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Sample records for resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa

  1. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  2. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  3. Resistance to pefloxacin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Michea-Hamzehpour, M; Lucain, C; Pechere, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of resistance to pefloxacin were investigated in four isogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: S (parent isolate; MIC, 2 micrograms/ml), PT1 and PT2 (posttherapy isolates obtained in animals; MICs, 32 and 128 micrograms/ml, respectively), and PT2-r (posttherapy isolate obtained after six in vitro subpassages of PT2; MIC, 32 micrograms/ml). [2-3H]adenine incorporation (indirect evidence of DNA gyrase activity) in EDTA-permeabilized cells was less affected by pefloxacin in PT2 and PT2-r (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.27 and 0.26 microgram/ml, respectively) than it was in S and PT1 (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.04 and 0.05 microgram/ml, respectively). Reduced [14C]pefloxacin labeling of intact cells in strains PT1 and PT2 correlated with more susceptibility to EDTA and the presence of more calcium (P less than 0.05) and phosphorus in the outer membrane fractions. Outer membrane protein analysis showed reduced expression of protein D2 (47 kDa) in strains PT1 and PT2. Other proteins were apparently similar in all strains. The addition of calcium chloride (2 mM) to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized samples of outer membrane proteins, before heating and Western blotting, probed with monoclonal antibody anti-OmpF showed electrophoretic mobility changes of OmpF in strains PT1 and PT2 which were not seen in strain S. Calcium-induced changes were reversed with ethyleneglycoltetraacetate. Decreased [14C]pefloxacin labeling was further correlated with an altered lipopolysaccharide pattern and increased 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid concentration (P less than 0.01). These findings suggested that resistance to pefloxacin is associated with altered DNA gyrase in strain PT2-r, with altered permeability in PT1, and with both mechanisms in PT2. The decreased expression of protein D2 and the higher calcium and lipopolysaccharide contents of the outer membrane could be responsible for the permeability deficiency in P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1645509

  4. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-08-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL.

  5. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL. Images PMID:2506813

  6. [Resistance to antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Villa, Lina M; Cortés, Jorge A; Leal, Aura L; Meneses, Andrés; Meléndez, Martha P

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause high morbidity and mortality. We performed a descriptive analysis of the rates of antibiotic resistance in isolates of P. aeruginosa in 33 hospitals enrolled in a surveillance network in Colombia. The study was conducted between January 2005 and December 2009 .9905 isolates of P. aeruginosa were identified, (4.9% of all strains). In intensive care units (ICU) P. aeruginosa showed an overall resistance to aztreonam, cefepime , ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem , and piperacillin / tazobactam of 31.8% , 23.9% , 24.8%, 22.5%, 20.3% and 22.3%, respectively. Resistance rates increased for piperacillin/tazobactam, cefepime, and imipenem; remained unchanged for meropenem; and decreased for aminoglycosides, quinolones and ceftazidime. Resistance to one, two and three or more families of antibiotics was found in 17%, 12.5%, and 32.1%, respectively. In samples collected from the wards, the resistance rate was lower but usually over 10%. Antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates in hospitalized patients and particularly in those admitted to ICUs in Colombia is high.

  7. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  8. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  9. Chromosomal DNA deletion confers phage resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Le, Shuai; Yao, Xinyue; Lu, Shuguang; Tan, Yinling; Rao, Xiancai; Li, Ming; Jin, Xiaolin; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Wu, Nicholas C; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan; Hu, Fuquan

    2014-04-28

    Bacteria develop a broad range of phage resistance mechanisms, such as prevention of phage adsorption and CRISPR/Cas system, to survive phage predation. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 strain was infected with lytic phage PaP1, and phage-resistant mutants were selected. A high percentage (~30%) of these mutants displayed red pigmentation phenotype (Red mutant). Through comparative genomic analysis, one Red mutant PA1r was found to have a 219.6 kb genomic fragment deletion, which contains two key genes hmgA and galU related to the observed phenotypes. Deletion of hmgA resulted in the accumulation of a red compound homogentisic acid; while A galU mutant is devoid of O-antigen, which is required for phage adsorption. Intriguingly, while the loss of galU conferred phage resistance, it significantly attenuated PA1r in a mouse infection experiment. Our study revealed a novel phage resistance mechanism via chromosomal DNA deletion in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution. PMID:27216077

  11. Plasmid-Determined Resistance to Boron and Chromium Compounds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Anne O.; Jacoby, George A.

    1978-01-01

    Plasmids determining resistance to arsenic, mercury, silver, and tellurium compounds in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested for resistance to 40 other metal compounds. Resistance to trivalent boron and hexavalent chromium compounds was a property of certain P. aeruginosa plasmids. PMID:96730

  12. Pyocyanin Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Confers Resistance to Ionic Silver

    PubMed Central

    Merrett, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Silver in its ionic form (Ag+), but not the bulk metal (Ag0), is toxic to microbial life forms and has been used for many years in the treatment of wound infections. The prevalence of bacterial resistance to silver is considered low due to the nonspecific nature of its toxicity. However, the recent increased use of silver as an antimicrobial agent for medical, consumer, and industrial products has raised concern that widespread silver resistance may emerge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen that produces pyocyanin, a redox toxin and a reductant for molecular oxygen and ferric (Fe3+) ions. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyocyanin reduces Ag+ to Ag0, which may contribute to silver resistance due to lower bioavailability of the cation. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, pyocyanin was confirmed to be a reductant for Ag+, forming Ag0 nanoparticles and reducing the bioavailability of free Ag+ by >95% within minutes. Similarly, a pyocyanin-producing strain of P. aeruginosa (PA14) reduced Ag+ but not a pyocyanin-deficient (ΔphzM) strain of the bacterium. Challenge of each strain with Ag+ (as AgNO3) gave MICs of 20 and 5 μg/ml for the PA14 and ΔphzM strains, respectively. Removal of pyocyanin from the medium strain PA14 was grown in or its addition to the medium that ΔphzM mutant was grown in gave MICs of 5 and 20 μg/ml, respectively. Clinical isolates demonstrated similar pyocyanin-dependent resistance to Ag+. We conclude that pseudomonal silver resistance exists independently of previously recognized intracellular mechanisms and may be more prevalent than previously considered. PMID:25001302

  13. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  14. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: arsenal of resistance mechanisms, decades of changing resistance profiles, and future antimicrobial therapies.

    PubMed

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Webster, Thomas J; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Schweizer, Herbert P; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Marei, Hany E; Ashour, Hossam M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious public health issues facing humans since the discovery of antimicrobial agents. The frequent, prolonged, and uncontrolled use of antimicrobial agents are major factors in the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant variants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. The abundant data on the increased resistance to antipseudomonal agents support the need for global action. There is a paucity of new classes of antibiotics active against P. aeruginosa. Here, we discuss recent antibacterial resistance profiles and mechanisms of resistance by P. aeruginosa. We also review future potential methods for controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as phage therapy, nanotechnology and antipseudomonal vaccines.

  16. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  17. Resistance Emergence Mechanism and Mechanism of Resistance Suppression by Tobramycin for Cefepime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Robert A.; Bahniuk, Nadzeya; Bulitta, Juergen B.; VanScoy, Brian; DeFiglio, Holland; Fikes, Steven; Brown, David; Drawz, Sarah M.; Kulawy, Robert; Louie, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    The panoply of resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes resistance suppression difficult. Defining optimal regimens is critical. Cefepime is a cephalosporin whose 3′ side chain provides some stability against AmpC β-lactamases. We examined the activity of cefepime against P. aeruginosa wild-type strain PAO1 and its isogenic AmpC stably derepressed mutant in our hollow-fiber infection model. Dose-ranging studies demonstrated complete failure with resistance emergence (both isolates). Inoculum range studies demonstrated ultimate failure for all inocula. Lower inocula failed last (10 days to 2 weeks). Addition of a β-lactamase inhibitor suppressed resistance even with the stably derepressed isolate. Tobramycin combination studies demonstrated resistance suppression in both the wild-type and the stably derepressed isolates. Quantitating the RNA message by quantitative PCR demonstrated that tobramycin decreased the message relative to that in cefepime-alone experiments. Western blotting with AmpC-specific antibody for P. aeruginosa demonstrated decreased expression. We concluded that suppression of β-lactamase expression by tobramycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was at least part of the mechanism behind resistance suppression. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that a regimen of 2 g of cefepime every 8 h plus 7 mg/kg of body weight of tobramycin daily would provide robust resistance suppression for Pseudomonas isolates with cefepime MIC values up to 8 mg/liter and tobramycin MIC values up to 1 mg/liter. For P. aeruginosa resistance suppression, combination therapy is critical. PMID:22005996

  18. Detection of extended spectrum beta lactamases, ampc beta lactamases and metallobetalactamases in clinical isolates of ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, Sivaraman; Joseph, Noyal M; Kumari, Kandha; Easow, Joshy M; Kumar, Shailesh; Stephen, Selvaraj; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Raj, Sruthi

    2011-10-01

    We studied the prevalence of ceftazidime resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase (AmpC) and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production among the ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A very high rate of MBL production was observed, which suggested it to be an important contributing factor for ceftazidime resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  19. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  20. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance to Zinc pyrithione: phenotypic changes suggest the involvement of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, Suzanne M; Al-Adham, Ibrahim S; Matalka, Khalid Z; Collier, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of an efflux pump in the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to zinc pyrithione (ZnPT). In the presence of efflux inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP), the minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnPT for P. aeruginosa resistant cells is reduced significantly (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of ZnPT excluded by the resistant bacteria was reduced significantly (p < 0.01). However, the above reductions did not reach the levels measured for P. aeruginosa PAO1 sensitive strain. Furthermore, such changes in P. aeruginosa resistant cells were correlated with the overexpression of outer membrane proteins, reduced sensitivity toward imipenem (p < 0.01) and increased sensitivity toward sulphatriad and chloramphenicol (p < 0.05). In a continuation to a previous study, we conclude that P. aeruginosa resistance to ZnPT is multifactorial and involves induced efflux systems.

  2. The complex interplay of iron, biofilm formation, and mucoidy affecting antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G; Djapgne, Louise; Nguyen, Angela T; Vasil, Adriana I; Vasil, Michael L

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is refractory to a variety of current antimicrobial therapeutic regimens. Complicating treatment for such infections is the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms, as well as several innate and acquired resistance mechanisms. Previous studies suggest iron plays a role in resistance to antimicrobial therapy, including the efficacy of an FDA-approved iron chelator, deferasirox (DSX), or Gallium, an iron analog, in potentiating antibiotic-dependent killing of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Here, we show that iron-replete conditions enhance resistance of P. aeruginosa nonbiofilm growth against tobramycin and tigecycline. Interestingly, the mechanism of iron-enhanced resistance to each of these antibiotics is distinct. Whereas pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake is important for optimal resistance to tigecycline, it does not enhance tobramycin resistance. In contrast, heme supplementation results in increased tobramycin resistance, while having no significant effect on tigecycline resistance. Thus, nonsiderophore bound iron plays an important role in resistance to tobramycin, while pyoverdine increases the ability of P. aeruginosa to resist tigecycline treatment. Lastly, we show that iron increases the minimal concentration of tobramycin, but not tigecycline, required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms. Moreover, iron depletion blocks the previous observed induction of biofilm formation by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, suggesting iron and tobramycin signal through overlapping regulatory pathways to affect biofilm formation. These data further support the role of iron in P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, providing yet another compelling case for targeting iron acquisition for future antimicrobial drug development.

  3. Correlation Between Virulence Genotype and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Kye Chul; Kim, Semi

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a clinically important pathogen that causes opportunistic infections and nosocomial outbreaks. Recently, the type III secretion system (TTSS) has been shown to play an important role in the virulence of P. aeruginosa. ExoU, in particular, has the greatest impact on disease severity. We examined the relationship among the TTSS effector genotype (exoS and exoU), fluoroquinolone resistance, and target site mutations in 66 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Methods Sixty-six carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were collected from patients in a university hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2008 to May 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) were determined by using the agar dilution method. We used PCR and sequencing to determine the TTSS effector genotype and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the respective target genes gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. Results A higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant than exoS+ strains (93.2%, 41/44 vs. 45.0%, 9/20; P≤0.0001). Additionally, exoU+ strains were more likely to carry combined mutations than exoS+ strains (97.6%, 40/41 vs. 70%, 7/10; P=0.021), and MIC increased as the number of active mutations increased. Conclusions The recent overuse of fluoroquinolone has led to both increased resistance and enhanced virulence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. These data indicate a specific relationship among exoU genotype, fluoroquinolone resistance, and resistance-conferring mutations. PMID:24982833

  4. Mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Meletis, G; Exindari, M; Vavatsi, N; Sofianou, D; Diza, E

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is an opportunistic pathogen associated with a range of nosocomial infections. This microorganism is noted for its intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and for its ability to acquire genes encoding resistance determinants. Among the beta-lactam antibiotics, carbapenems with antipseudomonal activity are important agents for the therapy of infections due to P. aeruginosa. The development of carbapenem resistance among P. aeruginosa strains is multifactorial. Plasmid or integron-mediated carbapenemases, increased expression of efflux systems, reduced porin expression and increased chromosomal cephalosporinase activity have all been defined as contributory factors. Phenotypic tests and molecular techniques are used for the characterization of the resistance determinants. The isolation of carbapenem resistant strains is alarming and requires the implementation of strict infection control measures in order to prevent the spread of carbapenemase encoding genes to unrelated clones or to other bacterial species. PMID:23935307

  5. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M.; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities. PMID:20305140

  6. Altered denA and anr gene expression in aminoglycoside adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, J A; Hoban, D J; Zelenitsky, S A; Zhanel, G G

    1997-09-01

    Adaptive resistance to aminoglycoside killing and cytoplasmic accumulation occurs in cultures of originally susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa following an initial incubation with aminoglycoside. Anaerobiosis has also been reported to reduce bacterial killing and limit cytoplasmic aminoglycoside accumulation. We hypothesized that a common mechanism may facilitate reduced bacterial killing and aminoglycoside accumulation in both cases. Northern blot analysis of P. aeruginosa adaptively resistant to gentamicin demonstrated increased mRNA levels of both denA (nitrite reductase), which facilitates terminal electron acceptance in the anaerobic respiratory pathway, and its regulatory protein, ANR, in the absence of promoter DNA sequence changes, when compared with controls. These observations suggested that P. aeruginosa may regulate the expression of genes in its anaerobic respiratory pathway in response to aminoglycosides and may explain, at least partially, P. aeruginosa adaptive resistance to aminoglycosides.

  7. Carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in the nosocomial setting in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Labarca, Jaime A; Salles, Mauro José Costa; Seas, Carlos; Guzmán-Blanco, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains in the nosocomial setting in Latin America represents an emerging challenge to public health, as the range of therapeutic agents active against these pathogens becomes increasingly constrained. We review published reports from 2002 to 2013, compiling data from throughout the region on prevalence, mechanisms of resistance and molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii. We find rates of carbapenem resistance up to 66% for P. aeruginosa and as high as 90% for A. baumannii isolates across the different countries of Latin America, with the resistance rate of A. baumannii isolates greater than 50% in many countries. An outbreak of the SPM-1 carbapenemase is a chief cause of resistance in P. aeruginosa strains in Brazil. Elsewhere in Latin America, members of the VIM family are the most important carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa strains. Carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii in Latin America is predominantly due to the oxacillinases OXA-23, OXA-58 and (in Brazil) OXA-143. Susceptibility of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii to colistin remains high, however, development of resistance has already been detected in some countries. Better epidemiological data are needed to design effective infection control interventions.

  8. Dissemination of high-risk clones of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in colombia.

    PubMed

    Correa, Adriana; Del Campo, Rosa; Perenguez, Marcela; Blanco, Victor M; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Perez, Federico; Maya, Juan J; Rojas, Laura; Cantón, Rafael; Arias, Cesar A; Villegas, Maria V

    2015-04-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to develop resistance to most antimicrobials represents an important clinical threat worldwide. We report the dissemination in several Colombian hospitals of two predominant lineages of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa strains. These lineages belong to the high-risk clones sequence type 111 (ST111) and ST235 and harbor blaVIM-2 on a class 1 integron and blaKPC-2 on a Tn4401 transposon, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa ST1492, a novel single-locus variant of ST111, was identified. Clonal dissemination and the presence of mobile genetic elements likely explain the successful spread of XDR P. aeruginosa strains in Colombia.

  9. Dissemination of High-Risk Clones of Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Perenguez, Marcela; Blanco, Victor M.; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Perez, Federico; Maya, Juan J.; Rojas, Laura; Cantón, Rafael; Arias, Cesar A.; Villegas, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to develop resistance to most antimicrobials represents an important clinical threat worldwide. We report the dissemination in several Colombian hospitals of two predominant lineages of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa strains. These lineages belong to the high-risk clones sequence type 111 (ST111) and ST235 and harbor blaVIM-2 on a class 1 integron and blaKPC-2 on a Tn4401 transposon, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa ST1492, a novel single-locus variant of ST111, was identified. Clonal dissemination and the presence of mobile genetic elements likely explain the successful spread of XDR P. aeruginosa strains in Colombia. PMID:25605362

  10. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. Objectives The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Results Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa. Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates. PMID:28138370

  11. Effectiveness of Antipseudomonal Antibiotics and Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    El ZOWALATYl, Mohamed E; Gyetvaii, Bpla

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading human pathogen that causes serious infections at various tissues and organs leading to life threatening health problems and possible deadly outcomes. Resistance patterns vary widely whether it is from hospitals or community acquired infections. Reporting resistance profiles to a certain antibiotics provide valuable information in a given setting, but may be extrapolated outside the sampling location. In the present study, P. aeruginosa isolates were screened to determine their susceptibilities against anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agents and possible existing mechanisms of resistance were determined. Eighty-six isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered. Isolates representing different resistance profiles were screened for the existence of three different resistance mechanisms including drug inactivation due to metallo-β-lactamases, drug impermeability by outer membrane proteins and drug efflux. All tested isolates showed uniform susceptibility (100%, n = 86/86) to piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, and polymyxin B. A single isolate was found to be imipenem resistant (99%, n = 85/86). The possible mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to imipenem involve active drug efflux pumps, outer membrane impermeability as well as drug inactivating enzymes. These findings demonstrate the fundamental importance of the in vitro susceptibility testing of antibiotics prior to antipseudomonal therapy and highlight the need for a continuous antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs to monitor the changing resistance patterns so that clinicians and health care officials are updated as to the most effective therapeutic agents to combat the serious outcomes of P. aeruginosa infections.

  12. Detection of Metallo-Beta Lactamases Among Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh Sheikh, Ahmad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Jolodar, Abbas; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Khorvash, Farzin; Saki, Azadeh; Shoja, Saeed; Sheikhi, Raheleh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carbapenems are important drugs used for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, however metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) are able to efficiently hydrolyze these classes of drugs. Immediate detection of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa is necessary in order to accurately treat infections caused by this organism. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of MBL producing P. aeruginosa in burn and non-burn patients by two phenotypic tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to compare phenotypic tests with PCR. Materials and Methods: A total of 223 non-duplicate strains of P. aeruginosa were collected from three teaching hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem and ertapenem) were determined by the Kirby-Bauer and E-test methods. Combined disk (CD) test, MBL E-test and PCR were performed for carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Results: Amongst all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 58.7% were resistant to imipenem while 31.8%, 13.5% and 74.4% were resistant to meropenem, doripenem and ertapenem, respectively. Amongst all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 44.4% were multidrug resistant and 13.45% were resistant to all of the carbapenems. The CD test with doripenem disk / 750 μg ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) had the highest efficiency compared to the other phenotypic tests. blaIMP and blaVIM genes were detected in 11.7% and 0.4% of isolates, respectively. blaSPM and blaNDM genes were not observed. Conclusions: Epidemiological and regional evaluation of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa through simple and inexpensive methods should be considered for effective treatment of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25774271

  13. Distribution of Pseudomonas-Derived Cephalosporinase and Metallo-β-Lactamases in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Gye Cheol; Kim, Semi; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasing problem in many parts of the world. In particular, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and AmpC β- lactamases are responsible for high-level resistance to carbapenem and cephalosporin. We studied the diversity and frequency of β-lactamases and characterized chromosomal AmpC β- lactamase from carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Sixty-one carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients in a tertiary hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2011 to June 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of four antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar-dilution method. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to identify the various β-lactamase genes, class 1 integrons, and chromosomally encoded and plasmid-mediated ampC genes. In addition, the epidemiological relationship was investigated by multilocus sequence typing. Among 61 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates, 25 isolates (41.0%) were MBL producers. Additionally, 30 isolates producing PDC (Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase)-2 were highly resistant to ceftazidime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml) and cefepime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml). Of all the PDC variants, 25 isolates harboring MBL genes showed high levels of cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance, whereas 36 isolates that did not harbor MBL genes revealed relatively low-level resistance (ceftazidime, p < 0.001; cefepime, p < 0.001; imipenem, p = 0.003; meropenem, p < 0.001). The coexistence of MBLs and AmpC β-lactamases suggests that these may be important contributing factors for cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance. Therefore, efficient detection and intervention to control drug resistance are necessary to prevent the emergence of P. aeruginosa possessing this combination of β-lactamases.

  14. Drug Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae Isolated from ICU, Babol, Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Masoomeh; Siadati, Sepideh; Rajabnia, Ramzan; Taher, Ali Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are spread throughout the world which causes nosocomial infections, especially in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This study aimed to investigate the resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae isolated from patients in the ICU. During 2011-2012, 30 isolates for each P. aeruginosa and E. cloacae were collected from the patients who acquired nosocomial infection after admition to the ICU at the hospitals affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, northern Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for five category antibiotics by microdilution method. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The highest resistance rate of P. aeruginosa was seen to amikacin (53.3%) followed by ceftazidime (43.3%). Also, 16.7% of E. cloacae was resistant to ceftazidime. Among P. aeruginosa isolates,18 (60%) were MDR while no E. cloacae isolates were MDR. The significant correlation was only demonstrated between MDR P. aeruginosa and the reason of hospitalization (P=0.004). In conclusion, there was alarming amount of P. aeruginosa MDR in patients in the ICU which could lead to a hazardous outcome for the patients. Therefore, new prevention policies regarding to hospital infection should be established. Also, the periodical assessment of bacterial resistance pattern particularly in ICUs should be performed. PMID:24551814

  15. [Outbreak of nosocomial urinary tract infections due to a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, I; Boukadida, J; Triki, O; Hannachi, N; Ben Redjeb, S

    2003-04-01

    An outbreak of a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa including imipenem resistance occurred in the urology intensive care unit at Charles Nicolle Hospital (Tunis). All isolates presented the same antibiotic resistance pattern and were only susceptible to colistin. The epidemic strain was detected in different sites of this unit. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after enzymatic restriction using XbaI was performed in order to establish an epidemiologic link between these infections. Genotypic analysis showed two different patterns and the environmental source was identified in both cases. Although the same antibiotype was harbored by all the isolates, two outbreaks occurring in the same period were identified. The strengthening of hygiene measures allowed to stop the outbreak spreading. Since the hospital environment is the major source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, a continuous surveillance of the patients and the environmental sources is required for the implementation efficient control measures.

  16. The prevalence and resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary care hospital in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Lila, Greta; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Bajrami, Rrezarta; Kurti, Arsim; Azizi, Elvir; Raka, Lul

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that continues to a leading cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections. The rapid increase in drug resistance in clinical isolates of this pathogen is a worldwide concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution rate, prevalence and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in clinical specimens from the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). During a three-year period, 553 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients admitted to a variety of UCCK units. The P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using standard laboratory procedures, and the susceptibility of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was investigated using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (2013-2015) guidelines. P. aeruginosa was the second most frequently isolated pathogen. The isolation rate of P. aeruginosa was 7.6%, 10.1% and 8.6% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Most clinical samples were from ICU (380, 68.7%). There was a statistically significant difference between ICU and non-ICU (p<0.05). P. aeruginosa isolates were most frequently isolated from the respiratory tract (323, 58.4%). The rate of resistance against most of the tested antimicrobials has increased, especially for carbapenems. Imipenem resistance was 25.2%, 26.5%, and 37.7% and meropenem resistance was 20.1%, 23.4%, and 36% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. This study provides important data on current antimicrobial resistance, and the results demonstrate that the resistance rates are progressively increasing. There is an urgent need to emphasise the prudent use of antibiotics and strictly adhere to the concept of "reserve drugs" to minimise the misuse of available antimicrobials. The acquisition and analysis of prevalence and resistance data will be an important tool to identify targets for quality improvement in Kosovo and will support the preparation of

  17. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  18. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  19. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    PubMed

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6) CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  20. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens.

    PubMed

    Heil, Emily L; Lowery, Ashleigh V; Thom, Kerri A; Nicolau, David P

    2015-01-01

    In the management of multidrug-resistant infections in critically ill patients with multiorgan dysfunction, consideration must be given to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an antimicrobial agent to optimize dosing. We describe a 25-year-old woman who was undergoing thrice-weekly hemodialysis and developed multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to infected left and right ventricular assist devices. After multiple courses of antibiotics, her blood cultures revealed that the infecting organism was becoming progressively more resistant to antibiotic options. Cefepime 2 g administered over 3 hours/day (in combination with colistimethate) provided adequate drug levels for multidrug-resistant, cefepime-intermediate P. aeruginosa bacteremia in this patient. We present the clinical case of this patient, followed by a discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to be considered, including illustration of the principles of using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens, and present the patient's resulting clinical course.

  1. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic investigation of imipenem-susceptible and -resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Sockalingum, G D; Bouhedja, W; Pina, P; Allouch, P; Mandray, C; Labia, R; Millot, J M; Manfait, M

    1997-03-06

    The primary mechanism of imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been ascribed to an outer membrane impermeability owing to a loss of expression of protein D2. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with statistical methods has been used as a new approach to rapidly discriminate four isogenic strains of P. aeruginosa--susceptible, less susceptible, and highly resistant to imipenem-- and to follow the structural modifications related to this low permeability. Decomposition of the broad protein and carbohydrate contours into underlying Gaussians and comparison of the susceptible and highly resistant strain provided quantitative and ultrastructural information on these strains. This methodology allows for discrimination not of the mutation itself but of its consequences observed in the protein and carbohydrate absorption regions. Its association with other existing biochemical methods may be envisaged since it may allow for rapid orientation of investigations in the field of bacterial resistance diagnosis.

  2. Development of resistance to chemical disinfection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchin, George L.

    1999-01-01

    Two long-term experiments have been conducted aboard the Mir Space Station to evaluate the development of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chemical disinfection by polyiodide quaternary ammonium strong base resin disinfectants. The first preliminary experiment was launched aboard STS 79 and a second more extensive experiment aboard STS 86. During both experiments, after two months in a microgravity environment, aqueous suspensions of P. aeruginosa contained viable bacteria after having the iodinated resin added to them. In the second experiment identical ground based controls did not exhibit a similar phenomenon. Also in the second experiment, individual colonies from the surviving bacteria were evaluated for resistance to aqueous iodine disinfection. Compared to individual colonies from the original inoculum no resistance was observed. The data are consistent with slow development of a resistant biofilm in the bacterial suspensions flown aboard the Mir Space Station.

  3. Invitro Apramycin Activity against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Anthony D; Smith, Kenneth P; Eliopoulos, George M; Berg, Anders H; McCoy, Christopher; Kirby, James E

    2017-03-16

    The in vitro activity of apramycin was compared to that of amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Apramycin demonstrated an MIC50/MIC90 of 8/32μg/ml for A. baumannii and 16/32μg/ml for P. aeruginosa. Only 2% of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa had an MIC greater than an epidemiological cutoff value of 64μg/ml. In contrast, the MIC50/MIC90 for amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin were ≥64/>256μg/ml for A. baumannii with 57%, 95%, and 74% of isolates demonstrating resistance, respectively, and the MIC50/MIC90 were ≥8/256μg/ml for P. aeruginosa with 27%, 50%, and 57% of strains demonstrating resistance, respectively. Apramycin appears to offer promising in vitro activity against highly resistant pathogens. It therefore may warrant further pre-clinical study to assess potential for repurposing as a human therapeutic and relevance as a scaffold for further medicinal chemistry exploration.

  4. In vitro antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, B.; Thomé, S.; Martins, R.; Martins, G.; Lilenbaum, W.

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (167) were obtained from 528 samples of canine otitis externa, identified by biochemical reactions and tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials. The most effective drug was ciprofloxacin. The study reports alarming resistance among P. aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:24031774

  5. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  6. Influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianqian; Li, Xiaoqing; Li, Wenzhang; Du, Xinmiao; He, Jian-Qing; Tao, Chuanmin; Feng, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of infectious diseases caused by the carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) is becoming more challenging with each passing year. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the impact of carbapenem resistance on mortality of patients with P. aeruginosa infection. We searched PUBMED, Web of science, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library up to December 25, 2014, to identify published cohort or case-control studies. 17 studies, including 6660 patients carrying P. aeruginosa, were identified. The pooling analysis indicated that patients infected with CRPA had significantly higher mortality than those infected with carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CSPA) (crude OR = 1.64; 95%CI = 1.40, 1.93; adjusted OR = 2.38; 95%CI = 1.53, 3.69). The elevated risk of mortality in patients with CRPA infection was not lessened when stratified by study design, sites of infection, or type of carbapenem, except that the estimate effect vanished in CRPA high-incidence region, South America (crude OR = 1.12; 95%CI = 0.64, 1.99). Begg’s (z = 0.95, p = 0.34) and Egger’s test (t = 1.23, p = 0.24) showed no evidence of publication bias. Our results suggest that carbapenem resistance may increase the mortality of patients with P. aeruginosa infection, whether under univariate or multivariate analysis. PMID:26108476

  7. Influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Li, Xiaoqing; Li, Wenzhang; Du, Xinmiao; He, Jian-Qing; Tao, Chuanmin; Feng, Yulin

    2015-06-25

    Treatment of infectious diseases caused by the carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) is becoming more challenging with each passing year. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the impact of carbapenem resistance on mortality of patients with P. aeruginosa infection. We searched PUBMED, Web of science, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library up to December 25, 2014, to identify published cohort or case-control studies. 17 studies, including 6660 patients carrying P. aeruginosa, were identified. The pooling analysis indicated that patients infected with CRPA had significantly higher mortality than those infected with carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CSPA) (crude OR = 1.64; 95%CI = 1.40, 1.93; adjusted OR = 2.38; 95%CI = 1.53, 3.69). The elevated risk of mortality in patients with CRPA infection was not lessened when stratified by study design, sites of infection, or type of carbapenem, except that the estimate effect vanished in CRPA high-incidence region, South America (crude OR = 1.12; 95%CI = 0.64, 1.99). Begg's (z = 0.95, p = 0.34) and Egger's test (t = 1.23, p = 0.24) showed no evidence of publication bias. Our results suggest that carbapenem resistance may increase the mortality of patients with P. aeruginosa infection, whether under univariate or multivariate analysis.

  8. Modulation of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bayroodi, Elnaz; Jalal, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a widespread public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the antibacterial activity of several conventional antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: ZnO NPs were prepared by solvothermal method and dispersed in glycerol with the help of ammonium citrate as a dispersant. The antibacterial effects of the resulting ZnO nanofluid, ceftazidime, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin were investigated against two P. aeruginosa strains, including one clinical isolate and P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 using microdilution method. For the evaluation of the combined effect of ZnO nanofluid and antibiotics, the fractional inhibitory concentration indices were calculated and isobolograms were plotted. Results: Clinical strain in comparison to standard strain of P. aeruginosa showed more resistance to ZnO nanofluid and the antibiotics. ZnO nanofluid acted synergistically with ceftazidime and tobramycin against both strains. Combination of ZnO nanofluid and ciprofloxacin displayed synergistic and partial synergistic activity against clinical and standard strains of P. aeruginosa, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that bacterial resistance to antimicrobials could be reduced by the synergistic action of ZnO NPs. PMID:27307973

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals High Intrinsic Resistance to Penem Antibiotics: Penem Resistance Mechanisms and Their Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kiyomi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC β-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC β-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC β-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC β-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems. PMID:11408209

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics: penem resistance mechanisms and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Gotoh, N; Nishino, T

    2001-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC beta-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC beta-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC beta-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC beta-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems.

  11. Genes involved in copper resistance influence survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on copper surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elguindi, Jutta; Wagner, Janine; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 on copper cast alloys and the influence of genes on survival on copper containing medium and surfaces. Methods and Results Different strains of P. aeruginosa were inoculated on copper containing medium or different copper cast alloys and the survival rate determined. The survival rates were compared to rates on copper-free medium and stainless steel as control. In addition, the effect of temperature on survival was examined. Conclusions Copper cast alloys had previously shown to be bactericidal to various bacteria but the mechanism of copper-mediated killing is still not known. In this report we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 is rapidly killed on different copper cast alloys and that genes involved in conferring copper resistance in copper-containing medium also influenced survival on copper cast alloys. We also show that the rate of killing is influenced by temperature. PMID:19239551

  12. RND efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a major issue worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puzari, Minakshi; Chetia, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic failures against diseases due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria have become a major threat nowadays as confirmed by surveillance reports across the world. One of the methods of development of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is by means of RND efflux pumps. Inhibition of these pumps might help to combat the antibiotic resistance problem, for which the structure and regulation of the pumps have to be known. Moreover, judicious antibiotic use is needed to control the situation. This paper focuses on the issue of antibiotic resistance as well as the structure, regulation and inhibition of the efflux pumps present in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  13. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Toffoli, D. J.; Prates, R. A.; Courrol, Lilia C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    Burns are frequently contamined by pathogenic microorganisms and the widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitals is a matter of growing concern. Hypocrellin B (HB) is a new generation photosensitizer extracted from the fungus Hypocrella bambusae with absorption bands at 460, 546 and 584 nm. Lanthanide ions change the HB molecular structure and a red shift in the absorption band is observed as well as an increase in the singlet oxygen quantum yield. In this study, we report the use of HB:La+3 to kill resistant strain of P. aeruginosa infected burns. Burns were produced on the back of mice and wounds were infected subcutaneously with 1x109 cfu/mL of P. aeruginosa. Three-hours after inoculation, the animals were divided into 4 groups: control, HB:La+3, blue LED and HB:La+3+blue LED. PDT was performed using 10μM HB:La+3 and 500mW light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=470nm+/-20nm during 120s. The animals of all groups were killed and the infected skin was removed for bacterial counting. Mice with photosensitizer alone, light alone or untreated infected wounds presented 1x108 cfu/g while mice PDT-treated showed a reduction of 2 logs compared to untreated control. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED is effective in diminishing antibiotic resistant strain P. aeruginosa in infected burns.

  14. VIM-2–producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175 Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Villa, Jennifer; Barrado, Laura; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquín R.; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A total of 183 patients were colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at a hospital in Spain during 2007–2010; prevalence increased over this period from 2.8% to 15.3%. To characterize these isolates, we performed molecular epidemiologic and drug resistance analysis. Genotyping showed that 104 (56.8%) isolates belonged to a single major clone (clone B), which was identified by multilocus sequence typing as sequence type (ST) 175. This clone was initially isolated from 5 patients in 2008, and then isolated from 23 patients in 2009 and 76 patients in 2010. PCR analysis of clone B isolates identified the blaVIM-2 gene in all but 1 isolate, which harbored blaIMP-22. ST175 isolates were susceptible to only amikacin (75%) and colistin (100%). Emergence of the ST175 clone represents a major health problem because it compromises therapy for treatment of P. aeruginosa nosocomial infections. PMID:22840969

  15. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Hydrogel Contact Lens Disinfection Correlates with Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Carol; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common pathogens in infection of hydrogel contact lens wearers is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can gain access to the eye via contamination of the lens, lens case, and lens care solutions. Only one strain per species is used in current regulatory testing for the marketing of chemical contact lens disinfectants. The aim of this study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa strains vary in their susceptibility to hydrogel contact lens disinfectants. A method for rapidly screening bacterial susceptibility to contact lens disinfectants was developed, based on measurement of the MIC. The susceptibility of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates to two chemical disinfectants was found to vary among strains. MICs ranged from 6.25 to 100% for both disinfectants at 37°C, and a number of strains were not inhibited by a 100% disinfectant concentration in the lens case environment at room temperature (22°C). Resistance to disinfection appeared to be an inherent rather than acquired trait, since some resistant strains had been isolated prior to the introduction of the disinfectants and some susceptible P. aeruginosa strains could not be made more resistant by repeated disinfectant exposure. A number of P. aeruginosa strains which were comparatively more resistant to short-term disinfectant exposure also demonstrated the ability to grow to levels above the initial inoculum in one chemical disinfectant after long-term (24 to 48 h) disinfectant exposure. Resistance was correlated with acute cytotoxic activity toward corneal epithelial cells and with exsA, which encodes a protein that regulates cytotoxicity via a complex type III secretion system. These results suggest that chemical disinfection solutions may select for contamination with cytotoxic strains. Further investigation of the mechanisms and factors responsible for resistance may also lead to strategies for reducing adverse responses to contact lens wear. PMID:11283074

  16. Interactions of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Polymicrobial Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B.; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections. PMID:23451098

  17. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Carbapenem Resistance on Mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Cristina; Gozalo, Mónica; Murillas, Javier; Almirante, Benito; Pomar, Virginia; Aguilar, Manuela; Granados, Ana; Calbo, Esther; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Rodríguez, Fernando; Tubau, Fe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The impact of antimicrobial resistance on clinical outcomes is the subject of ongoing investigations, although uncertainty remains about its contribution to mortality. We investigated the impact of carbapenem resistance on mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in a prospective multicenter (10 teaching hospitals) observational study of patients with monomicrobial bacteremia followed up for 30 days after the onset of bacteremia. The adjusted influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality was studied by using Cox regression analysis. Of 632 episodes, 487 (77%) were caused by carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CSPA) isolates, and 145 (23%) were caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) isolates. The median incidence density of nosocomial CRPA bacteremia was 2.3 episodes per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 2.8). The regression demonstrated a time-dependent effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality as well as a significant interaction with the Charlson index: the deleterious effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality decreased with higher Charlson index scores. The impact of resistance on mortality was statistically significant only from the fifth day after the onset of the bacteremia, reaching its peak values at day 30 (adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 0 at day 30, 9.9 [95% CI, 3.3 to 29.4]; adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 5 at day 30, 2.6 [95% CI, 0.8 to 8]). This study clarifies the relationship between carbapenem resistance and mortality in patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Although resistance was associated with a higher risk of mortality, the study suggested that this deleterious effect may not be as great during the first days of the bacteremia or in the presence of comorbidities. PMID:22155832

  18. Evaluation of efflux pumps gene expression in resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an Iranian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Yaslianifard, Sahar; Yaslianifard, Somaye; Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz-Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections and has an intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Among all the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pumps of P. aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM is the first efflux pump found to target multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression level of genes expressing MexAB-OprM in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: In this study, 45 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients admitted to Children’s Medical Center Hospital, an Iranian referral hospital. Disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods were used for determination of the patterns of resistance to antibiotics. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression level of genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Results: Among 45 resistant PA isolates, the frequency of genes overexpression was as follows: MexA (n=25, 55.5%), MexB (n=24, 53.3%) and OprM (n=16, 35.5%). In addition, in 28 strains (62%) overexpression was observed in one of the studied three genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusion: In our study 28 isolates (62%) had increased expression level of efflux pumps genes, MexAB-OprM. Although the efflux pumps play important roles in increasing the resistance towards different antibiotics but the role of other agents and mechanisms in evolution of resistance should not be ignored. Since the concomitant overproduction of other Mex efflux systems might have additive effects on antibiotic resistance, the co-expressing of a multicomponent efflux pump is recommended. On the other hand, the concomitant overproduction of two Mex pumps might have additive effects on resistance to antibiotic. Therefore co-expressing of Mex efflux systems is recommended. PMID:28210464

  19. A case of intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is the fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the external genitalia. The occurrence of Fournier's syndrome in patients with hematologic malignancies has been reported. Here we report a case of an intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). A 71-year-old Japanese man received intensive chemotherapy for recurring intravascular lymphoma. Blood culture revealed MDRP, and physical examination led to the diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Aggressive treatment that comprised granulocyte transfusion, granulocyte stimulating factor, endotoxin filtration, appropriate antibiotic coverage, and aggressive surgical therapy was administered, and this lead to the successful recovery from sepsis and Fournier's syndrome.

  20. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  1. Successful Management of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia after Kidney Transplantation in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Kyung-Mee; NAM, Hyun-Suk; WOO, Heung-Myong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 8-year-old male mongrel dog that had undergone renal transplantation was presented 25 days later with an acute cough, anorexia and exercise intolerance. During the investigation, neutrophilic leukocytosis was noted, and thoracic radiographs revealed caudal lung lobe infiltration. While being treated with two broad-spectrum antibiotics, clinical signs worsened. Pneumonia due to infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa, sensitive only to imipenem and amikacin, was confirmed by bacteria isolation. After treatment with imipenem-cilastatin without reducing the immunosuppressant dose, clinical signs completely resolved. During the 2-year follow-up period, no recurrence was observed. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of pneumonia caused by MDR P. aeruginosa in a renal recipient dog and successful management of this disease. PMID:23842146

  2. Calcium induces tobramycin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by regulating RND efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Sharmily; Guragain, Manita; Lenaburg, Dirk L; Kubat, Ryan; Patrauchan, Marianna A

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic multidrug resistant pathogen causing severe chronic infections. Our previous studies showed that elevated calcium (Ca(2+)) enhances production of several virulence factors and plant infectivity of the pathogen. Here we show that Ca(2+) increases resistance of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to tobramycin, antibiotic commonly used to treat Pseudomonas infections. LC-MS/MS-based comparative analysis of the membrane proteomes of P aeruginosa grown at elevated versus not added Ca(2+), determined that the abundances of two RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM and MexVW-OprM, were increased in the presence of elevated Ca(2+). Analysis of twelve transposon mutants with disrupted RND efflux pumps showed that six of them (mexB, muxC, mexY, mexJ, czcB, and mexE) contribute to Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance. Transcriptional analyses by promoter activity and RT-qPCR showed that the expression of mexAB, muxABC, mexXY, mexJK, czcCBA, and mexVW is increased by elevated Ca(2+). Disruption of mexJ, mexC, mexI, and triA significantly decreased Ca(2+)-induced plant infectivity of the pathogen. Earlier, our group showed that PAO1 maintains intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)in) homeostasis, which mediates Ca(2+) regulation of P. aeruginosa virulence, and identified four putative Ca(2+) transporters involved in this process (Guragain et al., 2013). Here we show that three of these transporters (PA2435, PA2092, PA4614) play role in Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance and one of them (PA2435) contributes to Ca(2+) regulation of mexAB-oprM promoter activity. Furthermore, mexJ, czcB, and mexE contribute to the maintenance of Ca(2+)in homeostasis. This provides the first evidence that Ca(2+)in homeostasis mediates Ca(2+) regulation of RND transport systems, which contribute to Ca(2+)-enhanced tobramycin resistance and plant infectivity in P. aeruginosa.

  3. Resistance Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Kanchipuram, Tamilnadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy A., Suneel Kumar; S., Sivasankari; C., Anitha; V., Somasunder; MS., Kumudhavathi; SK., Amshavathani; V., Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to analyze the extended spectrum of β lactamase (ESBL), metallo β lactamase (MBL) & AmpC production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in various clinical samples. Materials & Methods: One hundred four non repetitive clinical specimens were inoculated onto nutrient agar, blood agar and incubated at 37oC overnight. The colonies were tested for oxidase test and other biochemical tests and antibiogram. ESBL screening was done using 3rd generation cephalosporins and confirmatory combined double disc test, imipenem-EDTA double disc synergy test for MBL enzyme and AmpC test using Cefoxitin disc. Results & Analysis: Out of 104 P.aeruginosa isolates, 42.30% were ESBL producer, 15.38 % MBL producer and none were AmpC producer. Imipenem, Ofloxacin, and aminoglycosides (amikacin (29.8%) tobramycin (29.8%) and netilmycin (13.46%) has got the better antipseudomonal activity in this study. 43 (41.35%) P.aeruginosa was found to be Multi Drug Resistant (MDR). Conclusion: This study highlights the prevalence of ESBL, MBL and MDR P.aeruginosa. Carbapenems and aminoglycosides are promising drugs with antipseudomonal activity in our study. PMID:24995180

  4. Chemical alterations in cell envelopes of polymyxin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, H E; Lyle, R D

    1979-01-01

    Cell envelopes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to polymyxin were compared with cell envelopes from polymyxin-sensitive strains as to their content of total protein, carbohydrate, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate and as to their protein composition as determined by slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cell envelopes of the polymyxin-resistant strains had reduced amounts of lipopolysaccharide, as indicated a reduction in both carbohydrate and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate concentrations, and a greatly altered protein composition as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was a quantitative increase in total cell envelop protein in these strains. However, those protein bands identified as being major outer membrane proteins upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of separated outer and cytoplasmic membranes were reduced greatly in concentration in the polymyxin-resistant cell envelopes. Thus, it appears that polymyxin resistance in these strains is associated with the alteration of the outer membrane through a loss of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins. Images PMID:222726

  5. Intrinsic Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in the Superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Justine L.; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a serious threat in the clinic. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens that possess high intrinsic resistance. Though many studies have focused on understanding the acquisition of bacterial resistance upon exposure to antimicrobials, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are not well understood. In this study, we subjected the model opportunistic superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa to 14 antimicrobials under highly controlled conditions and assessed its response using expression- and fitness-based genomic approaches. Our results reveal that gene expression changes and mutant fitness in response to sub-MIC antimicrobials do not correlate on a genomewide scale, indicating that gene expression is not a good predictor of fitness determinants. In general, fewer fitness determinants were identified for antiseptics and disinfectants than for antibiotics. Analysis of gene expression and fitness data together allowed the prediction of antagonistic interactions between antimicrobials and insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling these interactions. PMID:26507235

  6. Quantitative Contributions of Target Alteration and Decreased Drug Accumulation to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Sebastian; Dötsch, Andreas; Nouri, Bianka; Chaberny, Iris F.

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics constitute a clinically successful and widely used class of broad-spectrum antibiotics; however, the emergence and spread of resistance increasingly limits the use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment and management of microbial disease. In this study, we evaluated the quantitative contributions of quinolone target alteration and efflux pump expression to fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We generated isogenic mutations in hot spots of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and inactivated the efflux regulator genes so as to overexpress the corresponding multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. We then introduced the respective mutations into the reference strain PA14 singly and in various combinations. Whereas the combined inactivation of two efflux regulator-encoding genes did not lead to resistance levels higher than those obtained by inactivation of only one efflux regulator-encoding gene, the combination of mutations leading to increased efflux and target alteration clearly exhibited an additive effect. This combination of target alteration and overexpression of efflux pumps was commonly observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates; however, these two mechanisms were frequently found not to be sufficient to explain the level of fluoroquinolone resistance. Our results suggest that there are additional mechanisms, independent of the expression of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and/or MexXY-OprM efflux pump, that increase ciprofloxacin resistance in isolates with mutations in the QRDRs. PMID:23274661

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of VIM-2-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175, an Epidemic High-Risk Clone.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Otero, Joaquín R; Oliver, Antonio; Chaves, Fernando

    2013-04-11

    The VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant high-risk clone Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type (ST) 175 was isolated in the setting of a large outbreak in Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre (Spain) from 2007 to 2010. This strain was resistant to all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides, with the exception of amikacin, and has become an endemic clone in our institution.

  8. Chromate Efflux by Means of the ChrA Chromate Resistance Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Cervantes, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Everted membrane vesicles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 harboring plasmid pCRO616, expressing the ChrA chromate resistance protein, accumulated four times more 51CrO42− than vesicles from plasmidless cells, indicating that a chromate efflux system functions in the resistant strain. Chromate uptake showed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.12 mM chromate and a Vmax of 0.5 nmol of chromate/min per mg of protein. Uptake of chromate by vesicles was dependent on NADH oxidation and was abolished by energy inhibitors and by the chromate analog sulfate. The mechanism of resistance to chromate determined by ChrA appears to be based on the active efflux of chromate driven by the membrane potential. PMID:10572148

  9. Aminoglycoside-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in cytochrome d, nitrite reductase, and aerobic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L E; Kwan, S

    1981-01-01

    Two gentamicin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO 503 were selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. Mutant PAO 2403 had significantly increased resistance to aminoglycoside but not to other antibiotics. Mutant PAO 2402 showed a similar spectrum of resistance but of lower magnitude. Both mutants showed no detectable cytochrome d and had a high frequency of reversion to a fully wild-type phenotype. PAO 2403 had a marked decrease and PAO 2402 had a moderate decrease in nitrite reductase activity. Both mutants had reduced uptake of gentamicin and dihydrostreptomycin. Mutant PAO 2403 showed a general decrease in transport rate of cationic compounds, whereas mutant PAO 2402 had only deficient glucose transport. Both mutants showed enhanced rates of glutamine transport and no change in glutamic acid transport. Other components of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were normal. These mutants involve ferrocytochrome C551 oxidoreductase formed only on anaerobic growth but illustrate transport defects in aerobically grown cells. PMID:6791588

  10. Adjuvants Based on Hybrid Antibiotics Overcome Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enhance Fluoroquinolone Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Guchhait, Goutam; Fernando, Dinesh M; Deo, Soumya; McKenna, Sean A; Zhanel, George G; Kumar, Ayush; Schweizer, Frank

    2016-01-11

    The use of adjuvants that rescue antibiotics against multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens is a promising combination strategy for overcoming bacterial resistance. While the combination of β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors has been successful in restoring antibacterial efficacy in MDR bacteria, the use of adjuvants to restore fluoroquinolone efficacy in MDR Gram-negative pathogens has been challenging. We describe tobramycin-ciprofloxacin hybrid adjuvants that rescue the activity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics against MDR and extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in vitro and enhance fluoroquinolone efficacy in vivo. Structure-activity studies reveal that the presence of both tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, which are separated by a C12 tether, is critical for the function of the adjuvant. Mechanistic studies indicate that the antibacterial modes of ciprofloxacin are retained while the role of tobramycin is limited to destabilization of the outer membrane in the hybrid.

  11. [Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from four hospitals of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Armando; Sierra R, Carmen I; de Waard, Jacobus

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 17 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems isolated in four hospitals in eastern and southern Venezuela collected between 2007 and 2010. Combined disk method showed production of metallo־β־lactamases (MBLs) in all strains. PCR and sequencing of genes encoding IMP, VIM and SPM metallo־β־lactamase families confirmed the presence of VIM-2 MMBL in all strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis classified the strains into three similarity groups. The largest group, group A included 13 strains with over 83% similarity between them and was found in four hospitals. Two strains of Cumana hospital formed the group B and other two the Group C with similitary of 73% and 65% respectively with Group A. These results confirmed that hospitals in eastern and southern Venezuela, circulating strains of P. aeruginosa producing VIM-2 type MBLs with a common clonal origin. On the other hand, carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa circulating in Cumana city hospital had polyclonal origin.

  12. Multiresistant Plasmids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Highly Resistant to Either or Both Gentamicin and Carbenicillin

    PubMed Central

    Kontomichalou, Polyxeni; Papachristou, Efstathia; Angelatou, Fevronia

    1976-01-01

    High-level resistance to gentamicin and carbenicillin was found in 30 and 10.7%, respectively, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, especially in isolates from urine. In 23 out of 25 strains tested, these resistances were R mediated and linked to multiresistant plasmids, carrying genes for resistances to five other aminoglycosides, tobramycin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, and spectinomycin, and for resistances to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and mercury chloride. Carbenicillin resistance was unstable in Pseudomonas, and in its presence the multiresistant plasmids had a host range extended to the Enterobacteriaceae (group I plasmids). Otherwise they were transferable intragenerically only (group II plasmids). The extended host range plasmids were, as a rule, in fi− incompatibility class A–C. Segregants incompatible with both class A–C and P plasmids were detected. The β-lactamase specified by the carbenicillin marker was of the TEM-like type. Multiple linkages of resistance determinants to the aminoglycosides were concomitantly present in most of the plasmids. Results from the bioassay indicated the presence of at least two aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes. PMID:820245

  13. Suboptimal chlorine treatment of drinking water leads to selection of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Jain, S R; Prasad, K N; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2004-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the spectrum of bacteria present in the River Gomti water before and after chlorination for drinking purposes. We observed that the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that survived chlorination on three out of seven occasions were resistant to almost all the antibiotics tested. The chlorine-resistant bacteria had mucoid colonies and grew better at 24 degrees C. All attempts to isolate the plasmid responsible for chlorine resistance were unsuccessful. Laboratory experiments using different strains of the P. aeruginosa in distilled water showed that only the resistant strain survived chlorine treatment at a dose of < or =500 microg/L. Similar results were obtained when water collected from seven different sites on the River Gomti was treated with graded doses of chlorine. At the higher dose of chlorine, all the bacteria died in 30 min, whereas with lower doses all the bacteria survived. The present study underscores the importance of measuring water chlorine concentrations to assure they are sufficiently high to remove pathogenic bacteria from drinking water. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of the selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria by suboptimal chlorine treatment of water.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolysaccharide Psl promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Zegans, Michael E; Wozniak, Daniel; Griffin, Edward; Toutain-Kidd, Christine M; Hammond, John H; Garfoot, Andrew; Lam, Joseph S

    2012-08-01

    Polysorbate 80 (PS80) is a nonionic surfactant and detergent that inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.001% and is well tolerated in human tissues. However, certain clinical and laboratory strains (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa are able to form biofilms in the presence of PS80. To better understand this resistance, we performed transposon mutagenesis with a PS80-resistant clinical isolate, PA738. This revealed that mutation of algC rendered PA738 sensitive to PS80 biofilm inhibition. AlgC contributes to the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Psl and alginate, as well as lipopolysaccharide and rhamnolipid. Analysis of mutations downstream of AlgC in these biosynthetic pathways established that disruption of the psl operon was sufficient to render the PA738 and PAO1 strains sensitive to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. Increased levels of Psl production in the presence of arabinose in a strain with an arabinose-inducible psl promoter were correlated with increased biofilm formation in PS80. In P. aeruginosa strains MJK8 and ZK2870, known to produce both Pel and Psl, disruption of genes in the psl but not the pel operon conferred susceptibility to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. The laboratory strain PA14 does not produce Psl and does not form biofilms in PS80. However, when PA14 was transformed with a cosmid containing the psl operon, it formed biofilms in the presence of PS80. Taken together, these data suggest that production of the exopolysaccharide Psl by P. aeruginosa promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor PS80.

  15. Galangin expresses bactericidal activity against multiple-resistant bacteria: MRSA, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pepeljnjak, Stjepan; Kosalec, Ivan

    2004-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of three propolis ethanol extracts (EEP) was examined for various Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial species, including multiple-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. EEP had a good bactericidal activity against Gram-positive species, and all multiple-resistant bacterial strains tested were sensitive to EEP. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were lower in samples of higher flavonoid content (from 0.65 to 7.81 mg mL(-1)), indicating the influence of the concentration of some potent bactericidal compound(s) in propolis or synergism among some bactericidal compounds. Antimicrobial-guided separation of flavonoid aglycones (bioassay in situ on thin-layer chromatogram) showed that galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is one compound in EEP with bactericidal activity. Galangin was isolated by preparative chromatography. After determining the quantity present, the MIC against multiple-resistant bacteria was determined. The MIC of galangin against multiple-resistant bacterial strains was significantly lower (from 0.16 to 0.44 mg mL(-1), p < 0.05) than that of EEP. The bactericidal activity of galangin against P. aeruginosa strains was present at 0.17+/-0.05 mg mL(-1).

  16. New amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their interactions with lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Delbar, Alicia; Souza Machado, Luiza; Jeannot, Katy; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Buyck, Julien M; Decout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2014-08-01

    The development of novel antimicrobial agents is urgently required to curb the widespread emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria like colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We previously synthesized a series of amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against bacterial membranes, among which 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)propyl]neamine (3',6-di2NP), 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)butyl]neamine (3',6-di2NB), and 3',6-di-O-nonylneamine (3',6-diNn) showed high levels of activity and low levels of cytotoxicity (L. Zimmermann et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:7691-7705, 2013). We have now further characterized the activity of these derivatives against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa and studied their mode of action; specifically, we characterized their ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to alter the bacterial outer membrane (OM). The three amphiphilic neamine derivatives were active against clinical colistin-resistant strains (MICs, about 2 to 8 μg/ml), The most active one (3',6-diNn) was bactericidal at its MIC and inhibited biofilm formation at 2-fold its MIC. They cooperatively bound to LPSs, increasing the outer membrane permeability. Grafting long and linear alkyl chains (nonyl) optimized binding to LPS and outer membrane permeabilization. The effects of amphiphilic neamine derivatives on LPS micelles suggest changes in the cross-bridging of lipopolysaccharides and disordering in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The molecular shape of the 3',6-dialkyl neamine derivatives induced by the nature of the grafted hydrophobic moieties (naphthylalkyl instead of alkyl) and the flexibility of the hydrophobic moiety are critical for their fluidifying effect and their ability to displace cations bridging LPS. Results from this work could be exploited for the development of new amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  17. Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, Monika; Maciąg, Joanna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2015-11-01

    Due to the clinical threat posed by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and importance of virulence factors produced in infection, 21 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were analyzed. 42.8% metallo-beta-lactamases-positive strains were identified. 85.7% of strains were meropenem resistant. 14.2% of strains were MDR; 38%, extensively drug-resistant (XDR). ExoY was present in all strains; exoT, in 95.2%; exoS, in 90.5%; exoU, in 47.6%. Eight XDR strains were typed using multilocus sequence typing: 4 as ST235, 2 as ST260, 2 as ST654 and ST234. MDR P. aeruginosa were isolated from hospitalized patients and among those from the community. Our study demonstrates the serious clinical issues posed by MDR P. aeruginosa and underscores the need for new treatment.

  18. Environmental variation alters the fitness effects of rifampicin resistance mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Danna R; Moss, Ethan; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-03-01

    The fitness effects of antibiotic resistance mutations in antibiotic-free conditions play a key role in determining the long-term maintenance of resistance. Although resistance is usually associated with a cost, the impact of environmental variation on the cost of resistance is poorly understood. Here, we test the impact of heterogeneity in temperature and resource availability on the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance using strains of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying clinically important rifampicin resistance mutations. Although the rank order of fitness was generally maintained across environments, fitness effects relative to the wild type differed significantly. Changes in temperature had a profound impact on the fitness effects of resistance, whereas changes in carbon substrate had only a weak impact. This suggests that environmental heterogeneity may influence whether the costs of resistance are likely to be ameliorated by second-site compensatory mutations or by reversion to wild-type rpoB. Our results highlight the need to consider environmental heterogeneity and genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness in models of resistance evolution.

  19. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN siRNA. The cytokines, EMMPRIN and MMP9 were examined by the RP-PCR and ELISA, respectively, undergoing the silence of EMMPRIN siRNA. Moreover, the western blot assay was also used to test the phosphorylated MAPK in the murine macrophages after silenced by the EMMPRIN siRNA. The EMMPRIN was activated, with lipopolysaccharide stimulation and treated with the MAPK inhibitor, to evaluate whether the MAPK participates in the EMMPRIN-triggered drug resistance. The results indicated that the EMMPRIN expression was elevated in the infected BALB/c at 3 or 5 days post-infection. Silence of EMMPRIN Enhanced the Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PA keratitis. Silence of EMMPRIN significantly up-regulated Th1-type cytokines IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-18, but down-regulated Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. MMP9 was increased in the cells with rEMMPRIN treatment. EMMPRIN inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production via a MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, EMMPRIN promotes host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:28078032

  20. [Evaluation of a hospital outbreak related to carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Cekin, Yeşim; Karagöz, Alper; Kızılateş, Filiz; Cekin, Ayhan Hilmi; Oztoprak Çuvalcı, Nefise; Bülbüller, Nurullah; Durmaz, Rıza

    2013-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes opportunistic infections and hospital outbreaks. During October 2012, carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa strains with similar antibiotic resistance patterns, were isolated from specimens sent from the intensive care and plastic surgery units in our hospital. Thus a hospital outbreak was suspected. The microbiology laboratory database was retrospectively searched and all strains of P.aeruginosa isolated during the four month period, starting with the initial carbapenem-resistant strain in August 2012, was evaluated as a hospital outbreak. The aim of this study was to define the outbreak by investigating the clonal relationship between the strains, to detect the potential environmental sources and to evaluate the period of the outbreak, risk factors and the efficiency of infection control measures. The study was conducted between August-November 2012. Twenty patients with carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa (CRPA) positive cultures were included in the study. The control group consisted of 22 patients with carbapenem-susceptible P.aeruginosa (CSPA) positive cultures. The clonal relationship between 26 CRPA strains was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The PFGE results indicated that CRPA strains in our hospital were not related to a single clone, however, there were four major clones composed of four to eight strains. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the risk increased 15.7 fold (95% CI: 1.19-207.76) by the use of carbapenem, 76.8 fold (95% CI: 2.03-2901.30) by surgical procedures and 0.787 fold (95% CI: 0.63-0.97) by the duration of hospital stay. Surveillance cultures from health-care personel and the environment performed in course of the outbreak, yielded no growth of a strain with the similar antibiotic resistance pattern. The spread of CRPA has been controlled by the use of effective precautionary measures, regressing the isolate number to 0-1 strain/month. Since

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  2. Low-level resistance and clonal diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among chronically colonized cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alex Guerra; Leão, Robson Souza; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'alincourt; da Silva, Érica Aparecida dos Santos Ribeiro; Firmida, Monica de Cássia; Folescu, Tania Wrobel; Paixão, Vilma Almeida; Santana, Maria Angélica; de Abreu e Silva, Fernando Antonio; Barth, Afonso Luís; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade

    2015-12-01

    A prospective study was conducted in Brazil to evaluate antimicrobial resistance patterns and molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection. All isolates were obtained between May 2009 and June 2010 from 75 patients seen in four reference centers in Brazil: HCPA (20 patients) and HEOM (15 patients), located in southern and northeastern Brazil, respectively; IFF (20 patients) and HUPE (20 patients), both in southwestern Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, PCR for detection of carpapenemases, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed in 274 isolates. A total of 224 PFGE types were identified and no clones were found circulating among the centers or within the same center. Despite the chronic infection, most patients were colonized by intermittent clones. Only three patients (4%) maintained the same clone during the study. The resistance rates were lower than 30% for the majority of antimicrobials tested in all centers and only 17% of isolates were multiresistant. Isolates (n = 54) with reduced susceptibility to imipenem and/or meropenem presented negative results for blaSPM-1, blaIMP-1, blaVIM , and blaKPC genes. Our results indicate an unexpected low level of antimicrobial resistance and a high genotypic diversity among P. aeruginosa from Brazilian chronic CF patients.

  3. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Rabindra; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance. PMID:27642599

  4. Emergence of resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics during moxalactam therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed Central

    Preheim, L C; Penn, R G; Sanders, C C; Goering, R V; Giger, D K

    1982-01-01

    In four patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, the infecting strain developed resistance to moxalactam during therapy with this drug. In addition, P. aeruginosa isolates from two of these four patients showed increased resistance to aminoglycosides. Isolates from a third patient acquired cross-resistance to other antipseudomonal beta-lactams. In three of the cases, disk susceptibility tests failed to detect the resistance that was demonstrated in broth dilution assays. Isolate identities were confirmed by serotyping. No new plasmids were found by agarose gel electrophoresis. The mechanisms for this resistance did not involve enzymatic antibiotic degradation. These findings suggest that currently available expanded-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives should probably not be used alone for most serious infections due to P. aeruginosa. They also suggest that strains with multiple antibiotic resistance may become more prevalent in hospitals if these drugs are used extensively. PMID:6218778

  5. Factors Affecting Comparative Resistance of Naturally Occurring and Subcultured Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Carson, L. A.; Favero, M. S.; Bond, W. W.; Petersen, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in pure culture from the reservoir of a hospital mist therapy unit by an extinction-dilution technique; its natural distilled water environment was used as a growth and maintenance medium. After a single subculture on Trypticase soy agar, the strain showed a marked decrease in resistance to inactivation by acetic acid, glutaraldehyde, chlorine dioxide, and a quaternary ammonium compound when compared with naturally occurring cells grown in mist therapy unit water. The following factors were observed to affect the relative resistances of naturally occurring and subcultured cells of the P. aeruginosa strain: (i) temperature at which the cultures were incubated prior to exposure to disinfectants, (ii) growth phase of the cultures at the time of exposure to disinfectants, (iii) nature of the suspending menstruum for disinfectants, and (iv) exposure to fluorescent light during incubation of inocula prior to testing. The applied significance of these findings may alter the present concepts of disinfectant testing as well as routine control procedures in the hospital environment. PMID:4624209

  6. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  7. High level of resistance to aztreonam and ticarcillin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from soil of different crops in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in water, soil, plants and, human and animal fecal samples. It is an important nosocomial pathogenic agent characterized by an intrinsic resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and the ability to develop high-level (acquired) multidrug resistance through some mechanisms, among them, by the acquisition of plasmids and integrons, which are mobile genetic elements. In this study, 40 isolates from Brazilian soil were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of integrons and plasmidial profile. The results demonstrated that the vast majority of the isolates have shown resistance for aztreonam (92.5%, n=37) and ticarcillin (85%, n=34), four isolates presented plasmids and eight isolates possess the class 1 integron. These results demonstrated that environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa possess surprising antibiotic resistance profile to aztreonam and ticarcillin, two antimicrobial agents for clinical treatment of cystic fibrosis patients and other infections occurred by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Overexpression of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Ping; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Fang, Ya-Ping; Shen, Ji-Lu

    2016-08-01

    Efflux pump systems are one of the most important mechanisms conferring multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM efflux pump is one of the largest multi-drug resistant efflux pumps with high-level expression, which is controlled by regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. This study investigated the role of efflux pump MexAB-OprM in 75 strains of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and evaluated the influence of point mutation of the regulatory genes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem and meropenem, with or without MC207110, an efflux pump inhibitor, were determined by agar dilution method to select the positive strains for an overexpressed active efflux pump. Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were used for the detection of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamases, respectively. The gene mexA, responsible for the fusion protein structure, and the reference gene rpoD of the MexAB-OprM pump were amplified by real-time PCR. The quantity of relative mRNA expression was determined simultaneously. By PCR method, the efflux regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD and outer membrane protein OprD2 were amplified for the strains showing overexpression of MexAB-OprM and subsequently analyzed by BLAST. Among the 75 P. aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of efflux pump-positive phenotype was 17.3 % (13/75). Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were all negative in the 13 strains. PCR assay results showed that ten strains overexpressed the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and were all positive for the regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. Sequence analysis indicated that of the ten isolates, nine had a mutation (Gly → Glu) at 71st amino acid position in NalC, and eight also had a mutation (Ser → Arg) at 209th position in NalC. Only one strain had a mutation (Thr → Ile) at the 158th amino acid position in NalD, whereas eight isolates had mutations in MexR. In conclusion, overexpression of efflux pump MexAB-OprM plays an important role in

  9. Superbugs in the coming new decade; multidrug resistance and prospects for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Patrice; Naas, Thierry; Fortineau, Nicolas; Poirel, Laurent

    2007-10-01

    New resistance problems have emerged recently among hospital and community-acquired pathogens such as in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hospital-acquired and now community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus are emerging worldwide whereas vancomycin-resistant S. aureus remain extremely rare. Hospital-acquired outbreaks of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are increasingly reported worldwide. Whereas novel molecules are being developed for treating Gram-positive infections, difficult to non possible-to-treat pandrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections may become a therapeutic challenge soon.

  10. Exposure to ertapenem is possibly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M J; Block, C S; Moses, A E; Nir-Paz, R

    2014-03-01

    The role of antibiotic exposure in the evolution and emergence of resistance is challenging to assess. We used carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) phenotypes to assess possible factors that are associated with the occurrence and prognosis of such a phenotype and to examine the possible contribution of antibiotic exposure to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. We conducted a nested case-control study. Cases were defined as patients from whom carbapenem-resistant ureidopenicillin-sensitive PA (CRUS-PA) was isolated; matched controls were PA patients who did not have isolation of CRUS-PA. We analysed potential predictors of CRUS-PA isolation and assessed their clinical significance (mortality and eventual isolation of pan-resistant PA), taking into account antibiotic exposures. We matched 800 case-control pairs. Case patients were more likely to have been exposed to anti-PA carbapenems (OR = 6.9; 95% CI, 2.5-18.6). This finding did not apply to the administration of other antibiotics. The mortality among CRUS-PA patients was similar to that of the controls (HR, 0.8 95%; CI, 0.6-1.1). Subsequent isolation of pan-resistant PA was more frequent among case patients compared with non-pan-resistant controls (p-value <0.05). Among cases, the risk of eventual pan-resistant PA isolation was increased in ertapenem recipients, only after and not prior to the index specimen date (HR, 1.9, 95%; CI, 1.01-3.4). Therefore we suggest that the CRUS-PA phenotype may represent pan beta-lactam resistance and that antibiotic exposure is associated with evolution of PA resistance phenotypes. We demonstrate a novel association of ertapenem with sequentially appearing PA resistance patterns.

  11. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules. PMID:26751736

  12. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-11

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules.

  13. Tobramycin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells growing as a biofilm on urinary catheter material.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J C; Ruseska, I; Wright, J B; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    When disks of urinary catheter material were exposed to the flow of artificial urine containing cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a thick adherent biofilm, composed of these bacteria and of their exopolysaccharide products, developed on the latex surface within 8 h. After this colonization, sterile artificial urine containing 1,000 micrograms of tobramycin per ml was flowed past this established biofilm, and a significant proportion of the bacterial cells within the biofilm were found to be still viable after 12 h of exposure to this very high concentration of aminoglycoside antibiotic. Planktonic (floating) cells taken from the test system just before the exposure of the biofilm to the antibiotic were completely killed by 50 micrograms of tobramycin per ml. The MIC of tobramycin for cells taken from the seeding cultures before colonization of the catheter material, and for surviving cells recovered directly from the tobramycin-treated biofilm, was found to be 0.4 micrograms/ml when dispersed cells were assayed by standard methods. These data indicate that growth within thick adherent biofilms confers a measure of tobramycin resistance on cells of P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:3923925

  14. Biofilm formation abilities and disinfectant-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-06-01

    Forty-five strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals were investigated with regard to their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to various disinfectants in various cellular states. The hydrophobicity value varied among the test strains from 0.001 to 0.241, and the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) was 0.101 +/- 0.074. The relative viscosity of the extracellular product was measured. All test strains produced a mucous substance, and the value was 1.05-1.30 (mean +/- SD: 1.11 +/- 0.06), showing that all test strains had a biofilm-forming ability. Bactericidal experiments were performed using 6 disinfectants: ethanol, Hibitane, Isojin, Osvan, Tego 51, and Welpas. When bacteria in suspension were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (suspension test), 5 of the 6 disinfectants excluding Tego 51 completely killed all test strains, showing high bactericidal effects. In contrast, when adherent bacteria were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (adhesion test), the killing rate by Welpas was 100%, but those by Isojin and ethanol were lower (88.9 and 60.0%, respectively), that by Osvan was only 4.4%, and no bacteria were killed by Hibitane or Tego 51. These findings showed that the bactericidal effects markedly decreased in the case of adherent P. aeruginosa.

  15. Functional Characterization of Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-acyl-carrier Protein Reductase (FabV) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Lin, Jin-Shui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR), FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholerae fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore the fabV mutant strain to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity. PMID:27965638

  16. In vivo challenging of polymyxins and levofloxacin eye drop against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kazuki; Miyake, Taku; Koike, Naohito; Hattori, Takaaki; Kumakura, Shigeto; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Koji; Kuroda, Masahiko; Ito, Norihiko; Goto, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish a rabbit multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) keratitis model, and test the efficacy of levofloxacin, colistin methanesulfate (CL-M), colistin sulfate (CL-S) and polymyxin B (PL-B) against MDRP infection. In a rabbit eye, making a 2-mm circular corneal excision, and MDRP strain #601 or representative P. aeruginosa strain IID1210 were instilled into the corneal concavity. IID1210 was used to confirm this model developed P. aeruginosa keratitis. After MDRP keratitis developed, we treated the eyes with levofloxacin, CL-M, CL-S or PL-B eye drops. The infected eyes were evaluated by clinical score, histopathological examination and viable bacterial count (CFU). Rabbits developed MDRP keratitis reproducibly after instilled the bacteria into the corneal lesion. MDRP produced severe keratitis similarly with IID1210, as shown by slit lamp examination and clinical score. In MDRP keratitis models, clinical scores and viable bacterial counts were significantly lower in levofloxacin- and CL-M-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group, but the magnitudes of reduction were not remarkable. However, clinical scores were dramatically lowered in CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group. CL-S- and PL-B-treated group were kept corneal translucency and little influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in histopathological examination. In addition, both CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups were not detected viable bacteria in infected cornea. Using our MDRP keratitis model, we showed that topical levofloxacin and CL-M are not adequately effective, while CL-S and PL-B are efficacious in controlling MDRP keratitis. Especially, PL-B, which is commercially available eye drop, might be most effective against MDRP.

  17. Targeting bacterial adherence inhibits multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Huebinger, Ryan M.; Stones, Daniel H.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Carlson, Deborah L.; Song, Juquan; Vaz, Diana Pereira; Keen, Emma; Wolf, Steven E.; Orth, Kim; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Classical antimicrobial drugs target proliferation and therefore place microbes under extreme selective pressure to evolve resistance. Alternative drugs that target bacterial virulence without impacting survival directly offer an attractive solution to this problem, but to date few such molecules have been discovered. We previously discovered a widespread group of bacterial adhesins, termed Multivalent Adhesion Molecules (MAMs) that are essential for initial binding of bacteria to host tissues and virulence. Thus, targeting MAM-based adherence is a promising strategy for displacing pathogens from host tissues and inhibiting infection. Here, we show that topical application of polymeric microbeads functionalized with the adhesin MAM7 to a burn infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantially decreased bacterial loads in the wound and prevented the spread of the infection into adjacent tissues. As a consequence, the application of this adhesion inhibitor allowed for vascularization and wound healing, and maintained local and systemic inflammatory responses to the burn. We propose that MAM7-functionalized microbeads can be used as a topical treatment, to reduce bacterial attachment and hence prevent bacterial colonization and infection of wounds. As adhesion is not required for microbial survival, this anti-infective strategy has the potential to treat multidrug-resistant infections and limit the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:27996032

  18. Ultrastructural Alterations Associated with the Growth of Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Presence of Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Hans-Peter; Geftic, Sam G.; Gelzer, Justus; Heymann, Hans; Adair, Frank W.

    1973-01-01

    Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to benzalkonium chloride (BC) underwent unique ultrastructural reorganizations when they were grown in the presence of 1 mg of BC/ml. The resistant cells usually contained a single, centrally positioned pseudovacuole. The pseudovacuole was surrounded by a diffuse substance that spread irregularly throughout the cytoplasm. The presence of the pseudovacuole seemed to cause a physical compartmentalization of the cytoplasm into random pockets of ribosomes and nuclear material. Contained within the pseudovacuole was a horseshoe-shaped, electron-dense body which was bounded by a trilaminar membrane 5.2 nm in width. These bodies averaged 77 nm when measured through the long axis. The surfaces of resistant cells were covered by an additional layer not found in sensitive cells. Thin sections of sensitive cells which had been treated with 1 mg of BC/ml showed little or no lysis. The cytoplasm appeared to be deeply stained and coagulated. Ribosomes were no longer distinctly visible. Although the cell wall remained intact, the cell membrane was dissolved and fragmented. BC-grown resistant cells could not be successfully stained by standard techniques; however, details were demonstrated with the aid of a combination of 1.5% glutaraldehyde, 1% osmium tetroxide, and 1% phosphotungstic acid prepared in 0.1 m sodium dimethylarsonate buffer (pH 6.8). Images PMID:4120070

  19. RT-PCR detection of exotoxin genes expression in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tartor, Y H; El-Naenaeey, E Y

    2016-01-22

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for causing a wide variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. These infections are very hard to eradicate because of the expression of numerous virulence factors and the intrinsic resistance against antibiotics. Herein, this study analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility of PA isolated from broiler chickens and cattle as well as expression of five significant exotoxin genes (exoU, exoS, toxA, lasB, and phzM) and ecfX as internal control. Genomic DNA was amplified employing oprL gene for species specific detection of PA. The highest resistance was found to ampicillin, erythromycin, followed by, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, intermediately sensitive to ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and highly sensitive to gentamicin, levofloxacin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and colistin. It appears that exoU+ and increased resistance to SXT may be co-selected traits. Vast majority of PA isolates expressed exoS (78.6%), exoU (71.4%) and both in more virulent strains. The ubiquity of toxA, lasB, exoU and exoS among PA clinical isolates is consistent with an important role for these virulence factors in chicken respiratory diseases and cattle mastitis that can be highlighted as potential therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by heterogeneous and resistant PA strains.

  20. Screening of antibiotics resistance to Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii by an advanced expert system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2005-12-01

    The VITEK2 advanced expert system (AES) gives information about the antibiotics-resistance mechanisms based on the biological validation derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result. In this study, we investigated whether or not this system correctly categorized the beta-lactamase resistance mechanism data derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result using the testing card, AST-N025, with Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We used 131 strains, and their phenotypes were determined according to the biological and genetic screening. The AES analysis result matched the phenotype testing in 120 (91.6%) of the 131 strains. Incorrect findings were found in six strains, including three strains of Serratia marcescens. The resistance mechanism could not be determined in five strains, including three strains of Providencia rettgeri. The analysis of those phenotypes agreed in 34 (97.1%) among 35 strains with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and in 27 (96.4%) among 28 strains with high-level cephalosporinase. The agreement ratio in the phenotype was very high as we expected. The incorrect and nondeterminable samples were strains with relatively high cephalosporinase that has variation of outer membrane protein. The AES was able to detect the phenotype for carbapenemase. The AES is a clinically useful system that allows taking prompt measures to treat patients because it can provide information about the resistance mechanism in less than half a day after starting the analysis.

  1. Carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible: a worrisome phenotype among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campana, Eloiza Helena; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Petrolini, Fernanda Villas-Boas; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Araujo, Maria Rita Elmor de; Gales, Ana Cristina

    The mechanisms involved in the uncommon resistance phenotype, carbapenem resistance and broad-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility, were investigated in 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that exhibited this phenotype, which were recovered from three different hospitals located in São Paulo, Brazil. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by CLSI broth microdilution. β-lactamase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Carbapenem hydrolysis activity was investigated by spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF assays. The mRNA transcription level of oprD was assessed by qRT-PCR and the outer membrane proteins profile was evaluated by SDS-PAGE. Genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by PFGE. Carbapenems hydrolysis was not detected by carbapenemase assay in the carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible P. aueruginosa clinical isolates. OprD decreased expression was observed in all P. aeruginosa isolates by qRT-PCR. The outer membrane protein profile by SDS-PAGE suggested a change in the expression of the 46kDa porin that could correspond to OprD porin. The isolates were clustered into 17 genotypes without predominance of a specific PFGE pattern. These results emphasize the involvement of multiple chromosomal mechanisms in carbapenem-resistance among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, alert for adaptation of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates under antimicrobial selective pressure and make aware of the emergence of an uncommon phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  2. Temporal variation in antibiotic environments slows down resistance evolution in pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Roemhild, Roderich; Barbosa, Camilo; Beardmore, Robert E; Jansen, Gunther; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern to public health. New treatment strategies may alleviate the situation by slowing down the evolution of resistance. Here, we evaluated sequential treatment protocols using two fully independent laboratory-controlled evolution experiments with the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 and two pairs of clinically relevant antibiotics (doripenem/ciprofloxacin and cefsulodin/gentamicin). Our results consistently show that the sequential application of two antibiotics decelerates resistance evolution relative to monotherapy. Sequential treatment enhanced population extinction although we applied antibiotics at sublethal dosage. In both experiments, we identified an order effect of the antibiotics used in the sequential protocol, leading to significant variation in the long-term efficacy of the tested protocols. These variations appear to be caused by asymmetric evolutionary constraints, whereby adaptation to one drug slowed down adaptation to the other drug, but not vice versa. An understanding of such asymmetric constraints may help future development of evolutionary robust treatments against infectious disease. PMID:26640520

  3. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  4. Enzymatic quorum quenching increases antibiotic susceptibility of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, S; Sharma, P; Harjai, K; Capalash, N

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing emergence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) strains and drug resistance is positively-correlated with biofilm-forming ability. Since about 10% of P. aeruginosa genome is controlled by quorum sensing (QS), alteration in its antibiotic susceptibility by targeting QS was the focus of the present study. Materials and Methods One day biofilms of PAO1 and three urinary tract infection MDRPA isolates (PA2, PA8 and PA18) were formed in 96-well microtiter plate. Biofilms were exposed to concentration gradient of ciprofloxacin and gentamicin to obtain Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) by direct enumeration method. Susceptibility of 24 h biofilms was evaluated by treatment with ciprofloxacin and gentamicin per se and in combination with lactonase. The effect was also examined on 72 h biofilms by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results Lactonase treatment did not have any effect on growth of the selected strains but 73.42, 69.1, 77.34 and 72.5% reduction of biofilm was observed after lactonase (1 unit) treatment, respectively. Antibiotics in combination with lactonase (0.3 units) resulted in an increased susceptibility of the biofilm forms by>3.3, 4, 5 and 1.5 folds of MBEC, for ciprofloxacin and>6.67, 12.5, 6 and>2.5 folds, for gentamicin respectively, which could be due to the disruption of biofilm by lactonase treatment as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Also there was significant reduction (p<0.001) in virulence factor production by the strains. Conclusion Lactonase treatment increased antibiotic susceptibility of the biofilms of MDRPA isolates underscoring the potential of quorum quenching in antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:22347576

  5. Streptomycin Accumulation in Susceptible and Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L. E.; Elzen, H. M. Van Den

    1976-01-01

    Streptomycin accumulation by susceptible strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to be prevented or inhibited by inhibitors of electron transport, sulfhydryl groups and protein synthesis, and agents that uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Streptomycin is recovered from cells in an unchanged form and is intracellularly concentrated above extracellular concentrations. Accumulation kinetics are multiphasic; an initial phase which cannot be prevented by the above inhibitors is unable to cause inhibition of cell growth or loss of cell viability. Prevention of further phases of uptake does prevent these events. Inhibitor-susceptible accumulation is time dependent and begins almost immediately upon exposure of cells to streptomycin. Streptomycin accumulation remains energy dependent even when cells are losing acid-soluble [3H]adenine, presumably through loss of permeability control. These results demonstrate that streptomycin accumulation necessary for inhibition of cell growth or cell death requires energy and is not a process of diffusion or secondary to membrane leakage. Streptomycin accumulation in ribosomally resistant mutants of E. coli and P. aeruginosa is similar in that both energy-independent and energy-dependent accumulation can be demonstrated. The total energy-dependent accumulation is, however, significantly lower than that in streptomycin-susceptible cells due to the absence of an additional energy-dependent phase of accumulation, which seems dependent on ribosomal binding of streptomycin. Ribosomally resistant strains can be shown to concentrate streptomycin accumulated by the energy-dependent process above the external concentration in nutrient broth but not in Trypticase soy broth. The energy-dependent accumulation can be saturated in the Strr strain of E. coli in nutrient broth, implying limited accumulation sites. PMID:820248

  6. Persistent Bacteremia from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with In Vitro Resistance to the Novel Antibiotics Ceftolozane-Tazobactam and Ceftazidime-Avibactam

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Patricia; Stewart, Cynthia; Miljkovic, Goran; Saul, Zane K.

    2016-01-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam are new antimicrobials with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present the first case of persistent P. aeruginosa bacteremia with in vitro resistance to these novel antimicrobials. A 68-year-old man with newly diagnosed follicular lymphoma was admitted to the medical intensive care unit for sepsis and right lower extremity cellulitis. The patient was placed empirically on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Blood cultures from Day 1 of hospitalization grew P. aeruginosa susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and cefepime identified using VITEK 2 (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS). Repeat blood cultures from Day 5 grew P. aeruginosa resistant to all cephalosporins, as well as to meropenem by Day 10. Susceptibility testing performed by measuring minimum inhibitory concentration by E-test (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS) revealed that blood cultures from Day 10 were resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam. The Verigene Blood Culture-Gram-Negative (BC-GN) microarray-based assay (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL) was used to investigate underlying resistance mechanism in the P. aeruginosa isolate but CTX-M, KPC, NDM, VIM, IMP, and OXA gene were not detected. This case report highlights the well-documented phenomenon of antimicrobial resistance development in P. aeruginosa even during the course of appropriate antibiotic therapy. In the era of increasing multidrug-resistant organisms, routine susceptibility testing of P. aeruginosa to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam is warranted. Emerging resistance mechanisms to these novel antibiotics need to be further investigated. PMID:27818808

  7. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Resistance and Fitness under Low and High Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Navas, Alfonso; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major cause of nosocomial and chronic infections, is considered a paradigm of antimicrobial resistance development. However, the evolutionary trajectories of antimicrobial resistance and the impact of mutator phenotypes remain mostly unexplored. Therefore, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed in lineages of wild-type and mutator (ΔmutS) strains exposed to increasing concentrations of relevant antipseudomonal agents. WGS provided a privileged perspective of the dramatic effect of mutator phenotypes on the accumulation of random mutations, most of which were transitions, as expected. Moreover, a frameshift mutagenic signature, consistent with error-prone DNA polymerase activity as a consequence of SOS system induction, was also seen. This effect was evidenced for all antibiotics tested, but it was higher for fluoroquinolones than for cephalosporins or carbapenems. Analysis of genotype versus phenotype confirmed expected resistance evolution trajectories but also revealed new pathways. Classical mechanisms included multiple mutations leading to AmpC overexpression (ceftazidime), quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations (ciprofloxacin), oprD inactivation (meropenem), and efflux pump overexpression (ciprofloxacin and meropenem). Groundbreaking findings included gain-of-function mutations leading to the structural modification of AmpC (ceftazidime), novel DNA gyrase (GyrA) modification (ciprofloxacin), and the alteration of the β-lactam binding site of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) (meropenem). A further striking finding was seen in the evolution of meropenem resistance, selecting for specific extremely large (>250 kb) genomic deletions providing a growth advantage in the presence of the antibiotic. Finally, fitness and virulence varied within and across evolved antibiotic-resistant populations, but mutator lineages showed a lower biological cost for some antibiotics. PMID:26729493

  8. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Resistance and Fitness under Low and High Mutation Rates.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Gabriel; Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Navas, Alfonso; Blázquez, Jesús; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-01-04

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major cause of nosocomial and chronic infections, is considered a paradigm of antimicrobial resistance development. However, the evolutionary trajectories of antimicrobial resistance and the impact of mutator phenotypes remain mostly unexplored. Therefore, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed in lineages of wild-type and mutator (ΔmutS) strains exposed to increasing concentrations of relevant antipseudomonal agents. WGS provided a privileged perspective of the dramatic effect of mutator phenotypes on the accumulation of random mutations, most of which were transitions, as expected. Moreover, a frameshift mutagenic signature, consistent with error-prone DNA polymerase activity as a consequence of SOS system induction, was also seen. This effect was evidenced for all antibiotics tested, but it was higher for fluoroquinolones than for cephalosporins or carbapenems. Analysis of genotype versus phenotype confirmed expected resistance evolution trajectories but also revealed new pathways. Classical mechanisms included multiple mutations leading to AmpC overexpression (ceftazidime), quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations (ciprofloxacin), oprD inactivation (meropenem), and efflux pump overexpression (ciprofloxacin and meropenem). Groundbreaking findings included gain-of-function mutations leading to the structural modification of AmpC (ceftazidime), novel DNA gyrase (GyrA) modification (ciprofloxacin), and the alteration of the β-lactam binding site of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) (meropenem). A further striking finding was seen in the evolution of meropenem resistance, selecting for specific extremely large (>250 kb) genomic deletions providing a growth advantage in the presence of the antibiotic. Finally, fitness and virulence varied within and across evolved antibiotic-resistant populations, but mutator lineages showed a lower biological cost for some antibiotics.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies.

  10. Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis and its effective treatment with topical colistimethate

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Agrawal, Deepshikha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical outcome in multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) bacterial keratitis and report the successful use of an alternative antibiotic, topical colistimethate in some of them. The medical records of 12 culture-proven MDR-PA keratitis patients, all exhibiting in vitro resistance by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method to ≥ three classes of routinely used topical antibiotics were reviewed. Eight patients were treated with 0.3% ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin, 1 patient with 5% imipenem/cilastatin and 3 patients with 1.6% colistimethate. The outcomes in 8 eyes treated with only fluoroquinolones were evisceration in 4 eyes, therapeutic corneal graft in 1 eye, phthisis bulbi in 1 eye, and no improvement in 2 eyes. The eye treated with imipenem/cilastin required a therapeutic corneal graft. All the three eyes treated with 1.6% colistimethate healed. Colistimethate may prove to be an effective alternative antibiotic in the treatment of MDR-PA keratitis. PMID:27050354

  11. Determinants for persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitals: interplay between resistance, virulence and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, S J; Mutters, N T; DeRosa, A; Ewers, C; Frank, U; Günther, F

    2017-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) is one of the major bacterial pathogens causing nosocomial infections. During the past few decades, multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) lineages of Pa have emerged in hospital settings with increasing numbers. However, it remains unclear which determinants of Pa facilitated this spread. A total of 211 clinical XDR and 38 susceptible clinical Pa isolates (nonXDR), as well as 47 environmental isolates (EI), were collected at the Heidelberg University Hospital. We used RAPD PCR to identify genetic clusters. Carriage of carbapenamases (CPM) and virulence genes were analyzed by PCR, biofilm formation capacity was assessed, in vitro fitness was evaluated using competitive growth assays, and interaction with the host's immune system was analyzed using serum killing and neutrophil killing assays. XDR isolates showed significantly elevated biofilm formation (p < 0.05) and higher competitive fitness compared to nonXDR and EI isolates. Thirty percent (62/205) of the XDR isolates carried a CPM. Similarities in distribution of virulence factors, as well as biofilm formation properties, between CPM+ Pa isolates and EI and between CPM- and nonXDR isolates were detected. Molecular typing revealed two distinct genetic clusters within the XDR population, which were characterized by even higher biofilm formation. In contrast, XDR isolates were more susceptible to the immune response than nonXDR isolates. Our study provides evidence that the ability to form biofilms is an outstanding determinant for persistence and endemic spread of Pa in the hospital setting.

  12. AmpG Inactivation Restores Susceptibility of Pan-β-Lactam-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Laura; Reeve, Thomas M.; Juan, Carlos; Moyá, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive AmpC hyperproduction is the most frequent mechanism of resistance to the weak AmpC inducers antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of the β-N-acetylglucosaminidase NagZ prevents and reverts this mechanism of resistance, which is caused by ampD and/or dacB (PBP4) mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we compared NagZ with a second candidate target, the AmpG permease for GlcNAc-1,6-anhydromuropeptides, for their ability to block AmpC expression pathways. Inactivation of nagZ or ampG fully restored the susceptibility and basal ampC expression of ampD or dacB laboratory mutants and impaired the emergence of one-step ceftazidime-resistant mutants in population analysis experiments. Nevertheless, only ampG inactivation fully blocked ampC induction, reducing the MICs of the potent AmpC inducer imipenem from 2 to 0.38 μg/ml. Moreover, through population analysis and characterization of laboratory mutants, we showed that ampG inactivation minimized the impact on resistance of the carbapenem porin OprD, reducing the MIC of imipenem for a PAO1 OprD mutant from >32 to 0.5 μg/ml. AmpG and NagZ targets were additionally evaluated in three clinical isolates that are pan-β-lactam resistant due to AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation, and overexpression of several efflux pumps. A marked increase in susceptibility to ceftazidime and piperacillin-tazobactam was observed in both cases, while only ampG inactivation fully restored wild-type imipenem susceptibility. Susceptibility to meropenem, cefepime, and aztreonam was also enhanced, although to a lower extent due to the high impact of efflux pumps on the activity of these antibiotics. Thus, our results suggest that development of small-molecule inhibitors of AmpG could provide an excellent strategy to overcome the relevant mechanisms of resistance (OprD inactivation plus AmpC induction) to imipenem, the only currently available β-lactam not

  13. Prevalence of resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a University Hospital in Northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna Diana; Sacha, Pawel Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Anna; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among twenty-five Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between 2002 and 2009. In PCR, following genes were detected: ant(2″)-Ia in 9 (36.0%), aac(6')-Ib in 7 (28.0%), qnrB in 5 (20.0%), aph(3″)-Ib in 2 (8.0%) of isolates.

  14. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  15. Correlation between Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds and Expression of Outer Membrane Protein OprR

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nagamune, Hideaki; Maeda, Takuya; Murakami, Keiji; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kourai, Hiroki

    2003-01-01

    The adaptation mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 10145 to quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) was investigated. A P. aeruginosa strain with adapted resistance to QACs was developed by a standard broth dilution method. It was revealed that P. aeruginosa exhibited remarkable resistance to N-dodecylpyridinium iodide (P-12), whose structure is similar to that of a common disinfectant, cetylpyridinium chloride. Adapted resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BAC), which is commonly used as a disinfectant, was also observed in P. aeruginosa. Moreover, the P-12-resistant strain exhibited cross-resistance to BAC. Analysis of the outer membrane protein of the P-12-resistant strain by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a significant increase in the level of expression of a protein (named OprR) whose molecular mass was approximately 26 kDa. The actual function of OprR is not yet clear; however, OprR was expected to be an outer membrane-associated protein with homology to lipoproteins of other bacterial species, according to a search of the National Center for Biotechnology Information website with the BLAST program by use of the N-terminal sequence of OprR. A correlation between the level of expression of OprR and the level of resistance of P. aeruginosa to QACs was observed by using a PA2800 gene knockout mutant derived from the P-12-resistant strain. The knockout mutant recovered susceptibility not only to P-12 but also to BAC. These results suggested that OprR significantly participated in the adaptation of P. aeruginosa to QACs, such as P-12 and BAC. PMID:12821452

  16. Alteration of some cellular function in amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfected macrophages: a time dependent approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; KarMahapatra, Santanu; Das, Sabyasachi; Roy, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the free radical generation and antioxidant enzymes status in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ARPA) treatment with different time interval. Methods Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 1×108 CFU/mL ARPA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and super oxide anion generation, NO generation, reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were analyzed. Results Super oxide anion generation and NO generation got peak at 12 h, indicating maximal free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during ARPA transfection. Reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of ARPA transfection. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 12 h in vitro ARPA transfection had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro ARPA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant system and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophage. PMID:23569818

  17. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  18. Mitophagy confers resistance to siderophore-mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Natalia V.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In the arms race of bacterial pathogenesis, bacteria produce an array of toxins and virulence factors that disrupt core host processes. Hosts mitigate the ensuing damage by responding with immune countermeasures. The iron-binding siderophore pyoverdin is a key virulence mediator of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its pathogenic mechanism has not been established. Here we demonstrate that pyoverdin enters Caenorhabditis elegans and that it is sufficient to mediate host killing. Moreover, we show that iron chelation disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and triggers mitophagy both in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Finally, we show that mitophagy provides protection both against the extracellular pathogen P. aeruginosa and to treatment with a xenobiotic chelator, phenanthroline, in C. elegans. Although autophagic machinery has been shown to target intracellular bacteria for degradation (a process known as xenophagy), our report establishes a role for authentic mitochondrial autophagy in the innate immune defense against P. aeruginosa. PMID:25624506

  19. Evaluate the Relationship Between Class 1 Integrons and Drug Resistance Genes in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Naeini, Niloofar Shoaee; Khaledi, Azad; Daymad, Seyede Fatemeh; Esmaeili, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates is increasing and it is considered as one of the major public health concerns in the world. The association between integrons and drug resistance has been proven and evidences suggest that integrons are coding and responsible for dissemination of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the relationship between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from burn patients. Methods: 100 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from burn patients hospitalized in the skin ward of Shahid Motahari hospital and susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer). Then DNA was extracted and PCR technique was performed for the detection of class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes. Then data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The most effective antibiotic was polymyxin B with sensitivity 100%, and the most resistance was observed to the ciprofloxacin (93%) and amikacin (67%), respectively. The maximum and lowest frequencies of drug resistance genes belonged to the aac (6 ') - 1, VEB-1 with prevalence rate 93% and 10%, respectively. The statistical Chi-square test did not find any significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes (p˃ 0.05). Conclusion: Although no significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance was observed, but the resistance rate to antibiotics tested among P. aeruginosa isolates was high. So, surveillance, optimization and strict consideration of antimicrobial use and control of infection are necessary. PMID:28077975

  20. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  1. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction. PMID:25713571

  2. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats.

  3. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  4. Prevalence of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JS; Arora, Sunil; Khanna, SP; Kumar, KVS Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The organism is classified into various phenotypes based on the drug resistance pattern, namely, drug-resistant (DR), multi-DR (MDR), extensively DR (XDR), and pan-DR (PDR). We aim to study the incidence of P. aeruginosa phenotypes in a tertiary level ICU. Materials and Methods: We conducted this prospective, observational study for 2 years (January 2014-December 2015) and collected appropriate clinical samples (blood, urine, wound discharge, etc.,) from all the patients admitted to ICU. We excluded patients with known septicemia and P. aeruginosa infection. Group 1 comprised a total 1915 patient samples and Group 2 comprised 100 active surveillance samples, collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods, and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We isolated 597 pathogenic bacteria out of 1915 specimens, giving a culture positivity rate of 31.2%. Klebsiella (43%), Acinetobacter (22%), and P. aeruginosa (15%) were the top three isolated bacteria. None of the surveillance samples grew P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance studies revealed that 47.7% of P. aeruginosa isolates were DR, 50% were MDR, and 2.3% were XDR phenotype. None of the strains showed PDR phenotype. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high prevalence of DR phenotypes of P. aeruginosa in the ICU. Judicious use of antibiotics and strict infection control measures are essential to reduce the prevalence of drug resistance. PMID:27942195

  5. Relationship of carbapenem restriction in 22 university teaching hospitals to carbapenem use and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pakyz, Amy L; Oinonen, Michael; Polk, Ronald E

    2009-05-01

    Many hospital antimicrobial stewardship programs restrict the availability of selected drugs by requiring prior approval. Carbapenems may be among the restricted drugs, but it is unclear if hospitals that restrict availability actually use fewer carbapenems than hospitals that do not restrict use. Nor is it clear if restriction is related to resistance. We evaluated the relationship between carbapenem restriction and the volume of carbapenem use and both the incidence rate and proportion of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 2002 through 2006 in a retrospective, longitudinal, multicenter analysis among a consortium of academic health centers. Carbapenem use was measured from billing records as days of therapy per 1,000 patient days. Hospital antibiograms were used to determine both the incidence rate and proportion of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. A survey inquired about restriction policies for antibiotics, including carbapenems. General linear mixed models were used to examine study outcomes. Among 22 hospitals with sufficient data for analysis, overall carbapenem use increased significantly over the 5 years of study (P < 0.0001), although overall carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa did not change. Hospitals that restricted carbapenems (n = 8; 36%) used significantly fewer carbapenems (P = 0.04) and reported lower incidence rates of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (P = 0.01) for all study years. Fluoroquinolone use was a potential confounder of these relationships, but hospitals that restricted carbapenems actually used fewer fluoroquinolones than those that did not. Restriction of carbapenems is associated with both lower use and lower incidence rates of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa.

  6. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Agents for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lomovskaya, Olga; Warren, Mark S.; Lee, Angela; Galazzo, Jorge; Fronko, Richard; Lee, May; Blais, Johanne; Cho, Deidre; Chamberland, Suzanne; Renau, Tom; Leger, Roger; Hecker, Scott; Watkins, Will; Hoshino, Kazuki; Ishida, Hiroko; Lee, Ving J.

    2001-01-01

    Whole-cell assays were implemented to search for efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) of the three multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN) that contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Secondary assays were developed to identify lead compounds with exquisite activities as inhibitors. A broad-spectrum EPI which is active against all three known Mex efflux pumps from P. aeruginosa and their close Escherichia coli efflux pump homolog (AcrAB-TolC) was discovered. When this compound, MC-207,110, was used, the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones was decreased significantly (eightfold for levofloxacin). Acquired resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps was also decreased (32- to 64-fold reduction in the MIC of levofloxacin). Similarly, 32- to 64-fold reductions in MICs in the presence of MC-207,110 were observed for strains with overexpressed efflux pumps and various target mutations that confer resistance to levofloxacin (e.g., gyrA and parC). We also compared the frequencies of emergence of levofloxacin-resistant variants in the wild-type strain at four times the MIC of levofloxacin (1 μg/ml) when it was used either alone or in combination with EPI. In the case of levofloxacin alone, the frequency was ∼10−7 CFU/ml. In contrast, with an EPI, the frequency was below the level of detection (<10−11). In summary, we have demonstrated that inhibition of efflux pumps (i) decreased the level of intrinsic resistance significantly, (ii) reversed acquired resistance, and (iii) resulted in a decreased frequency of emergence of P. aeruginosa strains that are highly resistant to fluoroquinolones. PMID:11120952

  8. Identification of MupP as a New Peptidoglycan Recycling Factor and Antibiotic Resistance Determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fumeaux, Coralie; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2017-03-28

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential cross-linked polymer that surrounds most bacterial cells to prevent osmotic rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane. Its synthesis relies on penicillin-binding proteins, the targets of beta-lactam antibiotics. Many Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are resistant to beta-lactams because of a chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase called AmpC. In P. aeruginosa, expression of the ampC gene is tightly regulated and its induction is linked to cell wall stress. We reasoned that a reporter gene fusion to the ampC promoter would allow us to identify mutants defective in maintaining cell wall homeostasis and thereby uncover new factors involved in the process. A library of transposon-mutagenized P. aeruginosa was therefore screened for mutants with elevated ampC promoter activity. As an indication that the screen was working as expected, mutants with transposons disrupting the dacB gene were isolated. Defects in DacB have previously been implicated in ampC induction and clinical resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The screen also uncovered murU and PA3172 mutants that, upon further characterization, displayed nearly identical drug resistance and sensitivity profiles. We present genetic evidence that PA3172, renamed mupP, encodes the missing phosphatase predicted to function in the MurU PG recycling pathway that is widely distributed among Gram-negative bacteria.IMPORTANCE The cell wall biogenesis pathway is the target of many of our best antibiotics, including penicillin and related beta-lactam drugs. Resistance to these therapies is on the rise, particularly among Gram-negative species like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a problematic opportunistic pathogen. To better understand how these organisms resist cell wall-targeting antibiotics, we screened for P. aeruginosa mutants defective in maintaining cell wall homeostasis. The screen identified a new factor, called MupP, involved in the recycling

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    PubMed

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7) and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga) enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months), were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  10. Short Synthetic β-Sheet Antimicrobial Peptides for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guansheng; Cheng, Junchi; Liang, Zhen Chang; Xu, Liang; Lou, Weiyang; Bao, Chang; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Dong, Huihui; Yang, Yi Yan; Fan, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often implicated in burn wound infections; its inherent drug resistance often renders these infections extremely challenging to treat. This is further compounded by the problem of emerging drug resistance and the dearth of novel antimicrobial drug discovery in recent years. In the perennial search for effective antimicrobial compounds, the authors identify short synthetic β-sheet folding peptides, IRIKIRIK (IK8L), IRIkIrIK (IK8-2D), and irikirik (IK8D) as prime candidates owing to their high potency against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the peptides are first assayed against 20 clinically isolated multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains in comparison with the conventional antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime, and IK8L is demonstrated to be the most effective. IK8L also exhibits superior antibacterial killing kinetics compared to imipenem and ceftazidime. From transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and protein release analyses, IK8L shows membrane-lytic antimicrobial mechanism. Repeated use of IK8L does not induce drug resistance, while the bacteria develop resistance against the antibiotics after several times of treatment at sublethal doses. Analysis of mouse blood serum chemistry reveals that peptide does not induce systemic toxicity. The potential utility of IK8L in the in vivo treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected burn wounds is further demonstrated in a mouse model.

  11. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  13. Cyclic Rhamnosylated Elongation Factor P Establishes Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rajkovic, Andrei; Erickson, Sarah; Witzky, Anne; Branson, Owen E.; Seo, Jin; Gafken, Philip R.; Frietas, Michael A.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Navarre, William; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elongation factor P (EF-P) is a ubiquitous bacterial protein that is required for the synthesis of poly-proline motifs during translation. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the posttranslational β-lysylation of Lys34 by the PoxA protein is critical for EF-P activity. PoxA is absent from many bacterial species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, prompting a search for alternative EF-P posttranslation modification pathways. Structural analyses of P. aeruginosa EF-P revealed the attachment of a single cyclic rhamnose moiety to an Arg residue at a position equivalent to that at which β-Lys is attached to E. coli EF-P. Analysis of the genomes of organisms that both lack poxA and encode an Arg32-containing EF-P revealed a highly conserved glycosyltransferase (EarP) encoded at a position adjacent to efp. EF-P proteins isolated from P. aeruginosa ΔearP, or from a ΔrmlC::acc1 strain deficient in dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis, were unmodified. In vitro assays confirmed the ability of EarP to use dTDP-l-rhamnose as a substrate for the posttranslational glycosylation of EF-P. The role of rhamnosylated EF-P in translational control was investigated in P. aeruginosa using a Pro4-green fluorescent protein (Pro4GFP) in vivo reporter assay, and the fluorescence was significantly reduced in Δefp, ΔearP, and ΔrmlC::acc1 strains. ΔrmlC::acc1, ΔearP, and Δefp strains also displayed significant increases in their sensitivities to a range of antibiotics, including ertapenem, polymyxin B, cefotaxim, and piperacillin. Taken together, our findings indicate that posttranslational rhamnosylation of EF-P plays a key role in P. aeruginosa gene expression and survival. PMID:26060278

  14. Type IV pilus glycosylation mediates resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to opsonic activities of the pulmonary surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rommel M; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Lee, Francis; Lee, Timothy; Lee, Ryan J; Lau, Gee W

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major bacterial pathogen commonly associated with chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). Previously, we have demonstrated that the type IV pilus (Tfp) of P. aeruginosa mediates resistance to antibacterial effects of pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A). Interestingly, P. aeruginosa strains with group I pilins are O-glycosylated through the TfpO glycosyltransferase with a single subunit of O-antigen (O-ag). Importantly, TfpO-mediated O-glycosylation is important for virulence in mouse lungs, exemplified by more frequent lung infection in CF with TfpO-expressing P. aeruginosa strains. However, the mechanism underlying the importance of Tfp glycosylation in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated one mechanism of increased fitness mediated by O-glycosylation of group 1 pilins on Tfp in the P. aeruginosa clinical isolate 1244. Using an acute pneumonia model in SP-A+/+ versus SP-A-/- mice, the O-glycosylation-deficient ΔtfpO mutant was found to be attenuated in lung infection. Both 1244 and ΔtfpO strains showed equal levels of susceptibility to SP-A-mediated membrane permeability. In contrast, the ΔtfpO mutant was more susceptible to opsonization by SP-A and by other pulmonary and circulating opsonins, SP-D and mannose binding lectin 2, respectively. Importantly, the increased susceptibility to phagocytosis was abrogated in the absence of opsonins. These results indicate that O-glycosylation of Tfp with O-ag specifically confers resistance to opsonization during host-mediated phagocytosis.

  15. Widespread of ESBL- and carbapenemase GES-type genes on carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates: a multicenter study in Mexican hospitals.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Catalan-Najera, Juan C; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Volkow, Patricia; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; González, Alejandra; Gaytan-Martinez, Jesus; Del Rocío Gónzalez-Martínez, Marisela; Vazquez-Farias, Maria; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes a prevalence of 36.2% of carbapenemases IMP-, VIM-, and GES-type on 124 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates. The ESBL GES-19 and carbapenemase GES-20 genes were the most prevalent (84.4%) β-lactamases among imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates in Mexico. These genes are chromosomal encoded on embedded class 1 integron arrays.

  16. Sequence Types 235, 111, and 132 Predominate among Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Izdebski, Radosław; Butic, Iva; Jelic, Marko; Abram, Maja; Koscak, Iva; Baraniak, Anna; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Gniadkowski, Marek; Tambic Andrasevic, Arjana

    2014-01-01

    A population analysis of 103 multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Croatian hospitals was performed. Twelve sequence types (STs) were identified, with a predominance of international clones ST235 (serotype O11 [41%]), ST111 (serotype O12 [15%]), and ST132 (serotype O6 [11%]). Overexpression of the natural AmpC cephalosporinase was common (42%), but only a few ST235 or ST111 isolates produced VIM-1 or VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases or PER-1 or GES-7 extended-spectrum β-lactamases. PMID:25070098

  17. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  18. Establishment and multi drug resistance evolution of ST235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in the intensive care unit of a Colombian hospital.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena; Pérez, Javier Escobar; Buelvas, Francisco; Tovar, Catalina; Vanegas, Natasha; Stokes, H W

    2014-12-01

    Drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a therapeutic challenge. To assess the diversity of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistant variants, isolates were recovered from hospital patients in Colombia. Thirty of 60 isolates contained class 1 integrons and five were of Sequence Type ST235 having appeared in a single intensive care unit. All five possessed an unusual integron but showed differences in gene cassette content and the presence/absence of insertion sequence IS26. This showed that differences can arise rapidly, even within a single ICU. Also, the emergence of IS26 in P. aeruginosa is contributing to the evolution of resistance in this bacterium.

  19. Comparative in vitro activities of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant gram-negative enteric bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Fass, R J

    1982-01-01

    Piperacillin was more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, moxalactam, or ceftriaxone against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures and against multidrug-resistant strains. Moxalactam and ceftriaxone were more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, or piperacillin against multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Synergy between beta-lactam antibiotics and tobramycin was frequently observed against strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures but not against multidrug-resistant organisms. Piperacillin plus tobramycin was the most active antibiotic combination against P. aeruginosa. Moxalactam plus tobramycin and ceftriaxone plus tobramycin were the most active antibiotic combinations against Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:6810755

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Increased Mutation Frequency Due to Inactivation of the DNA Oxidative Repair System▿

    PubMed Central

    Mandsberg, L. F.; Ciofu, O.; Kirkby, N.; Christiansen, L. E.; Poulsen, H. E.; Høiby, N.

    2009-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:19332676

  1. Genomic analyses of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 resequenced by single-molecule real-time sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Lu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    As a third-generation sequencing (TGS) method, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology provides long read length, and it is well suited for resequencing projects and de novo assembly. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 was characterized and resequenced using SMRT technology. PA1 was also subjected to genomic, comparative and pan-genomic analyses. The multidrug resistant strain PA1 possesses a 6,498,072 bp genome and a sequence type of ST-782. The genome of PA1 was also visualized, and the results revealed the details of general genome annotations, virulence factors, regulatory proteins (RPs), secretion system proteins, type II toxin–antitoxin (T–A) pairs and genomic islands. Whole genome comparison analysis suggested that PA1 exhibits similarity to other P. aeruginosa strains but differs in terms of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) regions, such as prophages and genomic islands. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that PA1 is closely related to PAO1, and P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into two main groups. The pan-genome of P. aeruginosa consists of a core genome of approximately 4,000 genes and an accessory genome of at least 6,600 genes. The present study presented a detailed, visualized and comparative analysis of the PA1 genome, to enhance our understanding of this notorious pathogen. PMID:27765811

  2. Nanoscale analysis of the effects of antibiotics and CX1 on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug-resistant strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, C.; Grare, M.; Jauvert, E.; Coutable, A.; Regnouf-de-Vains, J. B.; Mourer, M.; Duval, R. E.; Dague, E.

    2012-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge that can be addressed using nanotechnology. We focused on the resistance of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and investigated, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the behavior of a reference strain and of a multidrug resistant clinical strain, submitted to two antibiotics and to an innovative antibacterial drug (CX1). We measured the morphology, surface roughness and elasticity of the bacteria under physiological conditions and exposed to the antibacterial molecules. To go further in the molecules action mechanism, we explored the bacterial cell wall nanoscale organization using functionalized AFM tips. We have demonstrated that affected cells have a molecularly disorganized cell wall; surprisingly long molecules being pulled off from the cell wall by a lectin probe. Finally, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of CX1: it destroys the outer membrane of the bacteria as demonstrated by the results on artificial phospholipidic membranes and on the resistant strain.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Bradbury, Mark; Ostrikov, Kostya; Murphy, Anthony B

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med), with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min) may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine

    PubMed Central

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Bradbury, Mark; Ostrikov, Kostya; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med), with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min) may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP. PMID:26114428

  5. Identification of MupP as a New Peptidoglycan Recycling Factor and Antibiotic Resistance Determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fumeaux, Coralie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential cross-linked polymer that surrounds most bacterial cells to prevent osmotic rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane. Its synthesis relies on penicillin-binding proteins, the targets of beta-lactam antibiotics. Many Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are resistant to beta-lactams because of a chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase called AmpC. In P. aeruginosa, expression of the ampC gene is tightly regulated and its induction is linked to cell wall stress. We reasoned that a reporter gene fusion to the ampC promoter would allow us to identify mutants defective in maintaining cell wall homeostasis and thereby uncover new factors involved in the process. A library of transposon-mutagenized P. aeruginosa was therefore screened for mutants with elevated ampC promoter activity. As an indication that the screen was working as expected, mutants with transposons disrupting the dacB gene were isolated. Defects in DacB have previously been implicated in ampC induction and clinical resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The screen also uncovered murU and PA3172 mutants that, upon further characterization, displayed nearly identical drug resistance and sensitivity profiles. We present genetic evidence that PA3172, renamed mupP, encodes the missing phosphatase predicted to function in the MurU PG recycling pathway that is widely distributed among Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:28351916

  6. [Shall we report the carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains detected by BD Phoenix system?].

    PubMed

    Oğünç, Dilara; Ongüt, Gözde; Ozen, Nevgün Sepin; Baysan, Betil Ozhak; Günseren, Filiz; Dağlar, Duygu; Demirbakan, Hadiye; Gültekin, Meral

    2010-04-01

    Imipenem and meropenem are broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that are especially useful in the treatment of nosocomially acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. infections. Previous reports have noted that susceptibility tests could show false resistance to imipenem. For this reason, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all carbapenem resistant or intermediate resistant isolates should be tested with an additional method to verify the results. This study was aimed to evaluate the imipenem and meropenem susceptibilities by disk diffusion, E-test and broth microdilution in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains found to be resistant or intermediate to imipenem-meropenem by BD Phoenix automated susceptibility testing system. Between January 2006-January 2007, 85 non-duplicate isolates of A. baumannii and 51 non-duplicate isolates of P. aeruginosa which were determined as resistant or intermediate resistant to imipenem and/or meropenem by BD Phoenix automated identification and susceptibility system (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD, USA) were collected in Akdeniz University Hospital Central Laboratory. All strains were tested by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden), disk diffusion and reference broth microdilution (BMD) method following CLSI recommendations. All 51 isolates of P. aeruginosa determined as imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by BD Phoenix, were found to be imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by the reference BMD method. Minor error rates were same for all testing systems (1.9%) except for the meropenem results of BD Phoenix system (5.9%). No major errors were produced by any system. For A. baumannii, only one very major error was detected for meropenem by BD Phoenix system. Number of minor errors determined for meropenem by all testing systems compared to the reference test, ranged from 2 (2.4%) to 3 (3.5%). It was concluded that carbapenem susceptibility test

  7. Enhanced in vitro formation and antibiotic resistance of nonattached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates through incorporation of neutrophil products.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Silvia M; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Nichols, David P; Saavedra, Milene T; Bratton, Donna L; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Burns, Jane L; Nick, Jerry A

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Children with CF are routinely exposed to P. aeruginosa from the natural environment, and by adulthood, 80% of patients are chronically infected. P. aeruginosa in the CF airway exhibits a unique biofilm-like structure, where it grows in small clusters or aggregates of bacteria in association with abundant polymers of neutrophil-derived components F-actin and DNA, among other components. These aggregates differ substantially in size and appearance compared to surface-attached in vitro biofilm models classically utilized for studies but are believed to share properties of surface-attached biofilms, including antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about the formation and function of surface-independent modes of biofilm growth, how they might be eradicated, and quorum sensing communication. To address these issues, we developed a novel in vitro model of P. aeruginosa aggregates incorporating human neutrophil-derived products. Aggregates grown in vitro and those found in CF patients' sputum samples were morphologically similar; viable bacteria were distributed in small pockets throughout the aggregate. The lasA quorum sensing gene was differentially expressed in the presence of neutrophil products. Importantly, aggregates formed in the presence of neutrophils acquired resistance to tobramycin, which was lost when the aggregates were dispersed with DNase, and antagonism of tobramycin and azithromycin was observed. This novel yet simple in vitro system advances our ability to model infection of the CF airway and will be an important tool to study virulence and test alternative eradication strategies against P. aeruginosa.

  8. Proteomic analysis of the sarcosine-insoluble outer membrane fraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa responding to ampicilin, kanamycin, and tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuanxian; Xu, Changxin; Ren, Haixia; Lin, Xiangmin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Sanying

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial wound infections by antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains have increasing importance in hospitals. Outer membrane proteins of the bacterium have strong influence on its resistance to antibiotics. In the current study, a parallel proteomic approach was applied to analysis of sarcosine-insoluble outer membrane fraction of P. aeruginosa responding to ampicilin, kanamycin and tetracycline resistances. Eleven differential proteins with 15 spots were determined and then identified by MALDI-TOF/MS, in which four with increased OprF, MexA, OmpH, and decreased hypothetical protein (NCBI No. 15599856), six with increased OprF, OmpH, hypothetical protein (NCBI No. 15599183) and decreased OprG, MexA, conserved hypothetical protein (NCBI No. 15600371), and eight with increased OprF, MexA, OprL, probable Omp (NCBI No. 15599856), probable secretion protein (NCBI No. 15600167), OprD and decreased OprG, conserved hypothetical protein (NCBI No. 15600371) responded to ampicilin, kanamycin, and tetracycline resistances, respectively. With the exception of OprF, the other differential proteins did not show the same behaviors against the three antibiotic resistances. Compared with our previous report on E. coli Omps responding to ampicilin and tetracycline resistances, which was only a protein difference in quality between the two antibiotics, P. aeruginosa showed significant diversity against the three antibiotics. Our findings might provide valuable data for an understanding of antibiotic-resistant difference between different species of bacteria. Meanwhile, these proteins shared by different bacteria or a bacterium against different antibiotics may provide universal targets for the development of new drugs that control antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  9. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Buenos Aires hospital].

    PubMed

    Cejas, D; Almuzara, M; Santella, G; Tuduri, A; Palombarani, S; Figueroa, S; Gutkind, G; Radice, M

    2008-01-01

    From 129 P. aeruginosa isolated at a health care centre located in Buenos Aires (Hospital "Eva Perón"), 14% produced IMP-13. Although 18 isolates were metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) producers, only those isolates that displayed altered outer membrane protein profiles correlated with the resistant category according to CLSI or even Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos, SADEBAC, AAM. Phenotypic screening of metallo-beta-lactamases proved to be appropriate for detecting MBL producing isolates. IMP-13 producing isolates corresponded to at least five different clonal types, which not only suggests the dissemination of the resistant strain but also of the resistant marker.

  10. [Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Vallés, Jordi; Mariscal, Dolors

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of Gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia. It is the most common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and carries the highest mortality among hospital-acquired infections. P. aeruginosa produces a large number of toxins and surface components that make it especially virulent compared with other microorganisms. These include pili, flagella, membrane bound lipopolysaccharide, and secreted products such as exotoxins A, S and U, elastase, alkaline protease, cytotoxins and phospholipases. The most common mechanism of infection in mechanically ventilated patients is through aspiration of upper respiratory tract secretions previously colonized in the process of routine nursing care or via contaminated hands of hospital personnel. Intravenous therapy with an antipseudomonal regimen should be started immediately when P. aeruginosa pneumonia is suspected or confirmed. Empiric therapy with drugs active against P. aeruginosa should be started, especially in patients who have received previous antibiotics or present late-onset pneumonia.

  11. Osmoregulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under hyperosmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Burgoa, R; Flores, E; Hernández, E; Villa, A; Vaca, S

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain was found to be able to tolerate 700 mM NaCl. 0.5 mM of the osmoprotectant betaine restablished the growth of this strain in 1200 mM NaCl. Intracellular K+ and glutamate concentrations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 after an hyperosmotic shock (400 mM NaCl) showed a permanent increase. Adition of betaine (0.5 mM) to the medium with NaCl had an inhibitory effect on the intracellular accumulation of glutamate. The results indicate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 resists high NaCl concentrations, K+ accumulation and glutamate synthesis probably being the first mechanisms involved in adaptation to osmotic stress. Also is is demonstrated that betaine modulates intracellular glutamate levels in osmotically stressed P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  12. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  13. Trapping of nonhydrolyzable cephalosporins by cephalosporinases in Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a possible resistance mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Then, R L; Angehrn, P

    1982-01-01

    Resistance to cefotaxime (CTA) and ceftriaxone (CTR) in Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in several strains which are susceptible or resistant to these agents. All strains produced a chromosomally mediated cephalosporinase of the Richmond type 1. beta-Lactamases in susceptible strains were inducible, whereas resistant strains produced the enzymes constitutively. CTA and CTR were very poor substrates but potent inhibitors of all enzymes. Binding to, rather than hydrolysis by, beta-lactamases was assumed to be a major reason for resistance, and combination experiments supported this assumption. Dicloxacillin, which did not inhibit the growth and which was a poor inducer but a strong inhibitor of these beta-lactamases, exerted strong synergistic activity when combined with CTA or CTR in strains which produced large amounts of beta-lactamase constitutively. Cefoxitin, on the other hand, poorly active alone, but a good inducer, strongly antagonized CTA or CTR in susceptible strains producing inducible enzymes. In marked contrast to CTA and CTR were the findings with cefsulodin. Cefsulodin was active against CTA- and CTR-resistant Pseudomonas, and its activity was hardly influenced by dicloxacillin or cefoxitin. Since cefsulodin was found to have a very low affinity for all cephalosporinases, these findings corroborate the assumption that binding of nonhydrolyzable cephalosporins, rather than hydrolysis by cephalosporinases, may play an important role in resistance to these agents and other newer cephalosporins in Enterobacteriaceae, as well as in other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:6808912

  14. Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marwan; Khelissa, Oussama; Ibrahim, Ali; Benoliel, Corinne; Heliot, Laurent; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants.

  15. Art-175 is a highly efficient antibacterial against multidrug-resistant strains and persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Walmagh, Maarten; Grymonprez, Barbara; Biebl, Manfred; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Defraine, Valerie; Michiels, Jan; Cenens, William; Aertsen, Abram; Miller, Stefan; Lavigne, Rob

    2014-07-01

    Artilysins constitute a novel class of efficient enzyme-based antibacterials. Specifically, they covalently combine a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, which degrades the peptidoglycan, with a targeting peptide that transports the endolysin through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Art-085, as well as Art-175, its optimized homolog with increased thermostability, are each composed of the sheep myeloid 29-amino acid (SMAP-29) peptide fused to the KZ144 endolysin. In contrast to KZ144, Art-085 and Art-175 pass the outer membrane and kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains, in a rapid and efficient (∼ 5 log units) manner. Time-lapse microscopy confirms that Art-175 punctures the peptidoglycan layer within 1 min, inducing a bulging membrane and complete lysis. Art-175 is highly refractory to resistance development by naturally occurring mutations. In addition, the resistance mechanisms against 21 therapeutically used antibiotics do not show cross-resistance to Art-175. Since Art-175 does not require an active metabolism for its activity, it has a superior bactericidal effect against P. aeruginosa persisters (up to >4 log units compared to that of the untreated controls). In summary, Art-175 is a novel antibacterial that is well suited for a broad range of applications in hygiene and veterinary and human medicine, with a unique potential to target persister-driven chronic infections.

  16. Sensitivity to Antimicrobial Drugs of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Extreme-Resistant Strains Isolated in the Major Hospitals of Central Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Azizov, Ilya S.; Lavrinenko, Alyona V.; Belyaev, Ilya A.; Babenko, Dmitry B.; Shambilova, Natalya A.; Bissenova, Nelya M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The article presents the current data on the sensitivity of the main 37 strains of eXtremaly Drugs Resistance (XDR) category to anti-pseudomonas drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The strains were collected during the prospective multicenter study in large multidisciplinary hospitals of Central Kazakhstan. Susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was carried out by disk method and the serial dilution method with the interpretation of the results according to EUCAST criteria. Detection of carbapenemases gene of VIM, IMP, NDM and GES classes was carried out by PCR method using the commercial kits. RESULTS: All identified carbapenemases were sorted to VIM class and accounted for 63.64%. Resistance to aminoglycoside drugs exceeded 80%. All the strains were susceptible to polymyxin. CONCLUSION: Thus, at the present stage the circulation of P. aeruginosa strains of XDR category continues in major hospitals in Kazakhstan. The strains remain sensitiveness only to polymyxin. PMID:28293307

  17. Hospital Isolates of Serratia marcescens Transferring Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, and Gentamicin Resistance to Other Gram-Negative Bacteria Including Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Olexy, Vera M.; Bird, Thomas J.; Grieble, Hans G.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen independent isolates of Serratia marcescens associated with nosocomial urinary tract infections were obtained from the clinical microbiology laboratory at Hines Veterans Administration Hospital. The isolates were resistant to at least ampicillin, carbenicillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. They could be divided into two groups on the basis of their antibiotypes. Group I (9 strains) showed resistance to 13 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 6 aminoglycosides, tetracycline, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Group II (4 strains) was resistant to 11 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 5 aminoglycosides, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Donors from both groups transferred resistance traits to Escherichia coli. Transconjugants from matings with group II donors all acquired resistance to nine antibiotics, including the three beta-lactams, five aminoglycosides, and sulfonamide. Transconjugants from matings with group I donors were of varied antibiotypes, inheriting resistance to up to 11 of the 13 antibiotics. Resistances to trimethoprim and polymyxin B were never observed to transfer. E. coli transconjugants of each group were capable of transferring multiple-antibiotic resistance to several other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. All group II S. marcescens and E. coli donors and all group I S. marcescens donors transferred carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and sisomicin resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results suggest that these S. marcescens strains harbor R factors of a broader host range than previously reported. PMID:106772

  18. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Ito, A; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemotactic response to phosphate regardless of whether the cells were starved for phosphate.

  19. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E.; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27757111

  20. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype.

    PubMed

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  1. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Bryan A.; Ramsay, Kay A.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Whiley, David M.; Beatson, Scott A.; Bell, Scott C.

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment. PMID:28273168

  2. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tai, Anna S; Wee, Bryan A; Ramsay, Kay A; Kidd, Timothy J; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Whiley, David M; Beatson, Scott A; Bell, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  3. Successful treatment of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with a combination of colistin and tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Stanzani, Marta; Tumietto, Fabio; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Nanetti, Anna; Vianelli, Nicola; Arpinati, Mario; Giovannini, Maddalena; Bonifazi, Francesca; Bandini, Giuseppe; Baccarani, Michele

    2007-12-01

    A case of osteomyelitis caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is reported in a patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The patient was successfully treated by prolonged administration of a full dose of colistin and tigecycline, and surgical curettage with the positioning of resorbable calcium sulfate pellets loaded with colistin.

  4. Unraveling genomic and phenotypic nature of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04 isolated from keratitis patient.

    PubMed

    N, Murugan; J, Malathi; V, Umashankar; H N, Madhavan

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04, obtained from a keratitis patient was found to exhibit resistance to betalactam (Penicillins, cephalosporins, including carbapenems, except aztreonam), aminoglycosides, quinolone group of drugs and susceptible to colistin. The complete genome sequencing of the ocular isolate to measure and ascertain the degree of multidrug resistance in VRFPA04 strain resulted in 6,818,030bp (6.8Mb) genome sizes, which happen to be the third largest genome available in the Genbank to date. Two chromosomally integrated class I integrons carrying blaVIM-2 carbapenemase gene, multiple secretory systems consisting of types I-VI and VIII proteins and ocular virulence factors exo-T, Y, U and exotoxin A, a gene that inhibits protein synthesis which could have caused corneal cell death and Phytohormone auxin biosynthetic protein were detected in the genome of VRFPA04 Genome. In addition, 58 Regions of Genomic Plasticity (RGPs) regions, multiple phage genomes, genomic islands, CRISPR genes and RND family efflux pumps, such as MexCD-OprJ and MexEF-OprN and its regulators, MexT and MexR, were unraveled in VRFPA04. Thus, the current study reveals the virulence factors and resistome nature of an ocular isolate P aeruginosa VRFPA04 genome.

  5. Hydrogel Dressing with a Nano-Formula against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diabetic Foot Bacteria.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Moustafa Y; Gohar, Yousry M; Sorour, Magdy A; Waheeb, Marian G

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an alternative approach for the use of chitosan silver-based dressing for the control of foot infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were isolated from 40 diabetic patients. Staphylococcus aureus (37%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18.5%) were the predominant isolates in the ulcer samples. Ten antibiotics were in vitro tested against diabetic foot clinical bacterial isolates. The most resistant S. aureus and P. aeruginosa isolates were then selected for further study. Three chitosan sources were tested individually for chelating silver nanoparticles. Squilla chitosan silver nanoparticles (Sq. Cs-Ag(0)) showed the maximum activity against the resistant bacteria when mixed with amikacin that showed the maximum synergetic index. This, in turn, resulted in the reduction of the amikacin MIC value by 95%. For evaluation of the effectiveness of the prepared dressing using Artemia salina as the toxicity biomarker, the LC50 was found to be 549.5, 18,000, and 10,000 μg/ml for amikacin, Sq. Cs-Ag(0), and dressing matrix, respectively. Loading the formula onto chitosan hydrogel dressing showed promising antibacterial activities, with responsive healing properties for the wounds in normal rats of those diabetic rats (polymicrobial infection). It is quite interesting to note that no emergence of any side effect on either kidney or liver biomedical functions was noticed.

  6. Synergistic Activity of Colistin and Ceftazidime against Multiantibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Brent W.; Ibrahim, Khalid H.; Hovde, Laurie B.; Fromm, Timothy L.; Reed, Michael D.; Rotschafer, John C.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the marketing of a series of new antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacteria, no new agents for multiple-antibiotic-resistant gram-negative infections will be available for quite some time. Clinicians will need to find more effective ways to utilize available agents. Colistin is an older but novel antibiotic that fell into disfavor with clinicians some time ago yet still retains a very favorable antibacterial spectrum, especially for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. Time-kill curves for two strains of multiantibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were generated after exposure to colistin alone or in combination with ceftazidime or ciprofloxacin in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model. MICs of colistin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and tobramycin were 0.125, ≥32, >4, >128/4, 16, and >16 mg/liter, respectively. Colistin showed rapid, apparently concentration-dependent bactericidal activity at concentrations between 3 and 200 mg/liter. We were unable to detect increased colistin activity at concentrations above 18 mg/liter due to extremely rapid killing. The combination of colistin and ceftazidime was synergistic (defined as at least a 2-log10 drop in CFU per milliliter from the count obtained with the more active agent) at 24 h. Adding ciprofloxacin to colistin did not enhance antibiotic activity. These data suggest that the antibacterial effect of colistin combined with ceftazidime can be maximized at a peak concentration of ≤18 mg/liter. PMID:12604520

  7. Small Colony Variants and Single Nucleotide Variations in Pf1 Region of PB1 Phage-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wee S.; Phang, Kevin K. S.; Tan, Andy H.-M.; Li, Sam F.-Y.; Ow, Dave S.-W.

    2016-01-01

    Phage therapy involves the application of lytic bacteriophages for treatment of clinical infections but bacterial resistance may develop over time. Isolated from nosocomial infections, small colony variants (SCVs) are morphologically distinct, highly virulent bacterial strains that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. In this study, SCVs was derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to the lytic bacteriophage PB1 and these cells were resistant to subsequent phage infection by PB1. To elucidate the mechanism of the SCV phage resistance, we performed phenotypic assays, DNA microarrays and whole-genome sequencing. Compared with wild-type P. aeruginosa, the SCV isolate showed impaired biofilm formation, decreased twitching motility, reduced elastase and pyocyanin production. The SCV is also more susceptible to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin and exhibited higher syrface hydrophobicity than the wild-type, indicative of changes to cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Consistent with these results, transcriptomic studies of SCV revealed up-regulation of genes involved in O-specific antigen (OSA) biosynthesis, suggesting the regulation of surface moieties may account for phage resistance. Western blot analysis showed a difference in OSA distribution between the two strains. Simultaneously, genes involved in aromatic and branched chain amino acid catabolism were down-regulated. Whole genome sequencing of the SCV revealed multiple single nucleotide variations within the Pf1 prophage region, a genetic locus known to play a crucial role in biofilm formation and to provide survival advantage via gene transfer to a subpopulation of cells. Insights into phenotypic and genetic changes in SCV gained here should help direct future studies to elucidate mechanisms underpinning phage resistance, leading to novel counter resistance measures. PMID:27014207

  8. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Berrazeg, M.; Jeannot, K.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I.; Loeffert, S.; Fournier, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. PMID:26248364

  9. The effects of group 1 versus group 2 carbapenems on imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Lidji, Shiri Klarfeld; Shabtai, Esther; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2011-07-01

    Use of the group 2 carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, may lead to emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance. The group 1 carbapenem ertapenem has limited activity against P. aeruginosa and is not associated with imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IMP-R PA) in vitro. This retrospective, group-level, longitudinal study collected patient, antibiotic use, and resistance data from 2001 to 2005 using a hospital database containing information on 9 medical wards. A longitudinal data time series analysis was done to evaluate the association between carbapenem use (defined daily doses, or DDDs) and IMP-R PA. A total of 139 185 patient admissions were included, with 541 150 antibiotics DDDs prescribed: 4637 DDDs of group 2 carbapenems and 2130 DDDs of ertapenem. A total of 779 IMP-R PA were isolated (5.6 cases/1000 admissions). Univariate analysis found a higher incidence of IMP-R PA with group 2 carbapenems (P < 0.001), aminoglycosides (P = 0.034), and penicillins (P = 0.05), but not with ertapenem. Multivariate analysis showed a yearly increase in incidence of IMP-R-PA (3.8%, P < 0.001). Group 2 carbapenem use was highly associated with IMP-R PA, with a 20% increase in incidence (P = 0.0014) for each 100 DDDs. Group 2 carbapenem use tended to be associated with an increased proportion of IMP-R PA (P = 0.0625) in multivariate analysis. Ertapenem was not associated with IMP-R PA. These data would support preferentially prescribing ertapenem rather than group 2 carbapenems where clinically appropriate.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla- IMP and bla- VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β -lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla- VIM and bla- IMP ) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla- IMP and bla- VIM . The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla- VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla- IMP . The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection.

  11. Evaluation of the In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Ceftolozane-Tazobactam against Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Buehrle, Deanna J.; Shields, Ryan K.; Chen, Liang; Hao, Binghua; Press, Ellen G.; Alkrouk, Ammar; Potoski, Brian A.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    We compared ceftazidime-avibactam, ceftolozane-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam MICs for 38 meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. No isolates harbored carbapenemases; 74% were oprD mutants. Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam were active against 92% of the isolates, including 80% that were resistant to all three β-lactams. Forty-three percent of ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible isolates and 6% of ceftolozane-tazobactam-susceptible isolates exhibited MICs at the respective breakpoints. Ceftolozane-tazobactam and ceftazidime-avibactam are therapeutic options for meropenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections that should be used judiciously to preserve activity. PMID:26976862

  12. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E.; Patey, Sara A.; Crandon, Jared L.; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A.; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Blinn, Christina M.; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S.; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S.; Rooney, Michael T.; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E.; Eakin, Ann E.; Nicolau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R2 = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26438502

  13. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aryun; Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E; Patey, Sara A; Crandon, Jared L; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A; McLaughlin, Robert E; Blinn, Christina M; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S; Rooney, Michael T; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E; Eakin, Ann E; Nicolau, David P

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R(2) = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants resistant to urea inhibition of growth on acetanilide.

    PubMed

    Gregoriou, M; Brown, P R; Tata, R

    1977-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI 3 was able to grow in medium containing acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide) as a carbon source when NH4+ was the nitrogen source but not when urea was the nitrogen source. AIU mutants isolated from strain AI 3 grew on either medium. Urease levels in bacteria grown in the presence of urea were 10-fold lower when NH4+ or acetanilide was also in the medium, but there were no apparent differences in urease or its synthesis between strain AI 3 and mutant AIU 1N. The first metabolic step in the acetanilide utlization is catalyzed by an amidase. Amidases in several AIU strains showed altered physiochemical properties. Urea inhibited amidase in a time-dependent reaction, but the rates of the inhibitory reaction with amidases from the AIU mutants were slower than with AI 3 amidase. The purified amidase from AIU 1N showed a marked difference in its pH/activity profile from that obtained with purified AI 3 amidase. These observations indicate that the ability of strain AIU 1N and the other mutants to grow on acetanilide/urea medium is associated with a mutation in the amidase structural gene; this was confirmed for strain AIU 1N by transduction.

  15. Genetic Markers of Widespread Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa High-Risk Clones

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Domínguez, M. Angeles; Gago, Juan F.; Juan, Carlos; Tubau, Fe; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moyà, Bartolomé; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have revealed the existence of widespread extensively drug-resistant (XDR) P. aeruginosa high-risk clones in health care settings, but there is still scarce information on their specific chromosomal (mutational) and acquired resistance mechanisms. Up to 20 (10.5%) of 190 bloodstream isolates collected from 10 Spanish hospitals met the XDR criteria. A representative number (15 per group) of isolates classified as multidrug-resistant (MDR) (22.6%), resistant to 1 to 2 classes (moderately resistant [modR]) (23.7%), or susceptible to all antibiotics (multiS) (43.2%) were investigated in parallel. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis revealed that all XDR isolates belonged to sequence type 175 (ST175) (n = 19) or ST111 (n = 1), both recognized as international high-risk clones. Clonal diversity was higher among the 15 MDR isolates (4 ST175, 2 ST111, and 8 additional STs) and especially high among the 15 modR (13 different STs) and multiS (14 STs) isolates. The XDR/MDR pattern in ST111 isolates correlated with the production of VIM-2, but none of the ST175 isolates produced acquired β-lactamases. In contrast, the analysis of resistance markers in 12 representative isolates (from 7 hospitals) of ST175 revealed that the XDR pattern was driven by the combination of AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation (Q142X), 3 mutations conferring high-level fluoroquinolone resistance (GyrA T83I and D87N and ParC S87W), a G195E mutation in MexZ (involved in MexXY-OprM overexpression), and the production of a class 1 integron harboring the aadB gene (gentamicin and tobramycin resistance). Of particular interest, in nearly all the ST175 isolates, AmpC hyperproduction was driven by a novel AmpR-activating mutation (G154R), as demonstrated by complementation studies using an ampR mutant of PAO1. This work is the first to describe the specific resistance markers of widespread P. aeruginosa XDR high-risk clones producing invasive infections. PMID:23045355

  16. First report of NDM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zafer, Mai Mahmoud; Amin, Mady; El Mahallawy, Hadir; Ashour, Mohammed Seif El-Din; Al Agamy, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the occurrence of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) in metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt for the first time, and the presence of more than one blaMBL gene in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  17. Chlorin e6 mediated photodynamic inactivation for multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis in mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Feng; Deichelbohrer, Mona; Tschernig, Thomas; Laschke, Matthias W.; Szentmáry, Nóra; Hüttenberger, Dirk; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Seitz, Berthold; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Following corneal epithelium scratches, mouse corneas were infected with the multidrug resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa strain PA54. 24 hours later, 0% (for control group), 0.01%, 0.05% or 0.1% Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a second generation photosensitizer derived from chlorophyll, was combined with red light, for photodynamic inactivation (PDI). 1 hour or 2 days later, entire mouse eyes were enucleated and homogenized for counting colony forming units (CFU) of P. aeruginosa. For comparison, 0.1% Ce6 mediated PDI was started at 12 hours post infection, and 0.005% methylene blue mediated PDI 24 hours post infection. Clinical scores of corneal manifestation were recorded daily. Compared to the control, CFU 1 hour after PDI started 24 hours post infection in the 0.01% Ce6 and 0.05% Ce6 groups were significantly lower (more than one log10 reduction), the CFU 2 days post PDI higher in the 0.1% Ce6 group, clinical score lower in the 0.1% Ce6 group at 1 day post PDI. These findings suggest that PDI with Ce6 and red light has a transient efficacy in killing MDR-PA in vivo, and repetitive PDI treatments are required to fully resolve the infection. Before its clinical application, the paradoxical bacterial regrowth post PDI has to be further studied. PMID:28295043

  18. Identification of extensive drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: New clone ST1725 and high-risk clone ST233.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodea, Pamela; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Olivares Cervantes, Alma Lidia; Gamiño Arroyo, Ana Estela; Moreno-Espinosa, Sarbelio; de la Rosa Zamboni, Daniela; López Martínez, Briceida; Castellanos-Cruz, María Del Carmen; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Jiménez Rojas, Verónica Leticia; Vigueras Galindo, Juan Carlos; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Several microorganisms produce nosocomial infections (NIs), among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa stands out as an opportunist pathogen with the capacity to develop multiresistance to first-choice antibiotics. From 2007 to 2013, forty-six NIs produced by P. aeruginosa were detected at a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Mexico with a significant mortality rate (17.39%). All isolates (n = 58/46 patients) were characterized by evaluating their response to several antibiotics as panresistant (PDR), extensively resistant (XDR), multiresistant (MDR) or sensitive (S). In addition, all isolates were typified through multilocus sequencing of seven genes: acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE. Furthermore, to establish the genetic relationships among these isolates, we carried out a phylogenetic inference analysis using maximum likelihood to construct a phylogenetic network. To assess evolutionary parameters, recombination was evaluated using the PHI test, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions was determined. Two of the strains were PDR (ST1725); 42 were XDR; four were MDR; and ten were S. Twenty-one new sequence types were detected. Thirty-three strains exhibited novel sequence type ST1725. The ratio of nonsynonym to synonym substitutions was 1:1 considering all genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic relationship of the PDR, XDR and MDR strains was mainly clonal; however, the PHI test and the phylogenetic network suggest that recombination events occurred to produce a non-clonal population. This study aimed not only to determine the genetic diversity of clinical P. aeruginosa but also to provide a warning regarding the identification and spreading of clone ST1725, its ability to cause outbreaks with high mortality rates, and to remain in the hospital environment for over seven years. These characteristics highlight the need to identify clonal outbreaks, especially where high resistance to most antibiotics is observed, and control

  19. Mucoidy, Quorum Sensing, Mismatch Repair and Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Airways Infections

    PubMed Central

    Feliziani, Sofía; Sola, Claudia; Bocco, José L.; Montanaro, Patricia; Canigia, Liliana Fernández; Argaraña, Carlos E.; Smania, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis), LasR (quorum sensing) and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY) are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS) being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS-deficiency and antibiotic resistance. Thus, 38 isolates from 26 chronically infected CF patients were characterized for their phenotypic traits, PFGE genotypic patterns, mutations in the mucA, lasR, mexZ, mutS and mutL gene coding sequences and antibiotic resistance profiles. The most frequently mutated gene was mexZ (79%), followed by mucA (63%) and lasR (39%) as well as a high prevalence (42%) of hypermutators being observed due to loss-of-function mutations in mutL (60%) followed by mutS (40%). Interestingly, mutational spectra were particular to each gene, suggesting that several mechanisms are responsible for mutations during chronic infection. However, no link could be established between hypermutability and mutagenesis in mucA, lasR and mexZ, indicating that MRS-deficiency was not involved in the acquisition of these mutations. Finally, although inactivation of mucA, lasR and mexZ has been previously shown to confer resistance/tolerance to antibiotics, only mutations in MRS genes could be related to an antibiotic resistance increase. These results help to unravel the

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia.

  1. Time-kill effect of levofloxacin on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: synergism with imipenem and colistin.

    PubMed

    Safarika, A; Galani, I; Pistiki, A; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E J

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we challenged the concept that levofloxacin should not be used for the management of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) when minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) exceed 2 μg/ml. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and genetically distinct isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 49) and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 29) from patients with VAP were exposed over time to levofloxacin, imipenem, colistin and their combinations. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 55.3 % and between levofloxacin and colistin in 90.9 % of isolates of P. aeruginosa within the first 4 h of growth. Synergy with imipenem but not with colistin was dependent of the MIC. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 58.6 % of isolates of A. baumannii after 24 h of growth. Considerable synergy was found between levofloxacin and colistin, reaching 84.8 % of isolates of A.baumannii after 6 h of growth. Synergy was independent from the MIC. These results create hopes that levofloxacin can be used as combination therapy for infections by MDR bacteria.

  2. [Prevalence of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to imipenem by production of metallo-β-lactamases in Rabat Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V].

    PubMed

    Gildas Comlan Zohoun, Alban; Moket, Danièle; El Hamzaoui, Sakina

    2013-01-01

    We studied the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to imipenem at the Rabat Mohammed V military teaching hospital, according to Yong et al.'s method, using a sterilized solution of EDTA 0.5 M pH 8. One hundred and five bacterial strains (48 A. baumannii and 57 P. aeruginosa) were identified. 45 (42.9%) with 34 A. baumannii and 11 P. aeruginosa were resistant to imipenem. The prevalence of MBL producing strains was 22.2% (10/45). The existence of this isolates resistant to imipenem by producing metallo-β-lactamases is an emerging public health problem. It is necessary to implemente infection control programs to avoid spreading of multidrug resistant bacteria.

  3. Emerging and existing mechanisms co-operate in generating diverse β-lactam resistance phenotypes in geographically dispersed and genetically disparate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena; Pérez, Javier Escobar; Márquez, Carolina; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Centrón, Daniela; Leal, Aura L; Saavedra, Carlos; Saavedra, Sandra Y; Tovar, Catalina; Vanegas, Natasha; Stokes, H W

    2013-09-01

    β-Lactam resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates is driven by a number of mechanisms. Whilst several are understood, how they act co-operatively in pathogenic strains is less clear. In some isolates, resistance profiles cannot always be explained by identifying the common resistance-determining pathways, suggesting that other mechanisms may be important. Pathogenic P. aeruginosa isolates from four countries were characterised by PCR. Quantitative expression analysis was also assessed for the activity of several pathways that influence antibiotic resistance, and culture experiments were conducted to test how random transposition of the insertion sequence IS26 during growth may influence resistance to some antibiotics. In most strains, antibiotic resistance was being driven by changes in multiple pathways and by the presence or absence of genes acquired by lateral gene transfer. Multiple mechanisms of resistance were prevalent in strains from all of the countries examined, although regional differences in the type of interacting mechanisms were apparent. Changes in chromosomal pathways included overexpression of AmpC and two efflux pumps. Also, gain or loss of IS26 at some chromosomal locations, most notably oprD, could influence resistance to carbapenems. IS26-related resistance was found in strains from Argentina and geographically linked Uruguay, but not in strains from either Colombia or Australia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenic strains are evolving to become multidrug-resistant in more complex ways. This is being influenced by single strains acquiring changes in numerous known pathways as well as by newly emerging resistance mechanisms in this species.

  4. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance and acquired susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients to temocillin, a revived antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Chalhoub, Hussein; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Plésiat, Patrick; Kahl, Barbara C.; Denis, Olivier; Winterhalter, Mathias; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic temocillin (6-α-methoxy-ticarcillin) shows stability to most extended spectrum β-lactamases, but is considered inactive against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mutations in the MexAB-OprM efflux system, naturally occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates, have been previously shown to reverse this intrinsic resistance. In the present study, we measured temocillin activity in a large collection (n = 333) of P. aeruginosa CF isolates. 29% of the isolates had MICs ≤ 16 mg/L (proposed clinical breakpoint for temocillin). Mutations were observed in mexA or mexB in isolates for which temocillin MIC was ≤512 mg/L (nucleotide insertions or deletions, premature termination, tandem repeat, nonstop, and missense mutations). A correlation was observed between temocillin MICs and efflux rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (MexAB-OprM fluorescent substrate) and extracellular exopolysaccharide abundance (contributing to a mucoid phenotype). OpdK or OpdF anion-specific porins expression decreased temocillin MIC by ~1 two-fold dilution only. Contrarily to the common assumption that temocillin is inactive on P. aeruginosa, we show here clinically-exploitable MICs on a non-negligible proportion of CF isolates, explained by a wide diversity of mutations in mexA and/or mexB. In a broader context, this work contributes to increase our understanding of MexAB-OprM functionality and help delineating how antibiotics interact with MexA and MexB. PMID:28091521

  5. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel.

    PubMed

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents.

  6. Antimicrobial potentials of Helicteres isora silver nanoparticles against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mapara, Nikunj; Sharma, Mansi; Shriram, Varsha; Bharadwaj, Renu; Mohite, K C; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading opportunistic pathogen and its expanding drug resistance is a growing menace to public health. Its ubiquitous nature and multiple resistance mechanisms make it a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy and require a fresh approach for developing new antimicrobial agents against it. The broad-spectrum antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) make them an excellent candidate for use in the medical field. However, attempts made to check their potency against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) microbes are meager. This study describes the biosynthesis and biostabilization of SNPs by Helicteres isora aqueous fruit extract and their characterization by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Majority of SNPs synthesized were of 8--20-nm size. SNPs exhibited dose-dependent antibacterial activities against four XDR P. aeruginosa (XDR-PA) clinical isolates as revealed by growth curves, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300 μg/ml. The SNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against all strains, with maximum zone of inhibition (16.4 mm) in XRD-PA-2 at 1000 μg/ml. Amongst four strains, their susceptibilities to SNPs were in the following order: XDR-PA-2 > XDR-PA-4 > XDR-PA-3 > XDR-PA-1. The exposure of bacterial cells to 300 μg/ml SNPs resulted into a substantial leakage of reducing sugars and proteins, inactivation of respiratory chain dehydrogenases, and eventual cell death. SNPs also induced lipid peroxidation, a possible underlying factor to membrane porosity. The effects were more pronounced in XDR-PA-2 which may be correlated with its higher susceptibility to SNPs. These results are indicative of SNP-induced turbulence of membranous permeability as an important causal factor in XDR-PA growth inhibition and death.

  7. Impact of Bolus dosing versus continuous infusion of Piperacillin and Tazobactam on the development of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Felton, T W; Goodwin, J; O'Connor, L; Sharp, A; Gregson, L; Livermore, J; Howard, S J; Neely, M N; Hope, W W

    2013-12-01

    Management of nosocomial pneumonia is frequently complicated by bacterial resistance. Extended infusions of beta-lactams are increasingly being used to improve clinical outcomes. However, the impact of this strategy on the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is not known. A hollow-fiber infection model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was used. Pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of piperacillin-tazobactam similar to those in humans were simulated over 5 days. Three dosages of piperacillin-tazobactam were administered over 0.5 h or 4 h, with redosing every 8 h. Two initial bacterial densities were investigated (∼10(4) CFU/ml and ∼10(7) CFU/ml). The time courses of the total bacterial population and the resistant subpopulation were determined. All data were described using a mathematical model, which was then used to define the relationship between drug concentrations, bacterial killing, and emergence of piperacillin resistance. There was logarithmic growth in controls in the initial 24 h, reaching a plateau of ∼9 log10 CFU/ml. Bacterial killing following administration of piperacillin via bolus dosing and that after extended infusions were similar. For the lower initial bacterial density, trough total plasma piperacillin concentration/MIC ratios of 3.4 and 10.4 for bolus and extended-infusion regimens, respectively, were able to suppress the emergence of piperacillin resistance. For the higher initial bacterial density, all regimens were associated with progressive growth of a resistant subpopulation. A stratified approach, according to bacterial density, is required to treat patients with nosocomial pneumonia. Antimicrobial monotherapy may be sufficient for some patients. However, for patients with a high bacterial burden, alternative therapeutic strategies are required to maximize bacterial killing and prevent antimicrobial resistance.

  8. Extensively drug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates containing blaVIM-2 and elements of Salmonella genomic island 2: a new genetic resistance determinant in Northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M; Marshall, Steven H; Ray, Amy J; Rather, Philip N; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Dumford, Donald; O'Shea, Patrick; Domitrovic, T Nicholas J; Salata, Robert A; Chavda, Kalyan D; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Vila, Alejandro J; Haussler, Susanne; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenems are a mainstay of treatment for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Carbapenem resistance mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) remains uncommon in the United States, despite the worldwide emergence of this group of enzymes. Between March 2012 and May 2013, we detected MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in a university-affiliated health care system in northeast Ohio. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients, defined the resistance determinants and structure of the genetic element harboring the blaMBL gene through genome sequencing, and typed MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seven patients were affected that were hospitalized at three community hospitals, a long-term-care facility, and a tertiary care center; one of the patients died as a result of infection. Isolates belonged to sequence type 233 (ST233) and were extensively drug resistant (XDR), including resistance to all fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams; two isolates were nonsusceptible to colistin. The blaMBL gene was identified as blaVIM-2 contained within a class 1 integron (In559), similar to the cassette array previously detected in isolates from Norway, Russia, Taiwan, and Chicago, IL. Genomic sequencing and assembly revealed that In559 was part of a novel 35-kb region that also included a Tn501-like transposon and Salmonella genomic island 2 (SGI2)-homologous sequences. This analysis of XDR strains producing VIM-2 from northeast Ohio revealed a novel recombination event between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa, heralding a new antibiotic resistance threat in this region's health care system.

  9. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures.

  10. Impact of Microbiota on Resistance to Ocular Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Induced Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Kunz, Ryan; Fichorova, Raina; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the ocular microbiota has been reported but functional analyses to evaluate its significance in regulating ocular immunity are currently lacking. We compared the relative contribution of eye and gut commensals in regulating the ocular susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced keratitis. We find that in health, the presence of microbiota strengthened the ocular innate immune barrier by significantly increasing the concentrations of immune effectors in the tear film, including secretory IgA and complement proteins. Consistent with this view, Swiss Webster (SW) mice that are typically resistant to P. aeruginosa–induced keratitis become susceptible due to the lack of microbiota. This was exemplified by increased corneal bacterial burden and elevated pathology of the germ free (GF) mice when compared to the conventionally maintained SW mice. The protective immunity was found to be dependent on both eye and gut microbiota with the eye microbiota having a moderate, but significant impact on the resistance to infection. These events were IL-1ß–dependent as corneal IL-1ß levels were decreased in the infected GF and antibiotic-treated mice when compared to the SPF controls, and neutralization of IL-1ß increased the ocular bacterial burden in the SPF mice. Monocolonizing GF mice with Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus sp. isolated from the conjunctival swabs was sufficient to restore resistance to infection. Cumulatively, these data underline a previously unappreciated role for microbiota in regulating susceptibility to ocular keratitis. We predict that these results will have significant implications for contact lens wearers, where alterations in the ocular commensal communities may render the ocular surface vulnerable to infections. PMID:27658245

  11. A Galleria mellonella infection model reveals double and triple antibiotic combination therapies with enhanced efficacy versus a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Krezdorn, Jessica; Adams, Sophie; Coote, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effect of antibiotic combinations in vitro with efficacy in Galleria mellonella larvae in vivo to identify efficacious combinations that target Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa NCTC 13437, a multidrug-resistant strain resistant to β-lactams and aminoglycosides, was used. Susceptibility to cefotaxime, piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin and colistin alone, or in dual or triple combinations, was measured in vitro via a 24 h time-kill assay. In vitro results were then compared with the efficacy of the same dual or triple antibiotic combinations versus G. mellonella larvae infected with P. aeruginosa. G. mellonella haemolymph burden of P. aeruginosa was determined over 96 h post-infection and treatment with the most potent combination therapies. Many dual and triple combinations of antibiotics displayed synergistic inhibition of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in vitro. There was little correlation between combinations that were synergistic in vitro and those that showed enhanced efficacy in vivo versus infected G. mellonella larvae. The most potent dual and triple combinations in vivo were cefotaxime plus piperacillin, and meropenem plus piperacillin and amikacin, respectively. Fewer combinations were found to offer enhanced therapeutic benefit in vivo compared with in vitro. The therapeutic benefit arising from treatment with antibiotic combinations in vivo correlated with reduced larval burden of P. aeruginosa. This study has identified antibiotic combinations that merit further investigation for their clinical potential and has demonstrated the utility of using G. mellonella to screen for novel antibiotic treatments that demonstrate efficacy in vivo.

  12. Common antimicrobial resistance patterns, biotypes and serotypes found among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, A A; Masoud, H; Maslamani, F A Balkam

    2005-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in low rates from stool specimens of outpatients and inpatients (7% versus 12%) but in higher rates from chlorinated and nonchlorinated water sources (15% versus 44%), respectively in Jordan. The same biotype was recognized among 90% of P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and water sources using specific biochemical profiles. Three serogroups belonging to 01, 06 and 011 accounted for the majority of these isolates in water (66%) and stools (78%), respectively. All P. aeruginosa isolates from water were highly susceptible (87%-100%) to piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, aztreonam, ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, whereas the isolates from stool were slightly less susceptible (81%-98%) to these antimicrobials. P. aeruginosa isolates from water and stool sources were almost equally highly resistant to tetracycline (86%-89%) and carbenicillin (88%-89%), respectively. One common small plasmid (15.4 kb) was detected in 14/25 (56%) of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from both water and stool. This study demonstrates certain common epidemiological characteristics including antimicrobial resistance pattern, biotypes and serotypes among P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

  13. An Investigation of Antibacterial Resistance Patterns Among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Collected from Intensive Care Units of a University-Affiliated Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Izadpour, Farrokh; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavian, Mojtaba; ShahAli, Shiva; Larki, Farzaneh; Tabesh, Hamed; Morvaridi, Afrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, multidrug-resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been recognized as a major cause of healthcare-associated and nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs). Methods One hundred fifty-five clinical isolates, including 80 (51.6%) isolates of A. baumannii and 75 (48.4%) isolates of P. aeruginosa, from hospitalized patients in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, were collected from January 1 to December 30, 2013. The organisms were identified with conventional bacteriological methods, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all isolates in accordance with clinical laboratory and standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results The maximum resistance rates among A. baumannii isolates were observed for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (96.9% and 95.2%, respectively). For P. aeruginosa isolates, the maximum resistance rates were reported for ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (97.2% and 92.4%, respectively). Conclusions The majority of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics. Therefore, surveillance of antibiotic consumption and proper antibiotic administration guidelines are essential for preventing major outbreaks in the future. PMID:27800136

  14. High-level tolerance to triclosan may play a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in immunocompromised hosts: evidence from outbreak investigation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious threat to immunocompromised patients. We recently reported a fatal epidemic of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in an onchoematology unit, linked to massive contamination of a triclosan-based disinfectant. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate against the epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, to confirm the hypothesis that the soap dispenser acted as a continuous source of the infection during the outbreak, and to explore the potential role of triclosan in increasing the level of resistance to selected antibiotics. Susceptibility tests and time-kill assays for disinfectans were performed using two commercial formulations containing triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method. Findings The P. aeruginosa epidemic strain exhibited an extremely high level of triclosan resistance (apparent MIC = 2,125 mg/L), while it was markedly susceptible to chlorhexidine digluconate (apparent MIC = 12.5 mg/L). Upon gradual adaptation to triclosan, the epidemic strain survived for a long period (> 120 h) in the presence of 3,400 mg/L (equivalent to 1.6 × MIC) of triclosan, concomitantly increasing the resistance to six antibiotics that are typical substrates of drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division family. This effect was reversed by efflux pump inhibitors. Conclusions The epidemic P. aeruginosa strain was resistant to triclosan and its previous exposure to triclosan increases antibiotic resistance, likely through active efflux mechanisms. Since P. aeruginosa can become tolerant to elevated triclosan concentrations, the use of triclosan-based disinfectants should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22260715

  15. Effects of dietary supplementation of potential probiotic Pseudomonas aeruginosa VSG-2 on the innate immunity and disease resistance of tropical freshwater fish, Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Sen, Shib Sankar; Sukumaran, V

    2012-06-01

    The effects of dietary Pseudomonas aeruginosa VSG-2 supplementation on innate immunity and protection against Aeromonas hydrophila infection were evaluated in Labeo rohita. Fish were fed for 60 days with control diet or 3 experimental diets containing P. aeruginosa VSG-2 at 10(5), 10(7), and 10(9) cfu g(-l), respectively. Various innate immune parameters were examined at 30 and 60 days post-feeding. Fish were challenged with A. hydrophila 60 days post-feeding and mortalities were recorded over 10 days post-infection. Dietary supplementation of P. aeruginosa VSG-2 significantly increased serum lysozyme and alternative complement pathway (ACP) activities, phagocytosis, and respiratory burst activity in head kidney macrophages of L. rohita throughout the experimental period. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased after 60 days in the groups fed diets containing 10(7) and 10(9) cfu g(-1) P aeruginosa. Serum IgM levels were significantly higher in the treatment groups than in the control group after 30 days of feeding; however, the opposite result was observed at 60 days. Moreover, fish fed diets containing 10(7) and 10(9) cfu g(-1)P. aeruginosa had significantly higher post-challenge survival rates against A. hydrophila infection. Further, P. aeruginosa VSG-2 was found to be safe for mammals. These results indicate that dietary P. aeruginosa VSG-2 supplementation at 10(7) cfu g(-1) can effectively improve innate immunity and disease resistance in L. rohita.

  16. Identification of extensive drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: New clone ST1725 and high-risk clone ST233

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Rodea, Pamela; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Olivares Cervantes, Alma Lidia; Gamiño Arroyo, Ana Estela; Moreno-Espinosa, Sarbelio; de la Rosa Zamboni, Daniela; López Martínez, Briceida; Castellanos-Cruz, María del Carmen; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Jiménez Rojas, Verónica Leticia; Vigueras Galindo, Juan Carlos; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Several microorganisms produce nosocomial infections (NIs), among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa stands out as an opportunist pathogen with the capacity to develop multiresistance to first-choice antibiotics. From 2007 to 2013, forty-six NIs produced by P. aeruginosa were detected at a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Mexico with a significant mortality rate (17.39%). All isolates (n = 58/46 patients) were characterized by evaluating their response to several antibiotics as panresistant (PDR), extensively resistant (XDR), multiresistant (MDR) or sensitive (S). In addition, all isolates were typified through multilocus sequencing of seven genes: acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE. Furthermore, to establish the genetic relationships among these isolates, we carried out a phylogenetic inference analysis using maximum likelihood to construct a phylogenetic network. To assess evolutionary parameters, recombination was evaluated using the PHI test, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions was determined. Two of the strains were PDR (ST1725); 42 were XDR; four were MDR; and ten were S. Twenty-one new sequence types were detected. Thirty-three strains exhibited novel sequence type ST1725. The ratio of nonsynonym to synonym substitutions was 1:1 considering all genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic relationship of the PDR, XDR and MDR strains was mainly clonal; however, the PHI test and the phylogenetic network suggest that recombination events occurred to produce a non-clonal population. This study aimed not only to determine the genetic diversity of clinical P. aeruginosa but also to provide a warning regarding the identification and spreading of clone ST1725, its ability to cause outbreaks with high mortality rates, and to remain in the hospital environment for over seven years. These characteristics highlight the need to identify clonal outbreaks, especially where high resistance to most antibiotics is observed, and control

  17. Infections in intensive care unit adult patients harboring multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: implications for prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Borgatta, B; Lagunes, L; Imbiscuso, A T; Larrosa, M N; Lujàn, M; Rello, J

    2017-01-16

    The purpose of this paper was to report the burden and characteristics of infection by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) in clinical samples from intensive care unit (ICU) adults, and to identify predictors. This was a retrospective observational study at four medical-surgical ICUs. The case cohort comprised adults with documented isolation of an MDR-PA strain from a clinical specimen during ICU stay. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors for MDR-PA infection. During the study period, 5667 patients were admitted to the ICU and P. aeruginosa was isolated in 504 (8.8%). MDR-PA was identified in 142 clinical samples from 104 patients (20.6%); 62 (43.6%) of these samples appeared to be true infections. One hundred and eighteen (83.1%) isolates were susceptible only to amikacin and colistin, and 13 (9.2%) were susceptible only to colistin. Overall, the MIC50 to meropenem was 16 μg/mL and the MIC90 was >32 μg/mL, with 60.4% of respiratory samples being MIC >32 μg/mL to meropenem. Independent predictors for MDR-PA infection were fever/hypothermia [odds ratio (OR) 9.09], recent antipseudomonal cephalosporin therapy (OR 6.31), vasopressors at infection onset (OR 4.40), and PIRO (predisposition, infection, response, and organ dysfunction) score >2 (OR 2.06). This study provides novel information that may be of use for the clinical management of patients harboring MDR-PA and for the control of the spread of this organism.

  18. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    from ingesting P. aeruginosa in drinking water is low. The risk is slightly higher if the subject is taking an antibiotic resisted by P. aeruginosa. The fact that individuals on ampicillin are more susceptible to Pseudomonas gastrointestinal infection probably results from suppression of normal intestinal flora, which would allow Pseudomonas to colonize. The process of estimating risk was significantly constrained because of the absence of specific (quantitative) occurrence data for Pseudomonas. Sensitivity analysis shows that the greatest source of variability/uncertainty in the risk assessment is from the density distribution in the exposure rather than the dose-response or water consumption distributions. In summary, two routes appear to carry the greatest health risks from contacting water contaminated with P. aeruginosa (1) skin exposure in hot tubs and (2) lung exposure from inhaling aerosols.

  19. Human Lysozyme Peptidase Resistance Is Perturbed by the Anionic Glycolipid Biosurfactant Rhamnolipid Produced by the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kell K; Vad, Brian S; Scavenius, Carsten; Enghild, Jan J; Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-01-10

    Infection by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is accompanied by the secretion of virulence factors such as the secondary metabolite rhamnolipid (RL) as well as an array of bacterial enzymes, including the peptidase elastase. The human immune system tries to counter this via defensive proteins such as lysozyme (HLZ). HLZ targets the bacterial cell wall but may also have other antimicrobial activities. The enzyme contains four disulfide bonds and shows high thermodynamic stability and resistance to proteolytic attack. Here we show that RL promotes HLZ degradation by several unrelated peptidases, including the PA elastase and human peptidases. This occurs although RL does not by itself denature HLZ. Nevertheless, RL binds in a sufficiently high stoichiometry (8:1 RL:HLZ) to neutralize the highly cationic surface of HLZ. The initial cleavage sites agree well with the domain boundaries of HLZ. Thus, binding of RL to native HLZ may be sufficient to allow proteolytic attack at slightly exposed sites on the protein, leading to subsequent degradation. Furthermore, biofilms of RL-producing strains of PA are protected better against high concentrations of HLZ than RL-free PA strains are. We conclude that pathogen-produced RL may weaken host defenses by facilitating degradation of key host proteins.

  20. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  1. Characterization of carbapenem resistance mechanisms and integrons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from blood samples in a French hospital.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Cavalié, Laurent; Dubois, Damien; Oswald, Eric; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), porin OprD, integrons, virulence factors and the clonal relationships were characterized in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) isolates. Fifty-six IRPA strains were recovered from blood samples of different patients at a Toulouse teaching hospital from 2011 to 2013. Susceptibility testing of 14 antibiotics was performed by the disc diffusion method. Detection and characterization of MBLs, the oprD gene and integrons were studied by PCR and sequencing. Thirteen genes involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa were analysed. Molecular typing of IRPA strains was performed by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. In this study, 61 % of the IRPA isolates showed a multi-resistance phenotype. The MBL phenotype, detected in three isolates (5.4 %), was linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The oprD gene was amplified in 55 (98.2 %) IRPA strains, and variations were observed in 54 of them. Insertion sequences (IS) truncating oprD were detected in eight IRPA strains, with the novel ISPa56 identified in two strains. Class 1 integrons were detected in 24 (42.9 %) IRPA strains. The blaVIM-2 gene was found inside the class 1 integron arrangements. The new integrons In1054 (intI1-aacA56-qacEΔ1-sul1) and In1160 (intI1-aacA4-aacC1d-ISKpn4-gcuE-qacEΔ1-sul1) have been described for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this study. A high clonal diversity was found in our strains. Among the variety of sequence types (STs) found, ST175, ST233, ST235, ST244 and ST654 were noteworthy as epidemic clones. In conclusion, 5.4 % of IRPA strains showed an MBL phenotype linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The identified oprD high polymorphism could be implicated in the variable resistance to carbapenems in IRPA strains. The dissemination of high-risk clones is a cause of concern.

  2. Rates of gastrointestinal tract colonization of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abdalhamid, B.; Elhadi, N.; Alabdulqader, N.; Alsamman, K.; Aljindan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPAE) are globally a major medical issue, especially in intensive care units. The digestive tract is the main reservoir for these isolates; therefore, rectal swab surveillance is highly recommended. The purpose of this study was to detect the prevalence of gastrointestinal tract colonization of CRE and CRPAE in patients admitted to intensive care units in Saudi Arabia. This project also aimed to characterize carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzyme production in these isolates. From February to May 2015, 200 rectal swab specimens were screened by CHROMagar KPC. Organism identification and susceptibility testing were performed using the Vitek 2 system. One CRE and 13 CRPAE strains were identified, for a prevalence of 0.5% (1/200) and 6.5% (13/200) respectively. Strains showed high genetic diversity using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based PCR. NDM type and VIM type were detected by PCR in four and one CRPAE isolates respectively. ampC overexpression was detected in eight CRPAE isolates using Mueller-Hinton agar containing 1000 μg/mL cloxacillin. CTX-M-15 type was detected in 1 CRE by PCR. The prevalence of CRE strain colonization was lower than that of CRPAE isolates. The detection of NDM and VIM in the colonizing CRPAE strains is a major infection control concern. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Saudi Arabia and the gulf region focusing on digestive tract colonization of CRE and CRPAE organisms and characterizing the mechanisms of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26933499

  3. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  4. Bulgecin A as a β-lactam enhancer for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates containing various resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Skalweit, Marion J; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSDA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) reveals genes that confer increased susceptibility to β-lactams when disrupted, suggesting novel drug targets. One such target is lytic transglycosylase. Bulgecin A (BlgA) is a natural product of Pseudomonas mesoacidophila and a lytic transglycosolase inhibitor that works synergistically with β-lactams targeting PBP3 for Enterobacteriaceae. BlgA also weakly inhibits di-Zn2+ metallo-β-lactamases like L1 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We hypothesized that because of its unique mechanism of action, BlgA could restore susceptibility to carbapenems in carbapenem-resistant PSDA (CR-PSDA) and carbapenem-resistant ACB, as well as ACB resistant to sulbactam. A BlgA-containing extract was prepared using a previously published protocol. CR-PSDA clinical isolates demonstrating a variety of carbapenem resistance mechanisms (VIM-2 carbapenemases, efflux mechanisms, and AmpC producer expression) were characterized with agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing and polymerase chain reaction. Growth curves using these strains were prepared using meropenem, BlgA extract, and meropenem plus BlgA extract. A concentrated Blg A extract combined with low concentrations of meropenem, was able to inhibit the growth of clinical strains of CR-PSDA for strains that had meropenem MICs ≥8 mg/L by agar dilution, and a clinical strain of an OXA-24 producing ACB that had a meropenem MIC >32 mg/L and intermediate ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility. Similar experiments were conducted on a TEM-1 producing ACB strain resistant to sulbactam. BlgA with ampicillin/sulbactam inhibited the growth of this organism. As in Enterobacteriaceae, BlgA appears to restore the efficacy of meropenem in suppressing the growth of CR-PSDA and carbapenem-resistant ACB strains with a variety of common carbapenem resistance mechanisms. BlgA extract also inhibits VIM-2 β-lactamase in vitro. BlgA may prove to be

  5. Bactericidal Effect of Tomatidine-Tobramycin Combination against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Enhanced by Interspecific Small-Molecule Interactions.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Simon; Mitchell, Gabriel; Bouarab, Kamal; Marsault, Éric; Cantin, André; Frost, Eric H; Déziel, Eric; Malouin, François

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial activity of the plant alkaloid tomatidine (TO) against Staphylococcus aureus grown in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the P. aeruginosa exoproduct 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) is known to cause a respiratory deficiency in S. aureus and respiratory-deficient S. aureus are known to be hypersensitive to TO, we assessed kill kinetics of TO (8 μg/ml) against S. aureus in coculture with P. aeruginosa. Kill kinetics were also assessed using P. aeruginosa mutants deficient in the production of different exoproducts and quorum sensing-related compounds. After 24 h in coculture, TO increased the killing of S. aureus by 3.4 log10 CFU/ml in comparison to that observed in a coculture without TO. The effect of TO was abolished when S. aureus was in coculture with the lasR rhlR, pqsA, pqsL, or lasA mutant of P. aeruginosa. The bactericidal effect of TO against S. aureus in coculture with the pqsL mutant was restored by supplemental HQNO. In an S. aureus monoculture, the combination of HQNO and TO was bacteriostatic, indicating that the pqsL mutant produced an additional factor required for the bactericidal effect. The bactericidal activity of TO was also observed against a tobramycin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in coculture with P. aeruginosa, and the addition of tobramycin significantly suppressed the growth of both microorganisms. TO shows a strong bactericidal effect against S. aureus when cocultured with P. aeruginosa. The combination of TO and tobramycin may represent a new treatment approach for cystic fibrosis patients frequently cocolonized by MRSA and P. aeruginosa.

  6. Bactericidal Effect of Tomatidine-Tobramycin Combination against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Enhanced by Interspecific Small-Molecule Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Simon; Mitchell, Gabriel; Bouarab, Kamal; Marsault, Éric; Cantin, André; Frost, Eric H.; Déziel, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial activity of the plant alkaloid tomatidine (TO) against Staphylococcus aureus grown in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the P. aeruginosa exoproduct 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) is known to cause a respiratory deficiency in S. aureus and respiratory-deficient S. aureus are known to be hypersensitive to TO, we assessed kill kinetics of TO (8 μg/ml) against S. aureus in coculture with P. aeruginosa. Kill kinetics were also assessed using P. aeruginosa mutants deficient in the production of different exoproducts and quorum sensing-related compounds. After 24 h in coculture, TO increased the killing of S. aureus by 3.4 log10 CFU/ml in comparison to that observed in a coculture without TO. The effect of TO was abolished when S. aureus was in coculture with the lasR rhlR, pqsA, pqsL, or lasA mutant of P. aeruginosa. The bactericidal effect of TO against S. aureus in coculture with the pqsL mutant was restored by supplemental HQNO. In an S. aureus monoculture, the combination of HQNO and TO was bacteriostatic, indicating that the pqsL mutant produced an additional factor required for the bactericidal effect. The bactericidal activity of TO was also observed against a tobramycin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in coculture with P. aeruginosa, and the addition of tobramycin significantly suppressed the growth of both microorganisms. TO shows a strong bactericidal effect against S. aureus when cocultured with P. aeruginosa. The combination of TO and tobramycin may represent a new treatment approach for cystic fibrosis patients frequently cocolonized by MRSA and P. aeruginosa. PMID:26392496

  7. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  8. Discrepancies between disk diffusion and broth susceptibility studies of the activity of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid against ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Manian, F A; Alford, R H

    1986-01-01

    Ticarcillin and clavulanic acid in combination were tested against 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin by disk diffusion. A total of 21 isolates (53%) were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion, under currently recommended criteria for ticarcillin susceptibility. Macro-broth dilution tests (ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid, 2 micrograms/ml) confirmed susceptibility (MIC less than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) of only 8 (38%) of 21 isolates. Time-kill studies of disk diffusion susceptible isolates indicated 2 log10 or greater killing of most isolates at 6 h in broth containing ticarcillin (64 micrograms/ml) combined with clavulanic acid (1, 2, 5, or 10 micrograms/ml). After 6 h, regrowth was common in all concentrations of clavulanic acid except 10 micrograms/ml. Regrowth populations were resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate by MIC determination. Poor bactericidal activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate against ticarcillin-resistant P. aeruginosa was confirmed, as most isolates did not undergo 99.9% or greater killing at 24 h in all concentrations of clavulanic acid. Serotype O-11 was our most common serotype and was associated with disk diffusion "pseudosusceptibility." Concomitant disk diffusion testing of ticarcillin-clavulanate and ticarcillin is recommended for testing the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin should as a rule be considered also resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate, despite apparent susceptibility by disk diffusion. PMID:3092732

  9. Effect of bacteriophage infection in combination with tobramycin on the emergence of resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Lindsey B; McLean, Robert J C; Rohde, Rodney E; Aron, Gary M

    2014-10-03

    Bacteriophage infection and antibiotics used individually to reduce biofilm mass often result in the emergence of significant levels of phage and antibiotic resistant cells. In contrast, combination therapy in Escherichia coli biofilms employing T4 phage and tobramycin resulted in greater than 99% and 39% reduction in antibiotic and phage resistant cells, respectively. In P. aeruginosa biofilms, combination therapy resulted in a 60% and 99% reduction in antibiotic and PB-1 phage resistant cells, respectively. Although the combined treatment resulted in greater reduction of E. coli CFUs compared to the use of antibiotic alone, infection of P. aeruginosa biofilms with PB-1 in the presence of tobramycin was only as effective in the reduction of CFUs as the use of antibiotic alone. The study demonstrated phage infection in combination with tobramycin can significantly reduce the emergence of antibiotic and phage resistant cells in both E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, however, a reduction in biomass was dependent on the phage-host system.

  10. Biocontrol Potential of Siderophore Producing Heavy Metal Resistant Alcaligenes sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RZS3 vis-à-vis Organophosphorus Fungicide.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Patel, P R

    2011-07-01

    In present study in vitro phytopathogen suppression activity of siderophoregenic preparations of Ni and Mn resistant Alcaligenes sp. STC1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RZS3 SH-94B isolated from soil were found superior over the chemical pesticide. Siderophore rich culture broth and siderophore rich supernatant exerted antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger NCIM 1025, Aspergillus flavus NCIM 650, Fusarium oxysporum NCIM 1281, Alternaria alternata ARI 715, Cercospora arachichola, Metarhizium anisopliae NCIM 1311 and Pseudomonas solanacerum NCIM 5103. Siderophore rich broth and supernatant exhibited potent antifungal activity vis-à-vis oraganophosphorus chemical fungicide; kitazine. The minimum fungicidal concentration required was 25 μl for Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium oxysporum, Cercospora arachichola, Metarhizium anisopliae, Pseudomonas solanacerum and 75 μl for A. alternata.

  11. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  12. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  13. An integrated approach to control a prolonged outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Knoester, M; de Boer, M G J; Maarleveld, J J; Claas, E C J; Bernards, A T; de Jonge, E; van Dissel, J T; Veldkamp, K E

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we aim to provide insight into the complexity of outbreak management in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. In October 2010 four patients on the ICU of our tertiary care centre were colonized or infected with a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA). An outbreak investigation was carried out and infection control measures were taken in an attempt to identify a potential source and stop transmission. The outbreak investigation included descriptive epidemiology, comprising retrospective case finding by reviewing the laboratory information system back to 2004 and prospective case finding by patient screening for MDR-PA. Furthermore, microbiological analysis, environmental screening and a case-control study were carried out. Infection control measures consisted of re-education of healthcare personnel on basic hygiene measures, auditing of hygiene procedures used in daily practice by infection control practitioners, and stepwise up-regulation of isolation measures. From February 2009 to January 2012, 44 patients on our ICU were found to be MDR-PA positive. MDR-PA isolates of the 44 patients showed two distinct AFLP patterns, with homology within each of the AFLP clusters of more than 93%. The VIM metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in 20 of 21 tested isolates. A descriptive epidemiology investigation identified the rooms with the highest numbers of MDR-PA positive patients. The case-control study showed three factors to be independently associated with MDR-PA positivity: admission to ICU subunit 1 (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.7, 22), surgery prior to or during admission (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.6, 20) and being warmed-up with the warm-air blanket (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2, 11). After three environmental screening rounds, with sampling of sinks, furniture and devices in the ICU, without revealing a clear common source, a fourth environmental investigation included culturing of faucet aerators. Two faucets were found to be positive for MDR-PA and

  14. Enhanced in vivo fitness of carbapenem-resistant oprD mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed through high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Skurnik, David; Roux, Damien; Cattoir, Vincent; Danilchanka, Olga; Lu, Xi; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R.; Han, Kook; Guillard, Thomas; Jiang, Deming; Gaultier, Charlotte; Guerin, François; Aschard, Hugues; Leclercq, Roland; Mekalanos, John J.; Lory, Stephen; Pier, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    An important question regarding the biologic implications of antibiotic-resistant microbes is how resistance impacts the organism’s overall fitness and virulence. Currently it is generally thought that antibiotic resistance carries a fitness cost and reduces virulence. For the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, treatment with carbapenem antibiotics is a mainstay of therapy that can lead to the emergence of resistance, often through the loss of the carbapenem entry channel OprD. Transposon insertion-site sequencing was used to analyze the fitness of 300,000 mutants of P. aeruginosa strain PA14 in a mouse model for gut colonization and systemic dissemination after induction of neutropenia. Transposon insertions in the oprD gene led not only to carbapenem resistance but also to a dramatic increase in mucosal colonization and dissemination to the spleen. These findings were confirmed in vivo with different oprD mutants of PA14 as well as with related pairs of carbapenem-susceptible and -resistant clinical isolates. Compared with OprD+ strains, those lacking OprD were more resistant to killing by acidic pH or normal human serum and had increased cytotoxicity against murine macrophages. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed that an oprD mutant showed dramatic changes in the transcription of genes that may contribute to the various phenotypic changes observed. The association between carbapenem resistance and enhanced survival of P. aeruginosa in infected murine hosts suggests that either drug resistance or host colonization can cause the emergence of more pathogenic, drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clones in a single genetic event. PMID:24248354

  15. Application of the multifactor dimensionality reduction method in evaluation of the roles of multiple genes/enzymes in multidrug-resistant acquisition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Peng, Y; Bi, J; Xie, C; Chen, X; Li, Y; Ye, X; Zhou, J

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) infections are major threats to healthcare-associated infection control and the intrinsic molecular mechanisms of MDRPA are also unclear. We examined 348 isolates of P. aeruginosa, including 188 MDRPA and 160 non-MDRPA, obtained from five tertiary-care hospitals in Guangzhou, China. Significant correlations were found between gene/enzyme carriage and increased rates of antimicrobial resistance (P < 0·01). gyrA mutation, OprD loss and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) presence were identified as crucial molecular risk factors for MDRPA acquisition by a combination of univariate logistic regression and a multifactor dimensionality reduction approach. The MDRPA rate was also elevated with the increase in positive numbers of those three determinants (P < 0·001). Thus, gyrA mutation, OprD loss and MBL presence may serve as predictors for early screening of MDRPA infections in clinical settings.

  16. Pharmacodynamics of Aerosolized Fosfomycin and Amikacin against Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Hollow-Fiber Infection Model: Experimental Basis for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Johnson, Adam; Whalley, Sarah; Santoyo-Castelazo, Anahi; Montgomery, A. Bruce; Walters, Kathie Ann; Lipman, Jeffrey; Hope, William W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been a resurgence of interest in aerosolization of antibiotics for treatment of patients with severe pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. A combination formulation of amikacin-fosfomycin is currently undergoing clinical testing although the exposure-response relationships of these drugs have not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to describe the individual and combined antibacterial effects of simulated epithelial lining fluid exposures of aerosolized amikacin and fosfomycin against resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MICs of 16 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MICs of 2 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) using a dynamic hollow-fiber infection model over 7 days. Targeted peak concentrations of 300 mg/liter amikacin and/or 1,200 mg/liter fosfomycin as a 12-hourly dosing regimens were used. Quantitative cultures were performed to describe changes in concentrations of the total and resistant bacterial populations. The targeted starting inoculum was 108 CFU/ml for both strains. We observed that neither amikacin nor fosfomycin monotherapy was bactericidal against P. aeruginosa while both were associated with rapid amplification of resistant P. aeruginosa strains (about 108 to 109 CFU/ml within 24 to 48 h). For K. pneumoniae, amikacin but not fosfomycin was bactericidal. When both drugs were combined, a rapid killing was observed for P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae (6-log kill within 24 h). Furthermore, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin effectively suppressed growth of resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin was effective at maximizing bacterial killing and suppressing emergence of resistance against these clinical isolates. PMID:27795380

  17. Iron Availability Shapes the Evolution of Bacteriocin Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, R. Fredrik; Scanlan, Pauline; Buckling, Angus

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of bacterial resistance to conventional antimicrobials is a widely documented phenomenon with gravely important consequences for public health. However, bacteria also produce a vast repertoire of natural antimicrobials, presumably in order to kill competing species. Bacteriocins are a common class of protein-based antimicrobials that have been shown to play an important role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial communities. Relative to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, little is known about how novel resistance to these toxic compounds evolves. In this study we present results illustrating that although resistance is able to evolve, it remains critically dependent on the environmental context. Resistance to bacteriocins, in particular the pyocin S2, evolves readily when iron is present but less so when iron is limiting, because the receptor for this pyocin is also required for iron uptake during iron limitation. This suggests that although resistance to bacteriocins can easily evolve, environmental conditions will determine how and when resistance occurs. PMID:26905630

  18. Thermal mitigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Ann; Ricker, Erica B.; Nuxoll, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms infect 2 – 4 % of medical devices upon implantation, resulting in multiple surgeries and increased recovery time due to the very great increase in antibiotic resistance in the biofilm phenotype. This work investigates the feasibility of thermal mitigation of biofilms at physiologically accessible temperatures. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were cultured to high bacterial density (1.7 × 109 CFU cm−2) and subjected to thermal shocks ranging from 50 °C to 80 °C for durations of 1 to 30 min. The decrease in viable bacteria was closely correlated with an Arrhenius temperature dependence and Weibull-style time dependence, demonstrating up to six orders of magnitude reduction in bacterial load. The bacterial load for films with more conventional initial bacterial densities dropped below quantifiable levels, indicating thermal mitigation as a viable approach to biofilm control. PMID:26371591

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  20. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  1. Genetic analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from healthy captive snakes: evidence of high inter- and intrasite dissemination and occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colinon, Céline; Jocktane, Dominique; Brothier, Elisabeth; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cournoyer, Benoit; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated by selective plating and PCR identification test, among healthy captive snakes from zoological and private collections from France as well as from wild snakes from Guinea. P. aeruginosa faecal carriage among captive snakes was high (72 out of 83 individuals), but low among wild specimen (3 out of 23 individuals). Genetic diversity analyses of the isolates, based on SpeI-PFGE profiles, evidenced five dominant clones or clonal complexes spreading among snakes within a site and between sites and persisting over time. Similar clones or clonal complexes were detected from mouth swabs of the owners and from water and preys used to feed the snakes, evidencing various sources of snake colonization and the first cases of P. aeruginosa cross-contamination between snakes and owners. These observations led to the conclusion that P. aeruginosa behaves as an opportunistic species within snakes in captivity and that colonization and dissemination occurs consecutively to processes similar to those identified within the hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that most isolates had a wild-type resistance profile except for one persistent clone isolated from both snakes and preys that harboured multiple antimicrobial resistance genes mediated by an integron carrying the qacH, aadB, aadA2 and cmlA10 cassettes, and a tetA(C)-carrying transposon. Biocides or antibiotics used in the zoological garden could have led to the acquisition of this integron.

  2. Study on the resistance mechanism via outer membrane protein OprD2 and metal β-lactamase expression in the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuangqi; Chen, Yiqiang; Song, Dezhi; Kong, Jinliang; Wu, Yanbin; Lu, Huasong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the imipenem-resistant mechanism via the outer membrane protein (OMP) OprD2 and metal β-lactamase expression in the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa was clinically separated and validated by VITEK-2 full-automatic bacteria analyzer. Drug resistance, sensitive antibiotics and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were tested using the drug sensitivity analysis system. The phenotype positive strains of MBL genes were screened using the Kirby-Bauer diffusion method by adding metal ion-chelating agent EDTA on the imipenem susceptibility paper. IMP-1, VIM-1 and SPM metaloenzyme genes were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). The OMP OprD2 genes were tested by PCR-TRAP, and the protein expression was tested using western blot analysis. The location of OMP OprD2 was confirmed using the sodium salicylate inhibition test. The results showed that 80 portions (40%) of MBL-positive strains were screened out of 200 specimens. Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) and MIC values were significantly higher than quality control bacteria and control bacteria (P<0.05). A total of 35 cases with IMP-1 positive, 20 with VIM-1 positive, 16 with SPM positive, 5 with 2 positive genes and 4 with 3 positive genes were screened among MBL positive strains. A total of 150 portions (75%) of OprD2 deficiencies were screened from 200 specimens. The standard strains and sensitive strains showed OprD2 protein bands at 45 kDa while no OprD2 protein bands appeared in OprD2 deficiency strains. It was in accordance with gene detection. In conclusion, OMP OprD2 deficiency and MBL phenotype positivity may be important mechanisms of IRPA.

  3. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  4. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species.

  5. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Debarati; Das Talukdar, Anupam; Dutta Choudhury, Manabendra; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar Chanda, Debadatta; Chakravorty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa) and in a heterologous host (E. coli). Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB) could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1) and heterologous host (E. coli JM107) but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions significantly, there

  6. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  7. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  8. Diverse Genetic Background of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mainland China, and Emergence of an Extensively Drug-Resistant ST292 Clone in Kunming

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin; Wu, Yue; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Kudinha, Timothy; Bazaj, Alda; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding of the multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) epidemiology in mainland China, a nationwide surveillance network of 27 tertiary hospitals was established. Non-duplicate MDR-PA isolates from 254 cases of nosocomial infections, were collected during the period August 2011 to July 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nine antimicrobial agents were determined by broth micro-dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines [M7-A10]. Genotyping analysis was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The presence of acquired carbapenemases was also determined by molecular approaches for 233 carbapenem-resistant isolates. Carbapenemase genes were detected in 19 (8.2%) isolates, with 13 of these isolates encoding IMP-type enzymes, five with VIM-2, and one with KPC-2. MLST analysis revealed significant genetic diversity among the MDR-PA isolates studied, and 91 STs (including 17 novel STs) were identified. However, a long-term outbreak of an emerging extensively drug-resistant (XDR) ST292/PFGE genotype A clone was detected in a hospital from Southwest China. This study has demonstrated that MDR-PA in mainland China have evolved from diverse genetic backgrounds. Evidence of clonal dissemination of the organism and nosocomial outbreaks in some regions, suggest a need to strengthen existing infection control measures. PMID:27198004

  9. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa OspR is an oxidative stress sensing regulator that affects pigment production, antibiotic resistance and dissemination during infection

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lefu; Murray, Thomas S.; Kazmierczak, Barbara I.; He, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Oxidative stress is one of the main challenges bacteria must cope with during infection. Here, we identify a new oxidative stress sensing and response ospR (oxidative stress response and pigment production Regulator) gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Deletion of ospR leads to a significant induction in H2O2 resistance. This effect is mediated by de-repression of PA2826, which lies immediately upstream of ospR and encodes a glutathione peroxidase. Constitutive expression of ospR alters pigment production and β-lactam resistance in P. aeruginosa via a PA2826-independent manner. We further discovered that OspR regulates additional genes involved in quorum sensing and tyrosine metabolism. These regulatory effects are redox-mediated as addition of H2O2 or cumene hydroperoxide leads to the dissociation of OspR from promoter DNA. A conserved Cys residue, Cys-24, plays the major role of oxidative stress sensing in OspR. The serine substitution mutant of Cys-24 is less susceptible to oxidation in vitro and exhibits altered pigmentation and β-lactam resistance. Lastly, we show that an ospR null mutant strain displays a greater capacity for dissemination than wild-type MPAO1 strain in a murine model of acute pneumonia. Thus, OspR is a global regulator that senses oxidative stress and regulates multiple pathways to enhance the survival of P. aeruginosa inside host. PMID:19943895

  11. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H; Wiegmann, Daniel D; Sherman, David H; McKay, Robert M; LiPuma, John J; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains.

  12. Pleiotropic effects of temperature-regulated 2-OH-lauroytransferase (PA0011) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, virulence and type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bobo; Li, Bo; Liang, Ying; Li, Jing; Gao, Lang; Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin; Shen, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen which adapts to changing environment, such as temperature variations and entering host by regulating their gene expression. Here, we report that gene PA0011 in P. aeruginosa PAO1, which encodes a 2-OH-lauroytransferase participating in lipid A biosynthesis, is involved in carbapenem resistance and virulence in a temperature-regulated manner in PAO1. The expression of PA0011 was higher at an environment temperature (21 °C) than that at a body temperature (37 °C). The inactivation of PA0011 rendered increased antibiotic susceptibility and decreased virulence both in vivo and in vitro. The impaired integrity and the decreased stability of the outer membrane were the cause of the increased susceptibility of PAO1(Δ0011) to carbapenem and many other common antibiotics. The reduced endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contributed to the decreased virulence both at 21 °C and 37 °C in PAO1 (Δ0011). In addition, we have found that PA0011 repressed the expression of TTSS virulence factors both at transcriptional and translational levels, similar to the effect of O antigen of LPS but unlike any effect of its homologue reported in other bacteria. The effect of PA0011 on resistance to many antibiotics including carbapenem and virulence in P. aeruginosa makes it a target for novel antimicrobial therapies.

  13. Rapid identification of international multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones by multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis and investigation of their susceptibility to lytic bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Larché, Jérôme; Pouillot, Flavie; Essoh, Christiane; Libisch, Balázs; Straut, Monica; Lee, Je Chul; Soler, Charles; Lamarca, Richard; Gleize, Elodie; Gabard, Jérôme; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated over a period of 12 months in two French hospitals and to test their susceptibility to bacteriophages. A total of 47 MDR isolates recovered from hospitalized patients were genotyped using multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis. The genotypes were distributed into five clones (including 19, 5, 5, 3, and 3 isolates, respectively) and 12 singletons. Comparison to 77 MDR strains from three other countries, and MLST analysis of selected isolates showed the predominance of international MDR clones. The larger clone, CC235, contained 59 isolates displaying different antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including the presence of the GES1, VIM-2, VIM-4, and IMP-1 β-lactamases. Three newly isolated P. aeruginosa bacteriophages were found to lyse 42 of the 44 analyzed strains, distributed into the different clonal complexes. This pilot study suggests that systematic genotyping of P. aeruginosa MDR strains could improve our epidemiological understanding of transmission at both the local (hospital) and the national level and that phage therapy could be an alternative or a complementary treatment to antibiotics for treating MDR-infected patients.

  14. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Latino, Libera; Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Vu Thien, Hoang; Pourcel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31) is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10) with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  15. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation.

  16. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Tested against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Various Resistance Patterns Isolated in U.S. Hospitals (2011-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Robert K.; Sader, Helio S.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam, a novel antimicrobial agent with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including drug-resistant strains) and other common Gram-negative pathogens (including most extended-spectrum-β-lactamase [ESBL]-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains), and comparator agents were susceptibility tested by a reference broth microdilution method against 7,071 Enterobacteriaceae and 1,971 P. aeruginosa isolates. Isolates were collected consecutively from patients in 32 medical centers across the United States during 2011 to 2012. Overall, 15.7% and 8.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR), and 8.4% and 1.2% of Enterobacteriaceae were classified as MDR and XDR. No pandrug-resistant (PDR) Enterobacteriaceae isolates and only one PDR P. aeruginosa isolate were detected. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most potent (MIC50/90, 0.5/2 μg/ml) agent tested against P. aeruginosa and demonstrated good activity against 310 MDR strains (MIC50/90, 2/8 μg/ml) and 175 XDR strains (MIC50/90, 4/16 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam exhibited high overall activity (MIC50/90, 0.25/1 μg/ml) against Enterobacteriaceae and retained activity (MIC50/90, 4/>32 μg/ml) against many 601 MDR strains but not against the 86 XDR strains (MIC50, >32 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam was highly potent (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 μg/ml) against 2,691 Escherichia coli isolates and retained good activity against most ESBL-phenotype E. coli isolates (MIC50/90, 0.5/4 μg/ml), but activity was low against ESBL-phenotype Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (MIC50/90, 32/>32 μg/ml), explained by the high rate (39.8%) of meropenem coresistance observed in this species phenotype. In summary, ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated high potency and broad-spectrum activity against many contemporary Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa isolates collected in U.S. medical centers. Importantly, ceftolozane/tazobactam retained potency against many MDR and

  18. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    PubMed Central

    May, Ian; Abu-Khdeir, Maha; Blackwood, Roland Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection. PMID:24470950

  19. Microarray-mediated transcriptome analysis of the tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W in the presence of TBT.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Santosh K; Tokashiki, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Satoru

    2006-04-01

    The tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W, which was isolated in seawater from the Arabian Sea, was subjected to transcriptome analysis in the presence of high concentrations of TBT. Only slight effects were observed at TBT concentration of 50 microM, but exposure to 500 microM resulted in the upregulation of 6 genes and the downregulation of 75. Among the 75 downregulated genes, 53% (40 out of 75) were of hypothetical function, followed by 14 transcriptional regulation- and translation-associated genes. The results of this study indicated that although the 25W strain was highly resistant to TBT, high concentrations of TBT result in toxic effect on the transcriptional and translational levels. The target genes likely belong to a specific category of transcription- and translation-associated genes rather than to other gene categories.

  20. A case of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa commercial tattoo infection.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, A; Betelli, M; Perego, M R; Foresti, S; Scarabelli, G; Grassi, G

    2015-11-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium that can cause disease in immunocompromised patients but also burn wounds and other cutaneous infections. We report the case of a 31 years old woman with a P. Aeruginosa commercial tattoo infection treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy. Today tattooing is increasingly common and despite specific regulations many cases of tattoo site infection are reported in the literature. Principal actual tattoo infective epidemiology includes Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and mycosis infections and parenteral transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV but also recently published cases of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and non tuberculous mycobacterium tattoo infection.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Moradali, M. Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence.

    PubMed

    Moradali, M Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Susceptibility Results from Four Years (2012 to 2015) of the International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring Program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Huband, Michael D; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of health care-associated infections, and inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring (INFORM) program monitors the in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam and many comparator agents. We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 7,452 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 79 U.S. medical centers in 2012 to 2015. The isolates were collected and tested consecutively for susceptibility by broth microdilution method. Infection types included mainly pneumonia (50.5%), skin and skin structure (24.0%), urinary tract (7.8%), and bloodstream (7.7%) infections. The only compounds with >90% susceptibility rates were colistin (MIC50/90, 1/2 mg/liter, respectively; 99.4% susceptible), ceftazidime-avibactam (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0% susceptible), and amikacin (MIC50/90, 2/8 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0/93.0% susceptible [CLSI/EUCAST, respectively]). The addition of avibactam to ceftazidime increased the percentage of susceptible P. aeruginosa isolates from 84.3% to 97.0%. Multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR) phenotypes were observed among 1,151 (15.4%) and 698 (9.4%) isolates, respectively, and ceftazidime-avibactam inhibited 82.1 and 75.8% of these isolates at ≤8 mg/liter, respectively. High rates of cross-resistance were observed with ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam, whereas ceftazidime-avibactam retained activity against isolates nonsusceptible to ceftazidime (81.0% susceptible), meropenem (86.2% susceptible), and piperacillin-tazobactam (85.4% susceptible), as well as isolates nonsusceptible to these three β-lactams (71.2% susceptible). The only antimicrobial combinations that provided a better overall anti-Pseudomonas coverage than ceftazidime-avibactam (97.0% susceptibility rate) were those including amikacin (97.0 to 98.4% coverage

  4. [Determination of associated antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a public hospital in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Cláudia Castelo Branco Artiaga; Sadoyama, Geraldo; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the associated antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in relation to an antimicrobial agent with other drugs. The associated antimicrobial resistance was calculated by means of the relative risk. There was an obvious relationship between oxacillin resistance and resistance to other antimicrobial agents among isolates of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (68.5%), greater than 32%, except for linezolid (6.7%). Pronounced associated resistance among drugs was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, particularly for ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (59.6% to 60.7%) and for aminoglycosides and carbapenems (66.3 % to 67.7 %) and other beta-lactam antibiotics (52.3% to 85.8%). The present study emphasizes the importance of diagnostic cultures and susceptibility testing for selecting the correct antimicrobial agent, with regard to the clinical impact of increased multiresistance and selection of associated antimicrobial resistance.

  5. Interactions between Neutrophils and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects 70,000 patients worldwide. Morbidity and mortality in CF is largely caused by lung complications due to the triad of impaired mucociliary clearance, microbial infections and chronic inflammation. Cystic fibrosis airway inflammation is mediated by robust infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils). Neutrophils are not capable of clearing lung infections and contribute to tissue damage by releasing their dangerous cargo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa is a main respiratory pathogen in CF infecting most patients. Although PMNs are key to attack and clear P. aeruginosa in immunocompetent individuals, PMNs fail to do so in CF. Understanding why neutrophils cannot clear P. aeruginosa in CF is essential to design novel therapies. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms by which PMNs attack and eliminate P. aeruginosa. It also summarizes current advances in our understanding of why PMNs are incapable of clearing P. aeruginosa and how this bacterium adapts to and resists PMN-mediated killing in the airways of CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28282951

  6. Fast and specific detection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa from other pseudomonas species by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jami Al-Ahmadi, G.; Zahmatkesh Roodsari, R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important life-threatening nosocomial pathogen that plays a prominent role in wound infections of burned patients. We designed this study to identify the isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from burned patients at the genus and species level through primers targeting oprI and oprL genes, and analyzed their antimicrobial resistance pattern. Over a 2-month period, wound samples were taken from burned patients and plated on MacConkey agar. All suspected colonies were primarily screened for P. aeruginosa by a combination of phenotypic tests. Molecular identifications of colonies were done using specific primers for oprI and oprL genes. Bacterial isolates were recovered from burn wound infections. Based on phenotypical identification tests, 138 (34%) P. aeruginosa isolates were identified; whereas by molecular techniques, just 128 P. aeruginosa yielded amplicon of oprL gene using species-specific primers, verifying the identity of P. aeruginosa; the others yielded amplicon of oprI gene using genus-specific primers, confirming the identity of fluorescent pseudomonads. This study indicates that molecular detection of P. aeruginosa in burn patients employing the OprL gene target is a useful technique for the early and precise detection of P. aeruginosa. PCR detection should be carried out as well as phenotypic testing for the best aggressive antibiotic treatment of P. aeruginosa strains at an earlier stage. It also has significant benefits on clinical outcomes. PMID:28289359

  7. CpxR Activates MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump Expression and Enhances Antibiotic Resistance in Both Laboratory and Clinical nalB-Type Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xue-Xian; O’Gara, Fergal; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are responsible for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrate that CpxR, previously identified as a regulator of the cell envelope stress response in Escherichia coli, is directly involved in activation of expression of RND efflux pump MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. A conserved CpxR binding site was identified upstream of the mexA promoter in all genome-sequenced P. aeruginosa strains. CpxR is required to enhance mexAB-oprM expression and drug resistance, in the absence of repressor MexR, in P. aeruginosa strains PA14. As defective mexR is a genetic trait associated with the clinical emergence of nalB-type multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa during antibiotic treatment, we investigated the involvement of CpxR in regulating multidrug resistance among resistant isolates generated in the laboratory via antibiotic treatment and collected in clinical settings. CpxR is required to activate expression of mexAB-oprM and enhances drug resistance, in the absence or presence of MexR, in ofloxacin-cefsulodin-resistant isolates generated in the laboratory. Furthermore, CpxR was also important in the mexR-defective clinical isolates. The newly identified regulatory linkage between CpxR and the MexAB-OprM efflux pump highlights the presence of a complex regulatory network modulating multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736975

  8. Efficacy of High-Dose Meropenem (Six Grams per Day) in Treatment of Experimental Murine Pneumonia Induced by Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Iwanaga, Naoki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Taiga; Yanagihara, Kastunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    High-dose meropenem (MEPM; 6 g/day) has been approved as a treatment for purulent meningitis; however, little is known regarding its in vivo efficacy in refractory lower respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MEPM at 6 g/day in a murine model of severe pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Experimental pneumonia induced by MEPM-resistant P. aeruginosa was treated with normal-dose MEPM (150 mg/kg of body weight, simulating a 3-g/day regimen in humans) or high-dose MEPM (500 mg/kg, simulating a 6-g/day regimen in humans). Mice treated with high-dose MEPM showed significantly restored survival relative to that of untreated mice and tended to show a survival rate higher than that of mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. The viable bacterial counts (of two clinical isolates) in the lungs decreased significantly in mice treated with high-dose MEPM from those for untreated mice (P < 0.001) or mice treated with normal-dose MEPM (P, <0.01 and <0.05). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose MEPM than in untreated mice. The free MEPM concentration in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exceeded 16 μg/ml for 85 min in mice treated with high-dose MEPM, but not for mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. Our results demonstrate that high-dose MEPM (6 g/day) might provide better protection against pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa than the dose normally administered (less than 3 g/day).

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses Show that Carbapenem Use and Medical Devices Are the Leading Risk Factors for Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Voor in ‘t holt, Anne F.; Severin, Juliëtte A.; Lesaffre, Emmanuel M. E. H.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to identify the risk factors associated with carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to identify sources and reservoirs for the pathogen. A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases from 1 January 1987 until 27 January 2012 identified 1,662 articles, 53 of which were included in a systematic review and 38 in a random-effects meta-analysis study. The use of carbapenem, use of fluoroquinolones, use of vancomycin, use of other antibiotics, having medical devices, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, having underlying diseases, patient characteristics, and length of hospital stay were significant risk factors in multivariate analyses. The meta-analyses showed that carbapenem use (odds ratio [OR] = 7.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.43 to 9.25) and medical devices (OR = 5.11; 95% CI = 3.55 to 7.37) generated the highest pooled estimates. Cumulative meta-analyses showed that the pooled estimate of carbapenem use was stable and that the pooled estimate of the risk factor “having medical devices” increased with time. We conclude that our results highlight the importance of antibiotic stewardship and the thoughtful use of medical devices in helping prevent outbreaks of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. PMID:24550343

  11. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Friman, V-P; Soanes-Brown, D; Sierocinski, P; Molin, S; Johansen, H K; Merabishvili, M; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Buckling, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy--the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria--because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here, we determined whether in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and nonadapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages, whereas all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. Although the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely to explain why evolved phages were more effective in reducing the densities of chronic isolates. Our data show that pathogen genotypes respond differently to phage pre-adaptation, and as a result, phage therapies might need to be individually adjusted for different patients.

  12. Molecular epidemiology provides evidence of genotypic heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O:12 outbreak isolates from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E; Bonacorsi, S; Rohrlich, P; Duval, M; Lhopital, S; Brahimi, N; Vilmer, E; Goering, R V

    1996-01-01

    Ribotyping randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used for the epidemiologic evaluation of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:12 isolates obtained from eight children and two P. aeruginosa O:12 environmental isolates from a hematology ward. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were able to discriminate isolates that were indistinguishable by biochemical typing, O serotyping or ribotyping. PMID:8940479

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  14. Chlorine Dioxide is a Better Disinfectant than Sodium Hypochlorite against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Yasuda, Noritomo; Shima, Ayaka; Morino, Hirofumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on various multidrug-resistant strains in the presence of bovine serum albumin and sheep erythrocytes to mimic the blood contamination that frequently occurs in the clinical setting. The 3 most important species that cause nosocomial infections, i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRA), were evaluated, with three representative strains of each. At a 10-ppm concentration, ClO2 drastically reduced the number of bacteria of all MDRP and MDRA strains, and 2 out of 3 MRSA strains. However, 10 ppm of NaClO did not significantly kill any of the 9 strains tested in 60 seconds (s). In addition, 100 ppm of ClO2 completely killed all MRSA strains, whereas 100 ppm of NaClO failed to significantly lower the number of 2 MRSA strains and 1 MDRA strain. A time-course experiment demonstrated that, within 15 s, 100 ppm of ClO2, but not 100 ppm of NaClO, completely killed all tested strains. Taken together, these data suggest that ClO2 is more effective than NaClO against MRSA, MDRP, and MDRA, and 100 ppm is an effective concentration against these multidrug-resistant strains, which cause fatal nosocomial infections.

  15. Potency of carbapenems for the prevention of carbapenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the high potency of a new carbapenem doripenem.

    PubMed

    Sakyo, Shihomi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Tanimoto, Koichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The potencies of the carbapenems; doripenem (DRPM), meropenem (MEPM) and imipenem (IPM) in preventing the emergence of carbapenem-resistant mutants were examined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. The carbapenems predominantly selected carbapenem-resistant mutants or carbapenem mutants with reduced susceptibilities that were specifically resistant to carbapenems and had arisen as a result of the reduced level of expression of the outer membrane protein with a molecular weight of about 48,000 (OprD). The potency of carbapenems in preventing the growth of the mutants differed for DRPM, MEPM and IPM. The isolation frequency of the mutant was examined on agar plates containing each of the carbapenems at a concentration of 1/2 or 1/4 MIC of each carbapenem for that mutant. Mutants were not selected on agar containing DRPM at a frequency of greater than 10(-9) per cell per generation, whereas mutants of each strain were selected on agar containing MEPM or IPM at frequencies of 10(-7) to 10(-9) per cell per generation. The drug concentrations and the drug concentration range for the selective increase of carbapenem resistant mutants in the broth culture containing each carbapenem differed for each carbapenem. DRPM exhibited both the lowest drug concentration and the narrowest range of drug concentration for selection of the carbapenem-resistant mutants. The results shown in this report indicated that DRPM exhibited the greatest ability to prevent the emergence of the mutant.

  16. Effects of azlocillin in combination with clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and N-formimidoyl thienamycin against beta-lactamase-producing, carbenicillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, S B; Gardella, A; Philippon, A M; Jacoby, G A; Moellering, R C

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the combination of azlocillin with the beta-lactamase inhibitors clavulanic acid and sulbactam and with N-formimidoyl thienamycin against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with R-factor-mediated carbenicillin resistance. The 10 strains tested (1 R-, 9 R+) were isogenic, except for the presence of individual plasmids determining each of nine plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases found in P. aeruginosa. We utilized a checkerboard technique for testing antibiotic combinations. Low concentrations of clavulanic acid produced synergy with azlocillin against the strains producing the TEM-1, TEM-2, PSE-1, PSE-3, and PSE-4 beta-lactamases; for the strains producing the OXA-1, OXA-2, OXA-3, and PSE-2 beta-lactamases, such synergy was not found. With sulbactam, synergy was demonstrated in all strains except that producing PSE-2 beta-lactamase; for several strains, however, the concentration of sulbactam required to produce synergy was substantially higher than that for clavulanic acid. N-Formimidoyl thienamycin was highly active as a single agent against all of the strains, regardless of beta-lactamase production. The combination of N-formimidoyl thienamycin and azlocillin produced synergy against only two of the strains tested. PMID:6100423

  17. Alginate Overproduction Affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, Gail M.; Balzer, Grant J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant communities of microorganisms organized in biofilms. Although biofilm formation and the conversion to mucoidy are both important aspects of CF pathogenesis, the relationship between them is at the present unclear. In this study, we report that the overproduction of alginate affects biofilm development on an abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate-overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:11514525

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Additional CDC Patient Safety Websites Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Blood Safety ... the CDC AR Threat report . What is the CDC doing to monitor, prevent, and/or help treat ...

  19. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  2. Accelerated corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel caused by marine aerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Li, Huabing; Yang, Chunguang; Li, Qi; Lin, Hai; Li, Xiaogang; Yang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated through electrochemical and surface analyses. The electrochemical results showed that P. aeruginosa significantly reduced the corrosion resistance of 2205 DSS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images showed that the depths of the largest pits on 2205 DSS with and without P. aeruginosa were 14.0 and 4.9μm, respectively, indicating that the pitting corrosion was accelerated by P. aeruginosa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that CrO3 and CrN formed on the 2205 DSS surface in the presence of P. aeruginosa.

  3. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-01-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium. PMID:6410989

  4. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-06-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium.

  5. Oxidation of 1-Tetradecene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, A. J.; Klug, M. J.; Forney, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Sol 20 was grown on 1-tetradecene as sole carbon source, and a vinyl-unsaturated 14-carbon monocarboxylic acid, 13-tetradecenoic acid, was identified from culture fluid. This acid was not produced when n-tetradecane served as substrate for growth. Oxidation of the methyl group represents one method of attack on the 1-alkene by this organism. Tentative identification of 2-tetradecanol indicates that an attack on the double bond is also occurring. α, ω-Dienes would not support growth. PMID:4962057

  6. Presence of exoY, exoS, exoU and exoT genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Somayeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Shokrian, Saeed; Najaf, Khadijeh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Shahrivar, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund:Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ein Gram-negatives Stäbchenbakterium, besitzt eine wichtige Rolle als Krankheitserreger. Daher untersuchten wir Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolate im Nordwestiran auf das Vorkommen von exo-Genen und Biofilmbildnern. Material und Methode: 160 P. aeruginosa-Isolate wurden biochemisch identifiziert und die Antibiotikaresistenz charakterisiert. Die Fähigkeit zur Biofilmbildung wurde im Mikrotiterplatten-Assay, das Vorkommen von exo-Genen mit Allel-spezifischer PCR (Polymerase-Kettenreaktion) analysiert. Zur statistischen Analyse wurde der Chi-Quadrat-Test eingesetzt.Ergebnisse: Als effektivste Antibiotika erwiesen sich Colistin und Polymyxin B. 87% der Isolate waren Biofilmbildner, davon 69% mit massiver Biofilmbildung. In 55% der Isolate wurden exoY, in 52% exoU, in 26,3% exoS und in 5% exoT nachgewiesen. Schlussfolgerung: Die Analyse ergab eine unterschiedliche Verteilung der exo-Gene bei klinischen Isolaten von P. aeruginosa im Nordwestiran. ExoS und exoU kamen häufiger bei nicht biofilmbildenen Isolaten, exoY häufiger bei Biofilmbildnern vor. Die Ergebnisse können ein Hinweis auf die Bedeutung von exoY bei Biofilm bildenden Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolaten sein.

  7. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H.; Wiegmann, Daniel D.; Sherman, David H.; McKay, Robert M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa. This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that clinical CF-derived isolates of P. aeruginosa are susceptible to competition in the presence of environmental pseudomonads. We observed that many diverse environmental strains exhibited varied

  8. 7-fluoroindole as an antivirulence compound against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Kim, Jung-Ae; Lee, Jintae

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has necessitated new therapeutic approaches for combating persistent bacterial infection. An alternative approach is regulation of bacterial virulence instead of growth suppression, which can readily lead to drug resistance. The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa depends on a large number of extracellular factors and biofilm formation. Thirty-one natural and synthetic indole derivatives were screened. 7-fluoroindole (7FI) was identified as a compound that inhibits biofilm formation and blood hemolysis without inhibiting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells. Moreover, 7FI markedly reduced the production of quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin. 7FI clearly suppressed swarming motility, protease activity and the production of a polymeric matrix in P. aeruginosa. However, unlike natural indole compounds, synthetic 7FI did not increase antibiotic resistance. Therefore, 7FI is a potential candidate for use in an antivirulence approach against persistent P. aeruginosa infection.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: study of antibiotic resistance and molecular typing in hospital infection cases in a neonatal intensive care unit from Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, M M; de Moraes, B A; Mendonca, V L F; Quadra, M R R; Pinheiro, G S; Asensi, M D

    2002-04-01

    This study had the objective of to analyze the demographic and bacteriologic data of 32 hospitalized newborns in an neonatal intensive care unit of a public maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil, seized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis during a period ranged from July 1997 to July 1999, and to determine the antimicrobial resistance percentage, serotypes and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of 32 strains isolated during this period. The study group presented mean age of 12.5 days, with higher prevalence of hospital infection in males (59.4%) and vaginal delivery (81.2%), than females (40.6%) and cesarean delivery (18.8%), respectively. In this group, 20 (62.5%) patients received antimicrobials before positive blood cultures presentation. A total of 87.5% of the patients were premature, 62.5% presented very low birth weight and 40.6% had asphyxia. We detected high antimicrobial resistance percentage to b-lactams, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline among the isolated strains. All isolated strains were classified as multi-drug resistant. Most strains presented serotype O11 while PFGE analysis revealed seven distinct clones with isolation predominance of a single clone (75%) isolated from July 1997 to June 1998.

  10. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Therapy: Evolving Translational Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Veesenmeyer, Jeffrey L.; Lisboa, Thiago; Rello, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Structured abstract Objective Although most reviews of Pseudomonas aeruginosa therapeutics focus on antibiotics currently in use or in the pipeline, we review evolving translational strategies aimed at using virulence factor antagonists as adjuvant therapies. Data Source Current literature regarding P. aeruginosa virulence determinants and approaches that target them, with an emphasis on type III secretion, quorum-sensing, biofilms, and flagella. Data Extraction and Synthesis P. aeruginosa remains one of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Its predilection to develop resistance to antibiotics and expression of multiple virulence factors contributes to the frequent ineffectiveness of current therapies. Among the many P. aeruginosa virulence determinants that impact infections, type III secretion, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and flagella have been the focus of much recent investigation. Here we review how increased understanding of these important bacterial structures and processes has enabled the development of novel approaches to inhibit each. These promising translational strategies may lead to the development of adjuvant therapies capable of improving outcomes. Conclusions Adjuvant therapies directed against virulence factors have the potential to improve outcomes in P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:19325463

  12. Gold-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Swiecicka, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Misztalewska, Iwona; Kalska-Szostko, Beata; Bienias, Kamil; Bucki, Robert; Car, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and their derivatives (aminosilane and gold-coated) have been widely investigated in numerous medical applications, including their potential to act as antibacterial drug carriers that may penetrate into bacteria cells and biofilm mass. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in hospitalized patients, and significant numbers of currently isolated clinical strains are resistant to standard antibiotic therapy. Here we describe the impact of three types of SPIONs on the growth of P. aeruginosa during long-term bacterial culture. Their size, structure, and physicochemical properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We observed significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa growth in bacterial cultures continued over 96 hours in the presence of gold-functionalized nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄@Au). At the 48-hour time point, growth of P. aeruginosa, as assessed by the number of colonies grown from treated samples, showed the highest inhibition (decreased by 40%). These data provide strong evidence that Fe₃O₄@Au can dramatically reduce growth of P. aeruginosa and provide a platform for further study of the antibacterial activity of this nanomaterial.

  13. ISPa46, a novel insertion sequence in the oprD porin gene of an imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; L'homme, Tiphanie; Bellulo, Sophia; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Mely, Laurent; Leroy, Sylvie; Degand, Nicolas; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems were recovered from a French patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) who had not received carbapenem therapy. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism conferring the carbapenem-resistant phenotype in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from the same CF patient chronically colonised since 2005. Investigation of imipenem resistance of P. aeruginosa strain_02 isolated in May 2011 showed no carbapenemase activity. However, amplification and sequencing of the oprD porin gene revealed disruption of this gene by an insertion sequence (IS) element of 1337 bp that contained a novel transposase of 1227 bp (ISPa46) bordered by two terminal imperfect inverted repeats of 28 bp, which was associated with carbapenem resistance. Retrospective analysis of five additional strains of P. aeruginosa isolated before May 2011 from the same patient revealed that all isolates were likely to be the same clone by multilocus sequence typing analysis (ST540/551), but one of the five isolates was imipenem-susceptible. Although it was possible to demonstrate the presence of ISPa46 in all strains by PCR, this IS was transposed in the oprD gene only for imipenem-resistant isolates. Therefore, this study reports a novel IS element (ISPa46) in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates of a CF patient in Marseille, France, that was associated with carbapenem resistance and was selected in the absence of carbapenem treatment.

  14. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  15. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet (UV) analysis, gas chromatography (GC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5%) and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%), with a total yield of 88.8%. PMID:21609445

  16. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa (an obervation)].

    PubMed

    Abada, A; Benhmidoune, L; Tahiri, H; Essalim, K; Chakib, A; Elbelhadji, M; Rachid, R; Zaghloul, K; Amraoui, A

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an exceptional and severe form of subcutaneous gangrene which requires early diagnosis and emergency treatment. We report the case of a 24 year old woman presenting with necrotizing fasciitis after pansinusitis resistant to treatment. The germ detected was pseudomonas aeruginosa. The infection was controled with intensive care, antibiotics and surgical resection of necrotic tissues. The aim of this observation is to highlight the clinical characteristics of this disease, and to insist on the necessity to recognize the early symptoms and to start treatment as soon as possible.

  17. Cryptic transposable phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.N.; Mit`kina, L.N.; Pleteneva, E.A.; Aleshin, V.V.

    1995-11-01

    Frequencies of nucleotide sequences homologous to phage transposons (PT) of two species, D3112 and B3, were assessed in genomes of natural Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains by the dot-blot hybridization method. These strains were incapable of liberating viable phages on a lawn of the PA01 standard indicator strain of P. aeruginosa. It was shown that the homologies detected belong to two groups, high and intermediate, with respect to homology level. Homology patterns were classified as high when they provided signals comparable to those for hybridization in a positive control; patterns were classified as intermediate when the hybridization level was higher than the background level, but lower than in the positive control. Homologous PT sequences were designated as cryptic PT. Intact cryptic PT prophages were shown to exist in genomes of particular natural strains manifesting a higher level of hybridization. However, the growth of these phages was limited by the restriction system of strain PA01. It is possible to isolate strains maintaining the growth of some cryptic PT. These strains differed from P. aeruginosa with respect to the specificity of the restriction and modification system. Nevertheless, in most cases, the attempt to identify a novel host capable of maintaining growth of a cryptic PT failed. Natural strains often carry cryptic PT related to both known PT species, D3112 and B3. The frequency of cryptic PT is extremely high, reaching 30% in strains with a high level of homology only and up to 50% in all strains exhibiting homology. This high PT frequency is assumed to be associated with the considerable variation of P. aeruginosa. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-03-06

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  19. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  20. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; do Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27653359

  1. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues do; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos de; Matos, Juliana Arruda de; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens.

  2. Bacteriophages for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Harper, D R; Enright, M C

    2011-07-01

    Bacteriophages were first identified in 1915 and were used as antimicrobial agents from 1919 onwards. Despite apparent successes and widespread application, early users did not understand the nature of these agents and their efficacy remained controversial. As a result, they were replaced in the west by chemical antibiotics once these became available. However, bacteriophages remained a common therapeutic approach in parts of Eastern Europe where they are still in use. Increasing levels of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are now driving demand for novel therapeutic approaches. In cases where antibiotic options are limited or nonexistent, the pressure for new agents is greatest. One of the most prominent areas of concern is multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a prominent member of this class and is the cause of damaging infections that can be resistant to successful treatment with conventional antibiotics. At the same time, it exhibits a number of properties that make it a suitable target for bacteriophage-based approaches, including growth in biofilms that can hydrolyse following phage infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa provides a striking example of an infection where clinical need and the availability of a practical therapy coincide.

  3. Are ciprofloxacin dosage regimens adequate for antimicrobial efficacy and prevention of resistance? Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection in elderly patients as a simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Yoann; Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Martin, Olivier; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define the optimal dosage (OD) of ciprofloxacin in order to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a geriatric population with a bloodstream infection. A thousand pharmacokinetic profiles were simulated with a ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetic model from the literature. Three dosing regimens were tested for five days: once daily (QD), twice daily (BID), and thrice daily (TID). First of all, effective dosages (ED) of ciprofloxacin were defined as those achieving a target AUC24 /MIC ≥ 125. Then, these ED were simulated in order to calculate the percentage of time spent within the mutant selection window (TMSW ) and to select optimal dosage (OD) defined as those achieving TMSW ≤ 20%. Based on the AUC24 /MIC, for low MICs (0.125 μg/mL), all dosing regimens recommended by French guidelines were effective. For intermediate MICs (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL), simulated doses higher than those recommended were needed to achieve the efficacy target. About prevention of resistance for low MICs, dosages recommended were only effective in patients with creatinine clearance (CLCR ) ≥ 60 mL/min. For intermediate MICs, dosages higher than recommended were needed to achieve the optimality target. This study shows that current ciprofloxacin dosing guidelines have not been optimized to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance, especially in geriatric patients with mild to severe renal impairment. To achieve both efficacy and prevention of resistance, ciprofloxacin dosages greater than those recommended would be needed. Tolerance of such higher doses needs to be evaluated in clinical studies.

  4. The biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance gene ndvB is important for expression of ethanol oxidation genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J; Parr, Christopher J; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are responsible for a large number of persistent infections and are often more resistant to antibiotics than are free-floating bacteria. In a previous study, we identified a Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene, ndvB, which is important for the formation of periplasmic glucans. We established that these glucans function in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance by sequestering antibiotic molecules away from their cellular targets. In this study, we investigate another function of ndvB in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. DNA microarray analysis identified 24 genes that were responsive to the presence of ndvB. A subset of 20 genes, including 8 ethanol oxidation genes (ercS', erbR, exaA, exaB, eraR, pqqB, pqqC, and pqqE), was highly expressed in wild-type biofilm cells but not in ΔndvB biofilms, while 4 genes displayed the reciprocal expression pattern. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we confirmed the ndvB-dependent expression of the ethanol oxidation genes and additionally demonstrated that these genes were more highly expressed in biofilms than in planktonic cultures. Expression of erbR in ΔndvB biofilms was restored after the treatment of the biofilm with periplasmic extracts derived from wild-type biofilm cells. Inactivation of ethanol oxidation genes increased the sensitivity of biofilms to tobramycin. Together, these results reveal that ndvB affects the expression of multiple genes in biofilms and that ethanol oxidation genes are linked to biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

  5. In vitro and in vivo properties of a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that combats multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adawi, Azmi; Bisignano, Carlo; Genovese, Tiziana; Filocamo, Angela; Khouri-Assi, Camellia; Neville, Anat; Feuerstein, Giora Z; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Neville, Lewis F

    2012-09-01

    The development of an anti-bacterial drug in the form of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting an exposed virulence factor, represents an innovative therapeutic strategy. Consequently, a fully human IgG1 mAb (LST-007) targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) flagellin type b was recombinantly expressed and characterized in vitro and in an infection model driven by a multidrug resistant (MDR) PA strain. LST-007 demonstrated a highly specific binding towards whole PA bacteria harboring flagellin type b and its recombinant counterpart, with a K(D) of 7.4x10(-10) M. In bioactivity assays, LST-007 or titers of Cmax sera derived from pharmacokinetic studies, markedly attenuated PA motility in an equipotent manner. In vivo, parenteral LST-007 (20 mg/kg) given as a single or double-dosing paradigm post-infection, afforded survival (up to 75% at Day 7) in a lethal model of pneumonia driven by the intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of an LD(80) of the MDR PA isolate. This protective effect was markedly superior to that of imipenem (30% survival at Day 7) and totally devoid with an irrelevant, human isotype mAb. These data lay credence that LST-007 may be a valuable adjunct to the limited list of anti-bacterials that can tackle MDR PA strains, thereby warranting its continued development for eventual clinical evaluation.

  6. Measuring antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using Poloxamer 407 gel.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Koike, Naohito; Ehara, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2011-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes various opportunistic infections. Chronic and intractable infections with P. aeruginosa are closely related to the high levels of resistance displayed by this organism to antimicrobial agents and its ability to form biofilms. Although the standard method for examining antimicrobial resistance involves susceptibility testing using Mueller-Hinton agar or broth, this method does not take into account the influence of biofilm formation on antimicrobial susceptibility. Poloxamer 407 is a hydrophilic, nonionic surfactant of the more general class of copolymers that can be used to culture bacteria with similar properties as cells in a biofilm environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria cultured in Poloxamer 407 gel to those grown on Mueller-Hinton agar using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with 24 strains of P. aeruginosa. Antimicrobial sensibility differed between the two mediums, with >60% of the strains displaying increased resistance to β-lactams when cultured on Poloxamer 407 gel. In addition, scanning electron microscopy revealed that typical biofilm formation and extracellular polymeric substance production was only observed with bacteria grown on Poloxamer 407 gel. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility test using Poloxamer 407 gel may provide more accurate information and allow the selection of suitable antimicrobial agents for treating patients infected with biofilm-forming pathogens.

  7. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lectins As Targets for Novel Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, A. V.; Krivozubov, M. S.; Karyagina, A. S.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most widespread and troublesome opportunistic pathogens that is capable of colonizing various human tissues and organs and is often resistant to many currently used antibiotics. This resistance is caused by different factors, including the acquisition of specific resistance genes, intrinsic capability to diminish antibiotic penetration into the bacterial cell, and the ability to form biofilms. This situation has prompted the development of novel compounds differing in their mechanism of action from traditional antibiotics that suppress the growth of microorganisms or directly kill bacteria. Instead, these new compounds should decrease the pathogens’ ability to colonize and damage human tissues by inhibiting the virulence factors and biofilm formation. The lectins LecA and LecB that bind galactose and fucose, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides containing these sugars, are among the most thoroughly-studied targets for such novel antibacterials. In this review, we summarize the results of experiments highlighting the importance of these proteins for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and provide information on existing lectins inhibitors and their effectiveness in various experimental models. Particular attention is paid to the effects of lectins inhibition in animal models of infection and in clinical practice. We argue that lectins inhibition is a perspective approach to combating P. aeruginosa. However, despite the existence of highly effective in vitro inhibitors, further experiments are required in order to advance these inhibitors into pre-clinical studies. PMID:26085942

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  9. Overexpression of AmpC and Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Bloodstream Infections: Prevalence and Impact on Resistance in a Spanish Multicenter Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of the overexpression of AmpC and efflux pumps were evaluated with a collection of 190 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from bloodstream infections in a 2008 multicenter study (10 hospitals) in Spain. The MICs of a panel of 13 antipseudomonal agents were determined by microdilution, and the expressions of ampC, mexB, mexY, mexD, and mexF were determined by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Up to 39% of the isolates overexpressed at least one of the mechanisms. ampC overexpression (24.2%) was the most prevalent mechanism, followed by mexY (13.2%), mexB (12.6%), mexF (4.2%), and mexD (2.2%). The overexpression of mexB plus mexY, documented for 5.3% of the isolates, was the only combination showing a significantly (P = 0.02) higher prevalence than expected from the frequencies of the individual mechanisms (1.6%). Additionally, all imipenem-resistant isolates studied (25 representative isolates) showed inactivating mutations in oprD. Most of the isolates nonsusceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam (96%) and ceftazidime (84%) overexpressed ampC, while mexB (25%) and mexY (29%) overexpressions gained relevance among cefepime-nonsusceptible isolates. Nevertheless, the prevalence of mexY overexpression was highest among tobramycin-nonsusceptible isolates (37%), and that of mexB was highest among meropenem-nonsusceptible isolates (33%). Regarding ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, besides the expected increased prevalence of efflux pump overexpression, a highly significant link to ampC overexpression was documented for the first time: up to 52% of ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates overexpressed ampC, sharply contrasting with the 24% documented for the complete collection (P < 0.001). In summary, mutation-driven resistance was frequent in P. aeruginosa isolates from bloodstream infections, whereas metallo-β-lactamases, detected in 2 isolates (1%) producing VIM-2, although with increasing prevalences, were still uncommon. PMID

  10. Purification of extracellular lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stuer, W; Jaeger, K E; Winkler, U K

    1986-01-01

    Lipase (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3) was excreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAC1R during the late logarithmic growth phase. Characterization of cell-free culture supernatants by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of significant amounts of lipopolysaccharide, part of which seemed to be tightly bound to lipase. After concentration of culture supernatants by ultrafiltration, lipase-lipopolysaccharide complexes were dissociated by treatment with EDTA-Tris buffer and subsequent sonication in the presence of the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The solubilized lipase was purified by isoelectric focusing in an agarose gel containing the same detergent; the lipase activity appeared in a single peak corresponding to a distinct band in the silver-stained gel. The isoelectric point was 5.8. Analysis of purified lipase by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning revealed an apparent molecular weight of 29,000 and a specific activity of 760 mu kat/mg of protein. Estimations based on these data showed that a single P. aeruginosa cell excreted about 200 molecules of lipase, each having a molecular activity of 2.2 X 10(4) per s. Images PMID:3096967

  11. Social cheating in Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Mitzimberg, Shelby M; Schuster, Martin

    2007-10-02

    In a process termed quorum sensing, bacteria use diffusible chemical signals to coordinate cell density-dependent gene expression. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing controls hundreds of genes, many of which encode extracellular virulence factors. Quorum sensing is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in animal models. Curiously, quorum sensing-deficient variants, most of which carry a mutation in the gene encoding the central quorum sensing regulator lasR, are frequently isolated from acute and chronic infections. The mechanism for their emergence is not known. Here we provide experimental evidence suggesting that these lasR mutants are social cheaters that cease production of quorum-controlled factors and take advantage of their production by the group. We detected an emerging subpopulation of lasR mutants after approximately 100 generations of in vitro evolution of the P. aeruginosa wild-type strain under culture conditions that require quorum sensing for growth. Under such conditions, quorum sensing appears to impose a metabolic burden on the proliferating bacterial cell, because quorum-controlled genes not normally induced until cessation of growth were highly expressed early in growth, and a defined lasR mutant showed a growth advantage when cocultured with the parent strain. The emergence of quorum-sensing-deficient variants in certain environments is therefore an indicator of high quorum sensing activity of the bacterial population as a whole. It does not necessarily indicate that quorum sensing is insignificant, as has previously been suggested. Thus, novel antivirulence strategies aimed at disrupting bacterial communication may be particularly effective in such clinical settings.

  12. Predominance of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying blaIMP and blaVIM metallo-β-lactamases in a major hospital in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Guzmán-Marte, Anel; Madriz, Vivian; Somogyi, Teresita; Rodríguez, César; García, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the molecular basis of the resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from a tertiary-level health facility in San José, Costa Rica. A total of 198 non-duplicated isolates were evaluated for their susceptibility to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), the presence of MBL encoding genes (blaIMP, blaVIM and blaGIM-1) and the occurrence of these genes within class 1 integrons were investigated. In addition, an ERIC2 PCR fingerprinting method was used to elucidate the distribution of the detected MBL genes within the strain collection. Of the 198 isolates tested, 125 (63.1 %) were categorized as carbapenem-resistant. The majority (88.8 %) of the carbapemen-resistant isolates also showed resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Among the carbapenem-resistant isolates, 102 (81.6 %) showed MBL activity. Strikingly, both blaIMP and blaVIM genes were simultaneously detected in most (94.1 %) of the 102 MBL producers. Five carbapenem-resistant MBL producers were positive only for blaIMP genes. Almost 70 % of the isolates examined harboured the intI1 gene, accompanied by the sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes in 136 (99 %) and 122 (89 %) isolates, respectively. The majority (94.4 %) of the carbapenem-resistant isolates carried the intI1 gene, in contrast to 26 % of the carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three out of 96 (96.9 %) isolates carrying both blaIMP and blaVIM genes also harboured the intI1, sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes. Gene cassettes from carbapenem-susceptible and MBL-negative carbapenem-resistant isolates encoded aminoglycoside-resistance enzymes (aadA2, aadA4 and aadA6) as well as orfD and qacF genes. RAPD analysis distributed 126 of the isolates in 29 clusters. Eighty of the 90 blaIMP (+) blaVIM (+) isolates were sorted into 16

  13. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-05-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented.

  14. The increasing threat of Pseudomonas aeruginosa high-risk clones.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antonio; Mulet, Xavier; López-Causapé, Carla; Juan, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic and hospital-acquired infections produced by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This growing threat results from the extraordinary capacity of this pathogen for developing resistance through chromosomal mutations and from the increasing prevalence of transferable resistance determinants, particularly those encoding carbapenemases or extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). P. aeruginosa has a nonclonal epidemic population structure, composed of a limited number of widespread clones which are selected from a background of a large quantity of rare and unrelated genotypes that are recombining at high frequency. Indeed, recent concerning reports have provided evidence of the existence of MDR/XDR global clones, denominated high-risk clones, disseminated in hospitals worldwide; ST235, ST111, and ST175 are likely those more widespread. Noteworthy, the vast majority of infections by MDR, and specially XDR, strains are produced by these and few other clones worldwide. Moreover, the association of high-risk clones, particularly ST235, with transferable resistance is overwhelming; nearly 100 different horizontally-acquired resistance elements and up to 39 different acquired β-lactamases have been reported so far among ST235 isolates. Likewise, MDR internationally-disseminated epidemic strains, such as the Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES, ST146), have been noted as well among cystic fibrosis patients. Here we review the population structure, epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and virulence of the P. aeruginosa high-risk clones. The phenotypic and genetic factors potentially driving the success of high-risk clones, the aspects related to their detection in the clinical microbiology laboratory and the implications for infection control and public health are also discussed.

  15. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  16. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  17. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin K; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E; Kortright, Kaitlyn E; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E

    2016-05-26

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections.

  18. The Regulatory Network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important bacterial model due to its metabolic and pathogenic abilities, which allow it to interact and colonize a wide range of hosts, including plants and animals. In this work we compile and analyze the structure and organization of an experimentally supported regulatory network in this bacterium. Results The regulatory network consists of 690 genes and 1020 regulatory interactions between their products (12% of total genes: 54% sigma and 16% of transcription factors). This complex interplay makes the third largest regulatory network of those reported in bacteria. The entire network is enriched for activating interactions and, peculiarly, self-activation seems to occur more prominent for transcription factors (TFs), which contrasts with other biological networks where self-repression is dominant. The network contains a giant component of 650 genes organized into 11 hierarchies, encompassing important biological processes, such as, biofilms formation, production of exopolysaccharide alginate and several virulence factors, and of the so-called quorum sensing regulons. Conclusions The study of gene regulation in P. aeruginosa is biased towards pathogenesis and virulence processes, all of which are interconnected. The network shows power-law distribution -input degree -, and we identified the top ten global regulators, six two-element cycles, the longest paths have ten steps, six biological modules and the main motifs containing three and four elements. We think this work can provide insights for the design of further studies to cover the many gaps in knowledge of this important bacterial model, and for the design of systems strategies to combat this bacterium. PMID:22587778

  19. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  20. Heterogeneity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Silbert, Suzane; Barth, Afonso Luis; Sader, Hélio S.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diversity and genomic variability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients being treated at a university hospital in Brazil. Ninety-seven isolates of P. aeruginosa from 43 CF patients were characterized by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and tested for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. It was possible to evaluate single isolates from 20 patients and multiple isolates (two to seven) from 23 patients collected during a 22-month period. Among all of the unrelated patients, we detected only one pair of patients sharing a common strain. Among the 77 isolates from 23 patients who had multiple isolates analyzed, we identified 37 major types by PFGE, and five different colonization patterns were recognized. The isolates were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents, although consecutive isolates from the same patient may display differences in their susceptibilities. Mucoid isolates were more resistant (P < 0.001) than nonmucoid isolates to five antibiotics. Our results indicate that CF patients remain colonized by more than one strain of P. aeruginosa for long periods of time. In addition, the finding of several different genotypes in the same patient suggests that the colonizing strain may occasionally be replaced. PMID:11682517

  1. Exploitation of syndecan-1 shedding by Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances virulence.

    PubMed

    Park, P W; Pier, G B; Hinkes, M T; Bernfield, M

    2001-05-03

    Cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are ubiquitous and abundant receptors/co-receptors of extracellular ligands, including many microbes. Their role in microbial infections is poorly defined, however, because no cell-surface HSPG has been clearly connected to the pathogenesis of a particular microbe. We have previously shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, through its virulence factor LasA, enhances the in vitro shedding of syndecan-1-the predominant cell-surface HSPG of epithelia. Here we show that shedding of syndecan-1 is also activated by P. aeruginosa in vivo, and that the resulting syndecan-1 ectodomains enhance bacterial virulence in newborn mice. Newborn mice deficient in syndecan-1 resist P. aeruginosa lung infection but become susceptible when given purified syndecan-1 ectodomains or heparin, but not when given ectodomain core protein, indicating that the ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains are the effectors. In wild-type newborn mice, inhibition of syndecan-1 shedding or inactivation of the shed ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains prevents lung infection. Our findings uncover a pathogenetic mechanism in which a host response to tissue injury-syndecan-1 shedding-is exploited to enhance microbial virulence apparently by modulating host defences.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of LED irradiation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Morena; Trentini, Paolo; Tripodi, Domenico; Spoto, Giuseppe; D'Ercole, Simonetta

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible of many deaths due to nosocomial pneumonia each year. It is particularly resistant to many different classes of antibiotics and disinfectants. For all these reasons, there is the necessity to find novel approaches of treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 880nm light emitting diodes (LED) irradiation on P. aeruginosa, in vitro. Different LED irradiation parameters (time, energy output and the addition of methylene blue and chlorhexidine) have been tested in order to evaluate the effects on this bacterium. After treatment, the colony forming units per milliliter (CFU mL-1) were recorded and the data were submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests at a level of significance of 5%. A statistical significant reduction of bacterial count has been registered after 5min of LED irradiation. The antibacterial effect was directly proportional to irradiation time and the output energy. The pre-treatment with methylene blue, seems to be not effective against P. aeruginosa, independently from irradiation parameters. On the contrary, the contemporary action of LED and chlorhexidine has shown a great reduction of bacterial count that was statistical significant respect chlorhexidine and LED alone. The effect of LED irradiation was visible also after 24h, when a lower bacterial count characterized all irradiated samples respect controls.

  3. Indole and 7‐hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L. G.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7‐hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)‐regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI‐opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS‐regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2‐heptyl‐3‐hydroxy‐4(1H)‐quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole‐related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  4. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  5. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  6. Secretion of phospholipase C by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Hayden, C

    1979-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the secretion of phospholipase C (phosphatidylcholine cholinephosphohydrolase) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied. Enzyme secretion by washed cell suspensions required a carbon source and ammonium, potassium, and calcium ions. The calcium requirement could be substituted by magnesium and strontium but not by copper, manganese, cobalt, or zinc. During growth in liquid medium, cells secreted phospholipase C during late logarithmic and early stationary phases. Secretion was repressed by the addition of inorganic phosphate but not by organic phosphates, glucose, or sodium succinate. Studies with tetracycline indicated that de novo protein synthesis was necessary for the secretion of phospholipase C and that the exoenzyme was not released from a preformed periplasmic pool. Similarly, extraction of actively secreting cells with 0.2 M MgCl2 at pH 8.4 solubilized large quantities of the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase but insignificant amounts of phospholipase C. Bacteria continued to secrete enzyme for nearly 45 min after the addition of inorganic phosphate or rifampin. Images PMID:114487

  7. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  8. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  9. Regulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wade, Dana S; Calfee, M Worth; Rocha, Edson R; Ling, Elizabeth A; Engstrom, Elana; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients and is a major source of nosocomial infections. This bacterium controls many virulence factors by using two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. The las system is composed of the LasR regulator protein and its cell-to-cell signal, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone, and the rhl system is composed of RhlR and the signal N-butyryl homoserine lactone. A third intercellular signal, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone), also regulates numerous virulence factors. PQS synthesis requires the expression of multiple operons, one of which is pqsABCDE. Previous experiments showed that the transcription of this operon, and therefore PQS production, is negatively regulated by the rhl quorum-sensing system and positively regulated by the las quorum-sensing system and PqsR (also known as MvfR), a LysR-type transcriptional regulator protein. With the use of DNA mobility shift assays and beta-galactosidase reporter fusions, we have studied the regulation of pqsR and its relationship to pqsA, lasR, and rhlR. We show that PqsR binds the promoter of pqsA and that this binding increases dramatically in the presence of PQS, implying that PQS acts as a coinducer for PqsR. We have also mapped the transcriptional start site for pqsR and found that the transcription of pqsR is positively regulated by lasR and negatively regulated by rhlR. These results suggest that a regulatory chain occurs where pqsR is under the control of LasR and RhlR and where PqsR in turn controls pqsABCDE, which is required for the production of PQS.

  10. Genetics of O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocchetta, H. L.; Burrows, L. L.; Lam, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce an elaborate assortment of extracellular and cell-associated bacterial products that enable colonization and establishment of infection within a host. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules are cell surface factors that are typically known for their protective role against serum-mediated lysis and their endotoxic properties. The most heterogeneous portion of LPS is the O antigen or O polysaccharide, and it is this region which confers serum resistance to the organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of concomitantly synthesizing two types of LPS referred to as A band and B band. The A-band LPS contains a conserved O polysaccharide region composed of d-rhamnose (homopolymer), while the B-band O-antigen (heteropolymer) structure varies among the 20 O serotypes of P. aeruginosa. The genes coding for the enzymes that direct the synthesis of these two O antigens are organized into two separate clusters situated at different chromosomal locations. In this review, we summarize the organization of these two gene clusters to discuss how A-band and B-band O antigens are synthesized and assembled by dedicated enzymes. Examples of unique proteins required for both A-band and B-band O-antigen synthesis and for the synthesis of both LPS and alginate are discussed. The recent identification of additional genes within the P. aeruginosa genome that are homologous to those in the A-band and B-band gene clusters are intriguing since some are able to influence O-antigen synthesis. These studies demonstrate that P. aeruginosa represents a unique model system, allowing studies of heteropolymeric and homopolymeric O-antigen synthesis, as well as permitting an examination of the interrelationship of the synthesis of LPS molecules and other virulence determinants. PMID:10477307

  11. Low concentrations of ethanol stimulate biofilm and pellicle formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Inagaki, Aya; Ono, Kaori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Yawata, Yutaka; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of surface-attached microbial cells that resist environmental stresses. In this study, we found that low concentrations of ethanol increase biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 but not in a mutant of it lacking both Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides. Low concentrations of ethanol also increased pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface.

  12. Bioengineered lysozyme in combination therapies for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Karl E; Bement, Jenna L; Teneback, Charlotte C; Scanlon, Thomas C; Wargo, Matthew J; Leclair, Laurie W

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing urgency in the battle against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, and this public health crisis has created a desperate need for novel antimicrobial agents. Recombinant human lysozyme represents one interesting candidate for treating pulmonary infections, but the wild type enzyme is subject to electrostatic mediated inhibition by anionic biopolymers that accumulate in the infected lung. We have redesigned lysozyme’s electrostatic potential field, creating a genetically engineered variant that is less susceptible to polyanion inhibition, yet retains potent bactericidal activity. A recent publication demonstrated that the engineered enzyme outperforms wild type lysozyme in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Here, we expand upon our initial studies and consider dual therapies that combine lysozymes with an antimicrobial peptide. Consistent with our earlier results, the charge modified lysozyme combination outperformed its wild type counterpart, yielding more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in bacterial burden following treatment with a single dose. PMID:24637705

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa KUCD1, a possible candidate for cadmium bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sangram; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2009-01-01

    A cadmium (8 mM) resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain KUCd1 exhibiting high Cd accumulation under in vitro aerobic condition has been reported. The isolate showed a significant ability to remove more than 75% and 89% of the soluble cadmium during the active growth phase from the growth medium and from Cd-amended industrial wastewater under growth supportive condition. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) suggest the presence of Cd in the cells from mid stationary phase. The cell fractionation study revealed membrane and periplasm to be the major accumulating site in this strain. The chemical nature of the accumulated Cd was studied by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. PMID:24031411

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa essentials: an update on investigation of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised, cancer, burn and cystic fibrosis patients. Development of novel antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa is therefore of the highest importance. Although the first reports on P. aeruginosa essential genes date back to the early 2000s, a number of more sensitive genomic approaches have been used recently to better define essential genes in this organism. These analyses highlight the evolution of the definition of an 'essential' gene from the traditional to the context-dependent. Essential genes, particularly those indispensable under the clinically relevant conditions, are considered to be promising targets of novel antibiotics against P. aeruginosa. This review provides an update on the investigation of P. aeruginosa essential genes. Special focus is on recently identified P. aeruginosa essential genes and their exploitation for the development of antimicrobials.

  15. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  16. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

    PubMed Central

    Nde, Chantal W; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Toghrol, Freshteh; Bentley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf) and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS) of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the increased synthesis of

  17. Strong incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on bacterial rrs and ITS genetic structures of cystic fibrosis sputa

    PubMed Central

    Pages-Monteiro, Laurence; Marti, Romain; Commun, Carine; Alliot, Nolwenn; Bardel, Claire; Meugnier, Helene; Perouse-de-Montclos, Michele; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stephane; Vandenesch, Francois; Freney, Jean; Cournoyer, Benoit; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs harbor a complex community of interacting microbes, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Meta-taxogenomic analysis based on V5-V6 rrs PCR products of 52 P. aeruginosa-positive (Pp) and 52 P. aeruginosa-negative (Pn) pooled DNA extracts from CF sputa suggested positive associations between P. aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas and Prevotella, but negative ones with Haemophilus, Neisseria and Burkholderia. Internal Transcribed Spacer analyses (RISA) from individual DNA extracts identified three significant genetic structures within the CF cohorts, and indicated an impact of P. aeruginosa. RISA clusters Ip and IIIp contained CF sputa with a P. aeruginosa prevalence above 93%, and of 24.2% in cluster IIp. Clusters Ip and IIIp showed lower RISA genetic diversity and richness than IIp. Highly similar cluster IIp RISA profiles were obtained from two patients harboring isolates of a same P. aeruginosa clone, suggesting convergent evolution in the structure of their microbiota. CF patients of cluster IIp had received significantly less antibiotics than patients of clusters Ip and IIIp but harbored the most resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Patients of cluster IIIp were older than those of Ip. The effects of P. aeruginosa on the RISA structures could not be fully dissociated from the above two confounding factors but several trends in these datasets support the conclusion of a strong incidence of P. aeruginosa on the genetic structure of CF lung microbiota. PMID:28282386

  18. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa on vinyl-canvas inflatables and foam teaching aids in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Schets, F M; van den Berg, H H J L; Baan, R; Lynch, G; de Roda Husman, A M

    2014-12-01

    Swimming pool-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections mainly result in folliculitis and otitis externa. P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on surfaces in the swimming pool environment. The presence of P. aeruginosa on inflatables and foam teaching aids in 24 public swimming pools in the Netherlands was studied. Samples (n = 230) were taken from 175 objects and analysed for P. aeruginosa by culture. Isolated P. aeruginosa were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa was detected in 63 samples (27%), from 47 objects (27%) in 19 (79%) swimming pools. More vinyl-canvas objects (44%) than foam objects (20%) were contaminated, as were wet objects (43%) compared to dry objects (13%). Concentrations were variable, and on average higher on vinyl-canvas than on foam objects. Forty of 193 (21%) P. aeruginosa isolates from 11 different objects were (intermediate) resistant to one or more of 12 clinically relevant antibiotics, mostly to imipenem and aztreonam. The immediate risk of a P. aeruginosa infection from exposure to swimming pool objects seems limited, but the presence of P. aeruginosa on pool objects is unwanted and requires attention of pool managers and responsible authorities. Strict drying and cleaning policies are needed for infrequently used vinyl-canvas objects.

  20. Biological activities of pyochelins: iron-chelating agents of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P V; Shokrani, F

    1978-01-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to grow readily in serum (serum resistant) produce siderophores in large quantity, enabling them to extract iron from transferrins. The term pyochelin has been proposed for this group of compounds. Pyochelin extractable with ethyl acetate and designated pyochelin A appears to be a mixture of catechols and other phenolates. The structures of water-soluble siderophores, designated pyochelin B, have not been determined. Pyochelins enabled growth in serum of strains of serum-sensitive P. aeruginosa and other gram-negative bacilli. Serum-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa tended to be more virulent than equally toxigenic strains of the serum-sensitive group. However, incorporation of pyochelins into the inocula of serum-sensitive strains could reduce, rather than enhance, their virulence. Utilization of pyochelins by serum-sensitive strains of P. aeruginosa rendered some of these organisms resistant to pyocins which were otherwise lethal to them. Images PMID:103839

  1. In vivo selection of a target/efflux double mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ciprofloxacin therapy.

    PubMed

    Le Thomas, I; Couetdic, G; Clermont, O; Brahimi, N; Plésiat, P; Bingen, E

    2001-10-01

    We report the emergence after 4 days of ciprofloxacin monotherapy of a double mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa overexpressing the multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and harbouring a mutation in the gyrB gene. Compared with its initial susceptible counterpart, this mutant exhibited a significant increase in resistance to most of the beta-lactam antibiotics tested (16 x MIC of ticarcillin) and to ciprofloxacin (128 x MIC). Combined ceftazidime and amikacin therapy finally eradicated the resistant isolate and cured the patient of his infection. This case illustrates how strains of P. aeruginosa may develop high levels of fluoroquinolone resistance by combining efflux mechanisms and target alterations.

  2. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-01-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ΔsprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  3. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms.

  4. Quinazoline derivatives are efficient chemosensitizers of antibiotic activity in Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Jacqueline; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Baitiche, Milad; Adam, Elissavet; Viveiros, Miguel; Smarandache, Adriana; Militaru, Andra; Pascu, Mihail L; Amaral, Leonard; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    Amongst the three series of quinazoline derivatives synthesised and studied in this work, some molecules increase the antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria presenting multidrug-resistant phenotypes. N-alkyl compounds induced an increase in the activity of chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and sparfloxacin, which are substrates of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps in clinical isolates. These molecules are able to increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol in efflux pump-overproducing strains. Their activity depends on the antibiotic structure, suggesting that different sites may be involved for the recognition of substrates by a given efflux pump. Quinazoline molecules exhibiting a nitro functional group are more active, and structure-activity relationship studies may be undertaken to identify the pharmacophoric group involved in the AcrB and MexB affinity sites.

  5. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  6. Anionic fluoroquinolones as antibacterials against biofilm-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Long, Timothy E; Keding, Lexie C; Lewis, Demetria D; Anstead, Michael I; Withers, T Ryan; Yu, Hongwei D

    2016-02-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common biofilm-forming bacterial pathogen implicated in diseases of the lungs. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of respiratory Pseudomonas biofilms are largely comprised of anionic molecules such as rhamnolipids and alginate that promote a mucoid phenotype. In this Letter, we examine the ability of negatively-charged fluoroquinolones to transverse the EPS and inhibit the growth of mucoid P. aeruginosa. Anionic fluoroquinolones were further compared with standard antibiotics via a novel microdiffusion assay to evaluate drug penetration through pseudomonal alginate and respiratory mucus from a patient with cystic fibrosis.

  7. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  8. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  9. Biological Markers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Epidemic High-Risk Clones

    PubMed Central

    Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Domínguez, M. Angeles; Zamorano, Laura; Juan, Carlos; Tubau, Fe; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moyà, Bartolomé; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotypes (mainly ST-111, ST-175, and ST-235), known as high-risk clones, are responsible for epidemics of nosocomial infections by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains worldwide. We explored the potential biological parameters that may explain the success of these clones. A total of 20 isolates from each of 4 resistance groups (XDR, MDR, ModR [resistant to 1 or 2 classes], and MultiS [susceptible to all antipseudomonals]), recovered from a multicenter study of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections performed in 10 Spanish hospitals, were analyzed. A further set of 20 XDR isolates belonging to epidemic high-risk clones (ST-175 [n = 6], ST-111 [n = 7], and ST-235 [n = 7]) recovered from different geographical locations was also studied. When unknown, genotypes were documented through multilocus sequence typing. The biological parameters evaluated included twitching, swimming, and swarming motility, biofilm formation, production of pyoverdine and pyocyanin, spontaneous mutant frequencies, and the in vitro competition index (CI) obtained with a flow cytometry assay. All 20 (100%) XDR, 8 (40%) MDR, and 1 (5%) ModR bloodstream isolate from the multicenter study belonged to high-risk clones. No significant differences were observed between clonally diverse ModR and MultiS isolates for any of the parameters. In contrast, MDR/XDR high-risk clones showed significantly increased biofilm formation and mutant frequencies but significantly reduced motility (twitching, swimming, and swarming), production of pyoverdine and pyocyanin, and fitness. The defined biological markers of high-risk clones, which resemble those resulting from adaptation to chronic infections, could be useful for the design of specific treatment and infection control strategies. PMID:23979744

  10. Laboratory investigation of the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel in the presence of an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Xu, Dake; Sun, Da; Nan, Li; Sun, Ziqing; Li, Qi; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel (2205 Cu-DSS) against an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was investigated. The electrochemical test results showed that Rp increased and icorr decreased sharply after long-term immersion in the inoculation medium, suggesting that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed excellent MIC resistance to the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Fluorescence microscope images showed that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed a strong antibacterial ability, and its antibacterial efficiency after one and seven days was 7.75% and 96.92%, respectively. The pit morphology comparison after 14 days between 2205 DSS and 2205 Cu-DSS demonstrated that the latter showed a considerably reduced maximum MIC pit depth compared with the former (1.44 μm vs 9.50 μm). The experimental results suggest that inhibition of the biofilm was caused by the copper ions released from the 2205 Cu-DSS, leading to its effective mitigation of MIC by P. aeruginosa.

  11. Secretion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Cytotoxins is Dependent on Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Wu, B.; Baek, M.S.; Camargo, A.; Nguyen, A.; Slusher, N.A.; Srinivasan, R.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Lynch, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can, like other bacterial species, exist in antimicrobial resistant sessile biofilms and as free-swimming, planktonic cells. Specific virulence factors are typically associated with each lifestyle and several two-component response regulators have been shown to reciprocally regulate transition between biofilm-associated chronic, and free-swimming acute infections. Quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules belonging to the las and rhl systems are known to regulate virulence gene expression by P. aeruginosa. However the impact of a recently described family of novel quorum sensing signals produced by the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS) biosynthetic pathway, on the transition between these modes of infection is less clear. Using clonal isolates from a patient developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, we demonstrated that clinical observations were mirrored by an in vitro temporal shift in isolate phenotype from a non-secreting, to a Type III cytotoxin secreting (TTSS) phenotype and further, that this phenotypic change was PQS-dependent. While intracellular type III cytotoxin levels were unaffected by PQS concentration, cytotoxin secretion was dependent on this signal molecule. Elevated PQS concentrations were associated with inhibition of cytotoxin secretion coincident with expression of virulence factors such as elastase and pyoverdin. In contrast, low concentrations or the inability to biosynthesize PQS resulted in a reversal of this phenotype. These data suggest that expression of specific P. aeruginosa virulence factors appears to be reciprocally regulated and that an additional level of PQS-dependent posttranslational control, specifically governing type III cytotoxin secretion, exists in this species. PMID:20570614

  12. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  13. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Pecile, Patrizia; Casalone, Enrico; Mengoni, Alessio; Tamburini, Elena; Guidi, Stefano; Cecconi, Daniela; Bosi, Alberto; Nicoletti, Pierluigi; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2006-07-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in 6 patients who shared, during different periods, the same 2 rooms of a bone marrow transplantation unit. Phenotypic and molecular analysis of isolates from patients and from the environment strongly suggested a single, environmental source of infection.

  15. Production of mucoid exopolysaccharide during development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, B D; Williams, L J; Costerton, J W

    1993-01-01

    Production of mucoid exopolysaccharide by planktonic, chemostat-derived, and adherent Pseudomonas aeruginosa 579 bacteria was separately monitored for 7 days by using a lacZ-algD promoter-reporter gene and assays of total carbohydrate and metabolic activity. Mucoid exopolysaccharide production was transiently elevated following adherence but declined to planktonic levels by day 7. PMID:8423105

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K.; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  17. Electrochemically monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thaddaeus A; Sismaet, Hunter J; Chan, I-ping J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-11-07

    The condition of cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was monitored via the electrochemical detection of the electro-active virulence factor pyocyanin in a fabricated microfluidic growth chamber coupled with a disposable three electrode cell. Cells were exposed to 4, 16, and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate after overnight growth. At the end of testing, the measured maximum peak current (and therefore pyocyanin concentration) was reduced by approximately 68% and 82% in P. aeruginosa exposed to 16 and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate, respectively. Samples were removed from the microfluidic chamber, analyzed for viability using staining, and streaked onto culture plates to confirm that the P. aeruginosa cells were affected by the antibiotics. The correlation between electrical signal drop and the viability of P. aeruginosa cells after antibiotic exposure highlights the usefulness of this approach for future low cost antibiotic screening applications.

  18. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  19. Oxylipins produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa promote biofilm formation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids by dioxygenases occurs in all kingdoms of life and produces physiologically important lipids called oxylipins. The biological roles of oxylipins have been extensively studied in animals, plants, algae and fungi, but remain largely unidentified in prokaryotes. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays a diol synthase activity that transforms several monounsaturated fatty acids into mono- and di-hydroxylated derivatives. Here we show that oxylipins derived from this activity inhibit flagellum-driven motility and upregulate type IV pilus-dependent twitching motility of P. aeruginosa. Consequently, these oxylipins promote bacterial organization in microcolonies, increasing the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms in vitro and in vivo (in Drosophila flies). We also demonstrate that oxylipins produced by P. aeruginosa promote virulence in Drosophila flies and lettuce. Our study thus uncovers a role for prokaryotic oxylipins in the physiology and pathogenicity of bacteria. PMID:27929111

  20. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  2. Phage-antibiotic synergism: a possible approach to combatting Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Petar; Curcin, Sanja; Aleksic, Verica; Petrusic, Milivoje; Vlaski, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly resistant opportunistic pathogen and an important etiological agent of various types of infections. During the last decade, P. aeruginosa phages have been extensively examined as alternative antimicrobial agents. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of combining subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or polymyxin B with P. aeruginosa-specific bacteriophages belonging to families Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The time-kill curve method showed that a combination of bacteriophages and subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone generally reduced bacterial growth, and synergism was proven for a Siphoviridae phage σ-1 after 300 min of incubation. The detected alteration in morphology after ceftriaxone application, resulting in cell elongation, along with its specific mode of action, seemed to be a necessary but was not a sufficient reason for phage-antibiotic synergism. The phenomenon offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  3. A Novel Antimicrobial Endolysin, LysPA26, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mingquan; Feng, Chunyan; Ren, Jie; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Yongzhang; Dong, Ke; He, Ping; Guo, Xiaokui; Qin, Jinhong

    2017-01-01

    The global increase in multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria has led to phage therapy being refocused upon. A novel endolysin, LysPA26, containing a lysozyme-like domain, was screened against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in this study. It had activity against MDR P. aeruginosa without pretreatment with an outer-membrane permeabilizer. LysPA26 could kill up to 4 log units P. aeruginosa in 30 min. In addition, temperature and pH effect assays revealed that LysPA26 had good stability over a broad range of pH and temperatures. Moreover, LysPA26 could kill other Gram-negative bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli, but not Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, LysPA26 could eliminate P. aeruginosa in biofilm formation. Our current results show that LysPA26 is a new and promising antimicrobial agent for the combat of Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:28289407

  4. Investigation of ciprofloxacin penetration into Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    Suci, P A; Mittelman, M W; Yu, F P; Geesey, G G

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial infections associated with indwelling medical devices often demonstrate an intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial therapies. In order to explore the possibility of transport limitation to biofilm bacteria as a contributing factor, the penetration of a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, through Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was investigated. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) spectrometry was employed to monitor bacterial colonization of a germanium substratum, transport of ciprofloxacin to the biofilm-substratum interface, and interaction of biofilm components with the antibiotic in a flowing system. Transport of the antibiotic to the biofilm-substratum interface during the 21-min exposure to 100 micrograms/ml was found to be significantly impeded by the biofilm. Significant changes in IR bands of the biofilm in regions of the spectrum associated with RNA and DNA vibrational modes appeared following exposure to the antibiotic, indicating chemical modification of biofilm components. These results suggest that transport limitations may be an important factor in the antimicrobial resistance of biofilm bacteria and that ATR/FT-IR spectrometry may be used to follow the time course of antimicrobial action in biofilms in situ. Images PMID:7811031

  5. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration. PMID:28184354

  6. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Döring, G.; Hörz, M.; Ortelt, J.; Grupp, H.; Wolz, C.

    1993-01-01

    Genotyping was used to analyse Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from sink drains and 15 intubated patients as part of a 3-month prospective study of strain transmission in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. Ninety percent of all washbasin drains were persistently contaminated with several P. aeruginosa genotypes. In 60% (9/15) of the patients, P. aeruginosa colonization or infection was hospital-acquired: P. aeruginosa strains isolated from these patients were present in hospital sinks or in other patients before their admission. Since all patients were immobile, personnel were the probable route of transmission of P. aeruginosa in the hospital. The mechanism of strain transmission from sinks to hands during hand washing was investigated in a children's hospital. When P. aeruginosa was present at densities of > 10(5)/c.f.u. per ml in sink drains, hand washing resulted in hand contamination with P. aeruginosa via aerosol generation in the majority of experiments or P. aeruginosa was detected using an air sampler above the washing basin. High P. aeruginosa cfu were present at 4.30 h in the eight sinks (5.4 x 10(5)-7.0 x 10(10) c.f.u./ml), whereas at 13.00 h P. aeruginosa c.f.u. were significantly lower (3.1 x 10(2)-8.0 x 10(5) c.f.u./ml). These data reveal that the danger of bacterial contamination of hands during hand washing is highest in the morning. The identified transmission routes demand more effective hygienic measures in hospital settings particularly concerning personnel hands and sink drains. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8519308

  8. Subinhibitory bismuth-thiols reduce virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Liang; Domenico, Philip; Hassett, Daniel J; Beveridge, Terry J; Hauser, Alan R; Kazzaz, Jeffrey A

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated patients and produces a wide array of virulence factors. Bismuth-thiols (BTs) are active in vitro against all bacterial lung pathogens, including P. aeruginosa. The objective of these studies was to examine the biochemical and morphologic effects of sublethal BT concentrations on P. aeruginosa and to evaluate virulence in cell culture. Bismuth-dimercaprol, at a fraction of the minimal inhibitory concentration, reduced alginate expression by 67% in P. aeruginosa, whereas subinhibitory bismuth-ethanedithiol (BisEDT) reduced alginate by 92% in P. syringae. BisEDT effects on lipopolysaccharide content and type III secreted cytoxins were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Subinhibitory BisEDT reduced cell-associated lipopolysaccharide, and inhibited processing of the secreted cytotoxic protein ExoU. BisEDT-induced outer membrane blebbing and aggregation of cytoplasmic material was noted in electron microscopy. Virulence of P. aeruginosa was assessed by adherence to epithelial cells and sensitivity to serum killing. BisEDT inhibited adherence of P. aeruginosa to 16HBE14o- cells by 28% and to a collagen matrix by 53%. BisEDT-treated bacteria were also 100-fold more sensitive to serum bactericidal activity. In summary, low BT concentrations affect P. aeruginosa in a variety of ways, the combination of which may help prevent or resolve respiratory tract infection.

  9. Dynorphin Activates Quorum Sensing Quinolone Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zaborina, Olga; Lepine, Francois; Xiao, Gaoping; Valuckaite, Vesta; Chen, Yimei; Li, Terry; Ciancio, Mae; Zaborin, Alex; Petroff, Elaine; Turner, Jerrold R; Rahme, Laurence G; Chang, Eugene; Alverdy, John C

    2007-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488) and endogenous (dynorphin) κ-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to κ-opioids. The in vivo significance of κ-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence. PMID:17367209

  10. Otopathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enters and Survives Inside Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V.; Kumari, Hansi; Grati, M’hamed; Blackwelder, Patricia; Yan, Denise; Jain, Chaitanya; Mathee, Kalai; Weckwerth, Paulo H.; Liu, Xue Z.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a broad term describing a group of infectious and inflammatory disorders of the middle ear. Despite antibiotic therapy, acute OM can progress to chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) characterized by ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen associated with CSOM. Although, macrophages play an important role in innate immune responses but their role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa-induced CSOM is not known. The objective of this study is to examine the interaction of P. aeruginosa with primary macrophages. We observed that P. aeruginosa enters and multiplies inside human and mouse primary macrophages. This bacterial entry in macrophages requires both microtubule and actin dependent processes. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that P. aeruginosa was present in membrane bound vesicles inside macrophages. Interestingly, deletion of oprF expression in P. aeruginosa abrogates its ability to survive inside macrophages. Our results suggest that otopathogenic P. aeruginosa entry and survival inside macrophages is OprF-dependent. The survival of bacteria inside macrophages will lead to evasion of killing and this lack of pathogen clearance by phagocytes contributes to the persistence of infection in CSOM. Understanding host–pathogen interaction will provide novel avenues to design effective treatment modalities against OM. PMID:27917157

  11. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  12. Emergence of KPC-2-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sequence Type 463 Isolates in Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-yan; Gu, Dan-xia; Cai, Jia-chang; Zhou, Hong-wei

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-nine Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, all exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems and other β-lactam antibiotics, were isolated in Hangzhou, China. Molecular epidemiology analysis indicated the presence of two dominant clones, namely, clones A and B, both of which belong to sequence type 463 (ST463). A genetic environment analysis demonstrated that both clones harbor an ISKpn8 transposase, blaKPC-2, and an ISKpn6-like transposase. These findings depict the features of clonal expansion and transmission of KPC-2-producing P. aeruginosa strains in Hangzhou, China. PMID:25691651

  13. Wide Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing β-Lactamase blaKPC-2 Gene in Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Ten blaKPC-2-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded blaAmpC and blaOXA-50 genes and the acquired blaKPC-2 gene. In most cases, the blaKPC-2 genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associated with Tn4401b or a new structure containing only part of the Tn4401 sequence. This study revealed that several clones of P. aeruginosa producing blaKPC-2 are disseminating in Colombia. PMID:21844315

  14. Wide dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing beta-lactamase blaKPC-2 gene in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-11-01

    Ten bla(KPC-2)-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded bla(AmpC) and bla(OXA-50) genes and the acquired bla(KPC-2) gene. In most cases, the bla(KPC-2) genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associated with Tn4401b or a new structure containing only part of the Tn4401 sequence. This study revealed that several clones of P. aeruginosa producing bla(KPC-2) are disseminating in Colombia.

  15. Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Flonta, Mirela; Boudehen, Yves-Marie; Creton, Elodie; Bernabeu, Sandrine; Vogel, Anaïs; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates and 12 carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between August 2011 and March 2013 at the Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. One KPC-, nine NDM-1-, four OXA-48-, and one VIM-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates along with 11 VIM-2-producing and one IMP-13-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from clinical samples. All carbapenemase genes were located on self-conjugative plasmids and were associated with other resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and RmtC methylases. PMID:26303798

  16. Influence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa on Exacerbation in Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Manu, Mohan K; Lazer, Bernaitis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8%) patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008), greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007), a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03), and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis. PMID:25722615

  17. Insights into Mechanisms and Proteomic Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adaptation to a Novel Antimicrobial Substance

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Peter; Jübner, Martin; Müller, Stefan; Bender, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been reported since the introduction of synthetic antibiotics. Bacteria, such as one of the most common nosocomial pathogens P. aeruginosa, adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions, due to their short generation time. Thus microevolutional changes can be monitored in situ. In this study, the microevolutional process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance against a recently developed novel antibacterial zinc Schiff-base (ZSB) was investigated at the proteome level. After extended exposure to ZSB the passaged strain differed in tolerance against ZSB, with the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 exhibiting 1.6 times higher minimal inhibitory concentration. Using Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis, the changes in the proteome of ZSB adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 were examined by comparison with the non-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1. The proteome of the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain differed significantly from the non-adapted in the abundance of two proteins when both strains were grown under stressing conditions. One protein could be identified as the outer membrane protein D that plays a role in uptake of basic amino acids as well as in carbapeneme resistance. The second protein has been identified as alkyl peroxide reductase subunit F. Our data indicated a slight increase in abundance of alkyl peroxide reductase F (AhpF) in the case of ZSB passaged P. aeruginosa PAO1. Higher abundance of Ahp has been discussed in the literature as a promoter of accelerated detoxification of benzene derivatives. The observed up-regulated AhpF thus appears to be connected to an increased tolerance against ZSB. Changes in the abundance of proteins connected to oxidative stress were also found after short-time exposure of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the ZSB. Furthermore, adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed increased tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and, in addition, showed accelerated degradation of ZSB, as determined by HPLC measurements. PMID:23869205

  18. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol.

  19. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  20. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Diana P.; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  1. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps.

  2. Annona glabra Flavonoids Act As Antimicrobials by Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Stanley de S. L.; Monteiro, Andrea de S.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Dias-Souza, Marcus Vinícius; Ferreira, Gabriella F.; Denadai, Angelo Márcio L.; Santos, Áquila R. C.; Lúcia dos Santos, Vera; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in opportunistic infections in humans. The increased incidence of antimicrobial-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates has highlighted the need for novel and more potent therapies against this microorganism. Annona glabra is known for presenting different compounds with diverse biological activities, such as anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities. Although other species of the family display antimicrobial actions, this has not yet been reported for A. glabra. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) obtained from the leaf hydroalcoholic extract of A. glabra. EAF was bactericidal against different strains of P. aeruginosa. EAF also presented with a time- and concentration-dependent effect on P. aeruginosa viability. Testing of different EAF sub-fractions showed that the sub-fraction 32-33 (SF32-33) was the most effective against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the chemical constituents of SF32-33 demonstrated a high content of flavonoids. Incubation of this active sub-fraction with P. aeruginosa ATCC 27983 triggered an endothermic reaction, which was accompanied by an increased electric charge, suggesting a high binding of SF32-33 compounds to bacterial cell walls. Collectively, our results suggest that A. glabra-derived compounds, especially flavonoids, may be useful for treating infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:28066374

  3. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa. We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. PMID:27297477

  4. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  5. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  6. Mechanisms of phagocytosis and host clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lovewell, Rustin R; Patankar, Yash R; Berwin, Brent

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a high incidence of acute and chronic pulmonary infection. These infections are particularly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis: much of the morbidity and pathophysiology associated with these diseases is due to a hypersusceptibility to bacterial infection. Innate immunity, primarily through inflammatory cytokine production, cellular recruitment, and phagocytic clearance by neutrophils and macrophages, is the key to endogenous control of P. aeruginosa infection. In this review, we highlight recent advances toward understanding the innate immune response to P. aeruginosa, with a focus on the role of phagocytes in control of P. aeruginosa infection. Specifically, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic recognition and uptake of P. aeruginosa, and how current animal models of P. aeruginosa infection reflect clinical observations in the context of phagocytic clearance of the bacteria. Several notable phenotypic changes to the bacteria are consistently observed during chronic pulmonary infections, including changes to mucoidy and flagellar motility, that likely enable or reflect their ability to persist. These traits are likewise examined in the context of how the bacteria avoid phagocytic clearance, inflammation, and sterilizing immunity.

  7. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  8. Mechanisms of phagocytosis and host clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Patankar, Yash R.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a high incidence of acute and chronic pulmonary infection. These infections are particularly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis: much of the morbidity and pathophysiology associated with these diseases is due to a hypersusceptibility to bacterial infection. Innate immunity, primarily through inflammatory cytokine production, cellular recruitment, and phagocytic clearance by neutrophils and macrophages, is the key to endogenous control of P. aeruginosa infection. In this review, we highlight recent advances toward understanding the innate immune response to P. aeruginosa, with a focus on the role of phagocytes in control of P. aeruginosa infection. Specifically, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic recognition and uptake of P. aeruginosa, and how current animal models of P. aeruginosa infection reflect clinical observations in the context of phagocytic clearance of the bacteria. Several notable phenotypic changes to the bacteria are consistently observed during chronic pulmonary infections, including changes to mucoidy and flagellar motility, that likely enable or reflect their ability to persist. These traits are likewise examined in the context of how the bacteria avoid phagocytic clearance, inflammation, and sterilizing immunity. PMID:24464809

  9. COMPARATIVE TAXONOMY OF CRYSTALLOGENIC STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND PSEUDOMONAS CHLORORAPHIS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William C.; Rhodes, Lenora J.

    1962-01-01

    Haynes, William C. (Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, Peoria, Ill.) and Lenora J. Rhodes. Comparative taxonomy of crystallogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas chlororaphis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1080–1084. 1962.—Only 11 of 39 strains received in the Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection under the designation Pseudonomas chlororaphis proved to be authentic; 28 were typical, pyocyanogenic strains of P. aeruginosa. The reason for this disproportionately high rate of misidentification apparently arises from an erroneous belief that the ability to produce green and yellow crystals of chlororaphin and oxychlororaphin is confined to P. chlororaphis. The ability of many strains of P. aeruginosa to do likewise is not well known. Inasmuch as the characteristic is not unique to P. chlororaphis, other criteria are required to distinguish crystallogenic strains of these species. After a taxonomic comparison of 18 strains of P. chlororaphis and 47 crystallogenic strains of P. aeruginosa, it was determined that there are three main distinctions: (i) P. aeruginosa grows well at 42 C but fails to grow upon serial transfer at 5 C, whereas P. chlororaphis fails to grow at 42 C, but grows well at 5 C: (ii) most strains of P. aeruginosa produce pyocyanin, whereas P. chlororaphis strains do not; (iii) P. aeruginosa cells possess only one or two polar flagella, whereas P. chlororaphis usually has at least four, sometimes as many as eight, polar flagella. PMID:13963593

  10. Antipseudomonal agents exhibit differential pharmacodynamic interactions with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against established biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen infecting the lower respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where it forms tracheobronchial biofilms. Pseudomonas biofilms are refractory to antibacterials and to phagocytic cells with innate immunity, leading to refractory infection. Little is known about the interaction between antipseudomonal agents and phagocytic cells in eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Herein, we investigated the capacity of three antipseudomonal agents, amikacin (AMK), ceftazidime (CAZ), and ciprofloxacin (CIP), to interact with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) against biofilms and planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from sputa of CF patients. Three of the isolates were resistant and three were susceptible to each of these antibiotics. The concentrations studied (2, 8, and 32 mg/liter) were subinhibitory for biofilms of resistant isolates, whereas for biofilms of susceptible isolates, they ranged between sub-MIC and 2 × MIC values. The activity of each antibiotic alone or in combination with human PMNs against 48-h mature biofilms or planktonic cells was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. All combinations of AMK with PMNs resulted in synergistic or additive effects against planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates compared to each component alone. More than 75% of CAZ combinations exhibited additive interactions against biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates, whereas CIP had mostly antagonistic interaction or no interaction with PMNs against biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Our findings demonstrate a greater positive interaction between AMK with PMNs than that observed for CAZ and especially CIP against isolates of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract of CF patients.

  11. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  12. The role of 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Jordon D.; Chen, Wei; Parnham, Stuart; Beauchesne, Kevin; Moeller, Peter; Flume, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria synchronize group behaviors using quorum sensing, which is advantageous during an infection to thwart immune cell attack and resist deleterious changes in the environment. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (Pqs) quorum-sensing system is an important component of an interconnected intercellular communication network. Two alkylquinolones, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS), activate transcriptional regulator PqsR to promote the production of quinolone signals and virulence factors. Our work focused on the most abundant quinolone produced from the Pqs system, 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ), which was shown previously to sustain pyocyanin production and antifungal activity of P. aeruginosa. However, little is known about how DHQ affects P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. Using C. elegans as a model for P. aeruginosa infection, we found pqs mutants only able to produce DHQ maintained virulence towards the nematodes similar to wild-type. In addition, DHQ-only producing mutants displayed increased colonization of C. elegans and virulence factor production compared to a quinolone-null strain. DHQ also bound to PqsR and activated the transcription of pqs operon. More importantly, high extracellular concentration of DHQ was maintained in both aerobic and anaerobic growth. High levels of DHQ were also detected in the sputum samples of cystic fibrosis patients. Taken together, our findings suggest DHQ may play an important role in sustaining P. aeruginosa pathogenicity under oxygen-limiting conditions. PMID:26788419

  13. O serotype-independent susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lectin-like pyocins

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Dingemans, Jozef; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cornelis, Pierre; De Mot, René

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins of the LlpA family, originally identified in plant-associated bacteria, are narrow-spectrum antibacterial proteins composed of two tandemly organized monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. The LlpA-like bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1433, pyocin L1, lacks any similarity to known P. aeruginosa bacteriocins. The initial interaction of pyocin L1 with target cells is mediated by binding to d-rhamnose, present in the common polysaccharide antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but the actual cytotoxic mechanism is unknown. In this study, we characterized the activity range of pyocin L1 and two additional L pyocins revealed by genome mining, representing two highly diverged LlpA groups in P. aeruginosa. The recombinant proteins exhibit species-specific antagonistic activities down to nanomolar concentrations against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains, including several multidrug-resistant isolates. The overlap in target strain spectrum between two close homologues of the pyocin L1 group is only minimal, contrasting with the considerable spectral redundancy of LlpA proteins reported for other Pseudomonas species. No correlation was found between L pyocin susceptibility and phylogenetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates. Sensitive strains were retrieved in 13 out of 15 O serotypes tested, excluding the possibility that the highly variable and immunogenic O serotype antigen of the LPS coating would represent a dominant susceptibility-discriminating factor. PMID:25224846

  14. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as “genomic islands (GIs).” To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, “GEMINI.” GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  15. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, a programmed bacterial life for fitness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-03-17

    Biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabits on surfaces and is encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environments and influence our life tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium, known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicates the eradication of the biofilm infection and leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss a history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms of its own or in association with other bacterial species (i.e., multi-species biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  17. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence as a result of phage predation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; van de Ven, Theo G M; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    The rapid increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has attracted attention to bacteriophages for treating and preventing bacterial infections. Bacteriophages can drive the diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, giving rise to phage-resistant variants with different phenotypes from their ancestral hosts. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of phage resistance on cytotoxicity of host populations toward cultured mammalian cells. The library of phage-resistant P. aeruginosa PAO1 variants used was developed previously via experimental evolution of an isogenic host population using phages PP7 and E79. Our results presented herein indicate that the phage-resistant variants developed in a heterogeneous phage environment exhibit a greater ability to impede metabolic action of cultured human keratinocytes and have a greater tendency to cause membrane damage even though they cannot invade the cells in large numbers. They also show a heightened resistance to phagocytosis by model murine macrophages. Furthermore, all isolates produced higher levels of at least one of the secreted virulence factors, namely, total proteases, elastase, phospholipase C, and hemolysins. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed upregulation in the transcription of a number of genes associated with virulence of P. aeruginosa for the phage-resistant variants. The results of this study indicate a significant change in the in vitro virulence of P. aeruginosa following phage predation and highlight the need for caution in the selection and design of phages and phage cocktails for therapeutic use.

  18. Full Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprF▿

    PubMed Central

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  19. Identification of plasmid OXA and other β-lactamase genes among carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Clinical University Hospital in northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Paweł; Michalska, Anna; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Majewski, Piotr; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OXA and other β-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and the genetic relatedness among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems. The presence of bla- OXA genes was demonstrated in 48% of isolates belonging to four PFGE profiles. Most of them contained the blaOXA-2 gene (88.3%). Other blaOXA genes (Ps1310 with blaOXA-30 and Ps1309 with blaOXA-10) were found in only two isolates. The tested isolates also contained other β-lactamase genes such as blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, blaSHV-5, and blaTEM-1. All isolates were susceptible only to colistin (100%).

  20. Bactericidal and synergistic activity of moxalactam alone and in combination with gentamicin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, P K; Edson, R S; Washington, J A; Hermans, P E

    1983-01-01

    The bactericidal activity of moxalactam, alone and in combination with gentamicin, was studied with macrobroth two-dimensional checkerboard and killing curve techniques against gentamicin-resistant and -susceptible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moxalactam was bactericidal at concentrations equal to or at least two to four times its inhibitory concentrations. Synergy at clinically applicable concentrations of moxalactam and gentamicin occurred with 6 of 14 gentamicin-resistant strains and 4 of 4 gentamicin-susceptible strains by the checkerboard technique and with 7 of 14 gentamicin-resistant strains by the killing curve technique. Synergy between moxalactam and gentamicin against gentamicin-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa is unpredictable and strain- and method-dependent. PMID:6219619

  1. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  2. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  3. Characterization of temporal protein production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Southey-Pillig, Christopher J; Davies, David G; Sauer, Karin

    2005-12-01

    Phenotypic and genetic evidence supporting the notion of biofilm formation as a developmental process is growing. In the present work, we provide additional support for this hypothesis by identifying the onset of accumulation of biofilm-stage specific proteins during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maturation and by tracking the abundance of these proteins in planktonic and three biofilm developmental stages. The onset of protein production was found to correlate with the progression of biofilms in developmental stages. Protein identification revealed that proteins with similar function grouped within similar protein abundance patterns. Metabolic and housekeeping proteins were found to group within a pattern separate from virulence, antibiotic resistance, and quorum-sensing-related proteins. The latter were produced in a progressive manner, indicating that attendant features that are characteristic of biofilms such as antibiotic resistance and virulence may be part of the biofilm developmental process. Mutations in genes for selected proteins from several protein production patterns were made, and the impact of these mutations on biofilm development was evaluated. The proteins cytochrome c oxidase, a probable chemotaxis transducer, a two-component response regulator, and MexH were produced only in mature and late-stage biofilms. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins did not confer defects in growth, initial attachment, early biofilm formation, or twitching motility but were observed to arrest biofilm development at the stage of cell cluster formation we call the maturation-1 stage. The results indicated that expression of theses genes was required for the progression of biofilms into three-dimensional structures on abiotic surfaces and the completion of the biofilm developmental cycle. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis confirmed the detectable change in expression of the respective genes ccoO, PA4101, and PA4208. We propose a possible mechanism for the

  4. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  5. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  6. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; San Millan, Alvaro; Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-05-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs.

  7. Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to low shear modelled microgravity involves AlgU regulation.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Pycke, Benny; Van Houdt, Rob; Monsieurs, Pieter; Nickerson, Cheryl; Leys, Natalie; Cornelis, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    As a ubiquitous environmental organism that is occasionally part of the human flora, Pseudomonas aeruginosa could pose a health hazard for the immunocompromised astronauts during long-term missions. Therefore, insights into the behaviour of P. aeruginosa under spaceflight conditions were gained using two spaceflight-analogue culture systems: the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and the random position machine (RPM). Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in the low shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) environment of the RWV, compared with the normal gravity control (NG), revealed an apparent regulatory role for the alternative sigma factor AlgU (RpoE-like). Accordingly, P. aeruginosa cultured in LSMMG exhibited increased alginate production and upregulation of AlgU-controlled transcripts, including those encoding stress-related proteins. The LSMMG increased heat and oxidative stress resistance and caused a decrease in the oxygen transfer rate of the culture. This study also showed the involvement of the RNA-binding protein Hfq in the LSMMG response, consistent with its previously identified role in the Salmonella LSMMG and spaceflight response. The global transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa grown in the RPM was highly similar to that in NG. Fluid mixing was assessed in both systems and is believed to be a pivotal factor contributing to transcriptional differences between RWV- and RPM-grown P. aeruginosa. This study represents the first step towards the identification of virulence mechanisms of P. aeruginosa activated in response to spaceflight-analogue conditions, and could direct future research regarding the risk assessment and prevention of Pseudomonas infections during spaceflight and in immunocompromised patients.

  8. Evaluation of flagella and flagellin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as vaccines.

    PubMed

    Campodónico, Victoria L; Llosa, Nicolás J; Grout, Martha; Döring, Gerd; Maira-Litrán, Tomás; Pier, Gerald B

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious pathogen in hospitalized, immunocompromised, and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is motile via a single polar flagellum made of polymerized flagellin proteins differentiated into two major serotypes: a and b. Antibodies to flagella delay onset of infection in CF patients, but whether immunity to polymeric flagella and that to monomeric flagellin are comparable has not been addressed, nor has the question of whether such antibodies might negatively impact Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) activation, an important component of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa. We compared immunization with flagella and that with flagellin for in vitro effects on motility, opsonic killing, and protective efficacy using a mouse pneumonia model. Antibodies to flagella were superior to antibodies to flagellin at inhibiting motility, promoting opsonic killing, and mediating protection against P. aeruginosa pneumonia in mice. Protection against the flagellar type strains PAK and PA01 was maximal, but it was only marginal against motile clinical isolates from flagellum-immunized CF patients who nonetheless became colonized with P. aeruginosa. Purified flagellin was a more potent activator of TLR5 than were flagella and also elicited higher TLR5-neutralizing antibodies than did immunization with flagella. Antibody to type a but not type b flagella or flagellin inhibited TLR5 activation by whole bacterial cells. Overall, intact flagella appear to be superior for generating immunity to P. aeruginosa, and flagellin monomers might induce antibodies capable of neutralizing innate immunity due to TLR5 activation, but solid immunity to P. aeruginosa based on flagellar antigens may require additional components beyond type a and type b proteins from prototype strains.

  9. High frequency of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis lung infection.

    PubMed

    Oliver, A; Cantón, R; Campo, P; Baquero, F; Blázquez, J

    2000-05-19

    The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are chronically infected for years by one or a few lineages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These bacterial populations adapt to the highly compartmentalized and anatomically deteriorating lung environment of CF patients, as well as to the challenges of the immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. These selective conditions are precisely those that recent theoretical studies predict for the evolution of mechanisms that augment the rate of variation. Determination of spontaneous mutation rates in 128 P. aeruginosa isolates from 30 CF patients revealed that 36% of the patients were colonized by a hypermutable (mutator) strain that persisted for years in most patients. Mutator strains were not found in 75 non-CF patients acutely infected with P. aeruginosa. This investigation also reveals a link between high mutation rates in vivo and the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  10. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K.; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J. Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. PMID:25669133

  11. Microbial pathogenesis in cystic fibrosis: mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed Central

    Govan, J R; Deretic, V

    1996-01-01

    Respiratory infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia play a major role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). This review summarizes the latest advances in understanding host-pathogen interactions in CF with an emphasis on the role and control of conversion to mucoidy in P. aeruginosa, a phenomenon epitomizing the adaptation of this opportunistic pathogen to the chronic chourse of infection in CF, and on the innate resistance to antibiotics of B. cepacia, person-to-person spread, and sometimes rapidly fatal disease caused by this organism. While understanding the mechanism of conversion to mucoidy in P. aeruginosa has progressed to the point where this phenomenon has evolved into a model system for studying bacterial stress response in microbial pathogenesis, the more recent challenge with B. cepacia, which has emerged as a potent bona fide CF pathogen, is discussed in the context of clinical issues, taxonomy, transmission, and potential modes of pathogenicity. PMID:8840786

  12. Immunological evaluation of an alginate-based conjugate as a vaccine candidate against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Farjah, Ali; Owlia, Parviz; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Mohammadpour, Hashem Khorsand

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, is usually resistant to antimicrobial agents, and is the leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa produce a virulence factor known as alginate. Developing a strategy to raise opsonic antibodies against alginate could be promising for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection in CF patients. Conjugation of alginate to a carrier protein is a good method for increasing the immunogenicity of alginate. We conjugated alginate to the outer membrane vesicle (OMV) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, which is a safe carrier protein, and evaluated its efficacy in mice. To evaluate the immune response, total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b titers were analyzed. Immunization of mice with the alginate-OMV conjugate raised the levels of opsonic antibodies, and the vaccinated mice were protected when challenged intranasally with P. aeruginosa. Further studies showed that the conjugated vaccine could eliminate P. aeruginosa from the lungs of infected mice. This study supports the proposal that immunization of mice with an alginate-OMV conjugate vaccine could be safe and protective against P. aeruginosa infection.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Matthew R.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Fischer, Douglas K.; Flitter, Becca A.; Eichinger, Katherine M.; Durbin, Joan E.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Empey, Kerry M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients’ acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  14. Honey as an Antimicrobial Agent Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, PG; Bairy, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections. PMID:22754244

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  16. Exopolysaccharide-repressing small molecules with antibiofilm and antivirulence activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    van Tilburg Bernardes, Erik; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Reading, David J; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L; Lewenza, Shawn

    2017-02-21

    Biofilm formation is a universal virulence strategy in which bacteria grow in dense microbial communities enmeshed within a polymeric extracellular matrix that protects them from antibiotic exposure and the immune system. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an archetypal biofilm-forming organism that utilizes a biofilm growth strategy to cause chronic lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms is comprised mainly of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and DNA. Both mucoid and non-mucoid isolates of P. aeruginosa produces the Pel and Psl EPS, each of which have important roles in antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and immune evasion. Given the central importance of the EPS for biofilms, they are attractive targets for novel anti-infective compounds. In this study we used a high throughput gene expression screen to identify compounds that repress expression of the pel genes. The pel repressors demonstrated antibiofilm activity against microplate and flow chamber biofilms formed by wild type and hyperbiofilm forming strains. To determine the potential role of EPS in virulence, mutants in pel/psl were shown to have reduced virulence in the feeding behavior and slow killing virulence assays in Caenorhabditis elegans The antibiofilm molecules also reduced P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence in the nematode slow killing model. Importantly, the combination of antibiotics and antibiofilm compounds increased killing of P. aeruginosa biofilms. These small molecules represent a novel anti-infective strategy for the possible treatment of chronic P. aeruginosa infections.

  17. A Novel Insight into Dehydroleucodine Mediated Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, S.; Veisaga, M. L.; López, L. A.; Barbieri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) to conventional treatments demands the search for novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene lactone obtained from Artemisia (A.) douglasiana, was screened against several pathogenic virulence effectors of P. aeruginosa. In vitro, minimum inhibitory concentration of DhL was determined against P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA103, PA14, and multidrug resistant clinical strain, CDN118. Results showed that DhL was active against each strain where PAO1 and PA103 showed higher susceptibility (MIC 0.48 mg/mL) as compared to PA14 (MIC 0.96 mg/mL) and CDN118 (MIC 0.98 mg/mL). Also, when PAO1 strain was grown in the presence of DhL (MIC50, 0.12 mg/mL), a delay in the generation time was noticed along with significant inhibition of secretory protease and elastase activities, interruption in biofilm attachment phase in a stationary culture, and a significant decline in Type III effector ExoS. At MIC50, DhL treatment increased the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa towards potent antibiotics. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa with DhL prevented toxin-induced apoptosis in macrophages. These observations suggest that DhL activity was at the bacterial transcriptional level. Hence, antimicrobial activity of DhL may serve as leads in the development of new anti-Pseudomonas pharmaceuticals. PMID:26640783

  18. [Detection of metallo-beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Diana Christina Pereira Santos; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Leão, Lara Stefania Netto de Oliveira; Filho, José Rodrigues do Carmo; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium frequently isolated from hospital environments. This study had the aims of evaluating the susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously isolated from patients in a hospital in Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil), performing phenotypic screening for metallo-beta-lactamase production and detecting its genes using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Seventy-five 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between January 2005 and January 2007. Biochemical identification was performed using the API 20E system and an antibiogram was produced using the Kirby-Bauer method. Among the 62 isolates that were resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime, 35 (56.4%) produced metallo-beta-lactamase, while 26 (74.3%) showed the bla(SPM-1) gene. The frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produces metallo-beta-lactamase suggests that greater control over the dissemination of resistance in hospital environments is needed.

  19. Nanoparticles functionalized with ampicillin destroy multiple-antibiotic-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley N; Smith, Kathryn; Samuels, Tova A; Lu, Jiangrui; Obare, Sherine O; Scott, Maria E

    2012-04-01

    We show here that silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were intrinsically antibacterial, whereas gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were antimicrobial only when ampicillin was bound to their surfaces. Both AuNP and AgNP functionalized with ampicillin were effective broad-spectrum bactericides against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Most importantly, when AuNP and AgNP were functionalized with ampicillin they became potent bactericidal agents with unique properties that subverted antibiotic resistance mechanisms of multiple-drug-resistant bacteria.

  20. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  1. Conjugative type IVb pilus recognizes lipopolysaccharide of recipient cells to initiate PAPI-1 pathogenicity island transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity island 1 (PAPI-1) is one of the largest genomic islands of this important opportunistic human pathogen. Previous studies have shown that PAPI-1 encodes several putative virulence factors, a major regulator of biofilm formation, and antibiotic-resistance traits, a...

  2. Population structure and antimicrobial susceptibility of both nonpersistent and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n=18) and nonchronically (n=18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates.

  3. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Both Nonpersistent and Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n = 18) and nonchronically (n = 18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates. PMID:23761158

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Hex1T Isolated from Soils Contaminated with Used Lubricating Oil in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Feliziani, Sofía

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hex1T was isolated from soils contaminated with used lubricating oil from a garage in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain is capable of utilizing this pollutant as the sole carbon and energy source. Here, we present the 6.9-Mb draft genome sequence of Hex1T, which contains many heavy metal-resistance genes. PMID:28082504

  5. The susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients to bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Loukou, Guillaume; Cablanmian, Arsher; Lathro, Serge; Kutter, Elizabeth; Thien, Hoang Vu; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Phage therapy may become a complement to antibiotics in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. To design efficient therapeutic cocktails, the genetic diversity of the species and the spectrum of susceptibility to bacteriophages must be investigated. Bacterial strains showing high levels of phage resistance need to be identified in order to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Here we have selected genetically diverse P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and tested their susceptibility to a large collection of phages. Based on plaque morphology and restriction profiles, six different phages were purified from "pyophage", a commercial cocktail directed against five different bacterial species, including P. aeruginosa. Characterization of these phages by electron microscopy and sequencing of genome fragments showed that they belong to 4 different genera. Among 47 P. aeruginosa strains, 13 were not lysed by any of the isolated phages individually or by pyophage. We isolated two new phages that could lyse some of these strains, and their genomes were sequenced. The presence/absence of a CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Crisper associated genes) was investigated to evaluate the role of the system in phage resistance. Altogether, the results show that some P. aeruginosa strains cannot support the growth of any of the tested phages belonging to 5 different genera, and suggest that the CRISPR-Cas system is not a major defence mechanism against these lytic phages.

  6. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element. PMID:25494332

  7. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element.

  8. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgX

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Laura M.; Weadge, Joel T.; Baker, Perrin; Robinson, Howard; Codée, Jeroen D. C.; Tipton, Peter A.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2013-01-01

    The exopolysaccharide alginate, produced by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, undergoes two different chemical modifications as it is synthesized that alter the properties of the polymer and hence the biofilm. One modification, acetylation, causes the cells in the biofilm to adhere better to lung epithelium, form microcolonies, and resist the effects of the host immune system and/or antibiotics. Alginate biosynthesis requires 12 proteins encoded by the algD operon, including AlgX, and although this protein is essential for polymer production, its exact role is unknown. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AlgX at 2.15 Å resolution. The structure reveals that AlgX is a two-domain protein, with an N-terminal domain with structural homology to members of the SGNH hydrolase superfamily and a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding module. A number of residues in the carbohydrate-binding module form a substrate recognition “pinch point” that we propose aids in alginate binding and orientation. Although the topology of the N-terminal domain deviates from canonical SGNH hydrolases, the residues that constitute the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad characteristic of this family are structurally conserved. In vivo studies reveal that site-specific mutation of these residues results in non-acetylated alginate. This catalytic triad is also required for acetylesterase activity in vitro. Our data suggest that not only does AlgX protect the polymer as it passages through the periplasm but that it also plays a role in alginate acetylation. Our results provide the first structural insight for a wide group of closely related bacterial polysaccharide acetyltransferases. PMID:23779107

  10. Host defense mechanisms against pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pennington, J E; Ehrie, M G; Hickey, W F

    1984-01-01

    Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with unusually high mortalities. Accordingly, efforts to define better the most important components of lung defenses against this infection are justified as a prelude to defining improved management strategies. In this report, a guinea pig model of experimental aspiration pseudomonas pneumonia was employed for studies of cellular and humoral mechanisms of pulmonary defense. Animals treated with cortisone acetate plus cyclophosphamide experienced decreased survival from pneumonia, and survival rates correlated directly with the degree of myelosuppression. Numbers of pulmonary macrophages and polymorphonuclear neutrophils were reduced in drug-treated animals before impairment of macrophage antibacterial function. Thus, a reduction in numbers of phagocytes alone was sufficient to markedly reduce lung defenses. In additional experiments, normal guinea pigs were vaccinated with a lipopolysaccharide pseudomonas vaccine. Improved survival from pneumonia correlated with high titers of type-specific, heat-stable opsonic antibody. It is concluded that adequate numbers of lung phagocytes, plus type-specific opsonic antibody, represent the ideal status for lung defense against P. aeruginosa infection.

  11. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology.

  12. Antibiofilm and Antioxidant Activity of Propolis and Bud Poplar Resins versus Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Stefania; Piccioni, Miranda; Pagiotti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common biofilm-forming bacterial pathogen implicated in lung, skin, and systemic infections. Biofilms are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, which is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients characterized by drug-resistant biofilms in the bronchial mucus with zones, where reactive oxygen species concentration is increased mainly due to neutrophil activity. Aim of this work is to verify the anti-Pseudomonas property of propolis or bud poplar resins extracts. The antimicrobial activity of propolis and bud poplar resins extracts was determined by MIC and biofilm quantification. Moreover, we tested the antioxidant activity by DPPH and neutrophil oxidative burst assays. In the end, both propolis and bud poplar resins extracts were able to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and to influence both swimming and swarming motility. Moreover, the extracts could inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production by human PBMC and showed both direct and indirect antioxidant activity. This work is the first to demonstrate that propolis and bud poplar resins extracts can influence biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa contrasting the inflammation and the oxidation state typical of chronic infection suggesting that propolis or bud poplar resins can be used along with antibiotic as adjuvant in the therapy against P. aeruginosa infections related to biofilm. PMID:28127379

  13. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology. PMID:26448745

  14. Label-free molecular imaging of bacterial communities of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Nameera; Polisetti, Sneha; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Dunham, Sage J. B.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms, such as those formed by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are complex, matrix enclosed, and surface-associated communities of cells. Bacteria that are part of a biofilm community are much more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than their free-floating counterparts. P. aeruginosa biofilms are associated with persistent and chronic infections in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and HIV-AIDS. P. aeruginosa synthesizes and secretes signaling molecules such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which are implicated in quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria regulate gene expression based on population density. Processes such as biofilms formation and virulence are regulated by QS. This manuscript describes the powerful molecular imaging capabilities of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in conjunction with multivariate statistical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of signaling molecules, secondary metabolites and virulence factors in biofilm communities of P. aeruginosa. Our observations reveal that the laboratory strain PAO1C synthesizes and secretes 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxides and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinolones in high abundance, while the isogenic acyl homoserine lactone QS-deficient mutant (ΔlasIΔrhlI) strain produces predominantly 2-alkyl-quinolones during biofilm formation. This study underscores the use of CRM, along with traditional biological tools such as genetics, for studying the behavior of microbial communities at the molecular level.

  15. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  16. Dueling quorum sensing systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa control the production of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS).

    PubMed

    McGrath, Stephen; Wade, Dana S; Pesci, Everett C

    2004-01-15

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa regulates the production of numerous virulence factors via the action of two separate but coordinated quorum sensing systems, las and rhl. These systems control the transcription of genes in response to population density through the intercellular signals N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(12)-HSL) and N-(butanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C(4)-HSL). A third P. aeruginosa signal, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone [Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)], also plays a significant role in the transcription of multiple P. aeruginosa virulence genes. PQS is intertwined in the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing hierarchy with its production and bioactivity requiring the las and rhl quorum sensing systems, respectively. This report presents a preliminary transcriptional analysis of pqsA, the first gene of the recently discovered PQS biosynthetic gene cluster. We show that pqsA transcription required pqsR, a transcriptional activator protein encoded within the PQS biosynthetic gene cluster. It was also found that the transcription of pqsA and subsequent production of PQS was induced by the las quorum sensing system and repressed by the rhl quorum sensing system. In addition, PQS production was dependent on the ratio of 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL to C(4)-HSL, suggesting a regulatory balance between quorum sensing systems. These data are an important early step toward understanding the regulation of PQS synthesis and the role of PQS in P. aeruginosa intercellular signaling.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients from Southeast Austria.

    PubMed

    Masoud-Landgraf, Lilian; Badura, Alexandra; Eber, Ernst; Feierl, Gebhard; Posch, Josefa; Zarfel, Gernot; Zach, Maximilian; Marth, Egon

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, the predominant source of its acquisition, however, is under discussion. In order to study the molecular epidemiology, we evaluated 86 P. aeruginosa isolates from 43 CF patients from southeast Austria. The DiversiLab system was used to identify genetic relationships among the isolates. Antibiotic susceptibilities were tested with a broth microdilution method (Micronaut Merlin). A total of 39 unrelated P. aeruginosa genotypes were found of which 34 were unique to a single patient and one was unique to a sibling pair. We found low rates of resistance for β-lactams with resistance to piperacillin/tazobactam and ceftazidime ranging from 4 to 6%. Resistance rates for meropenem and ciprofloxacin were 11% and 15%, respectively. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant isolates was 2%. We conclude that the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients originate from environmental sources and patient-to-patient spread is very uncommon in our centre.

  18. Prevalence and Clonal Dissemination of Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Akya, Alisha; Salimi, Afsaneh; Nomanpour, Bizhan; Ahmadi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial infections. The emergence and dissemination of metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) has contributed to the high rate of resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and the clonal dissemination of MBL- producing P. aeruginosa isolates collected from major hospitals in Kermanshah. Materials and Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the minimal inhibitory concentrations. The MBLs were investigated using the Double-Disk Synergy Test (DDST) and Polymerase Chain Reaction. Molecular typing was performed by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Of the 60 P. aeruginosa isolates included in this study, 30 (50%) were resistant to Gentamicin, 38 (63.3%) to Piperacillin, 42 (70%) to Ceftazidime, and 45 (75%) to Cefepime. Twenty-nine (48.3%) isolates were MBL producers in the DDST test. Five (8.3%) isolates were positive for the VIM gene. PFGE analysis among the MBL producers revealed 12 distinct clonal patterns. Conclusions: The inter- and intra-hospital dissemination of resistant clones is a matter of concern and is an indicator of the level of the improvement and surveillance of standard hygiene, particularly disinfection and hand washing before and after contact with patients. Given the emergence of MBL-producing strains, surveillance has become an important procedure to control the transmission of resistant strains. PMID:26421137

  19. AnkB, a Periplasmic Ankyrin-Like Protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Is Required for Optimal Catalase B (KatB) Activity and Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Michael L.; Alsabbagh, Eyad; Ma, Ju-Fang; Ochsner, Urs A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Blumenthal, Kenneth M.; Niederhoffer, Eric C.; Morris, Randall E.; Needham, David; Dean, Gary E.; Wani, Maqsood A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have cloned the ankB gene, encoding an ankyrin-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ankB gene is composed of 549 bp encoding a protein of 183 amino acids that possesses four 33-amino-acid ankyrin repeats that are a hallmark of erythrocyte and brain ankyrins. The location of ankB is 57 bp downstream of katB, encoding a hydrogen peroxide-inducible catalase, KatB. Monomeric AnkB is a 19.4-kDa protein with a pI of 5.5 that possesses 22 primarily hydrophobic amino acids at residues 3 to 25, predicting an inner-membrane-spanning motif with the N terminus in the cytoplasm and the C terminus in the periplasm. Such an orientation in the cytoplasmic membrane and, ultimately, periplasmic space was confirmed using AnkB-BlaM and AnkB-PhoA protein fusions. Circular dichroism analysis of recombinant AnkB minus its signal peptide revealed a secondary structure that is ∼65% α-helical. RNase protection and KatB- and AnkB-LacZ translational fusion analyses indicated that katB and ankB are part of a small operon whose transcription is induced dramatically by H2O2, and controlled by the global transactivator OxyR. Interestingly, unlike the spherical nature of ankyrin-deficient erythrocytes, the cellular morphology of an ankB mutant was identical to that of wild-type bacteria, yet the mutant produced more membrane vesicles. The mutant also exhibited a fourfold reduction in KatB activity and increased sensitivity to H2O2, phenotypes that could be complemented in trans by a plasmid constitutively expressing ankB. Our results suggest that AnkB may form an antioxidant scaffolding with KatB in the periplasm at the cytoplasmic membrane, thus providing a protective lattice work for optimal H2O2 detoxification. PMID:10913088

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  1. Identification, cloning, and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Massimelli, María J; Beassoni, Paola R; Forrellad, Marina A; Barra, José L; Garrido, Mónica N; Domenech, Carlos E; Lisa, Angela T

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP) is a periplasmic enzyme produced simultaneously with the hemolytic phospholipase C (PLc-H) when the bacteria are grown in the presence of choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. Molecular analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutant JUF8-00, after Tn5-751 mutagenesis, revealed that the PA5292 gene in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome was responsible for the synthesis of PChP. The enzyme expressed in E. coli, rPChP-Ec, purified by a chitin-binding column (IMPACT-CN system, New England BioLabs) was homogeneous after SDS-PAGE analysis. PChP was also expressed in P. aeruginosa PAO1-LAC, rPChP-Pa. Both recombinant enzymes exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa, as expected for the size of the PA5292 gene, and catalyzed the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. The saturation curve of rPChP-Ec and rPChP-Pa by phosphorylcholine revealed that these recombinant enzymes, like the purified native PChP, also contained the high- and low-affinity sites for phosphorylcholine and that the enzyme activity was inhibited by high substrate concentration.

  2. Effects of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, DP; Caceres, S; Caverly, L; Fratelli, C; Kim, SH; Malcolm, KC; Poch, KR; Saavedra, M; Solomon, G; Taylor-Cousar, J; Moskowitz, SM; Nick, JA

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous thermal injuries (i.e. burns) remain a common form of debilitating trauma and outcomes are often worsened by wound infection with environmental bacteria, chiefly Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods We tested the effects of early administration of a single dose of azithromycin, with or without subsequent anti-pseudomonal antibiotics, in a mouse model of standardized thermal injury infected with P. aeruginosa on both wound site and systemic infection. We also tested the antimicrobial effects of these antibiotics alone or combined in comparative biofilm and planktonic cultures in vitro. Results In our model, early azithromycin administration significantly reduced wound and systemic infection without altering wound site or circulating neutrophil activity. The antimicrobial effect of azithromycin was additive with ciprofloxacin but significantly reduced the antimicrobial effect of tobramycin. This pattern was reproduced in biofilm cultures and not observed in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion these data suggest that early administration of azithromycin following burn-related trauma and infection may reduce P. aeruginosa infection and potential interactions with other antibiotics should be considered when designing future studies. PMID:23478086

  3. Does Pseudomonas aeruginosa use intercellular signalling to build biofilm communities?

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Parsek, Matthew R

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterial species that causes several opportunistic human infections. This organism is also found in the environment, where it is renowned (like other Pseudomonads) for its ability to use a wide variety of compounds as carbon and energy sources. It is a model species for studying group-related behaviour in bacteria. Two types of group behaviour it engages in are intercellular signalling, or quorum sensing, and the formation of surface-associated communities called biofilms. Both quorum sensing and biofilm formation are important in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Quorum sensing regulates the expression of several secreted virulence factors and quorum sensing mutant strains are attenuated for virulence in animal models. Biofilms have been implicated in chronic infections. Two examples are the chronic lung infections afflicting people suffering from cystic fibrosis and colonization of indwelling medical devices. This review will discuss quorum sensing and biofilm formation and studies that link these two processes.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dose response and bathing water infection.

    PubMed

    Roser, D J; van den Akker, B; Boase, S; Haas, C N; Ashbolt, N J; Rice, S A

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the opportunistic pathogen mostly implicated in folliculitis and acute otitis externa in pools and hot tubs. Nevertheless, infection risks remain poorly quantified. This paper reviews disease aetiologies and bacterial skin colonization science to advance dose-response theory development. Three model forms are identified for predicting disease likelihood from pathogen density. Two are based on Furumoto & Mickey's exponential 'single-hit' model and predict infection likelihood and severity (lesions/m2), respectively. 'Third-generation', mechanistic, dose-response algorithm development is additionally scoped. The proposed formulation integrates dispersion, epidermal interaction, and follicle invasion. The review also details uncertainties needing consideration which pertain to water quality, outbreaks, exposure time, infection sites, biofilms, cerumen, environmental factors (e.g. skin saturation, hydrodynamics), and whether P. aeruginosa is endogenous or exogenous. The review's findings are used to propose a conceptual infection model and identify research priorities including pool dose-response modelling, epidermis ecology and infection likelihood-based hygiene management.

  5. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  6. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  7. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  8. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence by Distinct Iron Sources

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Alexandria A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and versatile opportunistic pathogen. Like most other organisms, P. aeruginosa requires iron for survival, yet iron rapidly reacts with oxygen and water to form stable ferric (FeIII) oxides and hydroxides, limiting its availability to living organisms. During infection, iron is also sequestered by the host innate immune system, further limiting its availability. P. aeruginosa’s capacity to cause disease in diverse host environments is due to its ability to scavenge iron from a variety of host iron sources. Work over the past two decades has further shown that different iron sources can affect the expression of distinct virulence traits. This review discusses how the individual components of P. aeruginosa’s iron regulatory network allow this opportunist to adapt to a multitude of host environments during infection. PMID:27983658

  9. Production and characterization of the slime polysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Evans, L R; Linker, A

    1973-11-01

    The slime polysaccharides produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a variety of human infections were investigated. Slime production in culture seemed optimal when adequate amounts of carbohydrate were present and under conditions of either high osmotic pressure or inadequate protein supply. The polysaccharides produced by the organisms were similar to each other, to the slime of Azotobacter vinelandii, and to seaweed alginic acids. They were composed of beta-1,4-linked d-mannuronic acid residues and variable amounts of its 5-epimer l-guluronic acid. All bacterial polymers contained o-acetyl groups which are absent in the alginates. The polysaccharides differed considerably in the ratio of mannuronic to guluronic acid content and in the number of o-acetyl groups. The particular composition of the slime was not found to be characteristic for the disease process from which the mucoid variants of P. aeruginosa were obtained.

  10. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  11. [Water used for hemodialysis equipment: where is Pseudomonas aeruginosa?].

    PubMed

    Ducki, Sébastien; Francini, Nicolas; Blech, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The water used in dilution of the dialysis solutions constitutes an essential element of the efficiency and the safety of this therapeutics. Water must be specifically treated, and some technical rules must be respected, such as disinfection of the equipment for water treatment, to guarantee a satisfying level for whole the installation. This article reports the investigations, which were led to find the spring of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which contamined in a recurring way the water feeding dialysis equipment. The observation of samples'chronology and an analysis of the sanitary pad suggested a contamination during disinfection. Sample of residual water from the pump used for the injection of Dialox identified this reservoir as origin of the contamination. To stop this contamination by P. aeruginosa, a pump maintenance revision and purges of the system were used.

  12. Airway epithelial control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Campόdonico, Victoria L; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Uluer, Ahmet; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-01-01

    Defective expression or function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlies the hypersusceptibility of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to chronic airway infections, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CFTR is involved in the specific recognition of P. aeruginosa, thereby contributing to effective innate immunity and proper hydration of the airway surface layer (ASL). In CF, the airway epithelium fails to initiate an appropriate innate immune response, allowing the microbe to bind to mucus plugs that are then not properly cleared because of the dehydrated ASL. Recent studies have identified numerous CFTR-dependent factors that are recruited to the epithelial plasma membrane in response to infection and that are needed for bacterial clearance, a process that is defective in CF patients hypersusceptible to infection with this organism. PMID:18262467

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S induces proliferation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mody, C H; Buser, D E; Syme, R M; Woods, D E

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for devastating acute and chronic infections, which include bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis, nosocomial pneumonia, and infection of burn wounds. Previous studies have demonstrated that these patients have impaired host responses, including cell-mediated immune responses, which are important in anti-Pseudomonas host defense. The P. aeruginosa exoproduct, exoenzyme S, has a number of characteristics which suggest that it might be important in cell-mediated immunity. To determine whether exoenzyme S activates lymphocytes to proliferate, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal volunteers were stimulated with purified exoenzyme S, and the lymphocyte response was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine uptake and by counting the number of cells after various times in culture. Ninety-five percent of healthy adult donors had a lymphocyte response to exoenzyme S. The optimal lymphocyte response occurred on day 7, with 4 x 10(5) PBMC per microtiter well when cells were stimulated with 10 micrograms exoenzyme S per ml. [3H]thymidine uptake correlated with an increase in the number of mononuclear cells, indicating that proliferation occurred. In unseparated PBMC, T cells, and to a lesser extent B cells, proliferated. Purified T cells proliferated, while purified B cells proliferated only after the addition of irradiated T cells. Thus, T lymphocytes are necessary and sufficient for the proliferative response to exoenzyme S. We speculate that exoenzyme S from P. aeruginosa is important in T-lymphocyte-mediated host defense to P. aeruginosa. In strategies to enhance impaired cell-mediated immunity, exoenzyme S should be considered as a potential stimulant. PMID:7537248

  14. In vitro comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with various susceptibilities to aminoglycosides and ten beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D H; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P

    1984-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 98 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including 33 strains with known mechanisms of amikacin resistance, were tested by the agar dilution method against 10 beta-lactam drugs. Ceftazidime, imipenem, and cefsulodin had the greatest activity, regardless of the aminoglycoside susceptibilities. The strains which were highly resistant to amikacin appeared to be less susceptible to some beta-lactam drugs, especially if their resistance was related to amikacin-inactivating enzymes; statistical significance, however, was observed for aztreonam only. PMID:6428308

  15. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  16. Vaccines for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A long and winding road

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Gregory P.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, no vaccine against this bacteria have come to market. This review describes the current state-of-the-art in vaccinology for this bacterium. This includes a discussion of those at risk for infection, the types of vaccines and the approaches for empirical and targeted antigen selection under development, as well as a perspective on where the field should go. In addition, the challenges in developing a vaccine for those individuals at risk are discussed. PMID:24575895

  17. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  18. [Hospital infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Significance in intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, S V; Gel'fand, E B; Mamontova, O A

    1999-01-01

    The significance of P. aeruginosa as an agent of hospital infections in intensive care departments is determined by high prevalence of this microorganism, its natural and acquired resistance to antibiotics of various groups, and severity of the infection it induces. The resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is different in different regions. Among the strains isolated in Moscow in intensive care wards for newborns 9% were resistant to meropenem, 10% to amicacine, 15% to imipramine, 16% to cefepime, 37% to ceftasidime, 45% to piperacylline/tasobactam, 45% to ciprofloxacine, and 60% to gentamicin; 1.5% of these strains were resistant to all tested antibiotics. High prevalence of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa impedes the choice of drugs for empirical antibiotic therapy and increases the significance of microbiological diagnosis. Even if an agent is sensitive to such antibiotics as semisynthetic penicillines and aminoglycosides, their use as monotherapy in infections caused by P. aeruginosa is ineffective. Carbapenemes, III- IV generations cefalosporines, and fluoroquinolones can be used as mono therapy.

  19. Preparation, characterization and in vitro antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; Bento, Etiene Barbosa; Almeida, Larissa da Cunha; de Sá, Luisa Zaiden Carvalho Martins; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism with the ability to respond to a wide variety of environmental changes, exhibiting a high intrinsic resistance to a number of antimicrobial agents. This low susceptibility to antimicrobial substances is primarily due to the low permeability of its outer membrane, efflux mechanisms and the synthesis of enzymes that promote the degradation of these drugs. Cephalosporins, particularty ceftazidime and cefepime are effective against P. aeruginosa, however, its increasing resistance has limited the usage of these antibiotics. Encapsulating antimicrobial drugs into unilamellar liposomes is an approach that has been investigated in order to overcome microorganism resistance. In this study, antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and P. aeruginosa SPM-1 was compared to that of the free drugs. Liposomal characterization included diameter, encapsulation efficiency and stability. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined for free and liposomal forms of both drugs. Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was determined at concentrations 1, 2 and 4 times MIC. Average diameter of liposomes was 131.88 nm and encapsulation efficiency for cefepime and ceftazidime were 2.29% end 5.77%, respectively. Improved stability was obtained when liposome formulations were prepared with a 50% molar ratio for cholesterol in relation to the phospholipid. MIC for liposomal antibiotics for both drugs were 50% lower than that of the free drug, demonstrating that liposomal drug delivery systems may contribute to increase the antibacterial activity of these drugs. PMID:24031917

  20. In vivo Host Environment Alters Pseudomonas aeruginosa Susceptibility to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Dong, Yuanyuan; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Chang; Xia, Bin; Shi, Jing; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2017-01-01

    During host infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinately regulates the expression of numerous genes to adapt to the host environment while counteracting host clearance mechanisms. As infected patients take antibiotics, the invading bacteria encounter antibiotics in the host milieu. P. aeruginosa is highly resistant to antibiotics due to multiple chromosomally encoded resistant determinants. And numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated the regulatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance related genes in response to antibiotics. However, it is not well-known how host environment affects bacterial response to antibiotics. In this study, we found that P. aeruginosa cells directly isolated from mice lungs displayed higher susceptibility to tobramycin than in vitro cultured bacteria. In vitro experiments demonstrated that incubation with A549 and differentiated HL60 (dHL60) cells sensitized P. aeruginosa to tobramycin. Further studies revealed that reactive oxygen species produced by the host cells contributed to the increased bacterial susceptibility. At the same concentration of tobramycin, presence of A549 and dHL60 cells resulted in higher expression of heat shock proteins, which are known inducible by tobramycin. Further analyses revealed decreased membrane potential upon incubation with the host cells and modification of lipopolysaccharide, which contributed to the increased susceptibility to tobramycin. Therefore, our results demonstrate that contact with host cells increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin. PMID:28352614

  1. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cockroaches Captured in hospitals in Japan, and their antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were isolated from 45 of 370 (12.2%) cockroaches captured in hospitals. By cockroach species, the bacterial strains were isolated from 39 of 181 (21.5%) Periplaneta fuliginosa and 6 of 183 (3.3%) Blattella germanica, showing a significant difference (p<0.01). Many P. aeruginosa-carrying cockroaches inhabited locker rooms (66.7%) and kitchens (17.8%). In terms of serotyping, many isolates were typed into groups A, G, and B. In drug sensitivity tests, strains showed the highest sensitivity to ciprofloxacin with an MIC90 of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by 2 microg/ml meropenem, and 4 microg/ml ceftazidime, gentamicin, and ofloxacin. In contrast, many strains were resistant to cefotaxime and minocycline, accounting for 86.7% of all resistant strains. However, there was no multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strain, and all strains were negative for the metallo-beta-lactamase gene (IMP-1 and VIM-2). These findings suggested that cockroach-derived P. aeruginosa may contaminate hospital environments, for which the control of disease-carrying insects in hospitals is important.

  2. Hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients from Two Brazilian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Larissa; Leão, Robson Souza; Ferreira, Alex Guerra; Pereira, Dariane Castro; Raupp, Caroline; Pitt, Tyrone; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Hypermutable (HPM) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been found at high frequencies in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Europe. We report the results of testing for HPM frequencies, mutator genotype, and antimicrobial resistance of P. aeruginosa strains from Brazilian CF patients. A modified disk diffusion technique was used to quantify antibiotic-resistant subpopulations of an isolate, and estimations of the frequency of mutation to rifampin resistance were determined for 705 isolates from 149 patients attending clinics in two Brazilian cities. Mutations in the mutS gene were detected by sequencing assays. We found 194 (27.5%) HPM isolates in samples from 99 (66.4%) patients. Thirty-five HPM isolates (18.0%) from 31 (31.3%) patients exhibited a high increased spontaneous mutation rate compared with controls, and eight isolates from six patients displayed a defective mutS gene. The dominant HPM population was associated with very low antibiotic resistance levels, while HPM subpopulations were generally more resistant to antimicrobials. A relatively high prevalence of HPM P. aeruginosa in CF patients was associated with surprisingly low antibiotic resistance levels, in contrast to some earlier studies. PMID:23303495

  3. In vitro and in vivo screening for novel essential cell-envelope proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogens for which novel therapeutic options are urgently required. In order to identify new candidates as potential drug targets, we combined large-scale transposon mutagenesis data analysis and bioinformatics predictions to retrieve a set of putative essential genes which are conserved in P. aeruginosa and predicted to encode cell envelope or secreted proteins. By generating unmarked deletion or conditional mutants, we confirmed the in vitro essentiality of two periplasmic proteins, LptH and LolA, responsible for lipopolysaccharide and lipoproteins transport to the outer membrane respectively, and confirmed that they are important for cell envelope stability. LptH was also found to be essential for P. aeruginosa ability to cause infection in different animal models. Conversely, LolA-depleted cells appeared only partially impaired in pathogenicity, indicating that this protein likely plays a less relevant role during bacterial infection. Finally, we ruled out any involvement of the other six proteins under investigation in P. aeruginosa growth, cell envelope stability and virulence. Besides proposing LptH as a very promising drug target in P. aeruginosa, this study confirms the importance of in vitro and in vivo validation of potential essential genes identified through random transposon mutagenesis. PMID:26621210

  4. miR-155 suppresses bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis by targeting Rheb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Minhao; Li, Meiyu; Li, Dandan; Peng, Anping; Nie, Xinxin; Sun, Mingxia; Wang, Jinli; Wu, Yongjian; Deng, Qiuchan; Zhu, Min; Chen, Kang; Yuan, Jin; Huang, Xi

    2014-07-01

    miR-155 (microRNA-155) is an important noncoding RNA in regulating host inflammatory responses. However, its regulatory role in ocular infection remains unclear. Our study first explored the function of miR-155 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis, one of the most common sight-threatening ocular diseases. We found that miR-155 expression was enhanced in human and mouse corneas after P. aeruginosa infection and was mainly expressed in macrophages but not neutrophils. In vivo studies demonstrated that miR-155 knockout mice displayed more resistance to P. aeruginosa keratitis, with a higher inducible nitric oxide synthase level and a lower bacterial burden. More importantly, in vitro data indicated that miR-155 suppressed the macrophage-mediated bacterial phagocytosis and intracellular killing of P. aeruginosa by targeting Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in brain). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the role of miR-155 in bacterial keratitis, which may provide a promising target for clinical treatment of P. aeruginosa keratitis and other infectious diseases.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyocyanin Induces Neutrophil Death via Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Acid Sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Managò, Antonella; Becker, Katrin Anne; Carpinteiro, Alexander; Wilker, Barbara; Soddemann, Matthias; Seitz, Aaron P.; Edwards, Michael J.; Grassmé, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pulmonary infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a serious clinical problem and are often lethal. Because many strains of P. aeruginosa are resistant to antibiotics, therapeutic options are limited. Neutrophils play an important role in the host's early acute defense against pulmonary P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it is important to define the mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa interacts with host cells, particularly neutrophils. Results: Here, we report that pyocyanin, a membrane-permeable pigment and toxin released by P. aeruginosa, induces the death of wild-type neutrophils; its interaction with the mitochondrial respiratory chain results in the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the activation of mitochondrial acid sphingomyelinase, the formation of mitochondrial ceramide, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. A genetic deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase prevents both the activation of this pathway and pyocyanin-induced neutrophil death. This reduced death, on the other hand, is associated with an increase in the release of interleukin-8 from pyocyanin-activated acid sphingomyelinase-deficient neutrophils but not from wild-type cells. Innovation: These studies identified the mechanisms by which pyocyanin induces the release of mitochondrial ROS and by which ROS induce neutrophil death via mitochondrial acid sphingomyelinase. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of pyocyanin-induced death of neutrophils and show how this apoptosis balances innate immune reactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1097–1110. PMID:25686490

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation by Traditional Chinese Medicinal Herb Herba patriniae

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bo; Wu, Qiaolian; Dang, Minyan; Bai, Dangdang; Guo, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    New antimicrobial agents are urgently needed to treat infections caused by drug-resistant pathogens and by pathogens capable of persisting in biofilms. The aim of this study was to identify traditional Chinese herbs that could inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen that causes serious and difficult-to-treat infections in humans. A luxCDABE-based reporter system was constructed to monitor the expression of six key biofilm-associated genes in P. aeruginosa. The reporters were used to screen a library of 36 herb extracts for inhibitory properties against these genes. The results obtained indicated that the extract of Herba patriniae displayed significant inhibitory effect on almost all of these biofilm-associated genes. Quantitative analysis showed that H. patriniae extract was able to significantly reduce the biofilm formation and dramatically altered the structure of the mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Further studies showed H. patriniae extract decreased exopolysaccharide production by P. aeruginosa and promoted its swarming motility, two features disparately associated with biofilm formation. These results provided a potential mechanism for the use of H. patriniae to treat bacterial infections by traditional Chinese medicines and revealed a promising candidate for exploration of new drugs against P. aeruginosa biofilm-associated infections. PMID:28377931

  7. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: a review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hassanzadazar, Hassan; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: All required information was obtained by searching keywords such as P. aeruginosa, medicinal plant extracts or essential oils in published articles in authentic scientific databases such as Science Direct, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Google scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID) and Magiran. Results: According to the literature review, our results showed 12 different native medicinal plants were effective against P. aeruginosa in Iran including Eucalyptus camadulensis, Marticaria chamomilla, Ferula gummosa Boiss, Lawsonia inermis, Ocimumgra tissimum, Allium sativum, Satureja hortensis L, Satureja bachtiarica Bunge, Satureja khuzestanica (Jamzad), Thymus daenensis Celak, Thymus carmanicus Jalals and Camellia sinensis. Conclusion: Phytochemical analysis has shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants with their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be good alternatives for the synthetic medicines in food and drug industry. PMID:28149496

  8. In vitro and in vivo screening for novel essential cell-envelope proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogens for which novel therapeutic options are urgently required. In order to identify new candidates as potential drug targets, we combined large-scale transposon mutagenesis data analysis and bioinformatics predictions to retrieve a set of putative essential genes which are conserved in P. aeruginosa and predicted to encode cell envelope or secreted proteins. By generating unmarked deletion or conditional mutants, we confirmed the in vitro essentiality of two periplasmic proteins, LptH and LolA, responsible for lipopolysaccharide and lipoproteins transport to the outer membrane respectively, and confirmed that they are important for cell envelope stability. LptH was also found to be essential for P. aeruginosa ability to cause infection in different animal models. Conversely, LolA-depleted cells appeared only partially impaired in pathogenicity, indicating that this protein likely plays a less relevant role during bacterial infection. Finally, we ruled out any involvement of the other six proteins under investigation in P. aeruginosa growth, cell envelope stability and virulence. Besides proposing LptH as a very promising drug target in P. aeruginosa, this study confirms the importance of in vitro and in vivo validation of potential essential genes identified through random transposon mutagenesis.

  9. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cotar, Ani-Ioana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Dinu, Sorin; Bucur, Marcela; Iordache, Carmen; Banu, Otilia; Dracea, Olguta; Larion, Cristina; Lazar, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections. PMID:21614207

  10. Influence of Melaleuca alternifolia oil nanoparticles on aspects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Comin, Vanessa M; Lopes, Leonardo Q S; Quatrin, Priscilla M; de Souza, Márcia E; Bonez, Pauline C; Pintos, Francieli G; Raffin, Renata P; Vaucher, Rodrigo de A; Martinez, Diego S T; Santos, Roberto C V

    2016-04-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus and frequent cause of infection. This microorganism is resistant intrinsically to various drugs. The P. aeruginosa is associated with the biofilm formation, which causes worsen the prognosis and difficulty the treatment. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia oil or "tree of tee" oil (TTO) and TTO nanoparticles on adhesion of P. aeruginosa in buccal epithelial cells was investigated. Also was determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against this microorganism. The TTO nanoparticles were produced by deposition of preformed polymer and the physic-chemical properties of nanoparticles were measured by electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The characterization of nanoparticle showed acceptable values for diameter and zeta potential. The evaluation of antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1 was performed by microdilution indicating the minimal inhibitory concentration, and the potential antibiofilm. It was verified the action on virulence factors such the motility, besides the influence on adhesion in buccal epithelial cells. Both