins. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies confirmed that CCN-2 is an LRP1 ligand. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with an excess of the heparan sulphate-binding protamine lowered the large initial distribution volume of CCN-2 by 88 % and reduced interstitial staining of CCN-2, suggesting binding of CCN-2 to heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Protamine did not affect clearance rate, indicating that RAP-sensitive clearance of CCN-2 is HSPG independent. In conclusion, unlike its amino-terminal fragment which is cleared by the kidney, full length CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the liver via a fast RAP-sensitive, probably LRP1-dependent

  11. Uncoupling Proteins: Role in Insulin Resistance and Insulin Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine B.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are modulators of mitochondrial metabolism that have been implicated in the development of both insulin resistance and insulin insufficiency, the two major pathophysiological events associated with type 2 diabetes. UCP2 mRNA is expressed in a wide range of tissues; however UCP2 protein expression is restricted to fewer tissues, including the endocrine pancreas, spleen, stomach, brain and the lung. To date, its role in the pathophysiology of diabetes has been most strongly associated with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the β-cell, particularly after its induction by free fatty acids. The physiological role of UCP2 remains controversial, but it may act as a downstream signal transducer of superoxide. UCP3 mRNA and protein are expressed in relatively few tissues, predominately skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue and heart. Increased expression of UCP3 in skeletal muscle is associated with protection from diet-induced insulin resistance in mice. In patients with type 2 diabetes UCP3 protein in muscle is reduced by 50% compared to healthy controls. The primary physiological role of the novel UCPs does not appear to be protection against positive energy balance and obesity; this is based largely on findings from studies of UCP2 and UCP3 knockout mice and from observed increases in UCP3 expression with fasting. The mechanism(s) of action of UCP2 and UCP3 are poorly understood. However, findings support roles for UCP2 and UCP3 as modifiers of fatty acid metabolism and in mitigating damage from reactive oxygen species. PMID:18220632

  12. LRP5-linked osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome mimicking isolated microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Sezen Guntekin; Akay, Guvem Gumus; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Perçin, E Ferda

    2017-03-01

    Microphthalmia is defined as the measurement of the total axial length of the eyeball to be below average of the two standard deviation according to the age. While several genes have been identified so far related to microphthalmia, the genetic etiology of the disease has not been fully understood because of genetic heterogeneity observed in this disease. After exclusion of the genes that had been known to be the cause of microphthalmia, we performed homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to clarify the genetic etiology of the bilateral microphthalmia in this family. When the results of the exome and microarray data were considered together as a splice-site mutation in LRP5 gene [c.2827 + 1G > A], which is known to be important for eye development and Wnt receptor signaling pathway, was found to be the cause of microphthalmia in our family. It was understood that after finding this mutation, when bone mineral density was measured with DXA in the family whose ages range between 19 and 28 and who have no bone problem before, osteoporosis was diagnosed. It was also understood that microphthalmia found in this family is a clinical finding of OPPG syndrome.

  13. Protein Anabolic Resistance in Cancer: Does it really exist?

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Mariëlle P. K. J.; van der Meij, Barbara S.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Preventing unintentional weight and muscle loss is of crucial importance to maintain the condition and well-being of patients with cancer, improve treatment response and tolerance, and prolong survival. Anabolic resistance might explain why some cancer patients do not respond to nutritional intervention but does recent evidence actually support this? We will discuss recent literature that cast doubt on attenuated anabolic potential in cancer. Recent findings Although anabolic resistance was observed in the past, more recent studies have shown that advanced cancer patients have an anabolic potential after intake of high-quality proteins. Furthermore a consistent linear relationship is observed in cancer between (essential) amino acid availability from the diet and net protein gain. The studied cancer patients however were often characterized by a normal or obese body weight, following the trend in the general population, and mild systemic inflammation. Factors like recent chemotherapy, surgery or cachexia do not seem to attenuate the anabolic potential to feeding. Summary Cancer patients have a normal anabolic potential which relates to the amount of essential amino acids in the meal. It remains to be determined if this is also the case in weak cancer patients with a short life expectancy and high systemic inflammation. PMID:26560520

  14. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  15. Studies on pyrrolopyrimidines as selective inhibitors of multidrug-resistance-associated protein in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Folkes, Adrian; Chuckowree, Irina; Cockcroft, Xiaoling; Sohal, Sukhjit; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Wren, Stephen P; Vicker, Nigel; Depledge, Paul; Scott, John; Smith, Lyndsay; Jones, Hazel; Mistry, Prakash; Faint, Richard; Thompson, Deanne; Cocks, Simon

    2004-03-11

    Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) remains a major obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. Inhibition of Pgp and MRP transport is important for high efficacy of anticancer drugs. While several Pgp inhibitors have entered clinical trials, the development of specific MRP1 inhibitors is still in its infancy. In our screening program, we have identified a pyrrolopyrimidine (4) as a novel and selective MRP1 inhibitor. Subsequent SAR work on the 4-position of the template revealed the phenethylpiperazine side chain as a potent replacement of the benzylthio group of the lead molecule. Introduction of groups at the 2-position seems to have no detrimental effect on activity. Modifications to the nitrile group at the 7-position resulted in the identification of analogues with groups, such as amides, with superior pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo efficacy has been demonstrated by xenograft studies on selected compounds.

  16. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B.; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E.; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria. PMID:27375598

  17. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  18. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  19. APP interacts with LRP4 and agrin to coordinate the development of the neuromuscular junction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong Y; Liu, Yun; Tennert, Christian; Sugiura, Yoshie; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Kröger, Stephan; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Lin, Weichun; Herz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    ApoE, ApoE receptors and APP cooperate in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Intriguingly, the ApoE receptor LRP4 and APP are also required for normal formation and function of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In this study, we show that APP interacts with LRP4, an obligate co-receptor for muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Agrin, a ligand for LRP4, also binds to APP and co-operatively enhances the interaction of APP with LRP4. In cultured myotubes, APP synergistically increases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Deletion of the transmembrane domain of LRP4 (LRP4 ECD) results in growth retardation of the NMJ, and these defects are markedly enhanced in APP−/−;LRP4ECD/ECD mice. Double mutant NMJs are significantly reduced in size and number, resulting in perinatal lethality. Our findings reveal novel roles for APP in regulating neuromuscular synapse formation through hetero-oligomeric interaction with LRP4 and agrin and thereby provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern NMJ formation and maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00220.001 PMID:23986861

  20. Role of C reactive protein (CRP) in leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hribal, Marta Letizia; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Sesti, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Increased plasma levels of both leptin and C reactive protein (CRP) have been reported in a number of conditions, including obesity, and have been linked to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes and increased cardiovascular risk; interestingly these two biomarkers appear to be able to reciprocally regulate their bioavailability, through complex mechanisms that have not been completely clarified yet. Here we first review clinical evidence suggesting not only that the circulatory levels of CRP and leptin show an independent correlation, but also that assessing them in tandem may result in an increased ability to predict cardiovascular disease. We summarize also molecular studies showing that leptin is able to promote CRP production from hepatocytes and endothelial cells in vitro and discuss the studies addressing the possibility that in vivo leptin administration may be able to modulate plasma CRP levels. Furthermore, we describe two studies demonstrating that CRP directly binds leptin in extra-cellular settings, thus impairing its biological actions. Finally we report genetic evidence that common variations at the leptin receptor locus are associated with CRP blood levels. Overall, the data reviewed here show that the chronic elevation of CRP observed in obese subjects may worsen leptin resistance, contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, and highlight a potential link between conditions, such as leptin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, that may be amenable of pharmacological treatment targeted to the disruption of leptin-CRP interaction.

  1. Exocytosis of polyubiquitinated proteins in bortezomib-resistant leukemia cells: a role for MARCKS in acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Niels E.; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Niewerth, Denise; Kessler, Floortje L.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Kole, Jeroen; Smeets, Serge J.; Ylstra, Bauke; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee Joo; Horton, Terzah M.; Menezes, Rene X.; Musters, Renée J.P.; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    PSMB5 mutations and upregulation of the β5 subunit of the proteasome represent key determinants of acquired resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) in leukemic cells in vitro. We here undertook a multi-modality (DNA, mRNA, miRNA) array-based analysis of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and BTZ-resistant subclones to determine whether or not complementary mechanisms contribute to BTZ resistance. These studies revealed signatures of markedly reduced expression of proteolytic stress related genes in drug resistant cells over a broad range of BTZ concentrations along with a high upregulation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) gene expression. MARCKS upregulation was confirmed on protein level and also observed in other BTZ-resistant tumor cell lines as well as in leukemia cells with acquired resistance to other proteasome inhibitors. Moreover, when MARCKS protein expression was demonstrated in specimens derived from therapy-refractory pediatric leukemia patients (n = 44), higher MARCKS protein expression trended (p = 0.073) towards a dismal response to BTZ-containing chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we show a BTZ concentration-dependent association of MARCKS protein levels with the emergence of ubiquitin-containing vesicles in BTZ-resistant CEM cells. These vesicles were found to be extruded and taken up in co-cultures with proteasome-proficient acceptor cells. Consistent with these observations, MARCKS protein associated with ubiquitin-containing vesicles was also more prominent in clinical leukemic specimen with ex vivo BTZ resistance compared to BTZ-sensitive leukemia cells. Collectively, we propose a role for MARCKS in a novel mechanism of BTZ resistance via exocytosis of ubiquitinated proteins in BTZ-resistant cells leading to quenching of proteolytic stress. PMID:27542283

  2. Biased random walk model for the prioritization of drug resistance associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Dong, Jiaqiang; Hu, Sijun; Cai, Xiqiang; Tang, Guangbo; Dou, Jianhua; Tian, Miaomiao; He, Fuchu; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance is the main cause of treatment failure in cancer patients. How to identify molecules underlying drug resistance from multi-omics data remains a great challenge. Here, we introduce a data biased strategy, ProteinRank, to prioritize drug-resistance associated proteins in cancer cells. First, we identified differentially expressed proteins in Adriamycin and Vincristine resistant gastric cancer cells compared to their parental cells using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS experiments, and then mapped them to human protein-protein interaction network; second, we applied ProteinRank to analyze the whole network and rank proteins similar to known drug resistance related proteins. Cross validations demonstrated a better performance of ProteinRank compared to the method without usage of MS data. Further validations confirmed the altered expressions or activities of several top ranked proteins. Functional study showed PIM3 or CAV1 silencing was sufficient to reverse the drug resistance phenotype. These results indicated ProteinRank could prioritize key proteins related to drug resistance in gastric cancer and provided important clues for cancer research. PMID:26039373

  3. [National evaluation of the diagnosis of activated protein C resistance].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Manzano, Guadalupe; de la Peña-Díaz, Aurora; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Corona-de la Peña, Norma; Cruz-Cruz, Donají; Gaminio, Elizabeth; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Mayagoitia, Teresa; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Poblete, Teresita; Quintana-Martínez, Sandra; Ramírez, Raúl; Razo, Daniel; Ruiz de Chávez-Ochoa, Adriana; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia Adriana; Salazar, Rosario; Vicencio-Santiago, Guadalupe Virginia; Villa, Rosario; Reyes-Núñez, Aurelia Virginia

    2003-01-01

    Thrombophilia or prothrombotic state appears when activation of blood hemostatic mechanisms overcomes the physiological anticoagulant capacity allowing a thrombotic event. Thrombosis is the leading worldwide mortality cause and due to its high associated morbidity and mortality, it should be insisted in the opportune identification of a thrombophilic state. The study of thrombophilia identifies individuals at high risk for thrombosis. This meeting was conceived first to analyze the current status of the diagnosis of thrombophilia in Mexico and second to create the base for a national consensus for thrombophilia screening and for the establishment of a national center for laboratory reference and quality control for thrombophilia. Since searching of activated protein C resistance (APCR) and FV Leiden seem to have priority either in the clinical setting and in public health services, it was decided to start with these two abnormalities as a model to analyze the current status of thrombophilia diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. At this time, several thrombophilic abnormalities have been described however, APCR remains the most important cause of thrombophilia, accounting for as much as 20% to 60% of all venous thrombosis. APCR is a consequence of the resistance of activated FV to be inactivated by activated protein C. Procoagulant activity of activated FV increases the risk of thrombosis. Hereditary APCR is almost always due to a point mutation at the nucleotide 1691 of the FV gen inducing an Arg506Glu substitution in FV molecule. This mutation is better known as FV Leiden. Heterocygous carriers of FV Leiden have a thrombotic risk 5 to 10 times higher than general population while the risk for the homocygote state is increased 50 to 100-fold. When activated PC is added to plasma from patients with FV Leiden, this last resists the anticoagulant effect of activated PC. Therefore, thrombin production is not inhibited. This phenomenon is called APCR. The functional

  4. Protein kinase PKR mutants resistant to the poxvirus pseudosubstrate K3L protein.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Joo; Liu, Furong; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Ung, Tekly L; Cao, Chune; Dar, Arvin C; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2008-11-04

    As part of the mammalian cell innate immune response, the double-stranded RNA activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha to inhibit protein synthesis and thus block viral replication. Poxviruses including vaccinia and smallpox viruses express PKR inhibitors such as the vaccinia virus K3L protein that resembles the N-terminal substrate-targeting domain of eIF2alpha. Whereas high-level expression of human PKR was toxic in yeast, this growth inhibition was suppressed by coexpression of the K3L protein. We used this yeast assay to screen for PKR mutants that are resistant to K3L inhibition, and we identified 12 mutations mapping to the C-terminal lobe of the PKR kinase domain. The PKR mutations specifically conferred resistance to the K3L protein both in yeast and in vitro. Consistently, the PKR-D486V mutation led to nearly a 15-fold decrease in K3L binding affinity yet did not impair eIF2alpha phosphorylation. Our results support the identification of the eIF2alpha-binding site on an extensive face of the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain, and they indicate that subtle changes to the PKR kinase domain can drastically impact pseudosubstrate inhibition while leaving substrate phosphorylation intact. We propose that these paradoxical effects of the PKR mutations on pseudosubstrate vs. substrate interactions reflect differences between the rigid K3L protein and the plastic nature of eIF2alpha around the Ser-51 phosphorylation site.

  5. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  6. Physical association of the NB-LRR resistance protein Rx with a Ran GTPase-activating protein is required for extreme resistance to Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Tameling, Wladimir I L; Baulcombe, David C

    2007-05-01

    Nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins play an important role in plant and mammalian innate immunity. In plants, these resistance proteins recognize specific pathogen-derived effector proteins. Recognition subsequently triggers a rapid and efficient defense response often associated with the hypersensitive response and other poorly understood processes that suppress the pathogen. To investigate mechanisms associated with the activation of disease resistance responses, we investigated proteins binding to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) NB-LRR protein Rx that confers extreme resistance to Potato virus X (PVX) in potato and Nicotiana benthamiana. By affinity purification experiments, we identified an endogenous N. benthamiana Ran GTPase-Activating Protein2 (RanGAP2) as an Rx-associated protein in vivo. Further characterization confirmed the specificity of this interaction and showed that the association occurs through their N-terminal domains. By specific virus-induced gene silencing of RanGAP2 in N. benthamiana carrying Rx, we demonstrated that this interaction is required for extreme resistance to PVX and suggest that RanGAP2 is part of the Rx signaling complex. These results implicate RanGAP-mediated cellular mechanisms, including nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, in the activation of disease resistance.

  7. The rLrp of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and downregulates APC function in mouse macrophages via a TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway activation-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Jia-Yun; Chen, Su-Ting; Huang, Hai-Rong; Cai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant leucine-responsive regulatory protein (rLrp) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-12 production and blocks the nuclear translocation of subunits of the nuclear-receptor transcription factor NF-κB (Nuclear factor-kappa B). Moreover, rLrp attenuated LPS-induced DNA binding and NF-κB transcriptional activity, which was accompanied by the degradation of inhibitory IκBα and a consequent decrease in the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. RLrp interfered with the LPS-induced clustering of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 binding to TAK1. Furthermore, rLrp did not attenuate proinflammatory cytokines or the expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class-II induced by interferon-gamma in the macrophages of Toll-like receptor 2 deletion (TLR2−/−) mice and in protein kinase b (Akt)-depleted mouse cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of rLrp were dependent on TLR2-mediated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. RLrp could also activate the PI3K/Akt pathway by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta in macrophages. In addition, 19 amino acid residues in the N-terminus of rLrp were determined to be important and required for the inhibitory effects mediated by TLR2. The inhibitory function of these 19 amino acids of rLrp raises the possibility that mimetic inhibitory peptides could be used to restrict innate immune responses in situations in which prolonged TLR signaling has deleterious effects. Our study offers new insight into the inhibitory mechanisms by which the TLR2-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway ensures the transient expression of potent inflammatory mediators. PMID:26166760

  8. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  9. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-Bin; Ye, Jin-Zhou; Yang, Man-Jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication.

  10. p38 MAP kinase is required for Wnt3a-mediated osterix expression independently of Wnt-LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis in dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Kanaya, Sousuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2016-09-16

    Wnt3a is a secreted glycoprotein that activates the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)/β-catenin signaling pathway through low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)5/6 co-receptors. Wnt3a has been implicated in periodontal development and homeostasis, as well as in cementum formation. Recently, we have reported that Wnt3a increases alkaline phosphatase expression through the induction of osterix (Osx) expression in dental follicle cells, a precursor of cementoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism by which Wnt3a induces Osx expression is still unknown. In this study, we show that Wnt3a-induced Osx expression was inhibited in the presence of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and SB202190) at gene and protein levels, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunocytohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with Dickkopf-1, a potent canonical Wnt antagonist binding to LRP5/6 co-receptors, did not influence Wnt3a-mediated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting that Wnt3a activates p38 MAPK through LRP5/6-independent signaling. On the other hand, pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors had no effects on the phosphorylated status of GSK3β and β-catenin as well as β-catenin nuclear translocation, but inhibited Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK modulates canonical Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level without any crosstalk with the Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis and subsequent β-catenin nuclear translocation. These findings expand our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling periodontal development and regeneration.

  11. Induction of the LRP16 gene by estrogen promotes the invasive growth of Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuan Guang; Han, Wei Dong; Zhao, Ya Li; Huang, Ke; Si, Yi Ling; Wu, Zhi Qiang; Mu, Yi Ming

    2007-10-01

    LRP16 was previously identified as an estrogen-induced gene in breast cancer cells. The responsiveness of LRP16 to estrogen and its functional effects in endometrial cancer (EC) cells are still unclear. Here, we show that the mRNA level and promoter activity of the LRP16 gene were significantly increased by 17beta-estradiol (E2) in estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-positive Ishikawa human EC cells. Although the growth rate of Ishikawa cells was not obviously affected by ectopic expression of LRP16, the results of a Transwell assay showed an approximate one-third increase of the invasive capacity of LRP16-overexpressing cells. As a result of molecular screening, we observed that the expression of E-cadherin, an essential adhesion molecule associated with tumor metastasis, was repressed by LRP16. Further promoter analyses demonstrated that LRP16 inhibited E-cadherin transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibition was abolished by estrogen deprivation, indicating that the downregulation of E-cadherin transcription by LRP16 requires ER alpha mediation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the binding of ER alpha to the E-cadherin promoter was antagonized by LRP16, suggesting that LRP16 could interfere with ER alpha-mediated transcription. These results suggest that the upregulation of LRP16 by estrogen could be involved in invasive growth by downregulating E-cadherin in human ECs.

  12. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  13. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  14. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  15. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  16. 42 CFR 68a.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CR-LRP? 68a.7 Section 68a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH...

  17. 42 CFR 68a.8 - What does the CR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the CR-LRP provide to participants? 68a.8 Section 68a.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  18. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  19. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  20. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  1. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  2. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  3. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  4. 42 CFR 68c.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.6 Section 68c.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  5. 42 CFR 68c.8 - What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the CIR-LRP provide to participants? 68c.8 Section 68c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION...

  6. 42 CFR 68c.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.7 Section 68c.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. 42 CFR 68c.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the CIR-LRP? 68c.7 Section 68c.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. Polyhydramnios in Lrp4 knockout mice with bilateral kidney agenesis: Defects in the pathways of amniotic fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Hiroshi; Tian, Qing-Bao; Hara, Yoshinobu; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Endo, Shogo; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2016-02-05

    Amniotic fluid volume during mid-to-late gestation depends mainly on the urine excretion from the foetal kidneys and partly on the fluid secretion from the foetal lungs during foetal breathing-like movements. Urine is necessary for foetal breathing-like movements, which is critical for foetal lung development. Bilateral renal agenesis and/or obstruction of the urinary tract lead to oligohydramnios, which causes infant death within a short period after birth due to pulmonary hypoplasia. Lrp4, which functions as an agrin receptor, is essential for the formation of neuromuscular junctions. Herein, we report novel phenotypes of Lrp4 knockout (Lrp4(-/-)) mice. Most Lrp4(-/-) foetuses showed unilateral or bilateral kidney agenesis, and Lrp4 knockout resulted in polyhydramnios. The loss of Lrp4 compromised foetal swallowing and breathing-like movements and downregulated the expression of aquaporin-9 in the foetal membrane and aquaporin-1 in the placenta, which possibly affected the amniotic fluid clearance. These results suggest that amniotic fluid removal was compromised in Lrp4(-/-) foetuses, resulting in polyhydramnios despite the impairment of urine production. Our findings indicate that amniotic fluid removal plays an essential role in regulating the amniotic fluid volume.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes identifies candidate proteins for glyphosate resistance

    PubMed Central

    González-Torralva, Fidel; Brown, Adrian P.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes is an example of how unrelenting use of a single mode of action herbicide in agricultural weed control drives genetic adaptation in targeted species. While in other weeds glyphosate resistance arose from target site mutation or target gene amplification, the resistance mechanism in horseweed uses neither of these, being instead linked to reduced herbicide uptake and/or translocation. The molecular components underpinning horseweed glyphosate-resistance remain unknown. Here, we used an in vitro leaf disc system for comparative analysis of proteins extracted from control and glyphosate-treated tissues of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-susceptible biotypes. Analysis of shikimic acid accumulation, ABC-transporter gene expression, and cell death were used to select a suitable glyphosate concentration and sampling time for enriching proteins pivotal to glyphosate resistance. Protein gel analysis and mass spectrometry identified mainly chloroplast proteins differentially expressed between the biotypes before and after glyphosate treatment. Chloroplasts are the organelles in which the shikimate pathway, which is targeted by glyphosate, is located. Calvin cycle enzymes and proteins of unknown function were among the proteins identified. Our study provides candidate proteins that could be pivotal in engendering resistance and implicates chloroplasts as the primary sites driving glyphosate-resistance in horseweed. PMID:28198407

  10. Dickkopf-1 negatively regulates the expression of osteoprotegerin, a key osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, by sequestering Lrp6 in primary and metastatic lytic bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yun-Yan; Sun, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an inverse role for Wnt signaling in the development of osteoclasts in the bone was demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether there is a commonality in the mechanism of bone resorption and lysis that occur in a diverse set of bone metastatic lesions, as well as in primary bone lesions. Compared with control bone tissue and bone biopsies from patients with nonmetastatic primary tumors (i.e., breast carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and prostate carcinoma), patients with bone metastatic lesions from the three aforementioned primary tumors, as well as osteolytic lesions obtained from the bone biopsies of patients with multiple myeloma, demonstrated an upregulated expression of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, by coimmunoprecipitation, Dickkopf-1 pulled-down low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), which is a key downstream effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. The expression of Lrp6 was unaltered in the osteometastatic lesions. This negative regulation was associated with a lowered expression of osteoprotegerin in the osteometastatic lesions, an observation that was previously reported to promote osteoclastogenesis. These findings provide a common mechanism for the inverse relationship between the Wnt signaling pathway and the development of primary or metastatic bone lesions. Pharmacological modulation of the Wnt signaling pathway might benefit the clinical management of primary and metastatic bone lesions.

  11. Ribosomal protein alterations in thiostrepton- and Micrococcin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wienen, B; Ehrlich, R; Stöffler-Meilicke, M; Stöffler, G; Smith, I; Weiss, D; Vince, R; Pestka, S

    1979-08-25

    Ribosomal proteins of parental thiostrepton- and micrococcin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis cysA14 and thiostrepton-and micrococcin-resistant mutants were compared. Several electrophoretic and immunochemical techniques showed unambiguously that BS-L11 was not present on 50 S ribosomal subunits from the six thiostrepton-resistant mutants. Protein BS-L11 reappeared in all six revertants from thiostrepton resistance to thiostrepton sensitivity. No definitive protein alteration could be ascribed to the mutation from micrococcin sensitivity to resistance. It was also demonstrated that B. subtilis protein BS-L11 is homologous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L11. The finding that ribosomes from thiostrepton-resistant mutants do not contain protein L11 suggests that L11 not only is involved in binding of thiostrepton, but also, when mutationally altered, confers resistance to this antibiotic. Although the ribosomes of these strains do not contain protein L11, all thiostrepton-resistant mutants showed the same viability as the parental strain. Thus protein L11 cannot be obligatory for the structure and function of the ribosome.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  14. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 variants and dietary fatty acids: meta-analysis of European origin and African American studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein-related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor and signaling molecule that is expressed in adipose and the hypothalamus. Evidence for a role of LRP1 in adiposity is accumulating from animal and in vitro models, but data from human studies are limit...

  15. Heat-resistant protein expression during germination of maize seeds under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abreu, V M; Silva Neta, I C; Von Pinho, E V R; Naves, G M F; Guimarães, R M; Santos, H O; Von Pinho, R G

    2016-08-12

    Low water availability is one of the factors that limit agricultural crop development, and hence the development of genotypes with increased water stress tolerance is a challenge in plant breeding programs. Heat-resistant proteins have been widely studied, and are reported to participate in various developmental processes and to accumulate in response to stress. This study aimed to evaluate heat-resistant protein expression under water stress conditions during the germination of maize seed inbreed lines differing in their water stress tolerance. Maize seed lines 91 and 64 were soaked in 0, -0.3, -0.6, and -0.9 MPa water potential for 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h. Line 91 is considered more water stress-tolerant than line 64. The analysis of heat-resistant protein expression was made by gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry. In general, higher expression of heat-resistant proteins was observed in seeds from line 64 subjected to shorter soaking periods and lower water potentials. However, in the water stress-tolerant line 91, a higher expression was observed in seeds that were subjected to -0.3 and -0.6 MPa water potentials. In the absence of water stress, heat-resistant protein expression was reduced with increasing soaking period. Thus, there was a difference in heat-resistant protein expression among the seed lines differing in water stress tolerance. Increased heat-resistant protein expression was observed in seeds from line 91 when subjected to water stress conditions for longer soaking periods.

  16. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  17. Protein cyclization enhanced thermostability and exopeptidase-resistance of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhonglin; Ma, Xin; Li, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Ping, Shuzhen; Xu, Ming-Qun; Lin, Min

    2010-03-01

    A mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFPmut3*) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria was cyclized in vitro and in vivo by the use of a naturally split intein from the dnaE gene of Synechocystis species PCC6803 (Ssp). Cyclization of GFPmut3* was confirmed by amino acid sequencing and resulted in an increased electrophoretic mobility compared with the linear GFPmut3*. The circular GFPmut3* was 5 degrees C more thermostable than the linear form and significantly more resistant to proteolysis of exopeptidase. The circular GFPmut3* also displayed increased relative fluorescence intensity. In addition, chemical stability of GFPmut3* against GdnHCl revealed more stability of the circular form compared with the linear form.

  18. 42 CFR 68c.14 - When can a CIR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM § 68c.14 When can a CIR-LRP...

  19. 42 CFR 68c.14 - When can a CIR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM § 68c.14 When can a CIR-LRP...

  20. Crystal structure of the carbapenem intrinsic resistance protein CarG.

    PubMed

    Tichy, E M; Luisi, B F; Salmond, G P C

    2014-05-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue.

  1. Differential expression of hemolymph proteins between susceptible and insecticide-resistant Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Wang, X J; Huang, Y H; Zhao, Z G; Zhang, S S; Gong, X S; Xie, L; Kang, D M; Jing, X

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach combining two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry was used to compare hemolymph expression profiles of a beta-cypermethrin-resistant Blattella germanica L. strain and a beta-cypermethrin-susceptible strain. Twenty-eight hemolymph proteins were differentially expressed in the resistant cockroach strain; 19 proteins were upregulated and 9 proteins were downregulated compared with the susceptible strain. Protein identification indicated that expression of putative cuticular protein, nitric oxide synthase, triosephosphate isomerase, alpha-amylase, ABC transporter, and Per a 3 allergen was elevated, and expression of arginine kinase and glycosidase was reduced. The differential expression of these proteins reflects the overall change in cellular structure and metabolism related to the resistance of pyrethroid insecticides.

  2. High throughput atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization for identifying protein-resistant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Kilduff, James E; Belfort, Georges

    2012-02-01

    Three critical aspects of searching for and understanding how to find highly resistant surfaces to protein adhesion are addressed here with specific application to synthetic membrane filtration. They include the (i) discovery of a series of previously unreported monomers from a large library of monomers with high protein resistance and subsequent low fouling characteristics for membrane ultrafiltration of protein-containing fluids, (ii) development of a new approach to investigate protein-resistant mechanisms from structure-property relationships, and (iii) adaptation of a new surface modification method, called atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization (APP), together with a high throughput platform (HTP), for low cost vacuum-free synthesis of anti-fouling membranes. Several new high-performing chemistries comprising two polyethylene glycol (PEG), two amines and one zwitterionic monomers were identified from a library (44 commercial monomers) of five different classes of monomers as strong protein-resistant monomers. Combining our analysis here, using the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) approach, and data from the literature, we conclude that strong interactions with water (hydrogen bonding) and surface flexibility are necessary for producing the highest protein resistance. Superior protein-resistant surfaces and subsequent anti-fouling performance was obtained with the HTP-APP as compared with our earlier HTP-photo graft-induced polymerization (PGP).

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mite (Varroa destructor) resistance-related proteins in Eastern honeybees (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Ji, T; Shen, F; Liu, Z; Yin, L; Shen, J; Liang, Q; Luo, Y X

    2015-08-21

    The mite (Varroa destructor) has become the greatest threat to apiculture worldwide. As the original host of the mite, Apis cerana can effectively resist the mite. An increased understanding of the resistance mechanisms of Eastern honeybees against V. destructor may help researchers to protect other species against these parasites. In this study, the proteomes of 4 Apis cerana colonies were analyzed using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation technology. We determined the differences in gene and protein expression between susceptible and resistant colonies that were either unchallenged or challenged by V. destructor. The results showed that a total of 1532 proteins were identified. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that the transcription factors and basic metabolic and respiratory processes were efficient and feasible factors controlling this resistance, and 12 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Venn analysis. The results were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This study may provide insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of honeybee to mites.

  4. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition.

  5. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, A. M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, M. E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer, using nanoLC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ~5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ~550 ng protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n=24 and n=27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag (AMT) reference databases.

  6. Contemporary Issues in Protein Requirements and Consumption for Resistance Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jacob; Wilson, Gabriel J

    2006-01-01

    In recent years an explosion of research papers concerning protein consumption has been published. The need to consolidate this information has become critical from both practical and future research standpoints. For this reason, the following paper presents an in depth analysis of contemporary issues in protein requirements and consumption for resistance trained athletes. Specifically, the paper covers: 1.) protein requirements for resistance trained athletes; 2.) the effect of the digestion rate of protein on muscular protein balance; 3.) the optimal timing of protein intake relative to exercise; 4.) the optimal pattern of protein ingestion, relative to how an individual should consume their protein throughout a 24 hour period, and what sources are utilized during this time frame; 5.) protein composition and its interaction with measures of protein balance and strength performance; 6.) the combination of protein and carbohydrates on plasma insulin levels and protein balance; 7.) the efficacy of protein supplements and whole food protein sources. Our goal is to provide the reader with practical information in optimizing protein intake as well as for provision of sound advice to their clients. Finally, special care was taken to provide future research implications. PMID:18500966

  7. Activated protein C resistance in patients with central retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, J; Sellman, A; Bauer, B

    1997-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND—A new defect in the anticoagulant system has recently been discovered—activated protein C resistance. The frequency of this disorder has been shown to be increased in young patients (<50 years of age) with central retinal vein occlusion. This study was carried out to determine if there was any overrepresentation of activated protein C resistance in patients >50 years of age with central retinal vein occlusion.
METHODS—Blood samples were obtained from 83 patients >50 years of age and with a history of central retinal vein occlusion. The blood samples were analysed for activated protein C resistance with standard clinical laboratory methods.
RESULTS—In this material 11% of the patients were resistant to activated protein C. The normal incidence of activated protein C resistance in the same geographical area is 10-11%.
CONCLUSION—Activated protein C resistance does not seem to be a cause of central retinal vein occlusion in people older than 50 years.

 PMID:9486021

  8. Protein Kinase C-α–Mediated Regulation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein and Urokinase Increases Astrocytoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Samson; Mut, Melike; diPierro, Charles G.; Carpenter, Joan E.; Xiao, Aizhen; Kohutek, Zachary A.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Zhao, Yunge; Wang, Jiahu; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive and infiltrative invasion is one of the hallmarks of glioblastoma. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) is expressed by glioblastoma, but the role of this receptor in astrocytic tumor invasion remains poorly understood. We show that activation of protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) phosphorylated and down-regulated LRP expression. Pretreatment of tumor cells with PKC inhibitors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, PKC-α small interfering RNA (siRNA), and short hairpin RNA abrogated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate–induced down-regulation of LRP and inhibited astrocytic tumor invasion in vitro. In xenograft glioblastoma mouse model and in vitro transmembrane invasion assay, LRP-deficient cells, which secreted high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), invaded extensively the surrounding normal brain tissue, whereas the LRP-overexpressing and uPA-deficient cells did not invade into the surrounding normal brain. siRNA, targeted against uPA in LRP-deficient clones, attenuated their invasive potential. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of PKC-α/PI3K signaling pathways in the regulation of LRP-mediated astrocytoma invasion. Thus, a strategy of combining small molecule inhibitors of PKC-α and PI3K could provide a new treatment paradigm for glioblastomas. PMID:17974965

  9. Polyglycerol coatings of glass vials for protein resistance.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Becherer, Tobias; Qiang, Wei; Haag, Rainer; Friess, Wolfgang; Küchler, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are surface active molecules which undergo non-specific adsorption when getting in contact with surfaces such as the primary packaging material. This process is critical as it may cause a loss of protein content or protein aggregation. To prevent unspecific adsorption, protein repellent coatings are of high interest. We describe the coating of industrial relevant borosilicate glass vials with linear methoxylated polyglycerol, hyperbranched polyglycerol, and hyperbranched methoxylated polyglycerol. All coatings provide excellent protein repellent effects. The hyperbranched, non-methoxylated coating performed best. The protein repellent properties were maintained also after applying industrial relevant sterilization methods (≥200 °C). Marginal differences in antibody stability between formulations stored in bare glass vials and coated vials were detected after 3 months storage; the protein repellent effect remained largely stable. Here, we describe a new material suitable for the coating of primary packaging material of proteins which significantly reduces the protein adsorption and thus could present an interesting new possibility for biomedical applications.

  10. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y; Maynard, Heather D

    2015-03-20

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  11. Trehalose Glycopolymer Resists Allow Direct Writing of Protein Patterns by Electron-Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively cross-link to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometer and nanometer scale without requiring cleanroom conditions. PMID:25791943

  12. Expression, detergent solubilization, and purification of a membrane transporter, the MexB multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Forum H; Jeffery, Constance J

    2010-12-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the ability of a cancer cell or pathogen to be resistant to a wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics, is a current serious problem in public health. This multidrug resistance is largely due to energy-dependent drug efflux pumps. The pumps expel anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics into the external medium, lowering their intracellular concentration below a toxic threshold. We are studying multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes infections in patients with many types of injuries or illness, for example, burns or cystic fibrosis, and also in immuno-compromised cancer, dialysis, and transplantation patients. The major MDR efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa are tripartite complexes comprised of an inner membrane proton-drug antiporter (RND), an outer membrane channel (OMF), and a periplasmic linker protein (MFP). The RND and OMF proteins are transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins make up more than 30% of all proteins and are 65% of current drug targets. The hydrophobic transmembrane domains make the proteins insoluble in aqueous buffer. Before a transmembrane protein can be purified, it is necessary to find buffer conditions containing a mild detergent that enable the protein to be solubilized as a protein detergent complex (PDC). In this example, we use an RND protein, the P. aeruginosa MexB transmembrane transporter, to demonstrate how to express a recombinant form of a transmembrane protein, solubilize it using detergents, and then purify the protein detergent complexes. This general method can be applied to the expression, purification, and solubilization of many other recombinantly expressed membrane proteins. The protein detergent complexes can later be used for biochemical or biophysical characterization including X-ray crystal structure determination or crosslinking studies.

  13. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures.

  14. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  15. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  16. Lipid transfer protein-mediated resistance to a trichothecene mycotoxin – Novel players in FHB resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid transfer proteins are a class of basic cysteine rich proteins characterized by an eight cysteine motif backbone with intrinsic antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Previously, we identified two type IV nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes (LTP4.4 and LTP...

  17. Nuclear inheritance of erythromycin resistance in human cells: New class of mitochondrial protein synthesis mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The characterization of two new erythromycin-resistant mutants of HeLa cells is described. The strains ERY2305 and ERY2309 both exhibited resistance to erythromycin in growth assays and cell-free mitochondrial protein synthesis assays. The erythromycin resistance phenotype could not be transferred by cybridization. The mutation appeared to be encoded in the nucleus and inherited as a recessive trait. These two mutants, therefore, represent a new class of erythromycin-resistant mutants in human cells that is distinct from the cytoplasmically inherited mutation in strain ERY2301 described previously.

  18. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1) confers resistance to arsenic compounds in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Carew, Micheal W; Hao, Wen Hui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X Chris

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is established as one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, as well as other types of malignant tumors. However, HL-60 cells are resistant to As(2)O(3), and little is known about the underlying resistance mechanism for As(2)O(3) and its biomethylation products, namely, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) on the treatment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying iAs(III) and its intermediate metabolite MMA(III)-induced anticancer effects in the HL-60 cells. Here, we show that the HL-60 cells exhibit resistance to inorganic iAs(III) (IC(50) = 10 μM), but are relatively sensitive to its intermediate MMA(III) (IC(50) = 3.5 μM). Moreover, we found that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), but not MRP2, is expressed in HL-60 cells, which reduced the intracellular arsenic accumulation, and conferred resistance to inorganic iAs(III) and MMA(III). Pretreatment of HL-60 with MK571, an inhibitor of MRP1, significantly increased iAs(III) and MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity and arsenic accumulations, suggesting that the expression of MRP1/4 may lead to HL-60 cells resistance to trivalent arsenic compounds.

  19. Azide-resistant mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 are defective in protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-02-15

    Azide, an inhibitor of ATPase, and a specific inhibitor of protein export was used in order to select for protein secretion mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2. Two such mutants were isolated that were azide-resistant and defective in the general protein transport system. The mutation also conferred additional phenotypic changes, including an inability to grow on minimal media or at 40 degrees C. The existence of protein secretion mutants with a selectable phenotype may be useful for the genetic study of protein export.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel resistance-related proteins in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroya; Sakai, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoru; Kimura, Kosei; Miyamoto, Akiko; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used to treat various cancers; however, resistance to this drug is a major obstacle to breast cancer chemotherapy. To identify the proteins involved in paclitaxel resistance, the present study compared the proteomes of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and its paclitaxel-resistant subclone MCF-7/PTX. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, 11 upregulated and 12 downregulated proteins were identified in MCF-7/PTX cells compared with the parental cell line. These 23 proteins were functionally classified as stress-induced chaperones, metabolic enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. The anti-apoptotic proteins, stress-70 protein, 78-kD glucose-regulated protein, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H3, were also upregulated in MCF-7/PTX cells. Notably, knockdown of the stress-response chaperone PPIA using small interfering RNA in MCF-7/PTX cells restored their sensitivity to paclitaxel. These findings indicated that PPIA may have an important role in paclitaxel resistance in MCF-7/PTX cells. PMID:28123557

  1. Possibly similar genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of the sugarcane borer collected from Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Mao; Gowda, Anilkumar; Kerns, David L; Huang, Fangneng

    2016-11-08

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), is a major maize borer pest and a target of transgenic maize expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in South America and the mid-southern region of the United States. Evolution of resistance in target pest populations is a great threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt crops. In this study, we compared the genetic basis of resistance to Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of sugarcane borer established from field populations in Louisiana, USA. Responses of larvae to the Cry1Ab protein for the parental and 10 other cross colonies were assayed in a diet-incorporated bioassay. All 3 resistant colonies were highly resistant to the Cry1Ab protein with a resistance ratio of >555.6 fold. No maternal effect or sex linkage was evident for the resistance in the 3 colonies; and the resistance was functionally nonrecessive at the Cry1Ab concentrations of ≤ 3.16 μg/g, but it became recessive at ≥10 μg/g. In an interstrain complementation test for allelism, the F1 progeny from crosses between any 2 of the 3 resistant colonies exhibited the similar resistance levels as their parental colonies, indicating that the 3 colonies most likely shared a locus of Cry1Ab resistance. Results generated from this study should provide useful information in developing effective strategies for managing Bt resistance in the insect.

  2. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  3. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (1), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme’s catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor. PMID:27914058

  4. Widespread genetic switches and toxicity resistance proteins for fluoride.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jenny L; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B; Breaker, Ronald R

    2012-01-13

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion.

  5. Expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein predicts cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tan-Chen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Cho, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chiang, I-Ping; Ho, Shu-Peng

    2011-05-01

    DNA repair has been suggested to be a major cause of spontaneous drug resistance in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADC). Among the DNA repair-related proteins, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be essential for repairing cisplatin-induced interstrand cross-linkage. However, the role of other DNA repair-related proteins in drug resistance has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis to identify the DNA repair-related genes associated with cisplatin resistance. We focused on the association of XPC protein expression, which plays a pivotal role in the earliest response to global genomic repair, with the survival of LADC patients. Using suppression subtractive hybridization and a microarray analysis to identify drug resistance-associated DNA repair-related genes, we found that the mRNA levels of ERCC1, MSH-3, MSH-6 and XPC were significantly increased in LADC patients. Since the results of ERCC1 mRNA expression corresponded well with those in previous reports, in this study we focused on the clinical correlation between XPC expression and patient survival. The level of XPC protein was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses. We detected the XPC protein in 46 (43%) of 107 pathological LADC samples. XPC protein expression correlated with tumor stage, cigarette smoking and poor survival. In the in vitro experiments with LADC cell lines, increased XPC expression was associated with elevated drug resistance, and silencing of XPC expression reduced cisplatin resistance. Our results suggest that XPC expression predicts drug resistance in LADC.

  6. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo.

  7. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  8. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells.

  9. New insights into the roles of megalin/LRP2 and the regulation of its functional expression.

    PubMed

    Marzolo, María-Paz; Farfán, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and its association with familial hypercholesterolemia in the early 1980s, a family of structurally related proteins has been discovered that has apolipoprotein E as a common ligand, and the broad functions of its members have been described. LRP2, or megalin, is a member of the LDLR family and was initially called gp330. Megalin is an endocytic receptor expressed on the apical surface of several epithelial cells that internalizes a variety of ligands including nutrients, hormones and their carrier proteins, signaling molecules, morphogens, and extracellular matrix proteins. Once internalized, these ligands are directed to the lysosomal degradation pathway or transported by transcytosis from one side of the cell to the opposite membrane. The availability of megalin at the cell surface is controlled by several regulatory mechanisms, including the phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain by GSK3, the proteolysis of the extracellular domain at the cell surface (shedding), the subsequent intramembrane proteolysis of the transmembrane domain by the gamma-secretase complex, and exosome secretion. Based on the important roles of its ligands and its tissue expression pattern, megalin has been recognized as an important component of many pathological conditions, including diabetic nephropathy, Lowe syndrome, Dent disease, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and gallstone disease. In addition, the expression of megalin and some of its ligands in the central and peripheral nervous system suggests a role for this receptor in neural regeneration processes. Despite its obvious importance, the regulation of megalin expression is poorly understood. In this review, we describe the functions of megalin and its association with certain pathological conditions as well as the current understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the control of megalin expression.

  10. Protein promiscuity: drug resistance and native functions--HIV-1 case.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Tawfik, Dan S; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Sen, Taner; Jernigan, Bob

    2005-06-01

    The association of a drug with its target protein has the effect of blocking the protein activity and is termed a promiscuous function to distinguish from the protein's native function (Tawfik and associates, Nat. Genet. 37, 73-6, 2005). Obviously, a protein has not evolved naturally for drug association or drug resistance. Promiscuous protein functions exhibit unique traits of evolutionary adaptability, or evolvability, which is dependent on the induction of novel phenotypic traits by a small number of mutations. These mutations might have small effects on native functions, but large effects on promiscuous function; for example, an evolving protein could become increasingly drug resistant while maintaining its original function. Ariel Fernandez, in his opinion piece, notes that drug-binding "promiscuity" can hardly be dissociated from native functions; a dominant approach to drug discovery is the protein-native-substrate transition-state mimetic strategy. Thus, man-made ligands (e.g. drugs) have been successfully crafted to restrain enzymatic activity by focusing on the very same structural features that determine the native function. Using the successful inhibition of HIV-1 protease as an example, Fernandez illustrates how drug designers have employed naturally evolved features of the protein to suppress its activity. Based on these arguments, he dismisses the notion that drug binding is quintessentially promiscuous, even though in principle, proteins did not evolve to associate with man made ligands. In short, Fernandez argues that there may not be separate protein domains that one could term promiscuous domains. While acknowledging that drugs may bind promiscuously or in a native-like manner a la Fernandez, Tawfik maintains the role of evolutionary adaptation, even when a drug binds native-like. In the case of HIV-1 protease, drugs bind natively, and the initial onset of mutations results in drug resistance in addition to a dramatic decline in enzymatic

  11. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W; Amin, Hesham M; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Rosen, Steven T; Pham, Lan V; Ngo, Vu N

    2016-11-08

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5-10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL.

  12. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W.; Amin, Hesham M.; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Rosen, Steven T.; Pham, Lan V.; Ngo, Vu N.

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5–10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL. PMID:27713153

  13. Artificial TALE as a Convenient Protein Platform for Engineering Broad-Spectrum Resistance to Begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Li, Fangfang; Cai, Jianyu; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Nan; Sun, Yuqiang; Guo, Yushuang; Yang, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) are a class of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that utilize a simple and predictable modality to recognize target DNA. This unique characteristic allows for the rapid assembly of artificial TALEs, with high DNA binding specificity, to any target DNA sequences for the creation of customizable sequence-specific nucleases used in genome engineering. Here, we report the use of an artificial TALE protein as a convenient platform for designing broad-spectrum resistance to begomoviruses, one of the most destructive plant virus groups, which cause tremendous losses worldwide. We showed that artificial TALEs, which were assembled based on conserved sequence motifs within begomovirus genomes, could confer partial resistance in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana to all three begomoviruses tested. Furthermore, the resistance was maintained even in the presence of their betasatellite. These results shed new light on the development of broad-spectrum resistance against DNA viruses, such as begomoviruses. PMID:26308041

  14. Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, T A; Casey, P J

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

  15. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and fatal thrombosis in a patient with activated protein C resistance.

    PubMed

    Gardyn, J; Sorkin, P; Kluger, Y; Kabili, S; Klausner, J M; Zivelin, A; Eldor, A

    1995-12-01

    We report a 20-year-old woman who developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) associated with devastating and fatal multiorgan thrombosis. The patient, her mother, and her brother were found to have resistance to activated protein C (APC), and the congenital thrombophilia in this family was verified by the finding of the Arg506 Gln mutation in factor V. This is the first case of HIT and APC resistance. The consequences of this association are discussed.

  16. Reduced resting skeletal muscle protein synthesis is rescued by resistance exercise and protein ingestion following short-term energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Crawshay, Siobhan; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2014-04-15

    The myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) response to resistance exercise (REX) and protein ingestion during energy deficit (ED) is unknown. In young men (n = 8) and women (n = 7), we determined protein signaling and resting postabsorptive MPS during energy balance [EB; 45 kcal·kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1)·day(-1)] and after 5 days of ED (30 kcal·kg FFM(-1)·day(-1)) as well as MPS while in ED after acute REX in the fasted state and with the ingestion of whey protein (15 and 30 g). Postabsorptive rates of MPS were 27% lower in ED than EB (P < 0.001), but REX stimulated MPS to rates equal to EB. Ingestion of 15 and 30 g of protein after REX in ED increased MPS ~16 and ~34% above resting EB (P < 0.02). p70 S6K Thr(389) phosphorylation increased above EB only with combined exercise and protein intake (~2-7 fold, P < 0.05). In conclusion, short-term ED reduces postabsorptive MPS; however, a bout of REX in ED restores MPS to values observed at rest in EB. The ingestion of protein after REX further increases MPS above resting EB in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that combining REX with increased protein availability after exercise enhances rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis during short-term ED and could in the long term preserve muscle mass.

  17. The outer membrane protein TolC from Sinorhizobium meliloti affects protein secretion, polysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobial resistance, and symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ana M; Becker, Anke; Santos, Mário R; Sharypova, Larissa A; Santos, Pedro M; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2008-07-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is capable of establishing a symbiotic nitrogen fixation relationship with Medicago sativa. During this process, it must cope with diverse environments and has evolved different types of transport systems that help its propagation in the plant roots. TolC protein family members are the outer-membrane components of several transport systems involved in the export of diverse molecules, playing an important role in bacterial survival. In this work, we have characterized the protein TolC from S. meliloti 2011. An insertional mutation in the tolC gene strongly affected the resistance phenotype to antimicrobial agents and induced higher susceptibility to osmotic and oxidative stresses. Immunodetection experiments and comparison of the extracellular proteins present in the supernatant of the wild-type versus tolC mutant strains showed that the calcium-binding protein ExpE1, the endoglycanase ExsH, and the product of open reading frame SMc04171, a putative hemolysin-type calcium-binding protein, are secreted by a TolC-dependent secretion system. In the absence of TolC, neither succinoglycan nor galactoglucan were detected in the culture supernatant. Moreover, S. meliloti tolC mutant induced a reduced number of nonfixing nitrogen nodules in M. sativa roots. Taken together, our results confirm the importance of TolC in protein secretion, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobials resistance, and symbiosis.

  18. DBC2 resistance is achieved by enhancing 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Collado, Denise; Yoshihara, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Masaaki

    2007-08-31

    Tumor suppressor gene DBC2 stops growth of tumor cells through regulation of CCND1. Interference of CCND1 down-regulation prevented growth arrest caused by DBC2 [T. Yoshihara, D. Collado, M. Hamaguchi, Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function, Biochemical and biophysical research communications 358 (2007) 1076-1079]. It was also noted that DBC2 resistant cells eventually arose after repeated induction of DBC2 with muristerone A treatment [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. In order to elucidate the mechanism of resistance acquisition, we analyzed DBC2 sensitive and resistant cells derived from the same progenitor cells (T-47D). We discovered that DBC2 protein was abundantly expressed in the sensitive cells when DBC2 was induced. In contrast, it was undetectable by western blot analysis in the resistant cells. We confirmed that the inducible gene expression system was responsive in both cells by detecting induced GFP. Additionally, inhibition of 26S proteasome by MG132 revealed production of DBC2 protein in the resistant cells. These findings indicate that the resistant T-47D cells survive DBC2 induction by rapid destruction of DBC2 through 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

  19. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  20. Correlation between penicillin-binding protein 2 mutations and carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Chika; Kamai, Yasuki; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that carbapenem-resistant mutations in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are not observed in most Gram-negative bacteria under either clinical or experimental conditions. To understand the mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, this study constructed a mutS- and tolC-deficient Escherichia coli strain, which was expected to have elevated mutation frequencies and to lack drug efflux. Using this mutant, carbapenem-resistant strains with target mutations were successfully and efficiently isolated. The mutations T547I/A, M574I and G601D were identified in the PBP2 gene. Meropenem (MEPM)-resistant strains with the PBP2 T547I mutation showed fourfold increased resistance to 1-β-methyl-substituted carbapenems, such as doripenem, MEPM and biapenem, but not to non-substituted carbapenems such as imipenem and panipenem and other β-lactams. In addition, resistance resulting from the G601D mutation was limited to MEPM, whilst the M574I mutation conferred resistance to MEPM, imipenem and panipenem. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, that E. coli also has a carbapenem-resistance mechanism as a result of PBP2 mutations, and it provides insight into the resistance profiles of PBP2 mutations to carbapenems with and without the 1-β-methyl group.

  1. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  2. Protein-Adsorbed Magnetic-Nanoparticle-Mediated Assay for Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku A; Yang, Yaping; Rink, David E; Todd, Trever; Chen, Hongmin; Shen, Ye; Yan, Yajun; Xie, Jin

    2017-02-17

    Antibiotic susceptibility tests have been used for years as a crucial diagnostic tool against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, due to a lack of biomarkers specific to resistant types, these approaches are often time-consuming, inaccurate, and inflexible in drug selections. Here, we present a novel susceptibility test method named protein-adsorbed nanoparticle-mediated matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry, or PANMS. Briefly, we adsorb five different proteins (β-casein, α-lactalbumin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and avidin) onto the surface of Fe3O4. Upon interaction with bacteria surface, proteins were displaced from the nanoparticle surface, the amounts of which were quantified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. We find that the protein displacement profile was different distinctive among different bacteria strains and, in particular, between wild-type and drug-resistant strains. More excitingly, we observe bacteria resistant to drugs of the same mechanisms share similar displacement profiles on a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) map. This suggests the possibility of using PANMS to identify the type of mechanism behind antibiotic resistance, which was confirmed in a blind test. Given that PANMS is free of drug incubation and the whole procedure takes less than 50 min, it holds great potential as a high-throughput, low-cost, and accurate drug susceptibility test in the clinic.

  3. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  4. Impaired Synaptic Development, Maintenance, and Neuromuscular Transmission in LRP4 Myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Ohkawara, Bisei; Shen, Xin-Ming; McEvoy, Kathleen; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders. Defining the phenotypic features, genetic basis, and pathomechanisms of a CMS is relevant to prognosis, genetic counseling, and therapy. OBJECTIVE To characterize clinical, structural, electrophysiologic, and genetic features of a CMS and search for optimal therapy. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS Two sisters, 34 and 20 years of age suffering from a CMS affecting the limb-girdle muscles were investigated at an academic medical center by clinical observation, in vitro analysis of neuromuscular transmission, cytochemical and electron microscopy studies of the neuromuscular junction, exome sequencing, expression studies in HEK293 and COS-7 cells, and for response to therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We identified the disease gene and mutation, confirmed pathogenicity of the mutation by expression studies, and instituted optimal pharmacotherapy. RESULTS Intercostal muscle endplates (EPs) were abnormally small with attenuated reactivities for the acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine esterase. Most EPs had poorly differentiated or degenerate junctional folds and some appeared denuded of nerve terminals. The amplitude of the EP potential (EPP), the miniature EPP, and the quantal content of the EPP were all markedly reduced. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous p.Glu1233Ala mutation in LRP4, a coreceptor for agrin to activate MuSK, required for EP development and maintenance. Expression studies indicate the mutation compromises ability of LRP4 to bind to, phosphorylate, and activate MuSK. Albuterol improved the patients’ symptoms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE We identify a second CMS kinship harboring mutations in LRP4, identify the mechanisms that impair neuromuscular transmission, and mitigate the disease by appropriate therapy. PMID:26052878

  5. Genetic Variants in LRP1 and ULK4 Are Associated with Acute Aortic Dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Grove, Megan L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Eriksson, Per; Hostetler, Ellen M; LeMaire, Scott A; Body, Simon C; Shalhub, Sherene; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Regalado, Ellen S; Zhou, Wei; Mathis, Michael R; Eagle, Kim A; Yang, Bo; Willer, Cristen J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic dissections are a preventable cause of sudden death if individuals at risk are identified and surgically repaired in a non-emergency setting. Although mutations in single genes can be used to identify at-risk individuals, the majority of dissection case subjects do not have evidence of a single gene disorder, but rather have the other major risk factor for dissections, hypertension. Initial genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified SNPs at the FBN1 locus associated with both thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Here, we used the Illumina HumanExome array to genotype 753 individuals of European descent presenting specifically with non-familial, sporadic thoracic aortic dissection (STAD) and compared them to the genotypes of 2,259 control subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study matched for age, gender, and, for the majority of cases, hypertension. SNPs in FBN1, LRP1, and ULK4 were identified to be significantly associated with STAD, and these results were replicated in two independent cohorts. Combining the data from all cohorts confirmed an inverse association between LRP1 rs11172113 and STAD (p = 2.74 × 10(-8); OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.89) and a direct association between ULK4 rs2272007 and STAD (p = 1.15 × 10(-9); OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.23-1.49). Genomic copy-number variation analysis independently confirmed that ULK4 deletions were significantly associated with development of thoracic aortic disease. These results indicate that genetic variations in LRP1 and ULK4 contribute to risk for presenting with an acute aortic dissection.

  6. Antiviral Resistance Protein Tm-22 Functions on the Plasma Membrane1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianyuan; Liu, Dan; Niu, Xiaolin; Qian, Lichao; Han, Lu; Liu, Na; Zhao, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    The tomato Tobacco mosaic virus resistance-22 (Tm-22) gene encodes a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site-Leu-rich repeat protein lacking a conventional plasma membrane (PM) localization motif. Tm-22 confers plant extreme resistance against tobamoviruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) by recognizing the avirulence (Avr) viral movement protein (MP). However, the subcellular compartment where Tm-22 functions is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Tm-22 interacts with TMV MP to form a protein complex at the PM. We show that both inactive and active Tm-22 proteins are localized to the PM. When restricted to PM by fusing Tm-22 to the S-acylated PM association motif, the Tm-22 fusion protein can still induce a hypersensitive response cell death, consistent with its activation at the PM. Through analyses of viral MP mutants, we find that the plasmodesmata (PD) localization of the Avr protein MP is not required for Tm-22 function. These results suggest that Tm-22-mediated resistance takes place on PM without requirement of its Avr protein to be located to PD. PMID:28258211

  7. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in the cervical mucosa of HIV-1-resistant sex workers.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; Boutilier, Julie; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Carpenter, Michael; Westmacott, Garrett; Cheng, Keding; Ball, Terry B; Plummer, Francis

    2008-10-01

    Novel tools are necessary to understand mechanisms of altered susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in women of the Pumwani Sex Worker cohort, Kenya. In this cohort, more than 140 of the 2000 participants have been characterized to be relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. Given that sexual transmission of HIV-1 occurs through mucosal surfaces such as that in the cervicovaginal environment, our hypothesis is that innate immune factors in the genital tract may play a role in HIV-1 infection resistance. Understanding this mechanism may help develop microbicides and/or vaccines against HIV-1. A quantitative proteomics technique (2D-DIGE: two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis) was used to examine cervical mucosa of HIV-1 resistant women ( n = 10) for biomarkers of HIV-1 resistance. Over 15 proteins were found to be differentially expressed between HIV-1-resistant women and control groups ( n = 29), some which show a greater than 8-fold change. HIV-1-resistant women overexpressed several antiproteases, including those from the serpin B family, and also cystatin A, a known anti-HIV-1 factor. Immunoblotting for a selection of the identified proteins confirmed the DIGE volume differences. Validation of these results on a larger sample of individuals will provide further evidence these biomarkers are associated with HIV-1 resistance and could help aid in the development of effective microbicides against HIV-1.

  8. Annotated differentially expressed salivary proteins of susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes of Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Sonam; Rawal, Ritu; Kadian, Kavita; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Sharma, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Vector control is one of the major global strategies for control of malaria. However, the major obstacle for vector control is the development of multiple resistances to organochlorine, organophosphorus insecticides and pyrethroids that are currently being used in public health for spraying and in bednets. Salivary glands of vectors are the first target organ for human-vector contact during biting and parasite-vector contact prior to parasite development in the mosquito midguts. The salivary glands secrete anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory biologically active molecules to facilitate blood feeding from the host and also inadvertently inject malaria parasites into the vertebrate host. The Anopheles stephensi mosquito, an urban vector of malaria to both human and rodent species has been identified as a reference laboratory model to study mosquito-parasite interactions. In this study, we adopted a conventional proteomic approach of 2D-electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and bioinformatics to identify putative differentially expressed annotated functional salivary proteins between An. stephensi susceptible and multiresistant strains with same genetic background. Our results show 2D gel profile and MALDI-TOF comparisons that identified 31 differentially expressed putative modulated proteins in deltamethrin/DDT resistant strains of An. stephensi. Among these 15 proteins were found to be upregulated and 16 proteins were downregulated. Our studies interpret that An. stephensi (multiresistant) caused an upregulated expression of proteins and enzymes like cytochrome 450, short chain dehyrdogenase reductase, phosphodiesterase etc that may have an impact in insecticide resistance and xenobiotic detoxification. Our study elucidates a proteomic response of salivary glands differentially regulated proteins in response to insecticide resistance development which include structural, redox and regulatory enzymes of several pathways. These identified proteins

  9. Identification of a Putative Protein Profile Associated with Tamoxifen Therapy Resistance in Breast Cancer*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W. M.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ∼5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ∼550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with ≥2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were higher in therapy-resistant

  10. Sodium Orthovanadate-Resistant Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Show Defects in Golgi-Mediated Protein Glycosylation, Sporulation and Detergent Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C.; Montalvo, E.; Neff, N.

    1995-01-01

    Orthovanadate is a small toxic molecule that competes with the biologically important oxyanion orthophosphate. Orthovanadate resistance arises spontaneously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells by mutation in a number of genes. Mutations selected at 3 mM sodium orthovanadate have different degrees of vanadate resistance, hygromycin sensitivity, detergent sensitivity and sporulation defects. Recessive vanadate-resistant mutants belong to at least six genetic loci. Most mutants are defective in outer chain glycosylation of secreted invertase (van1, van2, van4, van5, van6, VAN7-116 and others), a phenotype found in some MNN or VRG mutants. The phenotypes of these vanadate-resistant mutants are consistent with an alteration in the permeability or specificity of the Golgi apparatus. The previously published VAN1 gene product has a 200 amino acid domain with 40% identity with the MNN9 gene product and 70% identity with the ANP1 gene product. Cells containing the van1-18, mnn9 (vrg6) or anp1 mutations have some phenotypic similarities. The VAN2 gene was isolated and its coding region is identified and reported. It is an essential gene on chromosome XV and its translated amino acid sequence predicts a unique 337 amino acid protein with multiple transmembrane domains. PMID:7672592

  11. Protein detection using tunable pores: resistive pulses and current rectification.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Emma L C J; Mayne, Laura J; Lickorish, Michael; Christie, Steven D R; Platt, Mark

    2016-12-12

    We present the first comparison between assays that use resistive pulses or rectification ratios on a tunable pore platform. We compare their ability to quantify the cancer biomarker Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). The first assay measures the electrophoretic mobility of aptamer modified nanoparticles as they traverse the pore. By controlling the aptamer loading on the particle surface, and measuring the speed of each translocation event we are able to observe a change in velocity as low as 18 pM. A second non-particle assay exploits the current rectification properties of conical pores. We report the first use of Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes onto the surface of the polyurethane pore. The current rectification ratios demonstrate the presence of the polymers, producing pH and ionic strength-dependent currents. The LbL assembly allows the facile immobilisation of DNA aptamers onto the pore allowing a specific dose response to VEGF. Monitoring changes to the current rectification allows for a rapid detection of 5 pM VEGF. Each assay format offers advantages in their setup and ease of preparation but comparable sensitivities.

  12. Development of a monoclonal anti-ADAMTS-5 antibody that specifically blocks the interaction with LRP1.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Salvatore; Fedorov, Oleg; McCafferty, John; Murphy, Gillian; Dudhia, Jayesh; Nagase, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-17

    The potent aggrecanase ADAMTS-5 is constitutively secreted by chondrocytes, but it is rapidly endocytosed in normal cartilage via the cell surface endocytic receptor LRP1. Therefore it is difficult to detect the total ADAMTS-5 activity produced. In this study, we isolated a monoclonal anti-ADAMTS-5 antibody 1B7 that blocks LRP1-mediated internalization without affecting the aggrecanolytic activity. Addition of 1B7 to cultured human chondrocytes revealed the full aggrecanolytic activity of ADAMTS-5 generated by the cells. 1B7 is a useful tool to estimate the ADAMTS-5 activity and to identify its potential roles in the tissues.

  13. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  14. DRPPP: A machine learning based tool for prediction of disease resistance proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tarun; Jaiswal, Varun; Chauhan, Rajinder S

    2016-11-01

    Plant disease outbreak is increasing rapidly around the globe and is a major cause for crop loss worldwide. Plants, in turn, have developed diverse defense mechanisms to identify and evade different pathogenic microorganisms. Early identification of plant disease resistance genes (R genes) can be exploited for crop improvement programs. The present prediction methods are either based on sequence similarity/domain-based methods or electronically annotated sequences, which might miss existing unrecognized proteins or low similarity proteins. Therefore, there is an urgent need to devise a novel machine learning technique to address this problem. In the current study, a SVM-based tool was developed for prediction of disease resistance proteins in plants. All known disease resistance (R) proteins (112) were taken as a positive set, whereas manually curated negative dataset consisted of 119 non-R proteins. Feature extraction generated 10,270 features using 16 different methods. The ten-fold cross validation was performed to optimize SVM parameters using radial basis function. The model was derived using libSVM and achieved an overall accuracy of 91.11% on the test dataset. The tool was found to be robust and can be used for high-throughput datasets. The current study provides instant identification of R proteins using machine learning approach, in addition to the similarity or domain prediction methods.

  15. Severe Injury Is Associated With Insulin Resistance, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response, and Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Song, Juquan; Boehning, Darren; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Baker, Henry V.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We determined whether postburn hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) activation leading to impaired insulin receptor signaling. Background Inflammation and cellular stress, hallmarks of severely burned and critically ill patients, have been causally linked to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes via induction of ER stress and the UPR. Methods Twenty severely burned pediatric patients were compared with 36 nonburned children. Clinical markers, protein, and GeneChip analysis were used to identify transcriptional changes in ER stress and UPR and insulin resistance–related signaling cascades in peripheral blood leukocytes, fat, and muscle at admission and up to 466 days postburn. Results Burn-induced inflammatory and stress responses are accompanied by profound insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Genomic and protein analysis revealed that burn injury was associated with alterations in the signaling pathways that affect insulin resistance, ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and cell growth/apoptosis up to 466 days postburn. Conclusion Burn-induced insulin resistance is associated with persistent ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR and subsequent suppressed insulin receptor signaling over a prolonged period of time. PMID:22241293

  16. Chromatin Remodeling Factor LSH is Upregulated by the LRP6-GSK3β-E2F1 Axis Linking Reversely with Survival in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Desheng; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yu; Li, Hao; Fu, Chunyan; Mao, Chao; Cheng, Yan; Shi, Ying; Chen, Ling; Jiang, Yiqun; Yang, Rui; Liu, Yating; Zhou, Jianhua; Cao, Ya; Liu, Shuang; Tao, Yongguang

    2017-01-01

    The signaling pathway-based stratification in chromatin modification could predict clinical outcome more reliably than morphology-alone-based classification schemes in gliomas. Here we reported a role of the chromatin-remodeling factor lymphoid-specific helicase (LSH) in gliomas. Among astrocytomas of grade I to III and glioblastoma of grade IV, LSH were almost completely expressed in all cases, and strongly correlated with astrocytomas progression and poor prognosis of patients with astrocytomas and glioblastoma. Ectopic expression of LSH promoted tumor formation. Up-regulation of transcription factor E2F1 in astrocytomas and glioblastoma was associated with the progression of gliomas and correlated with LSH expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed transcription factor E2F1 were recruited to the promoter region of LSH, and depletion of E2F1 decreased LSH expression and cell growth. Moreover, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), an intact complex of E2F1, were also highly expressed in astrocytomas and linked with astrocytomas progression and poor prognosis of patients with astrocytomas and glioblastoma. Inhibition of GSK3β increased the enrichment of E2F1 to the LSH promoter, in turn, increased LSH expression. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an upstream regulator of GSK3β signaling pathway, was highly expressed in gliomas. Knockdown of LRP6 decreased LSH expression through decrease of recruitment of E2F1 to the LSH promoter leading to inhibition of cell growth. Taken together, this study reveals evidence demonstrating a mechanism by which upregulated promoted gliomas. A mechanistic link between LSH expression and activation of the LPR6/ GSK3β/E2F1 axis in gliomas illustrates a novel role of LSH in malignant astrocytomas and glioblastoma. PMID:28042322

  17. dc-Sheet resistance as sensitive monitoring tool of protein immobilization on thin metal films.

    PubMed

    Neff, H; Beeby, T; Lima, A M N; Borre, M; Thirstrup, C; Zong, W; de Almeida, L A L

    2006-03-15

    The suitability of high resolution, in situ dc-sheet resistance monitoring (SRM) as a simplified and reliable sensing technique towards detection and tracking of protein immobilization has been explored. Non-specific adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto a very thin gold film, acting as the sensing resistor, has been employed as a model system. For comparison, the novel sensing method was combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, using the same flow cell and sensing surface. Two different, well known adsorption states, involving a composite layer of irreversibly and reversibly bound BSA, were clearly resolved by both methods. Clearly structured, pronounced and fully reproducible film resistance modulations have been resolved in the associated SRM data. The transition from reversibly bound BSA to the diluted protein phase is associated with an unusually large decrease in the dc-sheet resistance. The observed resistance modulation magnitude for an adsorbed BSA monolayer corresponds to approximately 1%, and up to 100 mOmega at a 10 Omega sensing resistor. The sheet resistance of irreversibly bound BSA was determined to 0.24 kOmega/cm2, and the associated specific resistivity estimated to 1-2x10(4) Omega cm.

  18. Enhanced pest resistance of maize leaves expressing monocot crop plant derived ribosome inactivating protein and agglutinin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many insect resistance genes have been identified, the number of studies examining their effects in combination using transgenic systems is limited. We introduced a construct into maize containing the coding sequence for maize ribosome inactivating protein (MRIP), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA...

  19. L-Alanylglutamine inhibits signaling proteins that activate protein degradation, but does not affect proteins that activate protein synthesis after an acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanyi; Choi, Ran Hee; Solares, Geoffrey J; Tseng, Hung-Min; Ding, Zhenping; Kim, Kyoungrae; Ivy, John L

    2015-07-01

    Sustamine™ (SUS) is a dipeptide composed of alanine and glutamine (AlaGln). Glutamine has been suggested to increase muscle protein accretion; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism following resistance exercise have not been fully addressed. In the present study, 2-month-old rats climbed a ladder 10 times with a weight equal to 75 % of their body mass attached at the tail. Rats were then orally administered one of four solutions: placebo (PLA-glycine = 0.52 g/kg), whey protein (WP = 0.4 g/kg), low dose of SUS (LSUS = 0.1 g/kg), or high dose of SUS (HSUS = 0.5 g/kg). An additional group of sedentary (SED) rats was intubated with glycine (0.52 g/kg) at the same time as the ladder-climbing rats. Blood samples were collected immediately after exercise and at either 20 or 40 min after recovery. The flexor hallucis longus (FHL), a muscle used for climbing, was excised at 20 or 40 min post exercise and analyzed for proteins regulating protein synthesis and degradation. All supplements elevated the phosphorylation of FOXO3A above SED at 20 min post exercise, but only the SUS supplements significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AMPK and NF-kB p65. SUS supplements had no effect on mTOR signaling, but WP supplementation yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6k, and rpS6 compared with PLA at 20 min post exercise. However, by 40 min post exercise, phosphorylation of mTOR and rpS6 in PLA had risen to levels not different than WP. These results suggest that SUS blocks the activation of intracellular signals for MPB, whereas WP accelerates mRNA translation.

  20. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean D.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (ΔMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that ΔMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which ΔMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels. PMID:19015512

  1. Chromate Efflux by Means of the ChrA Chromate Resistance Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Cervantes, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Everted membrane vesicles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 harboring plasmid pCRO616, expressing the ChrA chromate resistance protein, accumulated four times more 51CrO42− than vesicles from plasmidless cells, indicating that a chromate efflux system functions in the resistant strain. Chromate uptake showed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.12 mM chromate and a Vmax of 0.5 nmol of chromate/min per mg of protein. Uptake of chromate by vesicles was dependent on NADH oxidation and was abolished by energy inhibitors and by the chromate analog sulfate. The mechanism of resistance to chromate determined by ChrA appears to be based on the active efflux of chromate driven by the membrane potential. PMID:10572148

  2. Molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2010-01-01

    Millions of new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and over half of these patients die from this devastating disease. Thus, cancer causes a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs across the cell membrane barrier. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  3. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean D; Sauer, Robert T

    2008-11-25

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (DeltaMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that DeltaMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which DeltaMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels.

  4. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise–Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism123

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose–dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor

  5. High Levels of Expression of P-glycoprotein/Multidrug Resistance Protein Result in Resistance to Vintafolide.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Amy D; O'Neil, Jennifer; Stoeck, Alexander; Reddy, Joseph A; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Hinton, Marlene C; Dorton, Ryan; Bloomfield, Alicia; Nelson, Melissa; Vetzel, Marilynn; Lejnine, Serguei; Nebozhyn, Michael; Zhang, Theresa; Loboda, Andrey; Picard, Kristen L; Schmidt, Emmett V; Dussault, Isabelle; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Targeting surface receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is one way to specifically treat cancer versus normal cells. Vintafolide (EC145), which consists of folate linked to a cytotoxic small molecule, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), takes advantage of the overexpression of folate receptor (FR) on cancer cells. Once bound to FR, vintafolide enters the cell by endocytosis, and the reducing environment of the endosome cleaves the linker, releasing DAVLBH to destabilize microtubules. Vintafolide has shown efficacy and improved tolerability compared with DAVLBH in FR-positive preclinical models. As the first FR-targeting drug to reach the clinic, vintafolide has achieved favorable responses in phase II clinical trials in FR-positive ovarian and lung cancer. However, some FR-positive patients in these clinical trials do not respond to vintafolide. We sought to identify potential biomarkers of resistance to aid in the future development of this and other FR-targeting drugs. Here, we confirm that high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was the strongest predictor of resistance to DAVLBH in a panel of 359 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, targeted delivery of DAVLBH via the FR, as in vintafolide, fails to overcome P-gp-mediated efflux of DAVLBH in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical models. Therefore, we suggest that patients whose tumors express high levels of P-gp be excluded from future clinical trials for vintafolide as well as other FR-targeted therapeutics bearing a P-gp substrate. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1998-2008. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  7. Improving protein resistance of α-Al 2O 3 membranes by modification with POEGMA brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huating; Jing, Wenheng; Xing, Weihong; Fan, Yiqun

    2011-11-01

    A kind of protein-resistant ceramic membrane is prepared by grafting poly(oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA) brushes onto the surfaces and pore walls of α-Al2O3 membrane (AM) by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Contact-angle, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were measured to confirm that the surfaces and pore walls of the ceramic porous membranes have been modified by the brushes with this method successfully. The protein interaction behavior with the POEGMA modified membranes (AM-POEGMA) was studied by the model protein of bovine serum albumin (BSA). A protein-resistant mechanism of AM-POEGMA was proposed to describe an interesting phenomenon discovered in the filtration experiment, in which the initial flux filtrating BSA solution is higher than the pure water flux. The fouling of AM-POEGMA was easier to remove than AM for the action of POEGMA brushes, indicated that the ceramic porous membranes modified with POEGMA brushes exhibit excellent protein resistance.

  8. The Role of Organic Proteins on the Crack Growth Resistance of Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. PMID:25805107

  9. Arabidopsis dual resistance proteins, both RPS4 and RRS1, are required for resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial wilt phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a serious soil-borne disease that attacks several economically important plants worldwide, including Brassicaceae. Previous studies indicate that recognition of avirulence (Avr)-effector PopP2 by resistance (R) protein, RRS1-R, and physical interaction between RRS1-R and PopP2 in the nucleus are required for resistance. Of late, we showed that a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, function together in disease resistance against multiple pathogen isolates. Here, we report that dual R proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, from A. thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija confer resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops. For practical applications, this finding may provide a new strategy for developing disease resistant plants that express R genes from other plants.

  10. Lipid A and resistance of Salmonella typhimurium to antimicrobial granule proteins of human neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Casey, S G; Spitznagel, J K

    1984-01-01

    Granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were prepared and fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G75-SF. One fraction exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against an Rd1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. Susceptibility of the mutant to antimicrobial activity appeared to be due to binding of granule proteins to lipid A because isolated native LPS succeeded in blocking the antimicrobial activity of granule extracts whereas base-hydrolyzed LPS failed to do so. Centrifugation of control and base-hydrolyzed LPS-protein mixtures in cesium chloride gradients suggested that only control LPS formed complexes with antimicrobial proteins. Further evidence that bactericidal proteins from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules interact with lipid A was that sublethal concentrations of polymyxin B (an antibiotic known to bind to lipid A) rendered target bacteria phenotypically resistant to granule proteins. Moreover, a mutant of S. typhimurium which synthesized a lipid A with decreased electronegativity due to increased 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinosylation at the 4'-phosphate exhibited increased resistance to both polymyxin B and granule proteins. These results suggest that polymyxin B and antimicrobial proteins derived from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules interact with lipid A in an analogous manner. PMID:6199303

  11. Deciphering the protein translation inhibition and coping mechanism of trichothecene toxin in resistant fungi.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Indu; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-09-01

    In modern times for combating the deleterious soil microbes for improved sustainable agricultural practices, there is a need to have a proper understanding of the plant-microbe interactions present in the rhizospheric microbiome of the plant roots. In the present study, the interactions of trichodermin with petidyltransferase centre of ribosomal complex was studied by molecular dynamics and in silico interaction methods to demonstrate its mechanism of action and to decipher the possible reason how it may inhibit protein synthesis at the ribosomal complex. Further we have illustrated how trichodermin resistance protein (60S ribosomal protein L3) helps to overcome the deleterious effects of trichothecene compounds like trichodermin. Normal mode analysis of trichodermin resistance protein and 25S rRNA that constitutes the petidyltransferase centre showed that the W-finger region of the protein moved towards 25S rRNA. Further analysis of molecular dynamics simulation time frames showed that several intermediate states of large motions of the protein molecules towards the 25S rRNA which finally blocks the binding pocket of the trichodermin. It indicated that this protein not only changes the local environment and conformation of the petidyltransferase centre but also restrain trichodermin from binding to the 25S rRNA at the petidyltransferase centre.

  12. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance using a protein-inhibitor flexible docking approach.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Ekachai; Samudrala, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance remains one of the most challenging issues in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Here we focus on resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) at a molecular level, which can be analysed genotypically or phenotypically. Genotypic assays are based on the analysis of mutations associated with reduced drug susceptibility, but are problematic because of the numerous mutations and mutational patterns that confer drug resistance. Phenotypic resistance or susceptibility can be experimentally evaluated by measuring the amount of free drug bound to HIV-1 protease molecules, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we have developed a docking protocol that takes protein-inhibitor flexibility into account to predict phenotypic drug resistance. For six FDA-approved Pls and a total of 1792 HIV-1 protease sequence mutants, we used a combination of inhibitor flexible docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate protein-inhibitor binding energies. Prediction results were expressed as fold changes of the calculated inhibitory constant (Ki), and the samples predicted to have fold-increase in calculated Ki above the fixed cut-off were defined as drug resistant. Our combined docking and MD protocol achieved accuracies ranging from 72-83% in predicting resistance/susceptibility for five of the six drugs evaluated. Evaluating the method only on samples where our predictions concurred with established knowledge-based methods resulted in increased accuracies of 83-94% for the six drugs. The results suggest that a physics-based approach, which is readily applicable to any novel PI and/or mutant, can be used judiciously with knowledge-based approaches that require experimental training data to devise accurate models of HIV-1 Pl resistance prediction.

  13. Resistance of polysaccharide coatings to proteins, hematopoietic cells, and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyu; Pettit, Michala E; Conlan, Sheelagh L; Wagner, Wolfgang; Ho, Anthony D; Clare, Anthony S; Callow, James A; Callow, Maureen E; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2009-04-13

    The interaction of covalently coupled hyaluronic acid, alginic acid, and pectic acid with proteins, cells (hematopoietic KG1a and Jurkat cells), and marine organisms (algal zoospores and barnacle cypris larvae) is compared. In contrast to cells and proteins for which such polysaccharide coatings are known for their antiadhesive properties, marine algal spores and barnacle cyprids were able to colonize the surfaces. Of the three polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid showed the lowest settlement of both Ulva zoopores and barnacles. Photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the polysaccharide coatings tend to bind bivalent ions, such as calcium, from salt water. Such pretreatment with a high salinity medium significantly changes the protein and hematopoietic cell resistance of the surfaces. Complexation of bivalent ions is therefore considered as one reason for the decreased resistance of polysaccharide coatings when applied in the marine environment.

  14. Relative penicillin G resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and reduced affinity of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelman, P M; Campos, J; Chaffin, D O; Serfass, D A; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1988-01-01

    We examined clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis relatively resistant to penicillin G (mean MIC, 0.3 micrograms/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms/ml), which were isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid for resistance mechanisms, by using susceptible isolates (mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 micrograms/ml) for comparison. The resistant strains did not produce detectable beta-lactamase activity, otherwise modify penicillin G, or bind less total penicillin. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 of the six resistant isolates tested uniformly bound less penicillin G in comparison to the same PBP of four susceptible isolates. Reflecting the reduced binding affinity of PBP 3 of the two resistant strains tested, the amount of 3H-labeled penicillin G required for half-maximal binding was increased in comparison with that of PBP 3 of the two susceptible isolates. We conclude that the mechanism of resistance in these meningococci relatively resistant to penicillin G was decreased affinity of PBP 3. Images PMID:3134848

  15. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    Billnitzer, Andrew J; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer's pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing.

  16. TgPRELID, a Mitochondrial Protein Linked to Multidrug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kamau, Edwin T.; Srinivasan, Ananth R.; Harper, Jonathan; Sankaran, Preethi; Post, Sarah E.; Varberg, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT New drugs to control infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are needed as current treatments exert toxic side effects on patients. Approaches to develop novel compounds for drug development include screening of compound libraries and targeted inhibition of essential cellular pathways. We identified two distinct compounds that display inhibitory activity against the parasite’s replicative stage: F3215-0002, which we previously identified during a compound library screen, and I-BET151, an inhibitor of bromodomains, the “reader” module of acetylated lysines. In independent studies, we sought to determine the targets of these two compounds using forward genetics, generating resistant mutants and identifying the determinants of resistance with comparative genome sequencing. Despite the dissimilarity of the two compounds, we recovered resistant mutants with nonsynonymous mutations in the same domain of the same gene, TGGT1_254250, which we found encodes a protein that localizes to the parasite mitochondrion (designated TgPRELID after the name of said domain). We found that mutants selected with one compound were cross resistant to the other compound, suggesting a common mechanism of resistance. To further support our hypothesis that TgPRELID mutations facilitate resistance to both I-BET151 and F3215-0002, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/CAS9-mediated mutation of TgPRELID directly led to increased F3215-0002 resistance. Finally, all resistance mutations clustered in the same subdomain of TgPRELID. These findings suggest that TgPRELID may encode a multidrug resistance factor or that I-BET151 and F3215-0002 have the same target(s) despite their distinct chemical structures. IMPORTANCE We report the discovery of TgPRELID, a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial protein linked to multidrug resistance in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Drug resistance remains a major problem in the battle against parasitic

  17. TgPRELID, a Mitochondrial Protein Linked to Multidrug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Victoria; Kamau, Edwin T; Srinivasan, Ananth R; Harper, Jonathan; Sankaran, Preethi; Post, Sarah E; Varberg, Joseph M; Sullivan, William J; Boyle, Jon P

    2017-01-01

    New drugs to control infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are needed as current treatments exert toxic side effects on patients. Approaches to develop novel compounds for drug development include screening of compound libraries and targeted inhibition of essential cellular pathways. We identified two distinct compounds that display inhibitory activity against the parasite's replicative stage: F3215-0002, which we previously identified during a compound library screen, and I-BET151, an inhibitor of bromodomains, the "reader" module of acetylated lysines. In independent studies, we sought to determine the targets of these two compounds using forward genetics, generating resistant mutants and identifying the determinants of resistance with comparative genome sequencing. Despite the dissimilarity of the two compounds, we recovered resistant mutants with nonsynonymous mutations in the same domain of the same gene, TGGT1_254250, which we found encodes a protein that localizes to the parasite mitochondrion (designated TgPRELID after the name of said domain). We found that mutants selected with one compound were cross resistant to the other compound, suggesting a common mechanism of resistance. To further support our hypothesis that TgPRELID mutations facilitate resistance to both I-BET151 and F3215-0002, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/CAS9-mediated mutation of TgPRELID directly led to increased F3215-0002 resistance. Finally, all resistance mutations clustered in the same subdomain of TgPRELID. These findings suggest that TgPRELID may encode a multidrug resistance factor or that I-BET151 and F3215-0002 have the same target(s) despite their distinct chemical structures. IMPORTANCE We report the discovery of TgPRELID, a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial protein linked to multidrug resistance in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Drug resistance remains a major problem in the battle against parasitic infection, and

  18. Intracellular accumulation and resistance to degradation of the Alzheimer amyloid A4/beta protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knauer, M F; Soreghan, B; Burdick, D; Kosmoski, J; Glabe, C G

    1992-01-01

    The A4 or beta protein is a peptide that constitutes the major protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer disease. The A4/beta protein is derived from a larger, transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). The putative abnormal processing events leading to amyloid accumulation are largely unknown. Here we report that a 42-residue synthetic peptide, beta 1-42, corresponding to one of the longer forms of the A4/beta protein, accumulates in cultured human skin fibroblasts and is stable for at least 3 days. The peptide appears to accumulate intracellularly, since it does not accumulate under conditions that prevent endocytosis and accumulation is correlated with the acquisition of resistance to removal by trypsin digestion. This intracellular accumulation is also correlated with the ability of the peptide to aggregate as determined by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At low concentrations of the beta 1-42 peptide, which favor the nonaggregated state, no accumulation is observed. Shorter peptide analogs (28 or 39 residues) that are truncated at the C terminus, which lack the ability to aggregate in SDS gels, fail to accumulate. The accumulated intracellular beta 1-42 peptide is in an aggregated state and is contained in a dense organellar compartment that overlaps the distribution of late endosomes or secondary lysosomes. Immunofluorescence of the internalized peptide in permeabilized cells reveals that it is contained in granular deposits, consistent with localization in late endosomes or secondary lysosomes. Sequence analysis indicates that some of the internalized peptide is subject to N-terminal trimming. These results suggest that the aggregated A4/beta protein may be resistant to degradation and suggest that the A4/beta protein may arise, at least in part, by endosomal or lysosomal processing of APP. Our results also suggest that relatively nonspecific proteolysis may be sufficient to generate the A4/beta protein if this part of APP is selectively

  19. Coordinate regulation of proteins associated with radiation resistance in cultured insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, A.; Koval, T.M.

    1994-04-01

    Cultured TN-368 lepidopteran insect cells exhibit a pronounced resistance to the lethal effects of a variety of physical agents, including X rays and 254 nm UV light, as well as a large number of chemicals. The resistance to ionizing radiation has previously been associated with an inducible process which is not expressed in unirradiated cells or cells receiving less than some minimal amount of radiation necessary for activating the process. The studies in this paper were initiated in an attempt to identify and characterize the inducible proteins associated with the marked radiation resistance of the TN-368 cells. Cells were exposed to doses of 0, 25, 64 or 350 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays and incubated either for 3 h in medium containing [{sup 35}S]methionine or for 2 h without labeling. Labeled cells were separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions and proteins were analyzed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Unlabeled cells were used to isolate total RNA which was translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with {sup 35}S label. These translation products were also analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Gamma irradiation of the TN-368 cells resulted in the de novo synthesis of several proteins as well as the complete inhibition of others. The number of such proteins identified was 19. These proteins ranged in size from 18-73 kDa, with a pI distribution of 4.7 to 6.1. In addition to the unique proteins, a large number of other proteins were also either up- or down-regulated. These observations were made in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions as well as in the translation products of RNA produced after irradiation. These studies indicate that RNA and protein synthesis in lepidopteran cells are coordinately regulated in response to ionizing radiation and may participate in the pronounced radioresistance of the TN-368 cells. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization. PMID:28348809

  1. Characterization of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Involved in Tubercidin Resistance in Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Coelho, Adriano Cappellazzo; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Sanchez, Eduardo Milton Ramos; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Cotrim, Paulo Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Background Tubercidin (TUB) is a toxic adenosine analog with potential antiparasitic activity against Leishmania, with mechanism of action and resistance that are not completely understood. For understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying the potential metabolic pathways affected by this drug, we employed in this study an overexpression/selection approach using TUB for the identification of potential targets, as well as, drug resistance genes in L. major. Although, TUB is toxic to the mammalian host, these findings can provide evidences for a rational drug design based on purine pathway against leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal findings After transfection of a cosmid genomic library into L. major Friedlin (LmjF) parasites and application of the overexpression/selection method, we identified two cosmids (cosTUB1 and cosTU2) containing two different loci capable of conferring significant levels of TUB resistance. In the cosTUB1 contained a gene encoding NUPM1-like protein, which has been previously described as associated with TUB resistance in L. amazonensis. In the cosTUB2 we identified and characterized a gene encoding a 63 kDa protein that we denoted as tubercidin-resistance protein (TRP). Functional analysis revealed that the transfectants were less susceptible to TUB than LmjF parasites or those transfected with the control vector. In addition, the trp mRNA and protein levels in cosTUB2 transfectants were higher than LmjF. TRP immunolocalization revealed that it was co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a cellular compartment with many functions. In silico predictions indicated that TRP contains only a hypothetical transmembrane domain. Thus, it is likely that TRP is a lumen protein involved in multidrug efflux transport that may be involved in the purine metabolic pathway. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated for the first time that TRP is associated with TUB resistance in Leishmania. The next challenge is to determine how

  2. Combinatorial synthesis with high throughput discovery of protein-resistant membrane surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minghao; Vegas, Arturo J.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert S.; Kilduff, James E.; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Using combinatorial methods, we synthesized a series of new vinyl amide monomers and graft-polymerized them to light-sensitive poly(ether sulfone) (PES) porous films for protein resistance. To increase the discovery rate and statistical confidence, we developed high throughput surface modification methods (HTP) that allow synthesis, screening and selection of desirable monomers from a large library in a relatively short time (days). A series of amide monomers were synthesized by amidation of methacryloyl chloride with amines and grafted onto commercial poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes using irradiation from atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). The modified PES membrane surfaces were then tested and screened for static protein adhesion using HTP. Hydroxyl amide monomers N-(3-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (A3), N-(4-hydroxybutyl)methacrylamide (A4), and N-(4-hydroxybutyl) methacrylamide (A6), ethylene glycol (EG) monomer N-(3-methoxypropyl)methacrylamide (A7), and N-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A8), and N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A9) all terminated with tertiary amines and were shown to have protein resistance. The PES membranes modified with these monomers exhibited both low protein adhesion (i.e. membrane plugging or fouling) and high flux. Their performance is comparable with previously identified best performing PEG and zwitterionic monomers, i.e. the so-called gold-standard for protein resistance. Combining a Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis of the amide monomers and the HTP filtration results, we conclude that monomer solubility in water correlates with protein-resistant surfaces, presumably through its effects on surface–water interactions. PMID:23706542

  3. 42 CFR 68a.14 - When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68a.14 Section 68a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL...

  4. 42 CFR 68a.14 - When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68a.14 Section 68a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL...

  5. 42 CFR 68a.14 - When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When can a CR-LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68a.14 Section 68a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL...

  6. The Global Regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA Control Secondary Metabolism in Entomopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Yvonne; Windhorst, Carina; Lu, Xiaojun; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Bode, Helge B.

    2017-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens TTO1 and Xenorhabdus nematophila HGB081 are insect pathogenic bacteria and producers of various structurally diverse bioactive natural products. In these entomopathogenic bacteria we investigated the role of the global regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA in the production of natural products. Lrp is a general activator of natural product biosynthesis in X. nematophila and for most compounds in TTO1. Microarray analysis confirmed these results in X. nematophila and enabled the identification of additional biosynthesis gene clusters (BGC) regulated by Lrp. Moreover, when promoters of two X. nematophila BGC were analyzed, transcriptional activation by Lrp was observed. In contrast, LeuO in X. nematophila and P. luminescens has both repressing and activating features, depending on the natural product examined. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of leuO from X. nematophila in the closely related Xenorhabdus szentirmaii resulted in overproduction of several natural products including novel compounds. The presented findings could be of importance for establishing a tool for overproduction of secondary metabolites and subsequent identification of novel compounds. PMID:28261170

  7. The Global Regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA Control Secondary Metabolism in Entomopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Engel, Yvonne; Windhorst, Carina; Lu, Xiaojun; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Bode, Helge B

    2017-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens TTO1 and Xenorhabdus nematophila HGB081 are insect pathogenic bacteria and producers of various structurally diverse bioactive natural products. In these entomopathogenic bacteria we investigated the role of the global regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA in the production of natural products. Lrp is a general activator of natural product biosynthesis in X. nematophila and for most compounds in TTO1. Microarray analysis confirmed these results in X. nematophila and enabled the identification of additional biosynthesis gene clusters (BGC) regulated by Lrp. Moreover, when promoters of two X. nematophila BGC were analyzed, transcriptional activation by Lrp was observed. In contrast, LeuO in X. nematophila and P. luminescens has both repressing and activating features, depending on the natural product examined. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of leuO from X. nematophila in the closely related Xenorhabdus szentirmaii resulted in overproduction of several natural products including novel compounds. The presented findings could be of importance for establishing a tool for overproduction of secondary metabolites and subsequent identification of novel compounds.

  8. Discovery of novel phenoxazinone derivatives as DKK1/LRP6 interaction inhibitors: Synthesis, biological evaluation and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Thysiadis, Savvas; Mpousis, Spyros; Avramidis, Nicolaos; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Balomenos, Athanasios; Remelli, Rosaria; Efthimiopoulos, Spyros; Sarli, Vasiliki

    2016-03-01

    Amino derivatives of NCI8642 were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of DKK1/LRP6 interactions. The new inhibitors were able to activate the Wnt signaling pathway as indicated by the increased levels of β-catenin, and decrease the DKK1-induced Tau phosphorylation at serine 396.

  9. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males

    PubMed Central

    DeNysschen, Carol A; Burton, Harold W; Horvath, Peter J; Leddy, John J; Browne, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Background Most individuals at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) can reduce risk factors through diet and exercise before resorting to drug treatment. The effect of a combination of resistance training with vegetable-based (soy) versus animal-based (whey) protein supplementation on CVD risk reduction has received little study. The study's purpose was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of resistance exercise training with soy versus whey protein supplementation on strength gains, body composition and serum lipid changes in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. Methods Twenty-eight overweight, male subjects (BMI 25–30) with serum cholesterol >200 mg/dl were randomly divided into 3 groups (placebo (n = 9), and soy (n = 9) or whey (n = 10) supplementation) and participated in supervised resistance training for 12 weeks. Supplements were provided in a double blind fashion. Results All 3 groups had significant gains in strength, averaging 47% in all major muscle groups and significant increases in fat free mass (2.6%), with no difference among groups. Percent body fat and waist-to-hip ratio decreased significantly in all 3 groups an average of 8% and 2%, respectively, with no difference among groups. Total serum cholesterol decreased significantly, again with no difference among groups. Conclusion Participation in a 12 week resistance exercise training program significantly increased strength and improved both body composition and serum cholesterol in overweight, hypercholesterolemic men with no added benefit from protein supplementation. PMID:19284589

  10. Functions of oligochitosan induced protein kinase in tobacco mosaic virus resistance and pathogenesis related proteins in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yafei, Chen; Yong, Zhan; Xiaoming, Zhao; Peng, Guo; Hailong, An; Yuguang, Du; Yingrong, Han; Hui, Liu; Yuhong, Zhang

    2009-08-01

    Oligochitosan (OC) can regulate plant defense responses in many aspects, but the basic signal transduction pathway is still unclear. In this study, we used transgenic (TG) tobacco (Nicotiana Tabacum var. Samsun NN) as plant material whose oligochitosan induced protein kinase (OIPK) gene was inhibited by antisense transformation, to study the role of OIPK in tobacco defense reactions. The results showed that OIPK could increase tobacco resistance against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), in that wild-type (WT) tobacco showed longer lesion appearance time, higher lesion inhibition ratio, smaller average final lesion diameter and lower average final lesion area percent to whole leaf area. It led us to analyze some pathogenesis related (PR) enzymes' activities and mRNA level, which played roles in tobacco resistance against TMV. We found that phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (POD) activities were positively related to OIPK, but not polyphenol oxidase (PPO). It was also demonstrated that OIPK mRNA could be induced by OC, wound and TMV infection. In addition, OIPK could up-regulated three PR genes, PAL, chitinase (CHI) and beta-1, 3-glucanase (GLU) mRNA level to different extent. Taken together, these results implied that OIPK could function in tobacco resistance against both biotic and abiotic stress, possibly via various PR proteins.

  11. Rewiring mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by positive feedback confers potato blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamizo, Chihiro; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Akira; Katou, Shinpei; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Jones, Jonathan D G; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2006-02-01

    Late blight, caused by the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and during the 1840s caused the Irish potato famine and over one million fatalities. Currently, grown potato cultivars lack adequate blight tolerance. Earlier cultivars bred for resistance used disease resistance genes that confer immunity only to some strains of the pathogen harboring corresponding avirulence gene. Specific resistance gene-mediated immunity and chemical controls are rapidly overcome in the field when new pathogen races arise through mutation, recombination, or migration from elsewhere. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a pivotal role in plant innate immunity. Here we show that the transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of potato showed high resistance to early blight pathogen Alternaria solani as well as P. infestans. The pathogen attack provoked defense-related MAPK activation followed by induction of NADPH oxidase gene expression, which is implicated in reactive oxygen species production, and resulted in hypersensitive response-like phenotype. We propose that enhancing disease resistance through altered regulation of plant defense mechanisms should be more durable and publicly acceptable than engineering overexpression of antimicrobial proteins.

  12. LEA proteins are involved in cyst desiccation resistance and other abiotic stresses in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Salazar, Julieta; Moreno, Soledad; Espín, Guadalupe

    2017-03-03

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins constitute a large protein family that is closely associated with resistance to abiotic stresses in multiple organisms and protect cells against drought and other stresses. Azotobacter vinelandii is a soil bacterium that forms desiccation-resistant cysts. This bacterium possesses two genes, here named lea1 and lea2, coding for avLEA1 and avLEA2 proteins, both containing 20-mer motifs characteristic of eukaryotic plant LEA proteins. In this study, we found that disruption of the lea1 gene caused a loss of the cysts' viability after 3 months of desiccation, whereas at 6 months, wild-type or lea2 mutant strain cysts remained viable. Vegetative cells of the lea1 mutant were more sensitive to osmotic stress; cysts developed by this mutant were also more sensitive to high temperatures than cysts or vegetative cells of the wild type or of the lea2 mutant. Expression of lea1 was induced several fold during encystment. In addition, the protective effects of these proteins were assessed in Escherichia coli cells. We found that E. coli cells overexpressing avLEA1 were more tolerant to salt stress than control cells; finally, in vitro analysis showed that avLEA1 protein was able to prevent the freeze thaw-induced inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, avLEA1 is essential for the survival of A. vinelandii in dry conditions and for protection against hyper-osmolarity, two major stress factors that bacteria must cope with for survival in the environment. This is the first report on the role of bacterial LEA proteins on the resistance of cysts to desiccation.

  13. PVY-resistant transgenic potato plants expressing an anti-NIa protein scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia; Jaoua, Leïla; Rouis, Souad; Saïdi, Mohamed Najib; Bouaziz, Donia; Ellouz, Radhouane

    2006-06-01

    A synthetic gene encoding a single chain Fv fragment of an antibody directed against the nuclear inclusion a (NIa) protein of potato virus Y (PVY) was used to transform two commercial potato cultivars (Claustar and BF15). The NIa protease forms the nuclear inclusion body A and acts as the major protease in the cleavage of the viral polyprotein into functional proteins. Immunoblot analysis showed that most of the resulting transgenic plants accumulate high levels of the transgenic protein. Furthermore, a majority of the selected transgenic lines showed an efficient and complete protection against the challenge virus after mechanical inoculation with PVYO strain. Two transgenic lines showed an incomplete resistance with delayed appearance of symptoms accompanied by low virus titers, whereas one line developed symptoms during the first days after inoculation but recovered rapidly, leading to a low virus accumulation rate. These results confirm that expression of scFv antibody is able to inhibit a crucial step in the virus multiplication, such as polyprotein cleavage is a powerful strategy for engineered virus resistance. It can lead to a complete resistance that was not obtained previously by expression of scFv directed against the viral coat protein.

  14. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis. PMID:26237273

  15. Resistance to Ag(I) Cations in Bacteria: Environments, Genes and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Matsui, Kazuaki; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to Ag(I) has been reported periodically with isolates from many environments where toxic levels of silver might be expected to occur, but initial reports were limited to the occurrence of resistant bacteria. The availability of silver-resistance conferring DNA sequences now allow genetic and mechanistic studies that had basically been missing. The genes determining Ag(I) resistance were sequenced from a plasmid found in a burn ward isolate. The 14.2 kb determinant contains seven recognized genes, arranged in three mRNA transcriptional units. The silE gene determines an extracellular (periplasmic space) metal-binding protein of 123 amino acids, including ten histidine residues implicated in Ag(I) binding. SilE is homologous to PcoE, of copper resistance. The next two genes, silR and silS, determine a two protein, histidine-kinase membrane sensor and aspartyl phosphate transcriptional responder, similar to other two component systems such as CzcR and CzcS (for cadmium, zinc and cobalt resistance) and PcoR and PcoS (for copper resistance). The remaining four genes, silCBAP, are co-transcribed and appear to determine Ag+ efflux, with SilCBA homologous to CzcCBA, a three component cation/proton antiporter, and SilP a novel P-type ATPase with a amino-terminal histidine-rich cation-specificity region. The effects of increasing Ag+ concentrations and growth medium halides (Cl-, Br- and I-) have been characterized, with lower Cl- concentrations facilitating resistance and higher concentrations toxicity. The properties of this unique Ag(I)-binding SilE protein are being characterized. Sequences similar to the silver-resistance DNA are being characterized by Southern blot DNA/DNA hybridization, PCR in vitro DNA synthesis and DNA sequencing. More than 25 additional closely related sequences have been identified in bacteria from diverse sources. Initial DNA sequencing results shows approximately 5-20% differences in DNA sequences. PMID:18475907

  16. Strong effect of SNP rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene on bone phenotype of Caucasian postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Péter; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Tóbiás, Bálint; Szili, Balázs; Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Győri, Gabriella; Kató, Karina; Lakatos, Péter; Takács, István

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of the Wnt pathway and bone mineral density (BMD) of postmenopausal women. We chose this pathway due to its importance in bone metabolism that was underlined in several studies. DNA samples of 932 Hungarian postmenopausal women were studied. First, their BMD values at different sites (spine, total hip) were measured, using a Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Thereafter, T-score values and the patients' body mass indices (BMIs) were calculated, while information about the fracture history of the sample population was also collected. We genotyped nine SNPs of the following three genes: LRP5, GPR177, and SP7, using a Sequenom MassARRAY Analyzer 4 instrument. The genomic DNA samples used for genotyping were extracted from the buccal mucosa of the subjects. Statistical analyses were carried out using the SPSS 21 and R package. The results of this analysis showed a significant association between SNP rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene and total hip BMD values. We could not reveal any associations between the markers of GPR177, SP7, and bone phenotypes. We found no effect of these genotypes on fracture risk. We could demonstrate a significant gene-gene interaction between two SNPs of LRP5 (rs4988300 and rs634008, p = 0.009) which was lost after Bonferroni correction. We could firmly demonstrate a significant association between rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene and bone density of the hip on the largest homogeneous postmenopausal study group analyzed to date. Our finding corroborates the relationship between LRP5 genotype and bone phenotype in postmenopausal women, however, the complete mechanism of this relationship requires further investigations.

  17. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinlong; Gao, Shiwu; Lin, Qinliang; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP) genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms. PMID:25685813

  18. Expression and localization of p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 4, and breast cancer resistance protein in the female lower genital tract of human and pigtailed macaque.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Pearlman, Andrew; Patton, Dorothy; Rohan, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Antiretroviral drug absorption and disposition in cervicovaginal tissue is important for the effectiveness of vaginally or orally administered drug products in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV-1 sexual transmission to women. Therefore, it is imperative to understand critical determinants of cervicovaginal tissue pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to examine the mRNA expression and protein localization of three efflux transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), in the lower genital tract of premenopausal women and pigtailed macaques. Along the human lower genital tract, the three transporters were moderately to highly expressed compared to colorectal tissue and liver, as revealed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a given genital tract segment, the transporter with the highest expression level was either BCRP or P-gp, while MRP4 was always expressed at the lowest level among the three transporters tested. The immunohistochemical staining showed that P-gp and MRP4 were localized in multiple cell types including epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. BCRP was predominantly localized in the vascular endothelial cells. Differences in transporter mRNA level and localization were observed among endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina. Compared to human tissues, the macaque cervicovaginal tissues displayed comparable expression and localization patterns of the three transporters, although subtle differences were observed between the two species. The role of these cervicovaginal transporters in drug absorption and disposition warrants further studies. The resemblance between human and pigtailed macaque in transporter expression and localization suggests the utility of the macaque model in the studies of human cervicovaginal transporters.

  19. Covalently modified silicon and diamond surfaces: resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and optimization for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, Tami L; Clare, Brian H; Abbott, Nicholas L; Hamers, Robert J

    2004-08-25

    We report the direct covalent functionalization of silicon and diamond surfaces with short ethylene glycol (EG) oligomers via photochemical reaction of the hydrogen-terminated surfaces with terminal vinyl groups of the oligomers, and the use of these monolayers to control protein binding at surfaces. Photochemical modification of Si(111) and polycrystalline diamond surfaces produces EG monolayers linked via Si-C bond formation (silicon) or C-C bond formation (diamond). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the monolayer composition. Measurements using fluorescently labeled proteins show that the EG-functionalized surfaces effectively resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of mixed monolayers on silicon and diamond and apply these surfaces to control specific versus nonspecific binding to optimize a model protein sensing assay.

  20. Structure and function of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain consisting of 125-200 residues, widely distributed in animals, plants and bacteria but absent from fungi, archea and viruses. In plants and animals, these domains are found in proteins with functions in innate immune pathways, while in bacteria, some TIR domain-containing proteins interfere with the innate immune pathways in the host. TIR domains function as protein scaffolds, mostly involving self-association and homotypic interactions with other TIR domains. In the last 15 years, the three-dimensional structures of TIR domains from several mammalian, plant and bacterial proteins have been reported. These structures, jointly with functional data including the identification of interacting proteins, have started to provide insight into the molecular basis of the assembly of animal and plant immune signaling complexes, and for host immunosuppression by bacterial pathogens. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the structures of the TIR domains and how the structure relates to function.

  1. Insulin resistance of protein metabolism in type 2 diabetes and impact on dietary needs: a review.

    PubMed

    Gougeon, Réjeanne

    2013-04-01

    Evidence shows that the metabolism of protein is altered in type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance not only applies to glucose and lipid but protein metabolism as well. Population surveys report greater susceptibility to loss of lean tissue and muscle strength with aging in diabetes. Prevention of sarcopenia requires that protein receives more attention in dietary prescriptions. Protein intake of 1-1.2 g/kg of body weight (with weight at a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2))/day may be distributed equally among 3 meals a day, including breakfast, to optimize anabolism. Adopting a dietary pattern that provides a high plant-to-animal ratio and greater food volume favouring consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits, complemented with fish, low fat dairy and meat (preferably cooked slowly in moisture), soy and nuts may assist with metabolic and weight control. Depending on the magnitude of energy restriction, usual protein intake should be maintained or increased, and the caloric deficit taken from fat and carbohydrate foods. Exercise before protein-rich meals improves skeletal muscle protein anabolism. Because high levels of amino acids lower glucose uptake in individuals without diabetes, the challenge remains to define the optimal protein intake and exercise regimen to protect from losses of muscle mass and strength while maintaining adequate glucose control in type 2 diabetes.

  2. Teicoplanin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus expresses a novel membrane protein and increases expression of penicillin-binding protein 2 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Shlaes, D M; Shlaes, J H; Vincent, S; Etter, L; Fey, P D; Goering, R V

    1993-01-01

    In the recent clinical trials of teicoplanin therapy of endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, at least one instance of the emergence of teicoplanin-resistant strains during therapy has been reported (G.W. Kaatz, S. M. Seo, N. J. Dorman, and S. A. Lerner, J. Infect. Dis 162:103-108, 1990). We have confirmed, using conventional electrophoresis of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI-digested chromosomal DNA, that the resistant strain (12873) (MIC, 16 micrograms/ml) is genetically very similar to the susceptible parent (12871) (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml). Kaatz et al. were able to select spontaneous teicoplanin-resistant mutants (10(-9)), suggesting that a single gene might be involved. We have shown that the mutation is highly stable during growth in the absence of teicoplanin. Using Tn551, we have selected insertion mutants of 12873 that become teicoplanin susceptible. We have examined a number of aspects of cell wall physiology in strains 12871 and 12873 and the teicoplanin-susceptible Tn551 mutants of 12873. 12873 was more susceptible to lysostaphin lysis than 12871 and the susceptible Tn551 derivatives of 12873. Autolysis in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) and cell wall turnover rates were similar in 12871 and 12873. An analysis of membrane proteins revealed the expression of a ca. 35-kDa protein and increased expression of both polypeptides of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2 (PBP2) in 12873 relative to 12871 and the Tn551 mutants of 12873. This increased expression was not related to PBP2', since both strains were susceptible to oxacillin in 2% NaCl (MIC, < or = 0.25 microgram/ml) and cellular DNA from neither strain hybridized with a specific mec gene probe. Two independent Tn551 inserts have been mapped to a ca. 117-kb SmaI fragment of the chromosome. These data suggest the possibility that the mutation resulting in resistance to teicoplanin involves the regulation of expression of both polypeptides of PBP2 and a 35-k

  3. Multidrug-resistance proteins are weak tumor associated antigens for colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a clinically, highly relevant phenomenon. Under chemotherapy many tumors show an increasing resistance towards the applied substance(s) and to a certain extent also towards other agents. An important molecular cause of this phenomenon is an increased expression of transporter proteins. The functional relationship between high expression levels and chemotherapy resistance makes these MDR and MRP (MDR related protein) proteins to interesting therapeutic targets. We here wanted to systematically analyze, whether these proteins are tumor specific antigens which could be targeted immunologically. Results Using the reverse immunology approach, 30 HLA-A2.1 restricted MDR and MRP derived peptides (MDP) were selected. Stimulated T cell lines grew well and mainly contained activated CD8+ cells. Peptide specificity and HLA-A2.1 restriction were proven in IFN-γ-ELISpot analyses and in cytotoxicity tests against MDP loaded target cells for a total of twelve peptides derived from MDR-1, MDR-3, MRP-1, MRP-2, MRP-3 and MRP-5. Of note, two of these epitopes are shared between MDR-1 and MDR-3 as well as MRP-2 and MRP-3. However, comparably weak cytotoxic activities were additionally observed against HLA-A2.1+ tumor cells even after upregulation of MDR protein expression by in vitro chemotherapy. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that human T cells can be sensitised towards MDPs and hence, there is no absolute immunological tolerance. However, our data also hint towards rather low endogenous tumor cell processing and presentation of MDPs in the context of HLA-A2.1 molecules. Consequently, we conclude that MDR and MRP proteins must be considered as weak tumor specific antigens-at least for colorectal carcinoma. Their direct contribution to therapy-failure implies however, that it is worth to further pursue this approach. PMID:21740599

  4. Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, Douglas; Feldman, Samantha; Martinez, Michele; Krieger, Diane R; Tallon, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an inverse relationship between soy protein intake and serum concentrations of male sex hormones. Anecdotal evidence indicates that these alterations in serum sex hormones may attenuate changes in lean body mass following resistance training. However, little empirical data exists regarding the effects of soy and milk-based proteins on circulating androgens and exercise induced body composition changes. Methods For 12 weeks 20 subjects were supplemented with 50 g per day of one of four different protein sources (Soy concentrate; Soy isolate; Soy isolate and whey blend, and Whey blend only) in combination with a resistance-training program. Body composition, testosterone, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured at baseline and week 12. Results Protein supplementation resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass independent of protein source (0.5 ± 1.1 and 0.9 ± 1.4 kg, p = 0.006, p = 0.007). No significant differences were observed between groups for total and free testosterone, SHBG, percentage body fat, BMI or body weight. The Testosterone/Estradiol ratio increased across all groups (+13.4, p = 0.005) and estradiol decreased (p = 0.002). Within group analysis showed significant increases in the Testosterone/Estradiol ratio in soy isolate + whey blend group (+16.3, p = 0.030). Estradiol was significantly lower in the whey blend group (-9.1 ± 8.7 pg/ml, p = 0.033). Conclusion This investigation shows that 12 week supplementation with soy protein does not decrease serum testosterone or inhibit lean body mass changes in subjects engaged in a resistance exercise program. PMID:17908338

  5. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Klein, Seth J; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-AKT(Thr308) in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448) by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKT(Ser473) and p-AKT(Thr308) were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL(-1) · min(-1); P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling.

  6. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  7. Multiple changes of penicillin-binding proteins in penicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hakenbeck, R; Tarpay, M; Tomasz, A

    1980-01-01

    Penicillin-binding properties and characteristics of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) were investigated in several clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae differing in their susceptibilities to penicillin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC], 0.03 to 0.5 microgram/ml) and compared with the penicillin-susceptible strain R36A (MIC, 0.07 microgram/ml). Several changes accompanied the development of resistance: the relative affinity to penicillin of whole cells, isolated membranes, and two major PBPs after in vivo or in vitro labeling decreased (with increasing resistance). Furthermore, one additional PBP (2') appeared in four of five relatively resistant strains with an MIC of 0.25 microgram/ml and higher. PBP 3 maintained the same high affinity toward penicillin in all strains under all labeling conditions. Images PMID:7425601

  8. Consequences of manganese replacement of copper for prion protein function and proteinase resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David R.; Hafiz, Farida; Glasssmith, Leslie L.; Wong, Boon-Seng; Jones, Ian M.; Clive, Christine; Haswell, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds copper and has antioxidant activity enhancing the survival of neurones in culture. The ability of the PrP to bind other cations was tested and it was found that only manganese could substitute for copper. Although initially manganese-loaded PrP exhibited similar structure and activity to copper-loaded PrP, after aging, manganese-loaded PrP became proteinase resistant and lost function. It was also found that manganese could be incorporated into PrP expressed by astrocytes and that this PrP was partially proteinase resistant. These results show that it is possible to generate proteinase-resistant PrP from cells and suggest a possible mechanism for the formation of the scrapie isoform of the PrP as generated in sporadic prion disease. PMID:10716918

  9. Pokeweed Antiviral Protein: Its Cytotoxicity Mechanism and Applications in Plant Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Di, Rong; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a 29 kDa type I ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) found in pokeweed plants. Pokeweed produces different forms of PAP. This review focuses on the spring form of PAP isolated from Phytolacca americana leaves. PAP exerts its cytotoxicity by removing a specific adenine from the α-sarcin/ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA. Besides depurination of the rRNA, PAP has additional activities that contribute to its cytotoxicity. The mechanism of PAP cytotoxicity is summarized based on evidence from the analysis of transgenic plants and the yeast model system. PAP was initially found to be anti-viral when it was co-inoculated with plant viruses onto plants. Transgenic plants expressing PAP and non-toxic PAP mutants have displayed broad-spectrum resistance to both viral and fungal infection. The mechanism of PAP-induced disease resistance in transgenic plants is summarized. PMID:25756953

  10. Sweet potato starch residue as starting material to prepare polyacrylonitrile adsorbent via SI-SET-LRP.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhihai; Wang, Dongju; Chen, Hou; Sun, Jinming; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2014-02-26

    Sweet potato starch residue (SPSR) was used as starting material to prepare an eco-friendly adsorbent. SPSR was modified by bromoacetyl bromide to obtain a macroinitiator for surface-initiated single electron transfer-living radical polymerization (SI-SET-LRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) catalyzed by La(0)/hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of ascorbic acid (VC). The amidoxime (AO) adsorbent was prepared by the reaction of the graft copolymer bromoactylated sweet potato starch (BSPS)/polyacrylonitrile (BSPS-g-PAN) with hydroxylamine. The maximum adsorption capacity for Hg(II) was 4.03 mmol·g(-1). This simple method provided a novel approach to recycle and reuse agricultural residues for controlling heavy metal pollution.

  11. The impact of protein quality on the promotion of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-01-01

    Protein supplementation during resistance exercise training augments hypertrophic gains. Protein ingestion and the resultant hyperaminoacidemia provides the building blocks (indispensable amino acids - IAA) for, and also triggers an increase in, muscle protein synthesis (MPS), suppression of muscle protein breakdown (MPB), and net positive protein balance (i.e., MPS > MPB). The key amino acid triggering the rise in MPS is leucine, which stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1, a key signalling protein, and triggers a rise in MPS. As such, ingested proteins with a high leucine content would be advantageous in triggering a rise in MPS. Thus, protein quality (reflected in IAA content and protein digestibility) has an impact on changes in MPS and could ultimately affect skeletal muscle mass. Protein quality has been measured by the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS); however, the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) has been recommended as a better method for protein quality scoring. Under DIAAS there is the recognition that amino acids are individual nutrients and that protein quality is contingent on IAA content and ileal (as opposed to fecal) digestibility. Differences in protein quality may have important ramifications for exercise-induced changes in muscle mass gains made with resistance exercise as well as muscle remodelling. Thus, the purpose of this review is a critical appraisal of studies examining the effects of protein quality in supplementation on changes in muscle mass and strength as well as body composition during resistance training.

  12. Protein resistance efficacy of PEO-silane amphiphiles: Dependence on PEO-segment length and concentration

    PubMed Central

    Rufin, Marc A.; Barry, Mikayla E.; Adair, Paige A.; Hawkins, Melissa L.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Grunlan, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to modification with conventional PEO-silanes (i.e. no siloxane tether), silicones with dramatically enhanced protein resistance have been previously achieved via bulk-modification with poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO)-silane amphiphiles α-(EtO)3Si(CH2)2-oligodimethylsiloxane13-block-PEOn-OCH3 when n = 8 and 16 but not when n = 3. In this work, their efficacy was evaluated in terms of optimal PEO-segment length and minimum concentration required in silicone. For each PEO-silane amphiphile (n = 3, 8, and 16), five concentrations (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μmol per 1 g silicone) were evaluated. Efficacy was quantified in terms of the modified silicones’ abilities to undergo rapid, water-driven surface restructuring to form hydrophilic surfaces as well as resistance to fibrinogen adsorption. Only n = 8 and 16 were effective, with a lower minimum concentration in silicone required for n = 8 (10 μmol per 1 g silicone) versus n = 16 (25 μmol per 1 g silicone). Statement of Significance Silicone is commonly used for implantable medical devices, but its hydrophobic surface promotes protein adsorption which leads to thrombosis and infection. Typical methods to incorporate poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) into silicones have not been effective due to the poor migration of PEO to the surface-biological interface. In this work, PEO-silane amphiphiles – comprised of a siloxane tether (m = 13) and variable PEO segment lengths (n = 3, 8, 16) – were blended into silicone to improve its protein resistance. The efficacy of the amphiphiles was determined to be dependent on PEO length. With the intermediate PEO length (n = 8), water-driven surface restructuring and resulting protein resistance was achieved with a concentration of only 1.7 wt%. PMID:27090588

  13. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression reduces inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Cao, Shengxuan; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Wang, Songmei; Yin, Lianhua; Zhi, Xiuling

    2017-04-12

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a mitochondrial cholesterol delivery protein, plays a beneficial role in hyperlipidemia, NAFLD and endothelial inflammation. Elevated circulating fatty acids and low grade inflammation are known as key risk factors of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the present study, C57BL/6J mice were fed with a HFD and infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing StAR by tail-vein injection. Intraperitoneal glucose/insulin tolerance test was performed to assess the insulin sensitivity. Morphological analysis and intramuscular lipid determination were used to illustrate the adipose hypertrophy and ectopic fat accumulation in skeletal muscle. The levels of inflammatory factor and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. The fatty acids composition was analysis using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The expression of genes associated with inflammation and insulin resistance were determined by Western blotting and qPCR to elucidate the underlying mechanism.We demonstrated that StAR overexpression ameliorated insulin resistance and systemic inflammatory response with the reduction of adipose hypertrophy and intramuscular lipid in HFD fed mice. In addition, StAR overexpression increased serum unsaturated fatty acids and PPARγ expression in muscle and adipose tissue of obese mice. In conclusion, StAR may activate PPARγ by increasing unsaturated fatty acids, which leads to a protective role in systemic inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellular prion protein acquires resistance to proteolytic degradation following copper ion binding.

    PubMed

    Kuczius, Thorsten; Buschmann, Anne; Zhang, Wenlan; Karch, Helge; Becker, Karsten; Peters, Georg; Groschup, Martin H

    2004-08-01

    The conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into its pathological isoform (PrP(Sc)) conveys an increase in hydrophobicity and induces a partial resistance to proteinase K (PK). Interestingly, co-incubation with high copper ion concentrations also modifies the solubility of PrP(c) and induces a partial PK resistance which was reminiscent of PrP(Sc). However, concerns were raised whether this effect was not due to a copper-induced inhibition of the PK itself. We have therefore analyzed the kinetics of the formation of PK-resistant PrP(C) and excluded possible interference effects by removing unbound copper ions prior to the addition of PK by methanol precipitation or immobilization of PrP(C) followed by washing steps. We found that preincubation of PrPc with copper ions at concentrations as low as 50 microM indeed rendered these proteins completely PK resistant, while control substrates were proteolyzed. No other divalent cations induced a similar effect. However, in addition to this specific stabilizing effect on PrP(C), higher copper ion concentrations in solution (>200 microM) directly blocked the enzymatic activity of PK, possibly by replacing the Ca2+ ions in the active center of the enzyme. Therefore, as a result of this inhibition the proteolytic degradation of PrP(C) as well as PrP(Sc) molecules was suppressed.

  15. Towards predictive resistance models for agrochemicals by combining chemical and protein similarity via proteochemometric modelling.

    PubMed

    van Westen, Gerard J P; Bender, Andreas; Overington, John P

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem in agriculture. Despite practices such as phased use and cycling of 'orthogonally resistant' agents, resistance remains a major risk to national and global food security. To combat this problem, there is a need for both new approaches for pesticide design, as well as for novel chemical entities themselves. As summarized in this opinion article, a technique termed 'proteochemometric modelling' (PCM), from the field of chemoinformatics, could aid in the quantification and prediction of resistance that acts via point mutations in the target proteins of an agent. The technique combines information from both the chemical and biological domain to generate bioactivity models across large numbers of ligands as well as protein targets. PCM has previously been validated in prospective, experimental work in the medicinal chemistry area, and it draws on the growing amount of bioactivity information available in the public domain. Here, two potential applications of proteochemometric modelling to agrochemical data are described, based on previously published examples from the medicinal chemistry literature.

  16. Toxicological relevance of the multidrug resistance protein 1, MRP1 (ABCC1) and related transporters.

    PubMed

    Leslie, E M; Deeley, R G; Cole, S P

    2001-10-05

    The 190 kDa multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a founding member of a subfamily of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport proteins and was originally identified on the basis of its elevated expression in multidrug resistant lung cancer cells. In addition to its ability to confer resistance in tumour cells, MRP1 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and is a primary active transporter of GSH, glucuronate and sulfate conjugated and unconjugated organic anions of toxicological relevance. Substrates include lipid peroxidation products, herbicides, tobacco specific nitrosamines, mycotoxins, heavy metals, and natural product and antifolate anti-cancer agents. MRP1 also transports unmodified xenobiotics but often requires GSH to do so. Active efflux is generally an important aspect of cellular detoxification since it prevents the accumulation of conjugated and unconjugated compounds that have the potential to be directly toxic. The related transporters MRP2 and MRP3 have overlapping substrate specificities with MRP1 but different tissue distributions, and evidence that they also have chemoprotective functions are discussed. Finally, MRP homologues have been described in other species including yeast and nematodes. Those isolated from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMRPs) decrease the cytoplasmic concentration of conjugated toxins through sequestration in vacuoles and are implicated in providing herbicide resistance to plants.

  17. Bactobolin Resistance Is Conferred by Mutations in the L2 Ribosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Josephine R.; Truong, Thao T.; Silva, Patricia M.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A.; Sims, Elizabeth H.; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). PMID:23249812

  18. Heat Resistant Characteristics of Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) Oligomer.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Takanori; Ito, Aimi; Omote, Sumire; Miura, Yuri; Tsumoto, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Soluble royal jelly protein is a candidate factor responsible for mammiferous cell proliferation. Major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), which consists of oligomeric and monomeric forms, is an abundant proliferative protein in royal jelly. We previously reported that MRJP1 oligomer has biochemical heat resistance. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of several heat treatments (56, 65 and 96°C) on the proliferative activity of MRJP1 oligomer. Heat resistance studies showed that the oligomer molecular forms were slightly maintained until 56℃, but the molecular forms were converted to macromolecular heat-aggregated MRJP1 oligomer at 65℃ and 96℃. But, the growth activity of MRJP1 oligomer treated with 96°C was slightly attenuated when compared to unheated MRJP1 oligomer. On the other hand, the cell proliferation activity was preserved until 96℃ by the cell culture analysis of Jurkat cells. In contrast, those of IEC-6 cells were not preserved even at 56°C. The present observations suggest that the bioactive heat-resistance properties were different by the origin of the cells. The cell proliferation analysis showed that MRJP1 oligomer, but not MRJP2 and MRJP3, significantly increased cell numbers, suggesting that MRJP1 oligomer is the predominant proliferation factor for mammiferous cells.

  19. Physical Cross-Linking Starch-Based Zwitterionic Hydrogel Exhibiting Excellent Biocompatibility, Protein Resistance, and Biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Qiangsong; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Boguang; Ji, Feng; Dong, Dianyu; Gao, Lina; Cui, Yuanlu; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a novel starch-based zwitterionic copolymer, starch-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (ST-g-PSBMA), was synthesized via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization. Starch, which formed the main chain, can be degraded completely in vivo, and the pendent segments of PSBMA endowed the copolymer with excellent protein resistance properties. This ST-g-PSBMA copolymer could self-assemble into a physical hydrogel in normal saline, and studies of the formation mechanism indicated that the generation of the physical hydrogel was driven by electrostatic interactions between PSBMA segments. The obtained hydrogels were subjected to detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy, swelling ratio, protein resistance, and rheology tests. Toxicity and hemolysis analysis demonstrated that the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels possess excellent biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Moreover, the cytokine secretion assays (IL-6, TNF-α, and NO) confirmed that ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels had low potential to trigger the activation of macrophages and were suitable for in vivo biomedical applications. On the basis of these in vitro results, the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels were implanted in SD rats. The tissue responses to hydrogel implantation and the hydrogel degradation in vivo were determined by histological analysis (Hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson, and Masson's Trichrome stains). The results presented in this study demonstrate that the physical cross-linking, starch-based zwitterionic hydrogels possess excellent protein resistance, low macrophage-activation properties, and good biocompatibility, and they are a promising candidate for an in vivo biomedical application platform.

  20. Responses in the expression of extracellular proteins in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus treated with rhodomyrtone.

    PubMed

    Visutthi, Monton; Srimanote, Potjanee; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2011-12-01

    Rhodomyrtone from a medicinal plant species, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, is a challenged effective agent against Gram-positive bacteria, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The present study was undertaken to provide insight into MRSA extracellular protein expression following rhodomyrtone treatment. Secreteomic approach was performed on a representative clinical MRSA isolate exposing to subinhibitory concentration rhodomyrtone (0.174 μg/ml). The identified extracellular proteins of a response of MRSA to rhodomyrtone treated condition were both suppressed and overexpressed. Staphylococcal antigenic proteins, immunodominant antigen A (IsaA) and staphylococcal secretory antigen (SsaA) involved in cell wall hydrolysis were downregulated after the treatment. The results suggested that rhodomyrtone may interfere with WalK/WalR (YycG/YycF) system. Other enzymes such as lipase precursor and another lipase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, were absent. In contrast, cytoplasmic proteins such as SpoVG and glycerol phosphate lipoteichoic acid synthase, and ribosomal proteins were found in the treated sample. Appearance of several cytoplasmic proteins in the treated culture supernatant revealed that the bacterial cell wall biosynthesis was disturbed. This finding provides a proteomic mapping of extracellular proteins after rhodomytone treatment. Extensive investigation is required for this natural compound as it has a great potency as an alternative anti-MRSA drug.

  1. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion

    PubMed Central

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis. PMID:27909410

  2. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion.

    PubMed

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis.

  3. Overexpression of uncoupling protein 3 in skeletal muscle protects against fat-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Soo; Fillmore, Jonathan J.; Kim, Jason K.; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Kim, Sheene; Collier, Emily F.; Kulkarni, Ameya; Distefano, Alberto; Hwang, Yu-Jin; Kahn, Mario; Chen, Yan; Yu, Chunli; Moore, Irene K.; Reznick, Richard M.; Higashimori, Takamasa; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and is strongly associated with obesity. Increased concentrations of intracellular fatty acid metabolites have been postulated to interfere with insulin signaling by activation of a serine kinase cascade involving PKCθ in skeletal muscle. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) has been postulated to dissipate the mitochondrial proton gradient and cause metabolic inefficiency. We therefore hypothesized that overexpression of UCP3 in skeletal muscle might protect against fat-induced insulin resistance in muscle by conversion of intramyocellular fat into thermal energy. Wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet were markedly insulin resistant, a result of defects in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and hepatic insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in these tissues was associated with reduced insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate 1– (IRS-1–) and IRS-2–associated PI3K activity in muscle and liver, respectively. In contrast, UCP3-overexpressing mice were completely protected against fat-induced defects in insulin signaling and action in these tissues. Furthermore, these changes were associated with a lower membrane-to-cytosolic ratio of diacylglycerol and reduced PKCθ activity in whole-body fat–matched UCP3 transgenic mice. These results suggest that increasing mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle may be an excellent therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:17571165

  4. Adaptive Resistance and Differential Protein Expression of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilms Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Korber, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 μg ml−1) or intermittently (10 μg ml−1 for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 μg ml−1 for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC. PMID:16940079

  5. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P < 0.001), while pSRF protein levels increased similarly by 48% with both CONC and ECC exercise (P < 0.001). Prolonged ECC and CONC training equally stimulated muscle hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). No changes occurred for total SRF protein. There was no effect of whey protein supplementation. These results show that resistance exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations.

  6. Adaptive resistance and differential protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms exposed to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Korber, Darren R

    2006-11-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 microg ml(-1)) or intermittently (10 microg ml(-1) for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 microg ml(-1) for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC.

  7. The plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol-resistance protein of Rhodococcus fascians is homologous to the transmembrane tetracycline efflux proteins.

    PubMed

    Desomer, J; Vereecke, D; Crespi, M; Van Montagu, M

    1992-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chloramphenicol-resistance gene (cmr) of Rhodococcus fascians NCPPB 1675 (located on the conjugative plasmid pRF2) allowed the identification of two possible open reading frames (ORFs), of which ORF1 was consistent with the mutational analysis. Biochemical analysis of cmr revealed that it does not encode an antibiotic-modifying enzyme. The amino acid sequence of ORF1 predicted a hydrophobic protein, with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains, homologous to proteins involved in the efflux of tetracycline across the plasma membrane. Expression of the cmr gene was induced by addition of chloramphenicol to the growth media. The promoter of this gene was restricted to 50 bp upstream from a 200 bp 5'-untranslated mRNA region, the latter containing two inverted repeats. At the amino acid level, the cmr gene is 52% identical to a previously identified chloramphenicol-resistance determinant in Streptomyces lividans, indicating a wider dispersion of this type of cmr gene among the actinomycetes.

  8. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Triana-Baltzer, Gallen B; Gubareva, Larisa V; Klimov, Alexander I; Wurtman, David F; Moss, Ronald B; Hedlund, Maria; Larson, Jeffrey L; Belshe, Robert B; Fang, Fang

    2009-11-06

    Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase), a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) strain (H5N1). Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  9. Cross-talk between signalling pathways and the multidrug resistant protein MDR-1

    PubMed Central

    Ding, S; Chamberlain, M; McLaren, A; Goh, L-b; Duncan, I; Wolf, C R

    2001-01-01

    The multidrug resistant protein MDR-1 has been associated with the resistance to a wide range of anti-cancer drugs. Taxol is a substrate for this transporter system and is used in the treatment of a wide range of human malignancies including lung, breast and ovarian cancer. We have generated a series of ovarian cell lines resistant to this compound, all of which overexpress MDR-1 through gene amplification. We present novel evidence that a constitutive activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway was also observed although the level of active JNK and p38 remained unchanged. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway using UO126 or PD098059 re-sensitised the Taxol resistant cells at least 20-fold. Importantly, when Mdr-1 cDNA was stably expressed in the wild-type cell line to generate a highly Taxol-resistant sub-line, 1847/MDR5, ERK1/2 MAP kinases again became activated. This result demonstrated that the increased activity of the signalling pathway in the Taxol-resistant lines was directly attributable to MDR-1 overexpression and was not due to the effects of Taxol itself. Additionally, we demonstrated that inhibition of the P13K pathway with LY294002 sensitised the MDR-1-expressing 1847/TX0.5 cells and 1847/MDR5 cells at least 10-fold but had no effect in the wild-type cells. This finding suggests a possible role for this pathway, also, in the generation of resistance to Taxol. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710832

  10. Effects of soy protein and isoflavones on insulin resistance and adiponectin in male monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Janice D; Zhang, Li; Shadoan, Melanie K; Kavanagh, Kylie; Chen, Haiying; Tresnasari, Kristianti; Kaplan, Jay R; Adams, Michael R

    2008-07-01

    Isoflavones may influence insulin action by means of their well-known receptor-mediated estrogenic activity. However, isoflavones also bind to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) that are strongly associated with insulin action. Soy protein with its isoflavones has previously been shown to improve glycemic control in diabetic postmenopausal women and to improve insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized monkeys. The purpose of the current report was to extend our studies of dietary soy protein to male monkeys and determine effects of the soy isoflavones on insulin resistance. Two studies are reported here. Study one involved 91 male monkeys consuming 3 diets differing only by the source of protein (casein-lactalbumin, soy protein with a low isoflavone concentration, or soy protein with a high isoflavone concentration). Intravenous glucose tolerance tests were done, and plasma adiponectin and lipoprotein concentrations were determined after 25 months of study. Samples of visceral fat were obtained at 31 months for assessment of adiponectin and PPARgamma expression. The second study involved 8 monkeys in a Latin-square design that compared the effects of diets with casein/lactalbumin, soy protein with a high isoflavone concentration, or soy protein that was alcohol-washed to deplete the isoflavones. After 8 weeks of treatment, insulin sensitivity and plasma lipoproteins were assessed. At 10 weeks, a biopsy of the skeletal muscle was performed for determination of insulin receptor, PPARalpha, and PPARgamma content. The major findings were that consumption of isoflavone-containing soy protein dose-dependently increased insulin responses to the glucose challenge and decreased plasma adiponectin, whereas isoflavone-depleted soy protein decreased body weight and had no effect on plasma adiponectin concentrations. Muscle PPARalpha and gamma expression was also increased with the isoflavone-depleted soy relative to either casein or soy protein containing the

  11. Perioperative care of patients undergoing holmium laser resection of the prostate (HoLRP) compared with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilling, Peter J.; Mackey, Michael; Cresswell, Michael D.; Kennett, Katie M.; Cass, Carol B.; Fraundorfer, Mark R.; Kabalin, John N.

    1998-07-01

    HoLRP is a technique which produces a defect in the prostatic fossa analogous to TURP but does so with significantly less blood loss. The perioperative outcome was assessed in a randomized clinical trial. The patients in the HoLRP arm (61 patients) had a longer resection time when compared to the TURP group (59 patients) but had less nursing contact time, shorter catheter time and a shorter hospital stay. Four patients in the TURP arm (6.8%) required blood transfusion compared to none in the HoLRP arm. Postoperative dysuria was similar in the two groups. Overall, the perioperative morbidity of HoLRP is less than that of TURP.

  12. Effect of electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise on mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Yu; Ogasawara, Riki; Tamura, Yuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Hatta, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and muscle strength. However, little is known about the effect of resistance exercise on mitochondrial dynamics, which is coupled with mitochondrial function. In skeletal muscle, mitochondria exist as dynamic networks that are continuously remodeling through fusion and fission. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute and chronic resistance exercise, which induces muscle hypertrophy, on the expression of proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics in rat skeletal muscle. Resistance exercise consisted of maximum isometric contraction, which was induced by percutaneous electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius muscle. Our results revealed no change in levels of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission (Fis1 and Drp1) or fusion (Opa1, Mfn1, and Mfn2) over the 24-h period following acute resistance exercise. Phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser616 was increased immediately after exercise (P < 0.01). Four weeks of resistance training (3 times/week) increased Mfn1 (P < 0.01), Mfn2 (P < 0.05), and Opa1 (P < 0.01) protein levels without altering mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteins. These observations suggest that resistance exercise has little effect on mitochondrial biogenesis but alters the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission, which may contribute to mitochondrial quality control and improved mitochondrial function.

  13. Anaerobiosis increases resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to O2-independent antimicrobial proteins from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, S G; Shafer, W M; Spitznagel, J K

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA19 to the O2-independent antimicrobial systems of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Acid extracts of polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules (crude granule extracts) and a purified granule protein (57 kilodaltons) were, at low concentrations, bactericidal for gonococci under aerobic conditions that permitted growth. However, they were less effective under anaerobic conditions that imposed bacteriostasis. We found that adding sodium nitrite to reduced growth media permitted the growth of strain FA19 in an anaerobic environment. Under these conditions with nitrite, anaerobic cultures of strain FA19 were no more resistant to the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton protein than aerobic cultures. In contrast, Salmonella typhimurium SL-1004, a facultative anaerobe, was readily killed by both the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton antimicrobial protein regardless of the presence or absence of free molecular oxygen. This is the first demonstration that an isolated antimicrobial protein from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules is active against bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Our results also indicated that the efficacy of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte O2-independent killing of N. gonorrhoeae may, in part, be inhibited by bacteriostatic conditions imposed by hypoxia. Images PMID:3917976

  14. Phenylarsine Oxide Can Induce the Arsenite-Resistance Mutant PML Protein Solubility Changes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu Han; Chen, Ye Jia; Wang, Chao; Lan, Yong Fei; Yang, Chang; Wang, Qian Qian; Hussain, Liaqat; Maimaitiying, Yasen; Islam, Khairul; Naranmandura, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently become one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and its molecular mechanism has also been largely investigated. However, it has been reported that As2O3 resistant patients are frequently found in relapsed APL after consolidation therapy, which is due to the point mutations in B-box type 2 motifs of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene. In the present study, we for the first time establish whether organic arsenic species phenylarsine oxide (PAO) could induce the mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation. Here, three different PML protein variants (i.e., PML-IV, PML-V and mutant PML-A216V) were overexpressed in HEK293T cells and then exposed to PAO in time- and dose-dependent manners. Interestingly, PAO is found to have potential effect on induction of mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation, but no appreciable effects were found following exposure to high concentrations of iAsIII, dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) and adriamycin (doxorubicin), even though they cause cell death. Our current data strongly indicate that PAO has good effects on the mutant PML protein solubility changes, and it may be helpful for improving the therapeutic strategies for arsenic-resistant APL treatments in the near future. PMID:28125064

  15. Fibroblasts From Longer-Lived Species of Primates, Rodents, Bats, Carnivores, and Birds Resist Protein Damage.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Lehr, Marcus; Kohler, William J; Han, Melissa L; Miller, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Species differ greatly in their rates of aging. Among mammalian species life span ranges from 2 to over 60 years. Here, we test the hypothesis that skin-derived fibroblasts from long-lived species of animals differ from those of short-lived animals in their defenses against protein damage. In parallel studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, birds, and species from the Laurasiatheria superorder (bats, carnivores, shrews, and ungulates), we find associations between species longevity and resistance of proteins to oxidative stress after exposure to H(2)O(2) or paraquat. In addition, baseline levels of protein carbonyl appear to be higher in cells from shorter-lived mammals compared with longer-lived mammals. Thus, resistance to protein oxidation is associated with species maximal life span in independent clades of mammals, suggesting that this cellular property may be required for evolution of longevity. Evaluation of the properties of primary fibroblast cell lines can provide insights into the factors that regulate the pace of aging across species of mammals.

  16. Fibroblasts From Longer-Lived Species of Primates, Rodents, Bats, Carnivores, and Birds Resist Protein Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Andrew M.; Lehr, Marcus; Kohler, William J.; Han, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Species differ greatly in their rates of aging. Among mammalian species life span ranges from 2 to over 60 years. Here, we test the hypothesis that skin-derived fibroblasts from long-lived species of animals differ from those of short-lived animals in their defenses against protein damage. In parallel studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, birds, and species from the Laurasiatheria superorder (bats, carnivores, shrews, and ungulates), we find associations between species longevity and resistance of proteins to oxidative stress after exposure to H2O2 or paraquat. In addition, baseline levels of protein carbonyl appear to be higher in cells from shorter-lived mammals compared with longer-lived mammals. Thus, resistance to protein oxidation is associated with species maximal life span in independent clades of mammals, suggesting that this cellular property may be required for evolution of longevity. Evaluation of the properties of primary fibroblast cell lines can provide insights into the factors that regulate the pace of aging across species of mammals. PMID:25070662

  17. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  18. Biological protein-resistance layer construction of recombinant hirudin on polymethyl methacrylate IOL surface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiwen; Jiao, Yan; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the surface of intraocular len material PMMA was first aminated for activation on which some polar groups generated such as C-N, COO(-), -OH, NH3(+), etc. Then the anticoagulant drugs recombinant hirudin (rH) was grafted with amido bonds to look forward to resist the adsorption of nonspecific protein or cells in tear, even the cataract. The detailed analysis and discussion about the grafting quantity, molography, wettability, electric charges, chemical structure, and the dynamic adsorption of protein Fn on the material surface were carried on by the technology of ultraviolet photometric, contact angle, solid Zeta potential, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance. The surface with a certain amount of rH modification existed more hydrophilic due to the amphiphilic structure than before, on which the protein adsorption was the most unstable. The results indicated that the rH modification improved the resistance of PMMA to nonspecific adsorption of protein Fn to achieve the expectative effect.

  19. Interaction of oxazaphosphorines with multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ng, Ka-Yun; Ho, Paul C

    2010-09-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) is an organic anion efflux pump capable of transporting nucleoside, nucleotide analogs, and cyclic nucleotide. MRP4 could have an influence on the resistance and transport of the two oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF). V/HepG2 (HepG2, hepatoma cells stably transfected with an empty vehicle plasmid) and MRP4/HepG2 (HepG2 cells stably expressing MRP4) were exposed to CP and IF in the absence or presence of various MRP4 inhibitors. HepG2 and HEK293 human kidney cells were also used to investigate the inducing potency of oxazaphosphorines on the MRP4 expression. In this study, insertion of MRP4 gene in HepG2 cells was found to confer significant resistance to CP and IF in the 48-h drug-exposure assays. In the presence of various MRP4 inhibitors, the resistance to CP and IF was then partially reversed. These indicate that CP and IF are highly possible substrates of MRP4. In addition, CP and clofibrate (CFB), a reported MRP4 inducer, in vivo significantly increased the MRP4 expression at both protein level and mRNA level in HEK293 cells at higher concentrations, while IF significantly decreased the MRP4 expression at mRNA level at lower concentration and had no effect at higher concentrations. However, all tested compounds (CP, IF, and CFB) did not change the MRP4 protein expression in HepG2 cells. CP and CFB are cell-specific and concentration-dependent MRP4 inducers. The finding may have implications in the CP- or IF-based chemotherapy.

  20. High expression of intratumoral stromal proteins is associated with chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Srivastava, Supriya; Hartman, Mikael; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Chan, Ching-Wan; Iau, Philip; Khin, Lay Wai; Wong, Andrea; Tan, Sing-Huang; Goh, Boon-Cher; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the changes of intratumoral stromal proteins including THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA, following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The underlying mechanisms by which THBS1 and TNC regulated resistance to docetaxel were further studied using functional studies. 100 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer were treated with alternating sequential doxorubicin and docetaxel. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for stromal proteins was performed on pre- and post-treatment core biopsies respectively. THBS1 and TNC were further validated with IHC in an independent cohort of 31 patients. A high baseline combined expression score of the 5 stromal proteins predicted independently for poor progression-free (HRadjusted 2.22, 95% CI 1.06–4.64) and overall survival (HRadjusted 5.94, 95% CI 2.25–15.71). After 1–2 cycles of chemotherapy, increased expression of THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA was seen in patients with subsequent pathological lymph node involvement at surgery. Increased expression of THBS1 and TNC compared to baseline was also seen in intrinsically resistant tumors, but not in sensitive ones. Both THBS1 and TNC-associated chemoresistance were confirmed in an independent validation cohort. Exogenous THBS1 and TNC protected MCF-7 cells against proliferation inhibition induced by docetaxel through activating integrin β1/mTOR pathway. Thus, up-regulation of THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA following neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer patients. Functional studies showed THBS1 and TNC to mediate chemoresistance through the integrin β1/mTOR pathway, suggesting that therapies targeting integrin β1/mTOR pathway may be a promising strategy to overcome chemotherapy resistance. PMID:27487140

  1. Macrophage-specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes: identification by green fluorescent protein and kanamycin resistance selection.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vikas; Rouanet, Carine; Srivastava, Ranjana; Ramalingam, B; Locht, Camille; Srivastava, Brahm S

    2007-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives and multiplies inside macrophages of its host by modulating the expression of several genes essential for in vivo survival. An in vivo expression system has been developed, based on green fluorescent protein and kanamycin resistance, to identify M. tuberculosis genes which appear to be up-regulated in infected macrophages. A promoter-trap shuttle vector, pLL192, was constructed, containing a streptomycin resistance gene as selection marker and an artificial bicistronic operon composed of the promoterless green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene, followed by the kanamycin resistance gene. A unique BamHI site upstream of the gfp gene allowed for insertion of promoter libraries. The vector was validated by the use of known regulated or constitutive M. tuberculosis promoters. In addition, an M. tuberculosis genomic DNA library was inserted into pLL192 and then introduced into Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The recombinant BCG cells were then used to infect the J774A.1 murine macrophage-like cell line in the presence of kanamycin. Several recombinant BCG cells were thereby selected that were resistant to kanamycin within infected macrophages, but were sensitive to kanamycin when grown in vitro. The kanamycin resistance phenotype was paralleled by the fluorescence phenotype. After nucleotide sequencing, the corresponding genes were identified as mce1A, PE_PGRS63(RV3097c), Rv2232, Rv1026, Rv1635c, viuB, Rv2231(cobC) and Rv0997. Real-time PCR analysis using RNA isolated at various time points from M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG grown in vitro and within macrophages, confirmed the up-regulation of these genes. The level of up-regulation varied from 2- to 40-fold in macrophages compared to growth in vitro.

  2. Resistance exercise volume affects myofibrillar protein synthesis and anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation in young men

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Nicholas A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Selby, Keegan C; West, Daniel W D; Staples, Aaron W; Cain, Nathan E; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Potvin, James R; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine if any mechanistic differences exist between a single set (1SET) and multiple sets (i.e. 3 sets; 3SET) of resistance exercise by utilizing a primed constant infusion of [ring-13C6]phenylalanine to determine myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and Western blot analysis to examine anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation following an acute bout of resistance exercise. Eight resistance-trained men (24 ± 5 years, BMI = 25 ± 4 kg m−2) were randomly assigned to perform unilateral leg extension exercise at 70% concentric one repetition maximum (1RM) until volitional fatigue for 1SET or 3SET. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken in the fasted state (Fast) and fed state (Fed; 20 g of whey protein isolate) at rest, 5 h Fed, 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed post-exercise. Fed-state MPS was transiently elevated above rest at 5 h for 1SET (2.3-fold) and returned to resting levels by 29 h post-exercise. However, the exercise induced increase in MPS following 3SET was superior in amplitude and duration as compared to 1SET at both 5 h (3.1-fold above rest) and 29 h post-exercise (2.3-fold above rest). Phosphorylation of 70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) demonstrated a coordinated increase with MPS at 5 h and 29 h post-exercise such that the extent of p70S6K phosphorylation was related to the MPS response (r = 0.338, P = 0.033). Phosphorylation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p90RSK) and ribosomal protein S6 (rps6) was similar for 1SET and 3SET at 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed, respectively. However, 3SET induced a greater activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bɛ (eIF2Bɛ) and rpS6 at 5 h Fed. These data suggest that 3SET of resistance exercise is more anabolic than 1SET and may lead to greater increases in myofibrillar protein accretion over time. PMID:20581041

  3. The Arabidopsis Tellurite resistance C protein together with ALB3 is involved in photosystem II protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Strissel, Henning; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Manavski, Nikolay; Meurer, Jörg; Burkhard, Gabi; Jarzombski, Sabine; Schünemann, Danja; Geimer, Stefan; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Leister, Dario

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of photosystem II (PSII) occurs sequentially and requires several auxiliary proteins, such as ALB3 (ALBINO3). Here, we describe the role of the Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membrane protein Tellurite resistance C (AtTerC) in this process. Knockout of AtTerC was previously shown to be seedling-lethal. This phenotype was rescued by expressing TerC fused C-terminally to GFP in the terc-1 background, and the resulting terc-1TerC- GFP line and an artificial miRNA-based knockdown allele (amiR-TerC) were used to analyze the TerC function. The alterations in chlorophyll fluorescence and thylakoid ultrastructure observed in amiR-TerC plants and terc-1TerC- GFP were attributed to defects in PSII. We show that this phenotype resulted from a reduction in the rate of de novo synthesis of PSII core proteins, but later steps in PSII biogenesis appeared to be less affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that TerC interacts with PSII proteins. In particular, its interaction with the PSII assembly factor ALB3 has been demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. ALB3 is thought to assist in incorporation of CP43 into PSII via interaction with Low PSII Accumulation2 (LPA2) Low PSII Accumulation3 (LPA3). Homozygous lpa2 mutants expressing amiR-TerC displayed markedly exacerbated phenotypes, leading to seedling lethality, indicating an additive effect. We propose a model in which TerC, together with ALB3, facilitates de novo synthesis of thylakoid membrane proteins, for instance CP43, at the membrane insertion step.

  4. Structure-function analysis of the NB-ARC domain of plant disease resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Gerben; Mayr, Gabriele; Kasiem, Mobien M A; Albrecht, Mario; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Takken, Frank L W

    2008-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. Most resistance proteins contain a central nucleotide-binding domain. This so-called NB-ARC domain consists of three subdomains: NB, ARC1, and ARC2. The NB-ARC domain is a functional ATPase domain, and its nucleotide-binding state is proposed to regulate activity of the R protein. A highly conserved methionine-histidine-aspartate (MHD) motif is present at the carboxy-terminus of ARC2. An extensive mutational analysis of the MHD motif in the R proteins I-2 and Mi-1 is reported. Several novel autoactivating mutations of the MHD invariant histidine and conserved aspartate were identified. The combination of MHD mutants with autoactivating hydrolysis mutants in the NB subdomain showed that the autoactivation phenotypes are not additive. This finding indicates an important regulatory role for the MHD motif in the control of R protein activity. To explain these observations, a three-dimensional model of the NB-ARC domain of I-2 was built, based on the APAF-1 template structure. The model was used to identify residues important for I-2 function. Substitution of the selected residues resulted in the expected distinct phenotypes. Based on the model, it is proposed that the MHD motif fulfils the same function as the sensor II motif found in AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities)-co-ordination of the nucleotide and control of subdomain interactions. The presented 3D model provides a framework for the formulation of hypotheses on how mutations in the NB-ARC exert their effects.

  5. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  6. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  7. Prion protein is ubiquitinated after developing protease resistance in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Chung; Brown, David R; Whiteman, Matthew; Li, Ruliang; Pan, Tao; Perry, George; Wisniewski, Thomas; Sy, Man-Sun; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2004-05-01

    Although the key event in the pathology of prion diseases is thought to be the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the protease-resistant scrapie species termed PrP(Sc), the factors that contribute to neurodegeneration in scrapie-infected animals are poorly understood. One probable determinant could be when the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in infected brain overwhelms the ubiquitin-proteasome system and triggers the degenerative cascade. In the present study, it was found that in mouse brains infected with the ME7 scrapie strain, the level of ubiquitin protein conjugates increased significantly at approximately 144 days post-infection (pi) when clinical signs first become apparent. This elevation correlated with the detection of protease-resistant PrP(Sc) and a decline in two endopeptidase activities associated with proteasome function. However, ubiquitination of PrP was only detected at the terminal stage, 3 weeks after the development of clinical symptoms (approximately 165 days pi). These results suggest that ubiquitination of PrP is a late event phenomenon and this conjugation occurs after the formation of protease-resistant PrP(Sc). Whether this post-translational modification and the impairment of proteasome function are pivotal events in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains to be determined.

  8. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  9. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  10. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  11. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells. BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract, as well as through the blood-brain, placental, and possibly blood-testis barriers. BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use. Thus, BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs. Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker, its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance, self-renewal (sternness), and invasiveness (aggressiveness), and thereby impart a poor prognosis. Therefore, blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers. Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR. Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor. Furthermore, alternative promoter usage, demethylation of the BCRP promoter, and histone modification are likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells. Finally, PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions. These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner. Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with

  12. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3’)-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. Previously we demonstrated that eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, due to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. As well, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. Here, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3’)-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds – anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrazolopyrimidine (PP) – and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3’)-Ia versus ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP-derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3’)-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant E. coli strain. The structures presented here and these inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  13. Carbon nanotubes induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells through FLICE-inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Stueckle, Todd A; Wang, Liying; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-02-01

    Chronic exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been reported to induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells. As resistance to apoptosis is a foundation of neoplastic transformation and cancer development, we evaluated the apoptosis resistance characteristic of the exposed lung cells to understand the pathogenesis mechanism. Passage control and SWCNT-transformed human lung epithelial cells were treated with known inducers of apoptosis via the intrinsic (antimycin A and CDDP) or extrinsic (FasL and TNF-α) pathway and analyzed for apoptosis by DNA fragmentation, annexin-V expression, and caspase activation assays. Whole-genome microarray was performed to aid the analysis of apoptotic gene signaling network. The SWCNT-transformed cells exhibited defective death receptor pathway in association with cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) overexpression. Knockdown or chemical inhibition of c-FLIP abrogated the apoptosis resistance of SWCNT-transformed cells. Whole-genome expression signature analysis confirmed these findings. This study is the first to demonstrate carbon nanotube-induced defective death receptor pathway and the role of c-FLIP in the process.

  14. Protein phosphatase AP2C1 negatively regulates basal resistance and defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Boniecka, Justyna; Schweighofer, Alois; Simulis, Justinas; Kvederaviciute, Kotryna; Stumpe, Michael; Mauch, Felix; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Boutrot, Freddy; Zipfel, Cyril; Meskiene, Irute

    2017-01-06

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) mediate plant immune responses to pathogenic bacteria. However, less is known about the cell autonomous negative regulatory mechanism controlling basal plant immunity. We report the biological role of Arabidopsis thaliana MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 as a negative regulator of plant basal resistance and defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae AP2C2, a closely related MAPK phosphatase, also negatively controls plant resistance. Loss of AP2C1 leads to enhanced pathogen-induced MAPK activities, increased callose deposition in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns or to P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000, and enhanced resistance to bacterial infection with Pto. We also reveal the impact of AP2C1 on the global transcriptional reprogramming of transcription factors during Pto infection. Importantly, ap2c1 plants show salicylic acid-independent transcriptional reprogramming of several defense genes and enhanced ethylene production in response to Pto This study pinpoints the specificity of MAPK regulation by the different MAPK phosphatases AP2C1 and MKP1, which control the same MAPK substrates, nevertheless leading to different downstream events. We suggest that precise and specific control of defined MAPKs by MAPK phosphatases during plant challenge with pathogenic bacteria can strongly influence plant resistance.

  15. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance.

  16. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulates CD147 via Sp1 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Ma, Xiangdong; Yang, Hong; Hua, Wei; Chen, Biliang; Cai, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the highest mortality rate of all female reproductive malignancies. Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in malignant tumors. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein acts as an oncoprotein, regulates cell proliferation, and migration in breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on resistance to cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell lines. The mRNA and protein levels of hepatitis B X-interacting protein were detected using RT-PCR and Western blotting in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive tissues, cisplatin-resistant cell lines A2780/CP and SKOV3/CP, and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured to evaluate cellular sensitivity to cisplatin in A2780/CP cells. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine the relationship between hepatitis B X-interacting protein and CD147. The in vivo function of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on tumor burden was assessed in cisplatin-resistant xenograft models. The results showed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was highly expressed in ovarian cancer of cisplatin-resistant tissues and cells. Notably, knockdown of hepatitis B X-interacting protein significantly reduced cell viability in A2780/CP compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein and cisplatin cooperated to induce apoptosis and increase the expression of c-caspase 3 as well as the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. We confirmed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein up-regulated CD147 at the protein expression and transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was able to activate the CD147 promoter through Sp1. In vivo, depletion of hepatitis B X-interacting protein decreased the tumor volume and weight induced by cisplatin. Taken together, these results indicate that hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulated CD147 via Sp1 in

  17. Identification of detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains in dictyostelium: enrichment of signal transduction proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Z; Devreotes, P N

    1997-01-01

    Unlike most other cellular proteins, the chemoattractant receptor, cAR1, of Dictyostelium is resistant to extraction by the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS. We exploited this property to isolate a subcellular fraction highly enriched in cAR1 by flotation of CHAPS lysates of cells in sucrose density gradients. Immunogold electron microscopy studies revealed a homogeneous preparation of membrane bilayer sheets. This preparation, designated CHAPS-insoluble floating fraction (CHIEF), also contained a defined set of 20 other proteins and a single uncharged lipid. Cell surface biotinylation and preembedding immunoelectron microscopy both confirmed the plasma membrane origin of this preparation. The cell surface phosphodiesterase (PDE) and a downstream effector of cAR1, adenylate cyclase (ACA), were specifically localized in these structures, whereas the cell adhesion molecule gp80, most of the major cell surface membrane proteins, cytoskeletal components, the actin-binding integral membrane protein ponticulin, and G-protein alpha- and beta-subunits were absent. Overall, CHIFF represents about 3-5% of cell externally exposed membrane proteins. All of these results indicate that CHIFF is derived from specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane. The method of isolation is analogous to that of caveolae. However, we were unable to detect distinct caveolae-like structures on the cell surface associated with cAR1, which showed a diffuse staining profile. The discovery of CHIFF facilitates the purification of cAR1 and related signaling proteins and the biochemical characterization of receptor-mediated processes such as G-protein activation and desensitization. It also has important implications for the "fluid mosaic" model of the plasma membrane structures. Images PMID:9168471

  18. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation.

  19. Up-regulation of lipolysis genes and increased production of AMP-activated protein kinase protein in the skeletal muscle of rats after resistance training

    PubMed Central

    An, Jae-Heung; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Suk, Min-Hwa; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lipogenesis- and lipolysis-related genes and proteins in skeletal muscles after 12 weeks of resistance training. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) were randomly divided into control (resting) and resistance training groups. A tower-climbing exercise, in which rats climbed to the top of their cage with a weight applied to their tails, used for resistance training. After 12 weeks, rats from the resistance training group had lower body weights (411.66±14.71 g vs. 478.33±24.63 g in the control), there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol, and high or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the concentration of triglyceride was lower in resistance-trained rats (59.83±14.05 μg/mL vs 93.33±33.89 μg/mL in the control). The mRNA expression levels of the lipogenesis-related genes sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase were not significantly different between the resistance-trained and control rats; however, mRNA expression of the lipolysis-related carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase increased significantly with resistance training. AMP-activated protein kinase protein levels also significantly increased in resistance training group compared with in the control group. These results suggested that resistance exercise training contributing to reduced weight gain may be in part be due to increase the lipolysis metabolism and energy expenditure in response to resistance training. PMID:27419110

  20. Group A Streptococcal M1 Protein Provides Resistance against the Antimicrobial Activity of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Döhrmann, Simon; LaRock, Christopher N.; Anderson, Ericka L.; Cole, Jason N.; Ryali, Brinda; Stewart, Chelsea; Nonejuie, Poochit; Pogliano, Joe; Corriden, Ross; Ghosh, Partho; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Histones are essential elements of chromatin structure and gene regulation in eukaryotes. An unexpected attribute of these nuclear proteins is their antimicrobial activity. A framework for histone release and function in host defense in vivo was revealed with the discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps, a specialized cell death process in which DNA-based structures containing histones are extruded to ensnare and kill bacteria. Investigating the susceptibility of various Gram-positive pathogens to histones, we found high-level resistance by one leading human pathogen, group A Streptococcus (GAS). A screen of isogenic mutants revealed that the highly surface-expressed M1 protein, a classical GAS virulence factor, was required for high-level histone resistance. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed that the N-terminal domain of M1 protein binds and inactivates histones before they reach their cell wall target of action. This finding illustrates a new pathogenic function for this classic GAS virulence factor, and highlights a potential innate immune evasion strategy that may be employed by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:28220899

  1. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC–MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  2. Type 2C Protein Phosphatase Is a Key Regulator of Antiviral Extreme Resistance Limiting Virus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Cho, Won Kyong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is an active immune response triggered by interactions between host resistance proteins and their cognate effectors. Although ETI is often associated with the hypersensitive response (HR), various R genes mediate an HR-independent process known as extreme resistance (ER). In the soybean-Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) pathosystem, the strain-specific CI protein of SMV functions as an effector of Rsv3-mediated ER. In this study, we used the soybean (Rsv3)-SMV (CI) pathosystem to gain insight into the molecular signaling pathway involved in ER. We used genome-wide transcriptome analysis to identify a subset of the type 2C protein phophatase (PP2C) genes that are specifically up-regulated in Rsv3-mediated ER. Gain-of-function analysis of the most significantly expressed soybean PP2C gene, GmPP2C3a, showed that ABA-induced GmPP2C3a functions as a key regulator of Rsv3-mediated ER. Our results further suggest that the primary mechanism of ER against viruses is the inhibition of viral cell-to-cell movement by callose deposition in an ABA signaling-dependent manner. PMID:25082428

  3. The giant protein Ebh is a determinant of Staphylococcus aureus cell size and complement resistance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice G; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus USA300, the clonal type associated with epidemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, displays the giant protein Ebh on its surface. Mutations that disrupt the ebh reading frame increase the volume of staphylococcal cells and alter the cross wall, a membrane-enclosed peptidoglycan synthesis and assembly compartment. S. aureus ebh variants display increased sensitivity to oxacillin (methicillin) as well as susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Mutations in ebh are associated with reduced survival of mutant staphylococci in blood and diminished virulence in mice. We propose that Ebh, following its secretion into the cross wall, contributes to the characteristic cell growth and envelope assembly pathways of S. aureus, thereby enabling complement resistance and the pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections.

  4. Bcl-2 family proteins in breast development and cancer: could Mcl-1 targeting overcome therapeutic resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michelle M.; Cook, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, cell death executed by caspases, is essential to normal breast development and homeostasis. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals are tightly regulated in normal breast epithelial cells. Dysregulation of this balance is required for breast tumorigenesis and increases acquired resistance to treatments, including molecularly targeted therapies, radiation and chemotherapies. The pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members interact with each other to maintain mitochondrial integrity and regulate cellular commitment to apoptosis. Among the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 is uniquely regulated by numerous oncogenic signaling pathways. This review will focus on the role of Bcl-2 family proteins in normal breast development, breast tumorigenesis and acquired resistance to breast cancer treatment strategies, while highlighting Mcl-1 as a promising target to improve breast cancer tumor cell killing. PMID:25784482

  5. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    SciTech Connect

    DeGorter, Marianne K.; Conseil, Gwenaelle; Deeley, Roger G.; Campbell, Robert L.; Cole, Susan P.C.

    2008-01-04

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr{sup 324} in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated.

  6. Quantitative Immunofluorescent Blotting of the Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (MRP2)

    PubMed Central

    Gerk, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Quantitation of the expression levels of proteins involved in drug transport and disposition is needed to overcome limitations of film-based detection of chemiluminescent immunoblots. Purpose The purpose was to describe and validate a quantitative immunofluorescent blotting method for detection of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Isoform C2/Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (ABCC2/MRP2). Methods Western blotting was performed by electrophoresis of membrane vesicle protein isolated from Sf9 cells overexpressing MRP2 subsequently blotting with infrared labeled secondary antibody. The bound complex was detected using the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System (Li-Cor; Lincoln, NE). The images were analyzed using the Odyssey Application Software to obtain the integrated intensities, followed by linear regression of the intensity data. Results The limits of quantitation for the time-insensitive technique described here were from 0.001μg to 0.5μg of total membrane protein, the coefficient of variation of the slope was 8.9%; r2 values were 0.986 ± 0.012. The utility and sensitivity of this technique was demonstrated in quantitating expression of MRP2 in human placental tissue samples, in which MRP2 was present in low abundance. Discussion The immunofluorescent blotting technique described provides sensitive, reproducible, and quantitative determinations of large, integral membrane proteins such as MRP2, all with potential long-term cost savings. PMID:21277982

  7. Amino acids in Tobamovirus coat protein controlling pepper L(1a) gene-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Ikumi; Shimomoto, Yoshifumi; Sawada, Hiromasa; Tomita, Reiko; Sekine, Ken-Taro; Kiba, Akinori; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Kappei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2012-10-01

    In pepper plants (genus Capsicum), the resistance against Tobamovirus spp. is conferred by L gene alleles. The recently identified L variant L(1a) can recognize coat proteins (CPs) of Tobacco mild green mosaic virus Japanese strain (TMGMV-J) and Paprika mild mottle virus Japanese strain (PaMMV-J), but not of Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), as the elicitor to induce resistance at 24 °C. Interestingly, L(1a) gene-mediated resistance against TMGMV-J, but not PaMMV-J, is retained at 30 °C. This observation led us to speculate that L(1a) can discriminate between CPs of TMGMV-J and PaMMV-J. In this study, we aimed to determine the region(s) in CP by which L(1a) distinguishes TMGMV-J from PaMMV-J. By using chimeric CPs consisting of TMGMV-J and PaMMV-J, we found that the chimeric TMGMV-J CP, whose residues in the β-sheet domain were replaced by those of PaMMV-J, lost its ability to induce L(1a) gene-mediated resistance at 30 °C. In contrast, the chimeric PaMMV-J CP with the β-sheet domain replaced by TMGMV-J CP was able to induce L(1a) gene-mediated resistance at 30 °C. Furthermore, viral particles were not detected in the leaves inoculated with either chimeric virus. These observations indicated that the amino acids within the β-sheet domain were involved in both the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance and virion formation. Further analyses using chimeric CPs of TMGMV-J and PMMoV indicated that amino acids within the β-sheet domain alone were not sufficient for the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance by TMGMV-J CP. These results suggest that multiple regions in Tobamovirus CP are implicated in the induction of L(1a) gene-mediated resistance.

  8. Stimulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis in hindlimb suspended rats by resistance exercise and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Linderman, J K; Whittall, J B; Gosselink, K L; Wang, T J; Mukku, V R; Booth, F W; Grindeland, R E

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a single bout of resistance exercise alone or in combination with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis (Ks) in hindlimb suspended (HLS) adult female rats. Plantar flexor muscles were stimulated with resistance exercise, consisting of 10 repetitions of ladder climbing on a 1 m grid (85 degrees), carrying an additional 50% of their body weight attached to their tails. Saline or rhGH (1 mg/kg) was administered 30' prior to exercise, and Ks was determined with a constant infusion of 3H-Leucine at 15', 60', 180', and 360' following exercise. Three days of HLS depressed Ks approximately 65% and 30-40% in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively (p < or = 0.05). Exercise increased soleus Ks in saline-treated rats 149% 60' following exercise (p < or = 0.05), decaying to that of non-exercised animals during the next 5 hours. Relative to suspended, non-exercised rats rhGH+exercise increased soleus Ks 84%, 108%, and 72% at 15', 60' and 360' following exercise (p < or = 0.05). Gastrocnemius Ks was not significantly increased by exercise or the combination of rhGH and exercise up to 360' post-exercise. Results from this study indicate that resistance exercise stimulated Ks 60' post-exercise in the soleus of HLS rats, with no apparent effect of rhGH to enhance or prolong exercise-induced stimulation. Results suggests that exercise frequency may be important to maintenance of the slow-twitch soleus during non-weightbearing, but that the ability of resistance exercise to maintain myofibrillar protein content in the gastrocnemius of hindlimb suspended rats cannot be explained by acute stimulation of synthesis.

  9. Stimulation of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis in Hindlimb Suspended Rats by Resistance Exercise and Growth Hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Whittall, Justen B.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Booth, Frank W.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a single bout of resistance exercise alone or in combination with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis (Ks) in hindlimb suspended (HLS) adult female rats. Plantar flexor muscles were stimulated with resistance exercise, consisting of 10 repetitions of ladder climbing on a 1 m grid (85 deg.), carrying an additional 50% of their body weight attached to their tails. Saline or rhGH (1 mg/kg) was administered 30' prior to exercise, and Ks was determined with a constant infusion of H-3-Leucine at 15', 60', 180', and 360' following exercise. Three days of HLS depressed Ks is approx. equal to 65% and 30-40% in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Exercise increased soleus Ks in saline-treated rats 149% 60' following exercise (p less than or equal to 0.05), decaying to that of non-exercised animals during the next 5 hours. Relative to suspended, non-exercised rats rhGH + exercise increased soleus Ks 84%, 108%, and 72% at 15', 60' and 360' following exercise (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Gastrocnemius Ks was not significantly increased by exercise or the combination of rhGH and exercise up to 360' post-exercise. Results from this study indicate that resistance exercise stimulated Ks 60' post-exercise in the soleus of HLS rats, with no apparent effect of rhGH to enhance or prolong exercise-induced stimulation. Results suggests that exercise frequency may be important to maintenance of the slow-twitch soleus during non-weightbearing, but that the ability of resistance exercise to maintain myofibrillar protein content in the gastrocnemius of hindlimb suspended rats cannot be explained by acute stimulation of synthesis.

  10. Tracking structural features leading to resistance of activated protein C to alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Dahlbäck, B; Villoutreix, B O

    2000-03-21

    Activated protein C (APC) is a multi-modular anticoagulant serine protease, which degrades factor V/Va and factor VIIIa. Human APC (hAPC) is inhibited by human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), while the bovine enzyme (bAPC) is fully resistant to this serpin. Structural features in the catalytic domains between the two species cause this difference, but detailed knowledge about the causal molecular difference is missing. To gain insight into the APC-AAT interaction and to create a human protein C resistant to AAT inhibition, we have used molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. First, a structural model for bAPC based on the Gla-domainless X-ray structure of hAPC was built. Screening the molecular surface of the human and bovine APC enzymes suggested that a hAPC molecule resistant to AAT inhibition could be constructed by substituting only a few amino acids. We thus produced recombinant hAPC molecules with a single mutation (S173E, the numbering follows the chymotrypsinogen nomenclature), two mutations (E60aS/S61R) or a combination of all these substitutions (E60aS/S61R/S173E). Amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of the three mutant APC molecules were similar to those of wild-type hAPC. Inhibition of wild-type hAPC by AAT was characterized by a second-order rate constant (k2) of 2.71 M-1 s-1. The amino acid substitution at position 173 (S173E mutant) led to partial resistance to AAT (k2 = 0.84 M-1 s-1). The E60aS/S61R mutant displayed mild resistance to AAT inhibition (k2 = 1.70 M-1 s-1), whereas the E60aS/S61R/S173E mutant was inefficiently inactivated by AAT (k2 = 0.40 M-1 s-1). Inhibition of recombinant APC molecules by the serpin protein C inhibitor (PCI) in the presence and absence of heparin was also investigated.

  11. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zapun, André; Morlot, Cécile; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP), in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context. PMID:27690121

  12. [Bt transgenic crops for insect-resistance and modification of Bt protein and utilization of stacking strategy].

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Liu, Bolin

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from Bacillus thuringiensis are currently the most widely used insect-resistant genes. They have been transferred to many crops for breeding and production. Among them, cotton, maize, potato and other insect-resistant crops are commercialized, creating considerable economic benefit. In this review, we summarized advances in identifying functional genes and transgenic crops for insect resistance, compared different strategies for enhancing vigor of insecticidal protein and utilizing gene stacking as well as listing valuable groups of stacked genes. In addition, the methods for multiple gene transformation was discussed.

  13. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A; Jerez, Carlos A

    2015-12-04

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium.

  14. Interaction of Herbicides and Quinone with the QB-Protein of the Diuron-Resistant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutant Dr2

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Philip; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1987-01-01

    We have used the diuron-resistant Dr2 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is altered in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein at amino acid 219 (valine to isoleucine), to investigate the interactions of herbicides and plastoquinone with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein. The data contained in this report demonstrate that the effects of this mutation are different from those of the more completely characterized mutant which confers extreme resistance to triazines in higher plants. The mutation in C. reinhardtii Dr2 confers only slight resistance to a number of inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Extreme triazine resistance results from an increase in the binding constant of the herbicide with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein, in contrast the diuron binding constant for chloroplasts isolated from wild-type (sensitive) Chlamydomonas and the resistant Dr2 are indistinguishable. We conclude that the altered structure in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein of Dr2 does not directly affect the diuron binding site. This mutation appears to alter the steric properties of the binding protein in such a way that diuron and plastoquinone do not directly compete for binding. This steric perturbation confers mild resistance to other herbicidal inhibitors of photosynthesis and alters the kinetics of QA to QB electron transfer. PMID:16665318

  15. CRYPTOCHROME 2 and PHOTOTROPIN 2 regulate resistance protein mediated viral 2 defense by negatively regulating a E3 ubiquitin ligase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light harvested by plants is essential for the survival of most life forms. This light perception ability requires the activities of proteins termed photoreceptors. We report a function for photoreceptors in mediating resistance (R) protein-derived plant defense. The blue-light photoreceptors, crypt...

  16. Detergent-resistant membrane subfractions containing proteins of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, and internal membrane origins.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    HEK293 cell detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) isolated by the standard homogenization protocol employing a Teflon pestle homogenizer yielded a prominent opaque band at approximately 16% sucrose upon density gradient ultracentrifugation. In contrast, cell disruption using a ground glass tissue homogenizer generated three distinct DRM populations migrating at approximately 10%, 14%, and 20% sucrose, named DRM subfractions A, B, and C, respectively. Separation of the DRM subfractions by mechanical disruption suggested that they are physically associated within the cellular environment, but can be dissociated by shear forces generated during vigorous homogenization. All three DRM subfractions possessed cholesterol and ganglioside GM1, but differed in protein composition. Subfraction A was enriched in flotillin-1 and contained little caveolin-1. In contrast, subfractions B and C were enriched in caveolin-1. Subfraction C contained several mitochondrial membrane proteins, including mitofilin and porins. Only subfraction B appeared to contain significant amounts of plasma membrane-associated proteins, as revealed by cell surface labeling studies. A similar distribution of DRM subfractions, as assessed by separation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities, was observed in CHO cells, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and in HEK293 cells lysed in detergent-free carbonate. Teflon pestle homogenization of HEK293 cells in the presence of the actin-disrupting agent latrunculin B generated DRM subfractions A-C. The microtubule-disrupting agent vinblastine did not facilitate DRM subfraction separation, and DRMs prepared from fibroblasts of vimentin-null mice were present as a single major band on sucrose gradients, unless pre-treated with latrunculin B. These results suggest that the DRM subfractions are interconnected by the actin cytoskeleton, and not by microtubes or vimentin intermediate filaments. The subfractions described may prove useful in studying discrete protein

  17. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C; Neff, N

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous mutations in a large number of loci. Mutations in two of the recessive loci, van1-18 and van2-93, resulted in alterations in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins. The mutant van1-18 gene also showed an increase in plasma membrane ATPase activity in vitro and a lowered basal phosphatase activity under alkaline conditions. Cells containing the van2-93 mutant allele had normal levels of plasma membrane ATPase activity, but this activity was not inhibited by vanadate. Both of these mutants failed to enter stationary phase, were heat shock sensitive, showed lowered long-term viability, and sporulated on rich medium in the presence of 2% glucose. The wild-type VAN1 gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 522 amino acids, with no significant homology to any genes that have been identified. Diploid cells that contained two mutant alleles of this gene demonstrated defects in spore viability. These data suggest that the VAN1 gene product is involved in regulation of the phosphorylation of a number of proteins, some of which appear to be important in cell growth control. Images PMID:2137555

  18. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K; Reitelseder, Søren; Drummond, Micah J; Schjerling, Peter; Scheike, Thomas; Serena, Anja; Holm, Lars

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated whether well-tolerated light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects skeletal muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and anabolic intracellular signaling as a way to counteract age-related loss of muscle mass. Untrained healthy elderly (>65-yr-old) men were subjected to 13 h of supine rest. After 2.5 h of rest, unilateral LL-RE, consisting of leg extensions (10 sets, 36 repetitions) at 16% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), was conducted. Subsequently, the subjects were randomized to oral intake of 4 g of whey protein per hour (PULSE, n = 10), 28 g of whey protein at 0 h and 12 g of whey protein at 7 h postexercise (BOLUS, n = 10), or 4 g of maltodextrin per hour (placebo, n = 10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7, and 10 h postexercise from the resting and the exercised leg of each subject. Myofibrillar FSR and activity of select targets from the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1-signaling cascade were analyzed from the biopsies. LL-RE increased myofibrillar FSR compared with the resting leg throughout the 10-h postexercise period. Phosphorylated (T308) AKT expression increased in the exercised leg immediately after exercise. This increase persisted in the placebo group only. Levels of phosphorylated (T37/46) eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 increased throughout the postexercise period in the exercised leg in the placebo and BOLUS groups and peaked at 7 h. In all three groups, phosphorylated (T56) eukaryotic elongation factor 2 decreased in response to LL-RE. We conclude that resistance exercise at only 16% of 1 RM increased myofibrillar FSR, irrespective of nutrient type and feeding pattern, which indicates an anabolic effect of LL-RE in elderly individuals. This finding was supported by increased signaling for translation initiation and translation elongation in response to LL-RE.

  19. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinxing; Zhai, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhang, Caiyun; Sang, Hong; Han, Guanzhu; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins) that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11). In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap) family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:26908577

  20. Molecular basis for the role of Staphylococcus aureus penicillin binding protein 4 in antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Navratna, Vikas; Nadig, Savitha; Sood, Varun; Prasad, K; Arakere, Gayathri; Gopal, B

    2010-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated proteins that catalyze the final step of murein biosynthesis. These proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in a few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity. Both transpeptidase and carboxypeptidase activities of PBPs occur at the D-Ala-D-Ala terminus of a murein precursor containing a disaccharide pentapeptide comprising N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala. Beta-lactam antibiotics inhibit these enzymes by competing with the pentapeptide precursor for binding to the active site of the enzyme. Here we describe the crystal structure, biochemical characteristics, and expression profile of PBP4, a low-molecular-mass PBP from Staphylococcus aureus strain COL. The crystal structures of PBP4-antibiotic complexes reported here were determined by molecular replacement, using the atomic coordinates deposited by the New York Structural Genomics Consortium. While the pbp4 gene is not essential for the viability of S. aureus, the knockout phenotype of this gene is characterized by a marked reduction in cross-linked muropeptide and increased vancomycin resistance. Unlike other PBPs, we note that expression of PBP4 was not substantially altered under different experimental conditions, nor did it change across representative hospital- or community-associated strains of S. aureus that were examined. In vitro data on purified recombinant S. aureus PBP4 suggest that it is a beta-lactamase and is not trapped as an acyl intermediate with beta-lactam antibiotics. Put together, the expression analysis and biochemical features of PBP4 provide a framework for understanding the function of this protein in S. aureus and its role in antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Endogenous salicylic acid levels correlate with accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins and virus resistance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yalpani, N.; Shulaev, V.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is hypothesized to be an endogenous regulator of local and systemic disease resistance and an inducer of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins among plants. High levels of PR proteins have been observed in an uninoculated amphidiploid hybrid of Nicotiana glutinosa [times] N. debneyi, which is highly resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Fluoresence, UV, and mass spectral analysis established that the levels of SA in healthy N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi leaves were 30 times greater than in N. tabacum [open quotes]Xanthi-nc[close quotes] tobacco, which does not constitutively express PR proteins and is less resistant to TMV. Upon TMV-inoculation SA levels increased at least 70-fold leaves of Xanthi-nc but role only slightly in the hybrid. Phloem exudates of N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi contained at least 500 times more SA than those of Xanthi-nc. SA treatment caused the appearance of PR-1 protein in Xanthi-nc but did not affect constitutively high levels of PR-1 protein in N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi. In contrast to Xanthi-nc tobacco, TMV-inoculated N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi kept at 32 C accumulated more than 0.5 [mu]g SA/g fresh weight, maintained high levels of PR proteins, and developed a hypersensitive response to TMV. PR proteins have previously been shown to accumulate in the lower leaves of healthy, flowering Xanthi-nc tobacco, which exhibited increased resistance to TMV. These developmentally induced increases in resistance and PR-1 proteins positively correlated with tissue levels of SA. These results affirm the regulatory role of SA in disease resistance and PR protein production. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. [Evaluation of penicillin-binding protein genotypes in penicillin susceptible and resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Delialioğlu, Nuran; Aydın, Fatma Esin; Kuyucu, Necdet; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2012-04-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the natural targets of beta-lactam antibiotics and mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x genes, which encode PBPs, are responsible for resistance to beta-lactams in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, we intended to determine how often the common mutation patterns occurred within the pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x PBP gene regions and evaluate the PBP genotype mutations which were associated with penicillin resistance in several penicillin-susceptible and - resistant S.pneumoniae isolates in Mersin, Turkey. A total of 62 S.pneumoniae strains isolated from different clinical specimens (32 nasopharyngeal swab, 16 sputum, 3 blood, 3 wound, 2 cerebrospinal fluids and one of each urine, abscess, bronchoalveolar lavage, conjunctival swab, tracheal aspirate, middle ear effusion) were included in the study. Penicillin susceptibilities of the isolates were searched by disc diffusion and E-test methods, and 23 of them were identified as susceptible, 31 were intermediate susceptible, and eight were resistant to penicillin. A rapid DNA extraction procedure was performed for the isolation of nucleic acids from the strains. Distribution of PBP gene mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x gene regions related to penicillin resistance was determined by using a wild-type specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technique. PBP gene alterations of those isolates were also evaluated in relation to penicillin susceptibility and resistance patterns. Twenty two (95.7%) of 23 penicillin-susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes (pbp1a, pbp2x, and pbp 2b), while 1 (4.3%) of these harbored mutations in all of the three PBP genes. The penicillin-intermediate susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited various combinations of mutations. One (3.2%) of 31 penicillin-intermediate susceptible isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes, while 22 (71%) of them yielded mutations in all of the three PBP

  3. Outer membrane proteomics of kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli identified MipA as a novel antibiotic resistance-related protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Dan-feng; Lin, Xiang-min; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a great threat to human health and food safety and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance for combating these bacteria. In the current study, comparative proteomic methodologies were applied to identify Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane (OM) proteins related to kanamycin resistance. Mass spectrometry and western blotting results revealed that OM proteins TolC, Tsx and OstA were up-regulated, whereas MipA, OmpA, FadL and OmpW were down-regulated in kanamycin-resistant E. coli K-12 strain. Genetic deletion of tolC (ΔtolC-Km) led to a 2-fold decrease in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of kanamycin and deletion of mipA (ΔmipA-Km) resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of kanamycin. Changes in the MICs for genetically modified strains could be completely recovered by gene complementation. Compared with the wild-type strain, the survival capability of ΔompA-Km was significantly increased and that of Δtsx-Km was significantly decreased. We further evaluated the role and expression of MipA in response to four other antibiotics including nalidixic acid, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, which suggested that MipA was a novel OM protein related to antibiotic resistance.

  4. Increased chitin biosynthesis contributes to the resistance of Penicillium polonicum against the antifungal protein PgAFP.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Josué; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Asensio, Miguel A; Núñez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal proteins from molds have been proposed as a valuable tool against unwanted molds, but the resistance of some fungi limits their use. Resistance to antimicrobial peptides has been suggested to be due to lack of interaction with the mold or to a successful response. The antifungal protein PgAFP produced by Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits the growth of various ascomycetes, but not Penicillium polonicum. To study the basis for resistance to this antifungal protein, localization of PgAFP and metabolic, structural, and morphological changes were investigated in P. polonicum. PgAFP bound the outer layer of P. polonicum but not regenerated chitin, suggesting an interaction with specific molecules. Comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and comparative quantitative proteomics revealed changes in the relative abundance of several proteins from ribosome, spliceosome, metabolic, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite pathways. The proteome changes and an altered permeability reveal an active reaction of P. polonicum to PgAFP. The successful response of the resistant mold seems to be based on the higher abundance of protein Rho GTPase Rho1 that would lead to the increased chitin deposition via cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. Thus, combined treatment with chitinases could provide a complementary means to combat resistance to antifungal proteins.

  5. Expression and purification of an active cecropin-like recombinant protein against multidrug resistance Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Germán Alberto; Castaño-Osorio, Jhon Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Lucilin is a 36 residue cecropin antimicrobial peptide identified as a partial genetic sequence in Lucilia sericata maggots. The antimicrobial spectrum and toxicity profile of Lucilin is unknown. We first report the expression of Lucilin as an active recombinant fusion protein with a cysteine protease domain (CPD) tag. The fusion protein, GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8, showed maximum overexpression in Escherichia coli BL21 cells after 12h induction with 0.5mM IPTG (isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside) and growth conditions were 37 °C and 150 rpm shaking. The fusion protein was expressed as a soluble form and was purified by Ni-IMAC. The purified protein was active against E. coli ATCC 35218 with a MIC of 0.68 μM, and a clinical isolate of E. coli with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) with a MIC of 0.8 μM. The recombinant GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8 was not toxic against human erythrocytes or Vero cells with a therapeutic index >63. The results suggest that GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8 represents a potential candidate for therapy against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  7. FAM83 proteins: Fostering new interactions to drive oncogenic signaling and therapeutic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Courtney A.; Parameswaran, Neetha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    The FAM83 proteins were recently identified as novel transforming oncogenes that function as intermediaries in EGFR/RAS signaling. Using two distinct forward genetics screens, the Bissell and Jackson laboratories uncovered the importance of the FAM83 proteins in promoting resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and therapies targeting downstream EGFR signaling effectors. The discovery of this novel oncogene family using distinct genetic screens provides compelling evidence that the FAM83 proteins are key oncogenic players in cancer-associated signaling when they are overexpressed or dysregulated. Consistent with a role in oncogenic transformation, the FAM83 genes are frequently overexpressed in diverse human cancer specimens. Importantly, ablation of numerous FAM83 members results in a marked suppression of cancer-associated signaling and loss of tumorigenic potential. Here, we review the current knowledge of the FAM83 proteins’ involvement in cancer signaling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which they contribute to tumorigenesis. Both redundant activities shared by all 8 FAM83 members and non-redundant activities unique to each member are highlighted. We discuss the promise and challenges of the FAM83 proteins as novel points of attack for future cancer therapies. PMID:27221039

  8. Triclosan Resistome from Metagenome Reveals Diverse Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases and Selective Enrichment of Triclosan Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raees; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Choi, Jinhee; Baek, Kwang-Yeol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent and TCS resistance is considered to have evolved in diverse organisms with extensive use of TCS, but distribution of TCS resistance has not been well characterized. Functional screening of the soil metagenome in this study has revealed that a variety of target enoyl acyl carrier protein reductases (ENR) homologues are responsible for the majority of TCS resistance. Diverse ENRs similar to 7-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7-α-HSDH), FabG, or the unusual YX7K-type ENR conferred extreme tolerance to TCS. The TCS-refractory 7-α HSDH-like ENR and the TCS-resistant YX7K-type ENR seem to be prevalent in human pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that a selective enrichment occurred in pathogenic bacteria in soil. Additionally, resistance to multiple antibiotics was found to be mediated by antibiotic resistance genes that co-localize with TCS resistance determinants. Further comparative analysis of ENRs from 13 different environments has revealed a huge diversity of both prototypic and metagenomic TCS-resistant ENRs, in addition to a selective enrichment of TCS-resistant specific ENRs in presumably TCS-contaminated environments with reduced ENR diversity. Our results suggest that long-term extensive use of TCS can lead to the selective emergence of TCS-resistant bacterial pathogens, possibly with additional resistance to multiple antibiotics, in natural environments. PMID:27577999

  9. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes’ resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes. PMID:26656663

  10. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-12-10

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes' resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes.

  11. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    van Gorkom, B A P; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; van der Kolk, D M; Kleibeuker, J H; de Vries, E G E

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines interfere with topoisomerase II, intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 protect colonic epithelial cells against xenobiotics. The aim of this study was to analyse the interference of anthranoids with these natural defence mechanisms and the direct cytotoxicity of anthranoids in cancer cell lines expressing these mechanisms in varying combinations. A cytotoxicity profile of rhein, aloe emodin and danthron was established in related cell lines exhibiting different levels of topoisomerases, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and P-glycoprotein. Interaction of rhein with multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 was studied by carboxy fluorescein efflux and direct cytotoxicity by apoptosis induction. Rhein was less cytotoxic in the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 overexpressing GLC4/ADR cell line compared to GLC4. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 inhibition with MK571 increased rhein cytotoxicity. Carboxy fluorescein efflux was blocked by rhein. No P-glycoprotein dependent rhein efflux was observed, nor was topoisomerase II responsible for reduced toxicity. Rhein induced apoptosis but did not intercalate DNA. Aloe emodin and danthron were no substrates for MDR mechanisms. Rhein is a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and induces apoptosis. It could therefore render the colonic epithelium sensitive to cytotoxic agents, apart from being toxic in itself. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1494–1500. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600255 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11986786

  12. BMP-2 Modulates β-Catenin Signaling Through Stimulation of Lrp5 Expression and Inhibition of β-TrCP Expression in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Yan, Ying; Lim, Yong-bin; Tang, Dezhi; Xie, Rong; Chen, Ann; Tai, Peter; Harris, Stephen E.; Xing, Lianping; Qin, Yi-Xian; Chen, Di

    2010-01-01

    Canonical BMP and Wnt signaling pathways play critical roles in regulation of osteoblast function and bone formation. Recent studies demonstrate that BMP-2 acts synergistically with β-catenin to promote osteoblast differentiation. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the signaling cross-talk between canonical BMP and Wnt signaling pathways, we have used primary osteoblasts and osteoblast precursor cell lines 2T3 and MC3T3-E1 cells to investigate the effect of BMP-2 on β-catenin signaling. We found that BMP-2 stimulates Lrp5 expression and inhibits the expression of β-TrCP, the F-box E3 ligase responsible for β-catenin degradation and subsequently increases β-catenin protein levels in osteoblasts. In vitro deletion of the β-catenin gene inhibits osteoblast proliferation and alters osteoblast differentiation and reduces the responsiveness of osteoblasts to the BMP-2 treatment. These findings suggest that BMP-2 may regulate osteoblast function in part through modulation of the β-catenin signaling. PMID:19795382

  13. Generic amyloidogenicity of mammalian prion proteins from species susceptible and resistant to prions.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Sofie; Hammarström, Per

    2015-05-11

    Prion diseases are lethal, infectious diseases associated with prion protein (PrP) misfolding. A large number of mammals are susceptible to both sporadic and acquired prion diseases. Although PrP is highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed in all mammals, not all species exhibit prion disease. By employing full length recombinant PrP from five known prion susceptible species (human, cattle, cat, mouse and hamster) and two species considered to be prion resistant (pig and dog) the amyloidogenicity of these PrPs has been delineated. All the mammalian PrPs, even from resistant species, were swiftly converted from the native state to amyloid-like structure when subjected to a native condition conversion assay. The PrPs displayed amyloidotypic tinctorial and ultrastructural hallmarks. Self-seeded conversion of the PrPs displayed significantly decreased lag phases demonstrating that nucleation dependent polymerization is a dominating mechanism in the fibrillation process. Fibrils from Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, Lysozyme, Insulin and Transthyretin did not accelerate conversion of HuPrP whereas fibrils from HuPrP90-231 and HuPrP121-231 as well as full length PrPs of all PrPs efficiently seeded conversion showing specificity of the assay requiring the C-terminal PrP sequence. Our findings have implications for PrP misfolding and could have ramifications in the context of prion resistant species and silent carriers.

  14. Development of Conformation Independent Computational Models for the Early Recognition of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  15. Association of protein kinase A type I with detergent-resistant structures of mammalian sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Moos, J; Pĕknicová, J; Geussova, G; Philimonenko, V; Hozák, P

    1998-05-01

    The finding that flagellar movement in detergent-permeabilized sperm cells is restored when Mg ATP and cAMP are added implicated detergent-resistant protein kinase A (PKA) in the regulation of sperm motility. It is widely believed that only the PKA regulatory subunit RII can associate with the cytoskeleton and/or organelles. In this paper we used monoclonal antibodies against the PKA catalytic subunit and RI subunit and demonstrated that PKA type I is also associated with the sperm cytoskeleton. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing anchored PKA type I. This association was found in sperm of nonrodent mammalian species and, to a lesser extent, also in mouse sperm. The PKA catalytic subunit is bound to the cytoskeleton secondarily via its complex with the regulatory subunit. The detergent-resistant complexes of RI and catalytic subunits localize predominantly to the flagellum. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling revealed the association of detergent-resistant PKA type I with outer dense fibers (ODF) and the fibrous sheath (FS) but not with microtubules. This location is consistent with a proposed role of PKA in regulation of FS sliding on underlying ODF.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A contributes to anoikis resistance through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai; Minamitani, Takeharu; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various malignancies, including epithelial cancers. In this study, we analyzed the effect of EBV infection on epithelial cells by using EBV-converted epithelial cells. In EBV-positive cells, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is constitutively activated. Inhibition of ERK activity leads to reduced anoikis resistance; therefore, EBV-positive cells are more resistant to anoikis, a type of apoptosis induced by cell detachment, than are EBV-negative cells. Among the viral genes expressed in EBV-positive cells, the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is responsible for induction of ERK-mediated anoikis resistance, although the expression level of LMP2A is much lower in EBV-positive cells than in EBV-transformed B cells. Further analysis demonstrated that LMP2A downregulation of the proanoikis mediator Bim through proteasomal degradation is dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). These findings suggest that LMP2A-mediated ERK activation is involved in the generation of EBV-associated epithelial malignancies.

  17. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca2+-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  18. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks' robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  19. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M.; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  20. Short-Chain Chromate Ion Transporter Proteins from Bacillus subtilis Confer Chromate Resistance in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Aguilar-Barajas, Esther; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I.; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Vargas, Eréndira; Cervantes, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Tandem paired genes encoding putative short-chain monodomain protein members of the chromate ion transporter (CHR) superfamily (ywrB and ywrA) were cloned from genomic DNA of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The transcription of the paired genes, renamed chr3N and chr3C, respectively, was shown to occur via a bicistronic mRNA generated from a promoter upstream of the chr3N gene. The chr3N and chr3C genes conferred chromate resistance when expressed in Escherichia coli strain W3110. The cloned chr3N gene alone did not confer chromate resistance on E. coli, suggesting that both chr3N and chr3C genes are required for function. E. coli cells expressing paired chr3N and chr3C genes demonstrated diminished uptake of chromate compared to that by a vector-only control strain. These results suggest that short-chain CHR proteins form heterodimer transporters which efflux chromate ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:19581367

  1. Leaf Treatments with a Protein-Based Resistance Inducer Partially Modify Phyllosphere Microbial Communities of Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Martina; Perazzolli, Michele; Antonielli, Livio; Nesler, Andrea; Torboli, Esmeralda; Bianchedi, Pier L.; Pindo, Massimo; Puopolo, Gerardo; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Protein derivatives and carbohydrates can stimulate plant growth, increase stress tolerance, and activate plant defense mechanisms. However, these molecules can also act as a nutritional substrate for microbial communities living on the plant phyllosphere and possibly affect their biocontrol activity against pathogens. We investigated the mechanisms of action of a protein derivative (nutrient broth, NB) against grapevine downy mildew, specifically focusing on the effects of foliar treatments on plant defense stimulation and on the composition and biocontrol features of the phyllosphere microbial populations. NB reduced downy mildew symptoms and induced the expression of defense-related genes in greenhouse- and in vitro-grown plants, indicating the activation of grapevine resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, NB increased the number of culturable phyllosphere bacteria and altered the composition of bacterial and fungal populations on leaves of greenhouse-grown plants. Although, NB-induced changes on microbial populations were affected by the structure of indigenous communities originally residing on grapevine leaves, degrees of disease reduction and defense gene modulation were consistent among the experiments. Thus, modifications in the structure of phyllosphere populations caused by NB application could partially contribute to downy mildew control by competition for space or other biocontrol strategies. Particularly, changes in the abundance of phyllosphere microorganisms may provide a contribution to resistance induction, partially affecting the hormone-mediated signaling pathways involved. Modifying phyllosphere populations by increasing natural biocontrol agents with the application of selected nutritional factors can open new opportunities in terms of sustainable plant protection strategies. PMID:27486468

  2. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  3. The Streptomyces peucetius drrC gene encodes a UvrA-like protein involved in daunorubicin resistance and production.

    PubMed Central

    Lomovskaya, N; Hong, S K; Kim, S U; Fonstein, L; Furuya, K; Hutchinson, R C

    1996-01-01

    The drrC gene, cloned from the daunorubicin (DNR)- and doxorubicin-producing strain of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 29050, encodes a 764-amino-acid protein with a strong sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus UvrA proteins involved in excision repair of DNA. Expression of drrC was correlated with the timing of DNR production in the growth medium tested and was not dependent on the presence of DNR. Since introduction of drrC into Streptomyces lividans imparted a DNR resistance phenotype, this gene is believed to be a DNR resistance gene. The drrC gene could be disrupted in the non-DNR-producing S. peucetius dnrJ mutant but not in the wild-type strain, and the resulting dnrJ drrC double mutant was significantly more sensitive to DNR in efficiency-of-plating experiments. Expression of drrC in an E. coli uvrA strain conferred significant DNR resistance to this highly DNR-sensitive mutant. However, the DrrC protein did not complement the uvrA mutation to protect the mutant from the lethal effects of UV or mitomycin even though it enhanced the UV resistance of a uvrA+ strain. We speculate that the DrrC protein mediates a novel type of DNR resistance, possibly different from the mechanism of DNR resistance governed by the S. peucetius drrAB genes, which are believed to encode a DNR antiporter. PMID:8655504

  4. Downregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 of Leishmania donovani field isolates is associated with antimony resistance.

    PubMed

    Ashutosh; Garg, Mansi; Sundar, Shyam; Duncan, Robert; Nakhasi, Hira L; Goyal, Neena

    2012-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to pentavalent antimonials has become a severe obstacle in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) on the Indian subcontinent. The mechanisms operating in laboratory-generated strains are somewhat known, but the determinants of clinical antimony resistance are not well understood. By utilizing a DNA microarray expression profiling approach, we identified a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) for the kinetoplast protozoan Leishmania donovani (LdMAPK1) that was consistently downregulated in antimony-resistant field isolates. The expression level of the gene was validated by real-time PCR. Furthermore, decreased expression of LdMAPK1 was also confirmed at the protein level in resistant isolates. Primary structure analysis of LdMAPK1 revealed the presence of all of the characteristic features of MAPK1. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme showed kinase activity with myelin basic protein as the substrate and was inhibited by staurosporine. Interestingly, overexpression of this gene in a drug-sensitive laboratory strain and a resistant field isolate resulted in increased the sensitivity of the transfectants to potassium antimony tartrate, suggesting that it has a role in antimony resistance. Our results demonstrate that downregulation of LdMAPK1 may be in part correlated with antimony drug resistance in Indian VL isolates.

  5. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in WHD and 3.4 ± 0.8% (P < 0.01) in PLA, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.01). Proximal patellar tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.1 ± 3.2% (P = 0.054) for WHD and PLA, respectively, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.05), with no effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P < 0.001) and 12-63% (P < 0.05), respectively, with no group or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode.

  6. Recombineering reveals a diverse collection of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Elie J.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 confer resistance to erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics in a variety of bacteria. L4 and L22 have elongated loops whose tips converge in the peptide exit tunnel near the macrolide binding site, and resistance mutations typically affect residues within these loops. Here, we use bacteriophage λ Red-mediated recombination, or “recombineering”, to uncover new L4 and L22 alleles that confer macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli. We randomized residues at the tips of the L4 and L22 loops using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries, and selected the mutagenized cells for erythromycin-resistant mutants. These experiments led to the identification of 341 different resistance mutations encoding 278 unique L4 and L22 proteins – the overwhelming majority of which are novel. Many resistance mutations were complex, involving multiple missense mutations, in-frame deletions, and insertions. Transfer of L4 and L22 mutations into wild-type cells by phage P1-mediated transduction demonstrated that each allele was sufficient to confer macrolide resistance. Although L4 and L22 mutants are typically resistant to most macrolides, selections carried out on different antibiotics revealed macrolide-specific resistance mutations. L22 Lys90Trp is one such allele, which confers resistance to erythromycin, but not tylosin or spiramycin. Purified L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes show reduced erythromycin binding, but have the same affinity for tylosin as wild-type ribosomes. Moreover, DMS methylation protection assays demonstrated that L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes bind tylosin more readily than erythromycin in vivo. This work underscores the exceptional functional plasticity of the L4 and L22 proteins, and highlights the utility of Red-mediated recombination in targeted genetic selections. PMID:19150357

  7. Dominant negative RPW8.2 fusion proteins reveal the importance of haustorium-oriented protein trafficking for resistance against powdery mildew in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Berkey, Robert; Pan, Zhiyong; Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Xianfeng; King, Harlan; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew fungi form feeding structures called haustoria inside epidermal cells of host plants to extract photosynthates for their epiphytic growth and reproduction. The haustorium is encased by an interfacial membrane termed the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM). The atypical resistance protein RPW8.2 from Arabidopsis is specifically targeted to the EHM where RPW8.2 activates haustorium-targeted (thus broad-spectrum) resistance against powdery mildew fungi. EHM-specific localization of RPW8.2 suggests the existence of an EHM-oriented protein/membrane trafficking pathway during EHM biogenesis. However, the importance of this specific trafficking pathway for host defense has not been evaluated via a genetic approach without affecting other trafficking pathways. Here, we report that expression of EHM-oriented, nonfunctional RPW8.2 chimeric proteins exerts dominant negative effect over functional RPW8.2 and potentially over other EHM-localized defense proteins, thereby compromising both RPW8.2-mediated and basal resistance to powdery mildew. Thus, our results highlight the importance of the EHM-oriented protein/membrane trafficking pathway for host resistance against haustorium-forming pathogens such as powdery mildew fungi.

  8. The Plasmin-Sensitive Protein Pls in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Is a Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Pohlentz, Gottfried; Xia, Guoqing; Hussain, Muzaffar; Foster, Simon; Peters, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Most bacterial glycoproteins identified to date are virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria, i.e. adhesins and invasins. However, the impact of protein glycosylation on the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus remains incompletely understood. To study protein glycosylation in staphylococci, we analyzed lysostaphin lysates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains by SDS-PAGE and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff’s staining. We detected four (>300, ∼250, ∼165, and ∼120 kDa) and two (>300 and ∼175 kDa) glycosylated surface proteins with strain COL and strain 1061, respectively. The ∼250, ∼165, and ∼175 kDa proteins were identified as plasmin-sensitive protein (Pls) by mass spectrometry. Previously, Pls has been demonstrated to be a virulence factor in a mouse septic arthritis model. The pls gene is encoded by the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC)mec type I in MRSA that also encodes the methicillin resistance-conferring mecA and further genes. In a search for glycosyltransferases, we identified two open reading frames encoded downstream of pls on the SCCmec element, which we termed gtfC and gtfD. Expression and deletion analysis revealed that both gtfC and gtfD mediate glycosylation of Pls. Additionally, the recently reported glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB are involved in Pls glycosylation. Glycosylation occurs at serine residues in the Pls SD-repeat region and modifying carbohydrates are N-acetylhexosaminyl residues. Functional characterization revealed that Pls can confer increased biofilm formation, which seems to involve two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism depends on glycosylation of the SD-repeat region by GtfC/GtfD and probably also involves eDNA, while the second seems to be independent of glycosylation as well as eDNA and may involve the centrally located G5 domains. Other previously known Pls properties are not related to the sugar modifications. In conclusion, Pls is a glycoprotein and Pls glycosyl

  9. Lily ASR protein-conferred cold and freezing resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Feng; Yu, Shu-Chuan; Yang, Chin-Ying; Wang, Co-Shine

    2011-09-01

    The lily LLA23 protein is a member of the abscisic acid, stress and ripening-induced (ASR) protein family. Constitutive overexpression of LLA23 under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter confers cold and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. The phenotypical growth and survival percentage of the two transgenic 35S::LLA23 plants showed higher resistance to cold and freezing conditions than those of wild-type (WT) plants. The electrolyte leakage in WT leaves increased by approximately fourfold at -2 °C relative to that at 22 °C whereas both transgenic leaves showed little ion leakage under the same conditions. A microarray analysis of LLA23-overexpressing transgenic line, 35S::LLA23E, under normal growing conditions was previously conducted by Yang et al. (Protoplasma, 2008, 233:241-254). Microarray analysis showed that 12 cold-responsive genes are upregulated and 25 cold-responsive genes are downregulated by lily ASR. Many ASR-regulated genes encode proteins involved in the classes of defense/stress-related, transcription, and metabolism. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirms the changes in mRNA levels observed in the microarray analysis. Thus, our results provide in vivo evidence implying that LLA23 mediates cold/freezing stress-responsive signaling. To gain further insight into the functions of LLA23 protein, an in vitro enzyme protection assay was used in which lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were subjected to unfavorable conditions. The assay revealed that both enzyme activities were significantly retained with the addition of LLA23, which was superior to either trehalose or BSA, suggesting that the LLA23 protein can protect enzymatic activities against freeze-thaw cycles. The 35S::LLA23 seedlings also exhibited enzyme activity superior to WT at -4 °C. These results suggest that LLA23 may act as an osmoprotectant as well as a transcription factor to confer 35S::LLA23 plants enhanced cold and freezing resistance.

  10. Ursolic Acid Suppresses Hepatitis B Virus X Protein-mediated Autophagy and Chemotherapeutic Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Dong; Lin, Ping-Yuan; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Shih, Wen-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein is a multifunctional oncoprotein that affects diverse cell activities via regulation of various host cell signaling pathways. The current investigation demonstrated that ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid, protected hepatoma cells and reduced HBx-mediated autophagy through modulation of Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA). Low-level ectopic HBx expression in Huh7 cells induced more significant autophagosome formation than high-level HBx expression. HBx activated beclin-1 promoter and enhanced the beclin-1 protein expression under low HBx expression. Transcription factor AP-1 played an essential function in HBx-mediated beclin-1 promoter activation. Inhibition of RhoA and its downstream effector Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) alleviated HBx-mediated autophagy significantly. Transiently-expressed HBx elicited an increased RhoA-GTP level, as well as phospho-ROCK1 transient accumulation. Utilization of transactivation-deficient HBx demonstrated that the transactivation activity of HBx is required for autophagy induction. Furthermore, UA suppressed HBx-mediated RhoA activation, beclin-1 promoter activation and subsequent autophagy induction, while, most importantly, reversed HBx-induced anti-cancer drug resistance.

  11. PMT family of Candida albicans: five protein mannosyltransferase isoforms affect growth, morphogenesis and antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Prill, Stephan K-H; Klinkert, Birgit; Timpel, Claudia; Gale, Cheryl A; Schröppel, Klaus; Ernst, Joachim F

    2005-01-01

    Protein O-mannosyltransferases (Pmt proteins) initiate O-mannosylation of secretory proteins. The PMT gene family of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans consists of PMT1 and PMT6, as well as three additional PMT genes encoding Pmt2, Pmt4 and Pmt5 isoforms described here. Both PMT2 alleles could not be deleted and growth of conditional strains, containing PMT2 controlled by the MET3- or tetOScHOP1-promoters, was blocked in non-permissive conditions, indicating that PMT2 is essential for growth. A homozygous pmt4 mutant was viable, but synthetic lethality of pmt4 was observed in combination with pmt1 mutations. Hyphal morphogenesis of a pmt4 mutant was defective under aerobic induction conditions, yet increased in embedded or hypoxic conditions, suggesting a role of Pmt4p-mediated O-glycosylation for environment-specific morphogenetic signalling. Although a PMT5 transcript was detected, a homozygous pmt5 mutant was phenotypically silent. All other pmt mutants showed variable degrees of supersensitivity to antifungals and to cell wall-destabilizing agents. Cell wall composition was markedly affected in pmt1 and pmt4 mutants, showing a significant decrease in wall mannoproteins. In a mouse model of haematogenously disseminated infection, PMT4 was required for full virulence of C. albicans. Functional analysis of the first complete PMT gene family in a fungal pathogen indicates that Pmt isoforms have variable and specific roles for in vitro and in vivo growth, morphogenesis and antifungal resistance.

  12. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens.

  13. Characterization of resistance to Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in mungbean variety VC6089A and its resistance-associated protein VrD1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chan; Chen, Ching-San; Horng, Shwu-Bin

    2005-08-01

    Characteristics of resistance of VC6089A, a mungbean, Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek, bred by using a wild Vigna species, V. sublobata (Roxburgh) Verdcourt (accession no. TC1966), and containing a novel protein, VrD1, were investigated against the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). The seeds of VC6089A showed high level of resistance; > 96% of the bruchid eggs failed to develop into adults, whereas 85% of eggs laid on susceptible cultivar VC1973A became adults. Mortality of surviving bruchids raised for five generations on VC6089A remained higher than 96%; however, female adults maintained high fecundity and thus showed a positive population growth through these generations. We therefore cannot exclude the possibility that the beetles could develop resistance to the resistant mungbean VC6089A. The protein VrD1 purified from seeds of VC6089A showed marked toxicity to C. maculatus when beetles were reared on artificial seeds containing varying levels of VrD1. Thorough inhibition of development was observed when artificial seeds containing 0.2% (wt:wt) VrD1 was provided for insect feeding. Our findings demonstrated the insecticidal activity of VC6089A mungbean seeds and VrD1 protein against C. maculatus. These results may facilitate safer control against bruchid infestation.

  14. Resistance Mechanisms and the Future of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations leading to clinical antibiotic resistance are a liability of single-target inhibitors. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitors have one intracellular protein target and drug resistance is increased by the acquisition of single base pair mutations that alter drug binding. The spectrum of resistance mechanisms to FabI inhibitors suggests criteria that should be considered during the development of single-target antibiotics that would minimize the impact of missense mutations on their clinical usefulness. These criteria include high-affinity, fast on/off kinetics, few drug contacts with residue side chains, and no toxicity. These stringent criteria are achievable by structure-guided design, but this approach will only yield pathogen-specific drugs. Single-step acquisition of resistance may limit the clinical application of broad-spectrum, single-target antibiotics, but appropriately designed, pathogen-specific antibiotics have the potential to overcome this liability. PMID:26931811

  15. MiR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianhao; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W

    2016-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2), and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1), respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively.

  16. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-09-15

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  17. Altered Protein S-Glutathionylation Identifies a Potential Mechanism of Resistance to Acetaminophen-