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Sample records for resistive wall modes

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  2. Effect of Trapped Energetic Particles on the Resistive Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-07-01

    A stability analysis for the resistive wall mode is studied in the presence of trapped energetic particles (EPs). When the EPs' beta exceeds a critical value, a fishbonelike bursting mode (FLM) with an external kink eigenstructure can exist. This offers the first analytic interpretation of the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001 (2009)]. The mode-particle resonances for the FLM and the q=1 fishbone occur in different regimes of the precession frequency of EPs. In certain ranges of the plasma rotation speed and the EPs' beta, a mode conversion can occur between the resistive wall mode and FLM.

  3. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  4. Resistive wall modes in the Reversatron II RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Barrick, G.; Greene, P.; Robertson, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Reversatron 2 RFP (R/a=50cm/8cm) has been operated with interchangeable shells to investigate resistive wall modes. Shell penetration times are 610, 100, and 4 {mu}sec (no shell). With the 610 {mu}sec shell, the plasma current is {le} 65 kA and the duration {le} 550 {mu}sec. With no shell, helium discharges are more resistive and hydrogen discharges cannot be sustained. An m=1, n=-6 mode resonant on axis grows to a relative amplitude of 20% during the setting-up phase. With the 100{mu}sec shell, deuterium discharges can be sustained but are degraded due to a broad spectrum of modes. The increased plasma resistance can be correlated with the flux intersecting the wall. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation in advanced tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, G.

    1996-03-01

    By combining previous results of Betti and Freidberg [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995)] and Eriksson [Phys. Plasmas 2, 3095 (1995)], a fully analytical description is obtained for the stabilizing effect of toroidal plasma rotation in a large aspect ratio tokamak surrounded by a resistive wall. As in advanced tokamak configurations with a large fraction of bootstrap current, it is assumed that the current gradient near the plasma edge is large. This assumption enables an analytical analysis of external kink modes with low poloidal mode numbers. An expression is obtained, showing explicitly how the window of stable wall distances depends on the current profile.

  6. Study on resistive wall mode based on plasma response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2006-07-01

    A uniform framework, based on the frequency dependent plasma response model (PRM), is proposed to study the physics and control of the resistive wall mode (RWM). The PRM is constructed, respectively, from the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model, from a cylindrical theory with multiple RWM, and, finally, from toroidal calculations. Based on the PRM, several important aspects of the RWM physics are studied, including the interplay between active feedback and plasma rotation to stabilize the mode, the efficiency of external versus internal active coils for the mode control and the resonant field amplification effect due to a rotationally damped RWM.

  7. Study of the Resistive Wall Mode in DIII--D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Strait, E. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; DIII-D Team; Rice, B. W.

    1997-11-01

    Stability analysis of DIII--D discharges showed kink mode stabilization by a resistive wall in D-shaped plasmas with βN exceeding the expected no-wall ideal βN limit by a factor of 1.3.(E.J. Strait, et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2483 (1995). We will call this factor a wall stability enhancement factor, E_w: Ew = βN (experiment)/ βN (no-wall limit, MHD model). Recent DIII--D experiments were aimed at achieving a value of Ew > 1.3 in lower single null, JET-like plasmas with B_t=2.0--2.1 T and Ip = 1.8 MA. A lower plasma internal inductance of l_i ~ 0.7 (and thus lower no-wall βN limit) was produced using early neutral beam injection and a fast positive current ramp during beam injection in an H--mode plasma. Preliminary analysis shows a slowly rotating (25 Hz) n = 1 mode growing in a 40 ms time scale just before a β collapse, similar to what was observed in Ref. 2. The results of detailed stability studies using ideal (GATO) and resistive (MARS) MHD codes will be presented.

  8. Flow stabilization of the ideal MHD resistive wall mode^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time in a numerical calculation that for a typical circular cylindrical equilibrium, the ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be completely stabilized by bulk equilibrium plasma flow, V, for a window of wall locations without introducing additional dissipation into the system. The stabilization is due to a resonance between the RWM and the Doppler shifted ideal MHD sound continuum. Our numerical approach introduces^2 u=φξ+ iV .∇ξ and the perturbed wall current^3 as variables, such that the eigenvalue, φ, only appears linearly in the linearized stability equations, which allows for the use of standard eigenvalue solvers. The wall current is related to the plasma displacement at the boundary by a Green's function. With the introduction of the resistive wall, we find that it is essential that the finite element grid be highly localized around the resonance radius where the parallel displacement, ξ, becomes singular. We present numerical convergence studies demonstrating that this singular behavior can be approached in a limiting sense. We also report on progress toward extending this calculation to an axisymmetric toroidal geometry. ^1Work supported by a DOE FES fellowship through ORISE and ORAU. ^2L.Guazzotto, J.P Freidberg, and R. Betti, Phys.Plasmas 15, 072503 (2008). ^3S.P. Smith and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 080701 (2008).

  9. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  10. Control of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed field pinches with a resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A. S.; Finn, J. M.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2010-11-15

    Numerical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with feedback control in reversed field pinches (RFPs) are presented. Specifically, investigations are performed of the stability of m=1 modes in RFPs with control based on sensing the normal and tangential magnetic fields at the resistive wall and applying two-parameter feedback proportional to these fields. The control scheme is based on that of [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)], which is here modified to use a more realistic plasma model. The plasma model now uses full resistive MHD rather than reduced MHD, and it uses three realistic classes of equilibrium parallel current density profiles appropriate to RFPs. Results with these modifications are in qualitative agreement with [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)]: the feedback can stabilize tearing modes (with resistive or ideal-wall) and resistive wall ideal modes. The limit for stabilization is again found to be near the threshold for ideal modes with an ideal-wall. In addition to confirming these predictions, the nature of the instabilities limiting the range of feedback stabilization near the ideal-wall ideal-plasma threshold are studied, and the effects of viscosity, resistive wall time, and plasma resistivity are reported.

  11. Feedback Stabilization of Resistive Wall Modes in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzonella, Tommaso

    2006-10-01

    The search of efficient strategies for active control of MHD instabilities is one of the main missions of existing devices and one active field of research where important contributions can come not only from tokamak devices but also from alternative configurations. Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instabilities are known in particular to limit plasma performances in all toroidal devices with plasma duration exceeding the penetration time of the resistive magnetic boundary surrounding the plasma. RWMs are the main limit for tokamak high-beta advanced scenarios, where a high fraction of non-inductive current is requested to study long (in the limit steady state) operations. Historically RWMs were first observed in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) devices, where the current gradient plays the role of the drive, typically with multi-mode spectrum whose composition depends on magnetic equilibrium field profiles. RFX-mod device is a large RFP (R=2 m, a=0.46 m) where active control of MHD instabilities is intensively studied by means of a system of 192 active saddle coils placed outside the resistive shell (50 ms for Bv diffusion time) fully covering its external surface and driven by a digital controller. This system provides a very powerful and flexible environment where the study of RWMs physics and their active stabilisation under different experimental conditions is possible. Recent results from RFX-mod show that the complete stabilisation of multi-mode RWM spectrum at high plasma currents (Ip=1 MA) is possible allowing discharges longer than 6 times the diffusion time of the shell. Different control schemes are tested as well, such as open loop operations (intrinsic error field correction and Resonant Field Amplification studies), feedback operations using different measurement systems or incomplete set of coils to simulate systems with partial coverage by active coils.

  12. Kinetic damping of resistive wall modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Liu, Y. Q.; Graves, J. P.; Jucker, M.

    2012-05-15

    Full drift kinetic modelling including finite orbit width effects has been used to assess the passive stabilisation of the resistive wall mode (RWM) that can be expected in the ITER advanced scenario. At realistic plasma rotation frequency, the thermal ions have a stabilising effect on the RWM, but the stability limit remains below the target plasma pressure to achieve Q = 5. However, the inclusion of damping arising from the fusion-born alpha particles, the NBI ions, and ICRH fast ions extends the RWM stability limit above the target {beta} for the advanced scenario. The fast ion damping arises primarily from finite orbit width effects and is not due to resonance between the particle frequencies and the instability.

  13. Effects of Multiple Resistive Walls and Mode Coupling on Mode Locking in RFPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2001-10-01

    Locked dynamo modes give rise to a serious deterioration of confinement at the plasma edge during the high current phase of reversed field pinches (RFP) operations. This is caused by the large braking torque exerted by the eddy currents on the resistive vacuum vessel on the dynamo modes1. The torque is strong enough to reduce the rotation frequency to an extremely small value. These tearing modes are then readily stopped (wall-locked) by a small external fixed error field. Several RFP devices are equipped with one or two thin (or thick) shells outside the vessel. This can, in principle, alleviate the locked mode problem. The present work presents a systematic calculation of the braking torques of multiple resistive walls (including both thin and thick shells) on a rotating tearing mode. The evolution of the frequency and the amplitude of a single representative tearing mode under the effect of multiple resistive walls is investigated. Numerical examples are provided for the modified RFX and other relevant devices. Generalization to the case of multiple(three) coupled modes and in the presence of externally applied helical rotating magnetic field2 will also be presented. 1. R. Fitzpatrick, S.C. Guo, D. J. Den Hartog and C. C. Hegna; Phys. of Plasmas, 6(10) 3878 (1999). 2. S. C. Guo and M. S. Chu; Phys. of Plasmas, 8(7) 3342 (2001).

  14. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  15. Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode and Error Field Reduction by a Rotating Conducting Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    The hypothesis that the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) can be stabilized by high-speed differentially-rotating conducting walls is tested in a linear device. This geometry allows the use of cylindrical solid metal walls, whereas a torus would require a flowing liquid metal. Experiments over the past year have for the first time explored RWM stability with a rotating copper wall capable of achieving speeds (rΩw) of up to 280 km/h, equivalent to a magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) of 5. The main results are: 1) Wall rotation increases the stability window of the RWM, allowing ~ 25% more plasma current (Ip) at Rm = 5 while maintaining MHD stability. 2) Error field reduction below a critical value allows the observation of initial mode rotation, followed by braking, wall-locking, and subsequent faster growth. 3) Locking is found to depend on the direction of wall rotation (Ω̂w) with respect to the intrinsic plasma rotation, with locking to both the static wall (vacuum vessel) and rotating wall observed. Additionally, indirect effects on RWM stability are observed via the effect of wall rotation on device error fields. Wall rotation shields locking error fields, which reduces the braking torque and inhibits mode-locking. The linear superposition of error fields from guide field (Bz) solenoid misalignments and current-carrying leads is also shown to break symmetry in Ω̂w , with one direction causing stronger error fields and earlier locking irrespective of plasma flow. Vacuum field measurements further show that rotation decreases the error field penetration time and advects the field to a different orientation, as predicted by theory. Experiments are conducted on the Rotating Wall Machine, a 1.2 m long and 16 cm diameter screw-pinch with Bz ~ 500 G, where hollow-cathode injectors are biased to source up to 7 kA of Ip, exciting current-driven RWMs. MHD activity is measured through 120 edge Br, Bθ, Bz probes as well as internal Bdot, Langmuir and Mach probes. RWM

  16. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-01

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  17. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  18. Power Supply Changes for NSTX Resistive Wall Mode Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S S.

    2013-06-28

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. Prior to 2004, the NSTX power system was feeding twelve (12) circuits in the machine. In 2004 the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) Coils were installed on the machine to correct error fields. There are six of these coils installed around the machine in the mid-plane. Since these coils need fast and accurate controls, a Switching Power Amplifier (SPA) with three sub-units was procured, installed and commissioned along with other power loop components. Two RWM Coils were connected in series and fed from one SPA sub-unit. After the initial RWM campaign, operational requirements evolved such that each of the RWM coils now requires separate power and control. Hence a second SPA with three sub-units has been procured and installed. The second unit is of improved design and has the controls and power components completely isolated. The existing thyristor rectifier is used as DC Link to both of the Switching Power Amplifiers. The controls for the RWM are integrated into the overall computer control of the DC Power systems for NSTX. This paper describes the design changes in the RWM Power system for NSTX.

  19. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.

    2014-01-01

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  20. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z. Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-01-15

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  1. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  2. Kinetic calculation of the resistive wall mode and fishbone-like mode instability in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Yang, S. X.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, A. K.; He, H. D.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic effects of both trapped thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode (RWM) and on the fishbone-like mode (FLM) are investigated in theory. Here, the trapped thermal particles include both ions and electrons. The FLM is driven by trapped energetic particles. The results demonstrate that thermal particle collisions can either stabilize or destabilize the RWM, depending on the energetic particle pressure βh . Furthermore, the critical value of βh for triggering the FLM is increased when the thermal particle contribution is taken into account. The critical value sensitively depends on the plasma collision frequency. In addition, the plasma inertia is found to have a negligible influence on the FLM.

  3. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic instability excited by interplay between a resistive wall mode and stable ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Hirota, M.

    2015-08-15

    In a rotating toroidal plasma surrounded by a resistive wall, it is shown that linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can be excited by interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and stable ideal MHD modes, where the RWM can couple with not only a stable external kink mode but also various stable Alfvén eigenmodes that abound in a toroidal plasma. The RWM growth rate is shown to peak repeatedly as the rotation frequency reaches specific values for which the frequencies of the ideal MHD modes are Doppler-shifted to the small RWM frequency. Such destabilization can be observed even when the RWM in a static plasma is stable. A dispersion relation clarifies that the unstable mode changes from the RWM to the ideal MHD mode destabilized by wall resistivity when the rotation frequency passes through these specific values. The unstable mode is excited at these rotation frequencies even though plasma rotation also tends to stabilize the RWM from the combination of the continuum damping and the ion Landau damping.

  5. Effects Of Three-Dimensional Conducting Structures On Resistive Wall Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, Fabio

    2008-11-01

    This paper illustrates the effect of three-dimensional conducting structures on the evolution of Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) occurring in toroidal fusion devices. The CarMa code is used to derive the model, which then is used to design a feedback controller of RWMs. Some examples of application to the ITER geometry are reported.

  6. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values β{sub rp,rw} < β{sub rp,iw} < β{sub ip,rw} < β{sub ip,iw} (resistive plasma, resistive wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below β{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above β{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with β > β{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below β{sub rp,iw}.

  7. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  8. Shape, Pressure, and Kinetic Effects on the Resistive Wall Mode in Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    A comprehensive theory of the resistive wall mode is carried out, including the effects of finite ellipticity, finite beta, and plasma rotation. In the circular-cylindrical limit, the resistive wall mode (RWM) is an external kink mode without singular surfaces inside the plasma column. In a tokamak, the noncircularity, the toroidicity, and the finite pressure of the plasma column induce the coupling of the poloidal harmonics, and the mode sidebands have singular surfaces inside the plasma. At such surfaces, the radial electric field is large and so is the power dissipated by the mode. It is well known that such a dissipation, combined with the plasma rotation, creates a window of stability in beta(R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995).) and in b/a (wall radius/plasma radius).(A. Bondeson and D. J. Ward, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994).) The size of the stability window is modified by the stabilizing contribution of the trapped-particle compressibility and the plasma resistivity. The size of the stability window is determined for highly elongated plasmas where the ellipticity is comparable or larger than the toroidicity. The minimum rotation velocity for stabilization is derived, and the implications for tokamak design are discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-93ER54215.

  9. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-01

    An array of saddle coils having Nc=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n ,n' that fulfill the condition ∣n-n'∣=Nc are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  10. Identification of a Low Plasma-Rotation Threshold for Stabilization of the Resistive-Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Takechi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Fujita, T.; Ozeki, T.; Koide, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kurita, G.; Isayama, A.; Kamada, Y.

    2007-02-02

    The plasma rotation necessary for stabilization of resistive-wall modes (RWMs) is investigated by controlling the toroidal plasma rotation with external momentum input by injection of tangential neutral beams. The observed threshold is 0.3% of the Alfven velocity and much smaller than the previous experimental results obtained with magnetic braking. This low critical rotation has a very weak {beta} dependence as the ideal wall limit is approached. These results indicate that for large plasmas such as in future fusion reactors with low rotation, the requirement of the additional feedback control system for stabilizing RWM is much reduced.

  11. A fast technique applied to the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes with 3D conducting structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinacci, Guglielmo Liu, Yueqiang

    2009-03-20

    This paper illustrates the development of a 'fast' technique for the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) in fusion devices with three-dimensional conducting structures, by means of the recently developed CarMa code. Thanks to its peculiar features, the computational cost scales almost linearly with the number of discrete unknowns. Some large scale problems are solved in configurations of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  12. Status of FARTECH's Multi-Sensor Real-Time Resistive Wall Mode Identification Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, Y. B.; Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Leuer, J. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-11-01

    Early detection of resistive wall mode (RWM) identification (ID) is possible utilizing multiple sensors to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and mode structure recognition with a pre-modeled numerical structure, assuming similar equilibria to be reproduced. Magnetic probes, and internal and external saddle loops are currently used. The predicted structures are modeled via FARVAC(D.H. Edgell, FARTECH, Inc. Report FT020523, May (2002).) and VACUUM using the GATO linear RWM mode. The RWM structures are then matched to the experimental data in real-time. For better algorithm and understanding of the modes, other sensors such as soft x-ray data are being incorporated in the program. In addition, an equilibrium and stability code is being developed for basic understanding of the RWM physics such as RWM rotation and dissipation. Systematic implementation and communication of our mode identification to the DIII-D PCS are being developed and tested.

  13. Toroidal modeling of interaction between resistive wall mode and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang

    2013-02-15

    The non-linear interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and the toroidal plasma flow is numerically investigated in a full toroidal geometry, by simultaneously solving the initial value problems for the n = 1 RWM and the n = 0 toroidal force balance equation. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque is identified as the major momentum sink that brakes the toroidal plasma flow during the non-linear evolution of the RWM. This holds for a mode that is initially either unstable or stable. For an initially stable RWM, the braking of the flow, and hence the eventual growth of the mode, depends critically on the initial perturbation amplitude.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Wall Mode Control In DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jensen, T. H.; Leuer, J. A.; Nerem, A.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Detailed dynamic response models have been developed for all relevant subsystems comprising the DIII-D resistive wall mode (RWM) closed loop control system. These include the switching power amplifiers (SPA), digital plasma control system (PCS), acquisition and control circuitry, and a fully toroidal model of plasma/vessel dynamics based on specification of the marginal wall position from stability codes such as GATO and DCON. These models have been validated with experimental data, including open-loop excitation of the SPA, PCS, and vacuum vessel dynamic responses, and measurement of the growth rate and mode structure of the unstable plasma. These models are incorporated into a closed-loop control simulation to investigate the control limitations which are due to realistic power supply responses. Consequences of and approaches to the intrinsically multivariable RWM control problem are also investigated.

  15. Modeling resistive wall modes and disruptive instabilities with M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Nm; Jardin, Sc; Pfefferle, D.

    2016-10-01

    Disruptive instabilities pose a significant challenge to the tokamak approach to magnetic fusion energy, and must be reliably avoided in a successful reactor. These instabilities generally involve rapid, global changes to the magnetic field, and electromagnetic interaction with surrounding conducting structures. Here we apply the extended-MHD code M3D-C1 to calculate the stability and evolution of disruptive modes, including their interaction with external conducting structures. The M3D-C1 model includes the effects of resistivity, equilibrium rotation, and resistive walls of arbitrary thickness, each of which may play important roles in the stability and evolution of disruptive modes. The strong stabilizing effect of rotation on resistive wall modes is explored and compared with analytic theory. The nonlinear evolution of vertical displacement events is also considered, including the evolution of non-axisymmetric instabilities that may arise during the current-quench phase of the disruption. It is found that the non-axisymmetric stability of the plasma during a VDE depends strongly on the thermal history of the plasma. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling.

  16. Analysis of Resistive Wall Modes in RFP Plasmas with Rotation and Dissipative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the non-resonant external kink modes under the resistive wall boundary condition in an RFP is analyzed. This topic is especially relevant to the future long pulse discharges. With respect to previous work(R.Nachtrieb, J.P.Freidberg and R.Betti, Reversed Field Pinch Workshop, Madison, WI October 14-16, 1996), the parallel viscosity (Braginskii's stress tensor) effects have been added into the eigenmode equation. Therefore, both the ion sound wave damping and the viscosity effects together with the plasma rotation are taken into account in the analysis. The influence of the equilibrium parameters on the mode instability is carefully studied by employing the conventional α-Θo equilibrium models. It is found that the behaviours of the RWM is rather sensitive to the reversal parameter F of RFPs. In the low β (or zero β) plasma region, there is a stability window in the wall-plasma distance b/a due to the plasma rotation and viscous dissipative effects. For the typical RFP operating parameters, the required rotation velocity to stabilize the modes is in the range of the ion sound speed or even higher. The effects of the viscosity on the instability of the modes are investigated.

  17. Numerical Study of Equilibrium, Stability, and Advanced Resistive Wall Mode Feedback Algorithms on KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    Stability to ideal MHD kink/ballooning modes and the resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated for the KSTAR tokamak. Free-boundary equilibria that comply with magnetic field coil current constraints are computed for monotonic and reversed shear safety factor profiles and H-mode tokamak pressure profiles. Advanced tokamak operation at moderate to low plasma internal inductance shows that a factor of two improvement in the plasma beta limit over the no-wall beta limit is possible for toroidal mode number of unity. The KSTAR conducting structure, passive stabilizers, and in-vessel control coils are modeled by the VALEN-3D code and the active RWM stabilization performance of the device is evaluated using both standard and advanced feedback algorithms. Steady-state power and voltage requirements for the system are estimated based on the expected noise on the RWM sensor signals. Using NSTX experimental RWM sensors noise data as input, a reduced VALEN state-space LQG controller is designed to realistically assess KSTAR stabilization system performance.

  18. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z. Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  19. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  20. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  1. Resistive wall modes in the setting-up phase of a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, P.; Barrick, G. ); Robertson, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Resistive wall modes during the setting-up phase of a reversed field pinch have been investigated in an experiment (Reversatron II (IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. {bold PS}-{bold 16}, 667 (1988))) operated without a conducting shell. The time for the vertical field to penetrate the vacuum chamber (4 {mu}sec) is much shorter than the rise time of the plasma current (100 {mu}sec). The discharges, when compared to discharges in the same device with a conducting shell, have a greater resistance and lower plasma current. Magnetic probes indicate the growth of a strong {vert bar}{ital n}{vert bar}=6 helical kink resonant with the field on axis.

  2. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  3. Dispersion relations for slow and fast resistive wall modes within the Haney-Freidberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2014-04-01

    The dispersion relation for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is derived by using the trial function for the magnetic perturbation proposed in S. W. Haney and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1637 (1989). The Haney-Freidberg (HF) approach is additionally based on the expansion in dw/s ≪1, where dw is the wall thickness and s is the skin depth. Here, the task is solved without this constraint. The derivation procedure is different too, but the final result is expressed in a similar form with the use of the quantities entering the HF relation. The latter is recovered from our more general relation as an asymptote at dw≪s, which proves the equivalence of the both approaches in this case. In the opposite limit (dw≫s), we obtain the growth rate γ of the RWMs as a function of γHF calculated by the HF prescription. It is shown that γ ∝γHF2 and γ ≫γHF in this range. The proposed relations give γ for slow and fast RWMs in terms of the integrals calculated by the standard stability codes for toroidal systems with and without a perfectly conducting wall. Also, the links between the considered and existing toroidal and cylindrical models are established with estimates explicitly showing the relevant dependencies.

  4. Modeling of Resistive Wall Modes in Tokamak and Reversed Field Pinch Configurations of KTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Rui; Zhu, Ping; Bai, Wei; Lan, Tao; Liu, Wandong

    2016-10-01

    Resistive wall mode is believed to be one of the leading causes for macroscopic degradation of plasma confinement in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFP). In this study, we evaluate the linear RWM instability of Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) in both tokamak and RFP configurations. For the tokamak configuration, the extended MHD code NIMROD is employed for calculating the dependence of the RWM growth rate on the position and conductivity of the vacuum wall for a model tokamak equilibrium of KTX in the large aspect-ratio approximation. For the RFP configuration, the standard formulation of dispersion relation for RWM based on the MHD energy principle has been evaluated for a cylindrical α- Θ model of KTX plasma equilibrium, in an effort to investigate the effects of thin wall on the RWM in KTX. Full MHD calculations of RWM in the RFP configuration of KTX using the NIMROD code are also being developed. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant Nos. 2014GB124002, 2015GB101004, 2011GB106000, and 2011GB106003.

  5. Resistive Wall Mode Stability Forecasting in NSTX and NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Disruption prevention in tokamak fusion plasmas requires accurate identification and prediction of global MHD instabilities. We examine, in the NSTX device and its upgrade NSTX-U, characterization and forecasting of resistive wall modes (RWMs), which are crucial components of disruption event chains. The kinetic RWM growth rate is solved by the MISK code through a dispersion relation combining ideal and kinetic mode energy functionals, δW and δWK . A model for the ideal n = 1 no-wall δW term, depending on parameters measurable in real-time, has been recently developed by using the DCON code on more than 5,000 NSTX equilibria. When applied to NSTX-U discharges at higher aspect ratio, the model accurately predicts the n = 1 no-wall limit calculated by DCON through the aspect ratio dependence of the model. Full MISK calculations of δWK cannot be performed in real time, but a simplified model based on physics insight from MISK takes a form that depends on ExB frequency, collisionality, and energetic particle fraction. The model will examine when the plasma toroidal rotation profile falls into weaker RWM stability regions based upon this kinetic modification to ideal theory, which contains broad stabilizing resonances via mode-particle interaction. This approach enables, for the first time, the ability to anticipate a growing RWM rather than reacting to one. The reduced model results are tested on a database of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs. For each discharge, a newly-written disruption event characterization code (DECAF) finds the chain of events leading to a disruption by applying criteria that define each of the physical events. With a simple threshold test of mode amplitude an RWM event was found in each case, and 59% were within 20 wall times of the disruption. The earlier RWM warnings are not false positives; they caused significant, transient decreases in βN. Supported by U.S. D.O.E. contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M2 = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects.

  7. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  8. Active Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in Low Rotation, High Beta NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    An active feedback system to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is used to maintain plasma stability for greater than 90 RWM growth times. These experiments are the first to demonstrate RWM active stabilization in high beta, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas with toroidal plasma rotation significantly below the critical rotation profile for passive stability and in the range predicted for ITER. Actively stabilized, low rotation plasmas reached normalized beta of 5.6, and the ratio of normalized beta to the toroidal mode number, n = 1 and 2 ideal no-wall stability limits reached 1.2 and 1.15 respectively, determined by DCON stability analysis of the time-evolving reconstructed experimental equilibria. The significant, controlled reduction of the plasma rotation to less than one percent of the Alfven speed was produced by non-resonant magnetic braking by an applied n = 3 field. The observed plasma rotation damping is in quantitative agreement with neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory including trapped particle effects [1]. The active stabilization system employs a mode control algorithm using RWM sensor input analyzed to distinguish the amplitude and phase of the n = 1 mode. During n = 1 stabilization, the n = 2 mode amplitude increases and surpasses the n = 1 amplitude, but the mode remains stable. By varying the system gain, and relative phase between the measured n = 1 RWM phase and the applied control field, both positive and negative feedback were demonstrated. Contrary to past experience in moderate aspect ratio tokamaks with poloidally continuous stabilizing structure, the RWM can become unstable in certain cases by deforming poloidally, an important consideration for feedback system sensor and control coil design in future devices such as ITER and KSTAR. **In collaboration with R.E. Bell, J.E. Menard, D.A. Gates, A.C. Sontag, J.M. Bialek, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, K. Tritz, H. Yuh. [1] W. Zhu, S

  9. Optimized feedback control system modeling of resistive wall modes for burning plasmas experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana Nikolaevna

    A numerical study of active feedback control system performance and optimization for tokamak Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is the subject of this thesis. The ability to accurately model and predict the performance of an active MHD control systems is critical to present and future advanced confinement scenarios and fusion reactor design studies. The computer code VALEN has been designed to calculate the performance of a MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. The simulation of realistic effects in feedback systems, such as noise, time delays and filters is of particular importance. In this work realistic measurement noise analysis was added to VALEN and used to design the RWM feedback control amplifier power level for the DIII-D experiment. Modern control theory based on a state-space formulation obtained from VALEN was applied to design an Optimal Controller and Observer based on a reduced VALEN model. A quantitative low order model of the VALEN state space was derived from the high dimensional intrinsic state space structure of the VALEN using methods of a balanced realization and matched DC gain truncation. These techniques for the design of an optimal controller and optimal observer were applied to models of the DIII-D and ITER experiments and showed an order of magnitude reduction of the required control coil current and voltage in the presence of white noise as compared to a traditional, classical PID controller. This optimal controller for the ITER burning plasma experiment was robust from the no-wall pressure limit to a pressure value well above those achieved with a classical PID controller and could approach the ideal wall limit.

  10. The Role of Kinetic Effects, Including Plasma Rotation and Energetic Particles, in Resistive Wall Mode Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, John W.

    2009-11-01

    Continuous, disruption-free operation of tokamaks requires stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM). Theoretically, the RWM is thought to be stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and other parameters, with kinetic effects being emphasized.footnotetextB. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 057301. Experiments in NSTX show that the RWM can be destabilized in high rotation plasmas while low rotation plasmas can be stable, which calls into question the concept of a simple critical plasma rotation threshold for stability. The present work tests theoretical stabilization mechanisms against experimental discharges with various plasma rotation profiles created by applying non-resonant n=3 braking, and with various fast particle fractions. Kinetic modification of ideal stability is calculated with the MISK code, using experimental equilibrium reconstructions. Analysis of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs predicts near-marginal mode growth rates. Trapped ions provide the dominant kinetic resonances, while fast particles contribute an important stabilizing effect. Increasing or decreasing rotation in the calculation drives the prediction farther from the marginal point, showing that unlike simpler critical rotation theories, kinetic theory allows a more complex relationship between plasma rotation and RWM stability. Results from JT-60U show that energetic particle modes can trigger RWMsfootnotetextG. Matsunaga et al., IAEA FEC 2008 Paper EX/5-2.. Kinetic theory may explain how fast particle loss can trigger RWMs through the loss of an important stabilization mechanism. These results are applied to ITER advanced scenario equilibria to determine the impact on RWM stability.

  11. Impact of plasma poloidal rotation on resistive wall mode instability in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Tokuda, S.

    2011-02-15

    Stability of resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated in a cylindrical plasma and an axisymmetric toroidal plasma by taking into account not only toroidal rotation but also poloidal rotation. Since the Doppler shifted frequency is responsible for the RWM stability, the modification of this Doppler shifted frequency by poloidal rotation affects the rotation effect on RWM. When a poloidal rotation frequency is not so large, the effect of poloidal rotation on the RWM stability can be approximately treated with the modified toroidal rotation frequency. In a toroidal plasma, this modified frequency is determined by subtracting a toroidal component of the rotation parallel to the magnetic field from the toroidal rotation frequency. The poloidal rotation that counteracts the effect of the Doppler shift strongly reduces the stabilizing effect of toroidal rotation, but by changing the rotational direction, the poloidal rotation enhances this stabilizing effect. This trend is confirmed in not only a cylindrical plasma but also a toroidal plasma. This result indicates that poloidal rotation produces the dependence of the critical toroidal rotation frequency for stabilizing RWM on the rotational direction of toroidal rotation in the same magnetic configuration.

  12. The role of kinetic effects, including plasma rotation and energetic particles, in resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Betti, R.; Hu, B.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Manickam, J.; Podesta, M.

    2010-08-15

    The resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in high-beta tokamaks is stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and kinetic effects. Kinetic modification of ideal stability calculated with the 'MISK' code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)] is outlined. For an advanced scenario ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] plasma, the present calculation finds that alpha particles are required for RWM stability at presently expected levels of plasma rotation. Kinetic stabilization theory is tested in an experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] that produced marginally stable plasmas with various energetic particle contents. Plasmas with the highest and lowest energetic particle content agree with calculations predicting that increased energetic particle pressure is stabilizing but does not alter the nonmonotonic dependence of stability on plasma rotation due to thermal particle resonances. Presently, the full MISK model, including thermal particles and an isotropic slowing-down distribution function for energetic particles, overpredicts stability in NSTX experiments. Minor alteration of either effect in the theory may yield agreement; several possibilities are discussed.

  13. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  14. Multimachine data–based prediction of high-frequency sensor signal noise for resistive wall mode control in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; ...

    2016-08-12

    The high-frequency noise measured by magnetic sensors, at levels above the typical frequency of resistive wall modes, is analyzed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U, and NSTX. A high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasma operation of the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, to be used for resistive wall mode feedback stabilization, based on the multimachine database. The predicted root-mean-square n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number)more » noise level is 104 to 105 G/s for the voltage signal, and 0.1 to 1 G for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with a scaling coefficient of about 0.1. As a result, these basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modeling-based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.« less

  15. Multimachine data–based prediction of high-frequency sensor signal noise for resistive wall mode control in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Gerasimov, S.; Gribov, Y.; Hender, T. C.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.

    2016-08-12

    The high-frequency noise measured by magnetic sensors, at levels above the typical frequency of resistive wall modes, is analyzed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U, and NSTX. A high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasma operation of the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, to be used for resistive wall mode feedback stabilization, based on the multimachine database. The predicted root-mean-square n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number) noise level is 104 to 105 G/s for the voltage signal, and 0.1 to 1 G for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with a scaling coefficient of about 0.1. As a result, these basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modeling-based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.

  16. Cross-machine comparison of resonant field amplification and resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bialek, J.M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A.; Sontag, A.C.; Zhu, W.; Hender, T.C.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Howell, D F.; Bigi, M.; Vries, P. de; Liu, Y. Q.

    2006-05-15

    Dedicated experiments in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion, 42, 614 (2002)], the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut, R. J. Bickerton, and B. E. Keen, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)], and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] reveal the commonalities of resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization by sufficiently fast toroidal plasma rotation in devices of different size and aspect ratio. In each device the weakly damped n=1 RWM manifests itself by resonant field amplification (RFA) of externally applied n=1 magnetic fields, which increases with the plasma pressure. Probing DIII-D and JET plasmas with similar ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties with externally applied magnetic n=1 fields, shows that the resulting RFA is independent of the machine size. In each device the drag resulting from RFA slows the toroidal plasma rotation and can lead to the onset of an unstable RWM. The critical plasma rotation required for stable operation in the plasma center decreases with increasing q{sub 95}, which is explained by the inward shift of q surfaces where the critical rotation remains constant. The quantitative agreement of the critical rotation normalized to the inverse Alfven time at the q=2 surface in similar DIII-D and JET plasmas supports the independence of the RWM stabilization mechanism of machine size and indicates the importance of the q=2 surface. At low aspect ratio the required fraction of the Alfven velocity increases significantly. The ratio of the critical rotation in similar NSTX and DIII-D plasmas can be explained by trapped particles not contributing to the RWM stabilization, which is consistent with stabilization mechanisms that are based on ion Landau damping. Alternatively, the ratio of the required rotation to the sound wave velocity remains independent of aspect ratio.

  17. Model-based dynamic resistive wall mode identification and feedback control in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    In, Y.; Kim, J.S.; Edgell, D.H.; Strait, E.J.; Humphreys, D.A.; Walker, M.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Chu, M.S.; Johnson, R.; La Haye, R.J.; Okabayashi, M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Reimerdes, H.

    2006-06-15

    A new model-based dynamic resistive wall mode (RWM) identification and feedback control algorithm has been developed. While the overall RWM structure can be detected by a model-based matched filter in a similar manner to a conventional sensor-based scheme, it is significantly influenced by edge-localized-modes (ELMs). A recent study suggested that such ELM noise might cause the RWM control system to respond in an undesirable way. Thus, an advanced algorithm to discriminate ELMs from RWM has been incorporated into this model-based control scheme, dynamic Kalman filter. Specifically, the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] resistive vessel wall was modeled in two ways: picture frame model or eigenmode treatment. Based on the picture frame model, the first real-time, closed-loop test results of the Kalman filter algorithms during DIII-D experimental operation are presented. The Kalman filtering scheme was experimentally confirmed to be effective in discriminating ELMs from RWM. As a result, the actuator coils (I-coils) were rarely excited during ELMs, while retaining the sensitivity to RWM. However, finding an optimized set of operating parameters for the control algorithm requires further analysis and design. Meanwhile, a more advanced Kalman filter based on a more accurate eigenmode model has been developed. According to this eigenmode approach, significant improvement in terms of control performance has been predicted, while maintaining good ELM discrimination.

  18. Effects of Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Structures on Resistive-Wall-Mode Stability of Reversed Field Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.

    2008-06-27

    In this Letter, the linear stability of the resistive wall modes (RWMs) in toroidal geometry for a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is studied. Three computational models are used: the cylindrical code ETAW, the toroidal MHD code MARS-F, and the CarMa code, able to take fully into account the effects of a three-dimensional conducting structure which mimics the real shell geometry of a reversed field pinch experimental device. The computed mode growth rates generally agree with experimental data. The toroidal effects and the three-dimensional features of the shell, like gaps, allow a novel interpretation of the RWM spectrum in RFP's and remove its degeneracy. This shows the importance of making accurate modeling of conductors for the RWM predictions also in future devices such as ITER.

  19. Improved model predictive control of resistive wall modes by error field estimator in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    Many implementations of a model-based approach for toroidal plasma have shown better control performance compared to the conventional type of feedback controller. One prerequisite of model-based control is the availability of a control oriented model. This model can be obtained empirically through a systematic procedure called system identification. Such a model is used in this work to design a model predictive controller to stabilize multiple resistive wall modes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. Model predictive control is an advanced control method that can optimize the future behaviour of a system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss an additional use of the empirical model which is to estimate the error field in EXTRAP T2R. Two potential methods are discussed that can estimate the error field. The error field estimator is then combined with the model predictive control and yields better radial magnetic field suppression.

  20. Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit widtha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Hao, G. Z.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2014-05-01

    A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

  1. Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit width

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang Chapman, I. T.; Hao, G. Z.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2014-05-15

    A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

  2. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  3. Resistive Wall Mode feedback on DIII-D using Linear Quadratic Gaussian control and a GPU powered control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, M. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Piglowski, D. A.; Penaflor, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) based control system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak for Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) control similar to one implemented at the HBT-EP tokamak. DIII-D can excite RWMs, which are strong, locked or nearly locked kink modes whose rotation frequencies do not evolve quickly and are slow compared to their growth rates. Simulations have predicted that modern control techniques like Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control will perform better than classical control techniques when using control coils external to the vacuum vessel. An LQG control algorithm based on the VALEN model for the RWM has been developed and tested on this system. Early tests have shown the algorithm is able to track and suppress with external control coils the plasma response of an n=1 perturbation driven by internal control coils. An overview of the control hardware, VALEN model, control algorithm and initial results will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. Modeling of the Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode in Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Chu, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    The VACUUM^1 code is currently being modified to simulate the feedback stabilization of the RWM in the DIII-D device^2. We formulate the problem in terms of the eigenfunctions of the surface Laplacian obtained from the matching of the fields across a thin resistive toroidally symmetric shell. The window pane feedback (C-)coils are modeled accurately in the poloidal angle θ, and approximately by a single harmonic variation in φ. VACUUM relates the perturbations on the various surfaces, i.e., the plasma, both sides of the resistive shell and the C-coil. This results in an operator made up of a set of coupled time dependent equations relating the shell response to the plasma and feedback coil. Various attributes of the system can be calculated, such as the eddy current patterns and the time responses of the eigenmodes of the surface Laplacian operator. As a first appproximation, a PEST or GATO surface eigenmode of an ideal kink is assumed, whose structure remains unchanged during the feedback process, allowing only the magnitude to change. By energizing the C-coils according to the various proposed feedback schemes we propose to correlate with the present experimental results, and also to provide helpful guidance for future runs. rule[1.ex]1.9in.005in This work supported by DoE contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073 ^1 M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas, 4(1997)2161 ^2 A. A. Garofalo et al., Phys. Plasmas 6(1999) 1893

  5. Off-axis fishbone-like instability and excitation of resistive wall modes in JT-60U and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Solomon, W. M.; Budny, R. V.; Manickam, J.; Matsunaga, G.; Takechi, M.; Asakura, N.; Shinohara, K.; Grassie, J. S. de; Strait, E. J.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. B.; In, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-05-15

    An energetic-particle (EP)-driven ''off-axis-fishbone-like mode (OFM)'' often triggers a resistive wall mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D devices, preventing long-duration high-{beta}{sub N} discharges. In these experiments, the EPs are energetic ions (70-85 keV) injected by neutral beams to produce high-pressure plasmas. EP-driven bursting events reduce the EP density and the plasma rotation simultaneously. These changes are significant in high-{beta}{sub N} low-rotation plasmas, where the RWM stability is predicted to be strongly influenced by the EP precession drift resonance and by the plasma rotation near the q=2 surface (kinetic effects). Analysis of these effects on stability with a self-consistent perturbation to the mode structure using the MARS-K code showed that the impact of EP losses and rotation drop is sufficient to destabilize the RWM in low-rotation plasmas, when the plasma rotation normalized by Alfven frequency is only a few tenths of a percent near the q=2 surface. The OFM characteristics are very similar in JT-60U and DIII-D, including nonlinear mode evolution. The modes grow initially like a classical fishbone, and then the mode structure becomes strongly distorted. The dynamic response of the OFM to an applied n=1 external field indicates that the mode retains its external kink character. These comparative studies suggest that an energetic particle-driven 'off-axis-fishbone-like mode' is a new EP-driven branch of the external kink mode in wall-stabilized plasmas, analogous to the relationship of the classical fishbone branch to the internal kink mode.

  6. Off-axis fishbone-like instability and excitation of resistive wall modes in JT-60U and DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; deGrassie, J. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; In, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Reimerdes, H.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Takechi, M.; Asakura, N.; Budny, R. V.; Jackson, G. L.; Hanson, J. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Manickam, J.; Shinohara, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2011-05-01

    An energetic-particle (EP)-driven "off-axis-fishbone-like mode (OFM)" often triggers a resistive wall mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D devices, preventing long-duration high-βN discharges. In these experiments, the EPs are energetic ions (70-85 keV) injected by neutral beams to produce high-pressure plasmas. EP-driven bursting events reduce the EP density and the plasma rotation simultaneously. These changes are significant in high-βN low-rotation plasmas, where the RWM stability is predicted to be strongly influenced by the EP precession drift resonance and by the plasma rotation near the q =2 surface (kinetic effects). Analysis of these effects on stability with a self-consistent perturbation to the mode structure using the MARS-K code showed that the impact of EP losses and rotation drop is sufficient to destabilize the RWM in low-rotation plasmas, when the plasma rotation normalized by Alfvén frequency is only a few tenths of a percent near the q =2 surface. The OFM characteristics are very similar in JT-60U and DIII-D, including nonlinear mode evolution. The modes grow initially like a classical fishbone, and then the mode structure becomes strongly distorted. The dynamic response of the OFM to an applied n =1 external field indicates that the mode retains its external kink character. These comparative studies suggest that an energetic particle-driven "off-axis-fishbone-like mode" is a new EP-driven branch of the external kink mode in wall-stabilized plasmas, analogous to the relationship of the classical fishbone branch to the internal kink mode.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  8. A first attempt at few coils and low-coverage resistive wall mode stabilization of EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R.; Frassinetti, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    The reversed-field pinch features resistive-shell-type instabilities at any (vanishing and finite) plasma pressure. An attempt to stabilize the full spectrum of these modes using both (i) incomplete coverage and (ii) few coils is presented. Two empirically derived model-based control algorithms are compared with a baseline guaranteed suboptimal intelligent-shell-type (IS) feedback. Experimental stabilization could not be achieved for the coil array subset sizes considered by this first study. But the model-based controllers appear to significantly outperform the decentralized IS method.

  9. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  10. Investigation of Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization Physics in High-beta Plasmas Using Applied Non-axisymmetric Fields in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Zhu, W.; Menard, J. E.; Bell, R. E.; Bialek, J. M.; Bell, M. G.; Gates, D. A.; Glasser, A. H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Shaing, K. C.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K. L.

    2009-06-16

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) offers an operational space characterized by high-beta (βt = 39%, βN > 7, βN/βno-wall N > 1.5) and low aspect ratio (A > 1.27) to leverage the plasma parameter dependences of RWM stabilization and plasma rotation damping physics giving greater confidence for extrapolation to ITER. Significant new capability for RWM research has been added to the device with the commissioning of a set of six nonaxisymmetric magnetic field coils, allowing generation of fields with dominant toroidal mode number, n, of 1–3. These coils have been used to study the dependence of resonant field amplification on applied field frequency and RWMstabilization physics by reducing the toroidal rotation profile belowits steady-state value through non-resonant magnetic braking. Modification of plasma rotation profiles shows that rotation outside q = 2.5 is not required for passive RWM stability and there is large variation in the RWM critical rotation at the q = 2 surface, both of which are consistent with distributed dissipation models.

  11. Off-axis Fishbone-like Instability and Excitation of the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.

    2010-11-01

    Advanced tokamak experiments in JT-60U [1] and DIII-D [2] have revealed that in high-beta q(0)>1 plasmas, where the resistive wall modes (RWMs) are predicted to be stable by kinetic effects of energetic particles, plasma rotation and a nearby conducting wall, off-axis fishbone-like instabilities often trigger RWMs. The rapid growth of these RWMs prevents high performance operation. The off-axis fishbone-like instability has some similarities to the classic m/n=1/1 internal fishbone instability in terms of its initial frequency near the energetic ion precession frequency, downward frequency-chirping, and a neutron rate drop of ˜20% during each burst. However, there are several unique non-ideal-MHD features in the off-axis fishbone-like instability. The waveform time behavior has strong non-sinusoidal distortion from the q˜2 area to the edge, synchronized with bursting energetic particle losses, while the plasma rotation is rapidly reduced within a few milliseconds. Based on experimental observations the following hypothesis emerges. In plasmas where rotation and kinetic effects are usually sufficient to stabilize the RWM, energetic particles can drive the fishbone instability of several kHz (larger than the inverse of the resistive wall time constant). The reduction of kinetic stabilization due to the resulting energetic particle loss and rapid decrease of plasma rotation makes the plasma more vulnerable to the near-zero frequency RWM. The impact on RWM stability by the off-axis fishbone with its radial and toroidal distortion of the mode structure is assessed by comparing the JT-60U/DIII-D results with theoretical predictions. 6pt [1] G. Matsunaga et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001. (2009). [2] M. Okabayashi et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 125003.

  12. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  13. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  14. Different modes of vancomycin and D-alanyl-D-alanine peptidase binding to cell wall peptide and a possible role for the vancomycin resistance protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, J R; Pratt, R F

    1990-01-01

    A comparison was made of the binding modes of the bacterial cell wall precursor L-lysyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine to the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin and to the D-alanyl-D-alanine-cleaving peptidase of Streptomyces sp. strain R61, a model for cell wall-synthesizing enzymes whose X-ray three-dimensional structure is established. In each of the two pairings (vancomycin with peptide and DD-peptidase with peptide), polypeptide backbones were antiparallel, and the antibiotic or enzyme enveloped the peptide substrate from opposite sides. Hydrogen-bonding groups on the substrate which are involved with the DD-peptidase were shown to be different from the ones reported from nuclear magnetic resonance studies to be involved with vancomycin. Because of steric hindrance, the binding of either molecule to the substrate prevents the binding of the other molecule. Binding to the substrate by a D-alanyl-D-alanine-recognizing protein in a manner similar to that used by the DD-peptidase could explain recent observations of vancomycin resistance, in which a new membrane-associated protein has been detected. PMID:2386365

  15. Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

    2007-06-18

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  16. Transverse Effect Due to Short Range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Chao, Alexander Wu; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  17. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  18. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  19. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    SciTech Connect

    S. P. Smith; Jardin, S. C.

    2008-05-01

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: Α•χ = λΒ• χ. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  20. An improved resistive wall monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenz, Brian; Crisp, Jim

    1998-12-10

    Resistive wall monitors were designed and built for the Fermilab Main Injector project. These devices measure longitudinal beam current from 3 KHz to 4 GHz with a 1 ohm gap impedance. The new design provides a larger aperture and a calibration port to improve the accuracy of single-bunch intensity measurements. Microwave absorber material is used to reduce interference from spurious electromagnetic waves traveling inside the beam pipe. Several types of ferrite materials were evaluated for the absorber. Inexpensive ferrite rods were selected and assembled in an array forming the desired geometry without machining.

  1. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  2. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  3. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  4. Two feedback system schemes for the collider and resistive wall instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.

    1993-10-01

    Two feedback systems proposed for the SSC Collider are studied from the point of view of the capability for controlling the resistive wall instability. The previous kick subtraction feedback scheme can damp the dipole mode resistive wall instability. However, the feedback system with digital filter processing cannot control this instability.

  5. Spin waves and domain wall modes in curved magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bocklage, Lars; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Topp, Jesco; Matsuyama, Toru; Meier, Guido

    2014-07-02

    The confinement of spin waves in inhomogeneous fields and spin wave interaction with domain walls has attracted interest due to possible applications in magnonics. We investigate spin waves in curved ferromagnetic nanowires. The field dispersion and localization of spin waves is revealed by comparison to known modes in stripes and taking into account the specific field reversal of the curved wire. In small wires we find a strongly altered mode spectrum in a certain field regime. Micromagnetic simulations show an extended domain wall within the wire in this field region. The domain wall shows several dynamic modes and changes the remaining spin wave modes. We find mode suppression as well as newly arising modes due to the strong inhomogenous internal field of the wall.

  6. New 2BPM-1K scheme and resistive wall instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.

    1993-10-01

    One of the main goals of a transverse damping feedback system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is to control the transverse multibunch instabilities. These instabilities arise due to the interaction of the bunches with the wake field left by previous bunches traveling in the ring. The wake field is the electromagnetic field resulting from the interaction of charged particles in the bunch with the surrounding conductors elements, and it can also be characterized by the associated impedance. The instability that arises due to the resistive beam pipe is called resistive wall instability. Since the SSC Collider machine the injection time is higher than one hour and the storage time at high energy (20 TeV) must be at least 20 hours, the control of the resistive wall instability is of fundamental importance for the Collider to be operational. The most dangerous mode of the beam oscillation is the dipole one which has an estimated growth time between 56 msec and 150 msec. Reference 3 shows that the traditional feedback scheme was not good enough to control (with low gain) the Dipole Mode Multibunch Instability (DMMI) due to the resistive wall impedance. Consequently, a novel two BPM-two kickers transverse feedback system was proposed to control the DMMI much better (the gain could be one order of magnitude lower). This novel system was optimized later on, and it is still under study. Since this system has two kickers, one would like to reduce the cost of the system by looking for the possibility of using one single kicker with other correction scheme. In this paper, a new scheme is shown, using two BPM`s and a single kicker, which allows excellent control of the DMMI due to resistive wall impedance and allows a complete cancellation of the coherent oscillations within two turns, when the gain is equal to one and there is no other perturbations.

  7. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  8. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  9. RESISTIVE WALL STABILIZATION OF HIGH BETA PLASMAS IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    STRAIT,EJ; BIALEK,J; BOGATU,N; CHANCE,M; CHU,MS; EDGELL,D; GAROFALO,AM; JACKSON,GL; JENSEN,TH; JOHNSON,LC; KIM,JS; LAHAYE,RJ; NAVRATIL,G; OKABAYASHI,M; REIMERDES,H; SCOVILLE,JT; TURNBULL,AD; WALKER,ML

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 RESISTIVE WALL STABILIZATION OF HIGH BETA PLASMAS IN DIII-D. Recent DIII-D experiments show that ideal kink modes can be stabilized at high beta by a resistive wall, with sufficient plasma rotation. However, the resonant response by a marginally stable resistive wall mode to static magnetic field asymmetries can lead to strong damping of the rotation. Careful reduction of such asymmetries has allowed plasmas with beta well above the ideal MHD no-wall limit, and approaching the ideal-wall limit, to be sustained for durations exceeding one second. Feedback control can improve plasma stability by direct stabilization of the resistive wall mode or by reducing magnetic field asymmetry. Assisted by plasma rotation, direct feedback control of resistive wall modes with growth rates more than 5 times faster than the characteristic wall time has been observed. These results open a new regime of tokamak operation above the free-boundary stability limit, accessible by a combination of plasma rotation and feedback control.

  10. Adaptive feedback control of wall modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipeng

    The goal of this study is to stabilize the resistive wall modes (RWM) in tokamaks with adaptive stochastic feedback control. This is the first ever attempt at adaptive stochastic feedback optimal control of RWM in tokamaks. Both adaptive optimal state feedback and adaptive output feedback control have been studied. The adaptive optimal state feedback control design successfully stabilizes a slowly time-evolving RWM in a tokamak in a time scale of 4 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output for the time-invariant model is twice the system noise level. For the time-varying model, it is several times larger than the time-invariant case. The adaptive stochastic output feedback can also stabilize the slowly time-evolving RWM. It can do this in a time about 3 times that of the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output is twice as large as that of the state feedback case. In order to avoid the bottleneck encountered in the various sequential computations with big matrices in the feedback algorithms, neural network control has been proposed. It has been used to implement the adaptive stochastic output feedback control. It can stabilize the RWM instability in a time of 3 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized wall modes have the steady state output similar to the output feedback case. The developed algorithms, state feedback, output feedback, neural network control, can be readily applied to other plasma instabilities.

  11. Decays of bosonic and fermionic modes on a domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    The decays of excited bosonic and excited fermionic modes in the external field of the domain wall are studied. The wave functions of the excited fermionic modes are found analytically in the external field approximation. Some properties of the fermionic modes are investigated. The reflection and transmission coefficients are calculated for fermion scattering from the domain wall. Properties of the reflection and transmission coefficients are studied. The decays of the first excited fermionic mode are investigated to the first order in the Yukawa coupling constant. The amplitudes, angular distributions, and widths of these decays are found by analytical and numerical methods. Decays of the excited bosonic mode are also investigated to the first order in the Yukawa and self-interaction coupling constants. The amplitudes, angular distributions, and widths of these decays are obtained analytically and by numerical methods.

  12. Proportionality between chest wall resistance and elastance.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Fredberg, J J

    1991-02-01

    Fredberg and Stamenovic (J. Appl. Physiol. 67: 2408-2419, 1989) demonstrated a relatively robust phenomenological relationship between resistance (R) and elastance (E) of lung tissue during external forcing. The relationship can be expressed as omega R = eta E, where omega = 2 pi times forcing frequency and eta is hysteresivity; they found eta to be remarkably invariant under a wide range of circumstances. From data gathered in previous experiments, we have tested the adequacy and utility of this phenomenological description for the chest wall (eta w) and its major compartments, the rib cage (eta rc), diaphragm-abdomen (eta d-a), and belly wall (eta bw+). For forcing frequencies and tidal volumes within the normal range of breathing, we found that eta w remained in a relatively narrow range (0.27-0.37) and that neither eta w nor the compartmental eta's changed much with frequency or tidal volume. Compared with eta w, eta rc tended to be slightly low, whereas eta d-a tended to be slightly higher than eta w. However, at higher frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) all eta's increased appreciably with frequency. During various static nonrespiratory maneuvers involving use of respiratory muscles, eta w increased up to twofold. We conclude that in the normal ranges of breathing frequency and tidal volume 1) elastic and dissipative processes within the chest wall appear to be coupled, 2) eta's of the various component parts of the chest wall are well matched, 3) respiratory muscle contraction increases the ratio of cyclic dissipative losses to energy storage, and 4) R of the relaxed chest wall can be estimated from E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  14. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-01

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  15. Resistance-based biosensor of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kolosovas-Machuca, E S; Vera-Reveles, G; Rodríguez-Aranda, M C; Ortiz-Dosal, L C; Segura-Cardenas, Emmanuel; Gonzalez, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) are a good choice for resistive biosensors due to their great resistance changes when immunoreactions take place, they are also low-cost, more biocompatible than single-walled carbon nanotubes, and resistive measurement equipment is usually not expensive and readily available. In this work a novel resistive biosensor based on the immobilization of an antigen through a silanization process over the surface of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) is reported. Results show that the biosensor increases its conductivity when adding the antigen and decreases when adding the antibody making them good candidates for disease diagnosis.

  16. Improved feedback control of wall-stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP tokamak can excite strong, saturated kink modes whose growth rates and rotation frequencies evolve on a millisecond timescale. To control such modes, HBT-EP uses a GPU-based feedback system in a low latency architecture. When feedback is applied, the mode amplitude and rotation frequency can change quickly. We describe an improved algorithm that captures the rapid phase changes in the mode while also removing transient amplitude jumps. Additionally, the control coil driving signal is implemented using a current-controller instead of a voltage-controller. The feedback performance is improved and has been tested under more unstable regimes, including different wall configurations and plasmas slowed by a bias probe. Feedback suppression is observed in all cases and the feedback parameters' dependency on different experimental conditions is studied. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  17. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants.

  18. Higher-spin modes in a domain-wall universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Rahman, Rakibur

    2014-10-01

    We find a consistent set of equations of motion and constraints for massive higher-spin fluctuations in a gravitational background, required of certain characteristic properties but more general than constant curvature space. Of particular interest among such geometries is a thick domain wall-a smooth version of the Randall-Sundrum metric. Apart from the graviton zero mode, the brane accommodates quasi-bound massive states of higher spin contingent on the bulk mass. We estimate the mass and lifetime of these higher-spin resonances, which may appear as metastable dark matter in a braneworld universe.

  19. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  20. Resistive Wall Growth Rate Measurements in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, R.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; Kourbanis, I.

    2016-10-05

    Impedance could represent a limitation of running high intensity beams in the Fermilab recycler. With high intensity upgrades foreseen, it is important to quantify the impedance. To do this,studies have been performed measuring the growth rate of presumably the resistive wall instability. The growth rates at varying intensities and chromaticities are shown. The measured growth rates are compared to ones calculated with the resistive wall impedance.

  1. Fracture resistance of zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to possess extraordinary strength, stiffness and ductility properties. Their fracture resistance is an important issue from the perspective of durability and reliability of CNT-based materials and devices. According to existing studies, brittle fracture is one of the important failure modes of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) failure due to mechanical loading. However, based on the authors' knowledge, the fracture resistance of CNTs has not been quantified so far. In this paper, the fracture resistance of zigzag SWNTs with preexisting defects is calculated using fracture mechanics concepts based on atomistic simulations. The interatomic forces are modelled with a modified Morse potential; the Anderson thermostat is used for temperature control. The problem of unstable crack growth at finite temperature, presumably caused by the lattice trapping effect, is circumvented by computing the strain energy release rate through a series of displacement-controlled tensile loading of SWNTs (applied through moving the outermost layer of atoms at one end at constant strain rate of 9.4 × 10-4 ps-1) with pre-existing crack-like defects of various lengths. The strain energy release rate, G, is computed for (17, 0), (28, 0) and (35, 0) SWNTs (each with aspect ratio 4) with pre-existing cracks up to 29.5 Å long. The fracture resistance, Gc, is determined as a function of crack length for each tube at three different temperatures (1, 300 and 500 K). A significant dependence of Gc on crack length is observed, reminiscent of the rising R curve behaviour of metals at the macroscale: for the zigzag nanotubes Gc increases with crack length at small length, and tends to reach a constant value if the tube diameter is large enough. We suspect that the lattice trapping effect plays the role of crack tip plasticity at the atomic scale. For example, at 300 K, Gc for the (35, 0) tube with aspect ratio 4 converges to 6 J m-2 as the crack length exceeds 20

  2. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  3. Development of an efficient Procedure for Resist Wall Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Higuchi, Sayoko; Kirihata, Kuniaki; Inoue, Yasue; Fujie, Miho; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    The Resist Wall space experiment aims to examine the role of the cortical microtubule-plasma membrane-cell wall continuum in plant resistance to the gravitational force, thereby clarifying the mechanism of gravity resistance. For this purpose, we will cultivate Arabidopsis mutants defective in organization of cortical microtubules (tua6 ) or synthesis of membrane sterols (hmg1 ) as well as the wild type under microgravity and 1 g conditions in the European Modular Cultivation System on the International Space Station up to reproductive stage, and compare phenotypes on growth and development. We will also analyze cell wall properties and gene expression levels using collected materials. However, the amounts of materials collected will be severely limited, and we should develop an efficient procedure for this space experiment. In the present study, we examined the possibility of analyzing various parameters successively using the identical material. On orbit, plant materials will be fixed with RNAlater solution, kept at 4° C for several days and then frozen in a freezer at -20° C. We first examined whether the cell wall extensibility of inflorescence stems can be measured after RNAlater fixation. The gradient of the cell wall extensibility along inflorescence stems was detected in RNAlater-fixed materials as in methanol-killed ones. The sufficient amounts of RNA to analyze the gene expression were also obtained from the materials after measurement of the cell wall extensibility. Furthermore, the levels and composition of cell wall polysaccharides could be measured using the materials after extraction of RNA. These results show that we can analyze the physical and chemical properties of the cell wall as well as gene expression using the identical material obtained in the space experiments.

  4. Experimental study of lattice dynamics in individual semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes: Tangential G modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, D. I.; Tran, H. N.; Slabodyan, Yu. S.; Osadchii, A. V.; Roshal', S. B.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    The tangential G modes in individual semiconducting double-walled nanotubes have been examined via Raman spectroscopy over a wide laser excitation wavelength range. Individual suspended nanotubes have been synthesized via chemical vapor deposition. The ( n, m) chirality indices are determined via electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The pronounced shift in the tangential modes compared to the analogous modes of single-walled nanotubes has been observed in Raman spectra of double-walled nanotubes. The shift value is shown to depend on the interlayer distance and on the van der Waals interaction between the layers in a double-walled tube.

  5. On gas desorption from the tokamak first wall during edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-11-15

    The effect of gas desorption from the tokamak first wall on the pedestal recovery in the H-mode after an edge-localized-mode burst is considered. Results of FACE code simulations of hydrogen desorption from a beryllium wall are presented. It is found that the wall has a significant effect on plasma processes only at sufficiently low temperatures (of about 400 K), which agrees with qualitative estimates obtained earlier in the zero-dimensional approximation.

  6. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed.

  7. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; ...

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externallymore » applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.« less

  8. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Navratil, Gerald A.

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.

  9. Segmentation of arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution using M-mode ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Craig; Azer, Karim; Ramcharan, Sharmilee L; Bunzel, Michelle; Cambell, Barry R; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Walker, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for segmenting arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution, using the returns from M-mode ultrasound. The technique involves measuring the spatial offset between all pairs of scans from their cross-correlation, converting the spatial offsets to relative wall motion through a global optimization, and finally translating from relative to absolute wall motion by interpolation over the M-mode image. The resulting detailed wall distension waveform has the potential to enhance existing vascular biomarkers, such as strain and compliance, as well as enable new ones.

  10. Resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Albert, Maximilian; Lequeux, Steven; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Bortolotti, Paolo; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fangohr, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We study resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches in ferromagnetic nanostrips. We demonstrate that a mode's sensitivity to notches depends strongly on the mode's characteristics. For example, the frequencies of modes that involve lateral motion of the wall are the most sensitive to changes in the notch intrusion depth, especially at the narrow, more strongly confined end of the domain wall. In contrast, the breathing mode, whose dynamics are concentrated away from the notches is relatively insensitive to changes in the notches' sizes. We also demonstrate a sharp drop in the translational mode's frequency towards zero when approaching depinning which is confirmed, using a harmonic oscillator model, to be consistent with a reduction in the local slope of the notch-induced confining potential at its edge.

  11. Scaling and interaction of self-similar modes in models of high Reynolds number wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Moarref, R.; McKeon, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has established the usefulness of the resolvent operator that maps the terms nonlinear in the turbulent fluctuations to the fluctuations themselves. Further work has described the self-similarity of the resolvent arising from that of the mean velocity profile. The orthogonal modes provided by the resolvent analysis describe the wall-normal coherence of the motions and inherit that self-similarity. In this contribution, we present the implications of this similarity for the nonlinear interaction between modes with different scales and wall-normal locations. By considering the nonlinear interactions between modes, it is shown that much of the turbulence scaling behaviour in the logarithmic region can be determined from a single arbitrarily chosen reference plane. Thus, the geometric scaling of the modes is impressed upon the nonlinear interaction between modes. Implications of these observations on the self-sustaining mechanisms of wall turbulence, modelling and simulation are outlined.

  12. Orthogonality breaking induces extraordinary single-mode transparency in an elaborate waveguide with wall corrugations

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhi-Yong; Fan, Ya-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Orthogonality plays a fundamental role in various mathematical theorems and in physics. The orthogonal eigenfunctions that represent the intrinsic motions of various physical systems can also be regarded as transverse wave modes in a straight waveguide. Because of their orthogonality, these modes propagate independently, without mutual interference. When the wall separation fluctuates, the former mode orthogonality is destroyed because of the change in the Euclidean space of the system. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the extraordinary single-mode transparency that arises as a result of the intense mode interference induced by orthogonality breaking in a waveguide with a varying cross section. A mode diagram is also introduced to illuminate these mode interactions. In particular, measurements of the transverse field distributions indicate that a three-mode interaction leads to a single high-order mode that penetrates through the lower-mode bandgaps when the wall period is carefully selected. The observation of Bessel-like transverse distributions is promising for applications in wave-control engineering. PMID:25403089

  13. Design of Wall Segments for Ferritic Wall Mode Studies on HBT-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2012-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO [1]. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will be crucial physics for these experiments. Although there has been a linear FRWM experiment [2], the FRWM has not yet been observed in toroidal geometry. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics, HBT-EP will explore the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with ferromagnetic materials. We describe simple models [3] for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, and compare material options for magnetic properties, cost, and ease of fabrication. Also, initial modeling, design, and installation of moderate permeability (1<μ<10) wall segments on HBT-EP will be discussed.[4pt] [1] Kurtz, R.J., et. al. 2009 J Nucl Mater 386-388[0pt] [2] Bergerson, W., et. al. 2008 Phys Rev Lett 101[0pt] [3] Kurita, G., et. al. 2003 Nucl Fus 43 949-954

  14. Drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes in quasihelical stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2010-02-15

    A linear stability theory of nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning modes is investigated using a two fluid model for electron-ion plasmas. Drift-resistive-inertial ballooning mode eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are calculated for a variety of equilibria including axisymmetric shifted circular geometry (s-alpha model) as well as for three dimensional configurations relevant for the Helically Symmetric Stellarator (HSX) [F. S. B. Anderson, A. F. Almagri, D. T. Anderson, et al., Fusion Technology 27, 273 (1995)]. For typical HSX parameters, characteristic ballooning mode growth rates exceed the electron collision frequency. In this regime, electron inertial effects dominate plasma resistivity and produce an instability whose growth rate scales with the electromagnetic skin depth. However, as plasma beta is increased, the resistive and inertial effects become unimportant. Under these conditions, the mode is completely stabilized by drift frequency effects, which dominate resistivity and inertia. Numerical results indicate that in the absence of drift effects, the resistive-inertial MHD modes are purely growing and persist in regimes where ideal MHD ballooning modes are stable. It is found that the magnitudes of the linear growth rates are not sensitive to the addition of a mirror term to the magnetic spectrum that spoils the quasihelical symmetry of the configuration. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors in the strong ballooning approximation are used together with a quasilinear mixing length estimate to determine particle flux and particle diffusivity. The particle diffusivity increases with rising density gradient and collisionality in a plasma with a low electron temperature. This increase in transport is consistent with the increase observed in the edge region of HSX plasmas. The magnitude of the particle diffusivity is computed to be in the range from 5 to 10 m{sup 2}/s, which is consistent with the experimental measured particle diffusivity at the edge of HSX

  15. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  16. IRAC: Mode of action classification and insecticide resistance management.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Insecticide resistance is a long standing and expanding problem for pest arthropod control. Effective insecticide resistance management (IRM) is essential if the utility of current and future insecticides is to be preserved. Established in 1984, the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) is an international association of crop protection companies. IRAC serves as the Specialist Technical Group within CropLife International focused on ensuring the long term efficacy of insect, mite and tick control products through effective resistance management for sustainable agriculture and improved public health. A key function of IRAC is the continued development of the Mode of Action (MoA) classification scheme, which provides up-to-date information on the modes of action of new and established insecticides and acaricides and which serves as the basis for developing appropriate IRM strategies for crop protection and vector control. The IRAC MoA classification scheme covers more than 25 different modes of action and at least 55 different chemical classes. Diversity is the spice of resistance management by chemical means and thus it provides an approach to IRM providing a straightforward means to identify potential rotation/alternation options.

  17. A molecular dynamics study of the failure modes of a glassy polymer confined between rigid walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmi, Udit; Basu, Sumit

    2006-09-01

    Adhesion is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon which is controlled by various factors such as the loading rate, interface toughness, temperature and geometric and molecular properties. The mode of failure of adhesive joints (adhesive or cohesive) is decided through a complex interplay between these factors. In this work, we study the failure under tensile loading of a thin layer of a polymeric material confined between two rigid walls using molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the interface is controlled by the interaction potential between the polymer and wall atoms. The polymer modelled is a simple linear chain of 'united atoms' having a fixed bond length but contributions to the energy arise from bending and torsion of bonds as well as from non-bonded interactions between the 'united atoms'. The results indicate that even when the adhesion between the wall and the polymer is weak, a short chained polymer is more likely to fail by a mixed adhesive cohesive mode. A long chained polymer, with the same interface strength, fails in a pure adhesive manner. However, when the interface is sufficiently strengthened, the long chained polymer fails cohesively and it can bear a much higher load. The failure mode is somewhat modulated by the rate at which deformation occurs. Moreover, when the polymer is confined such that the spacing between the walls is comparable to the end-to-end distance of the polymer chain, strength of the joint increases significantly. In such a situation, even polymers with weak interfacial adhesion might fail cohesively.

  18. The removal of wall components in Doppler ultrasound signals by using the empirical mode decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Gao, Yali; Wang, Le; Chen, Jianhua; Shi, Xinling

    2007-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound systems, used for the noninvasive detection of the vascular diseases, normally employ a high-pass filter (HPF) to remove the large, low-frequency components from the vessel wall from the blood flow signal. Unfortunately, the filter also removes the low-frequency Doppler signals arising from slow-moving blood. In this paper, we propose to use a novel technique, called the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), to remove the wall components from the mixed signals. The EMD is firstly to decompose a signal into a finite and usually small number of individual components named intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Then a strategy based on the ratios between two adjacent values of the wall-to-blood signal ratio (WBSR) has been developed to automatically identify and remove the relevant IMFs that contribute to the wall components. This method is applied to process the simulated and clinical Doppler ultrasound signals. Compared with the results based on the traditional high-pass filter, the new approach obtains improved performance for wall components removal from the mixed signals effectively and objectively, and provides us with more accurate low blood flow.

  19. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.; the JT-60 Team

    2013-07-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  20. Polarised spectroscopy of individual single-wall nanotubes: Radial-breathing mode study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2001-02-01

    Polarised Raman spectroscopy is performed in a randomly distributed single-wall carbon tube (SWNT) sample at the scale of an individual single-wall nanotube. A detailed analysis in the radial-breathing mode (RBM) domain is presented. Selection of either a single tiny rope of SWNTs or of a single SWNT results from the conjugated high spatial selection of confocal microscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and sample dilution. The drastic modifications observed in the low-frequency Raman spectra as a function of the polarisation configuration confirm the theoretical results.

  1. Resistance of Concrete Masonry Walls With Membrane Catcher Systems Subjected to Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    are made. sandwich panel, prestressed concrete , composite, test, explosive load U U U UU 22 Paul Sheppard Reset 1 Resistance of...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0090 RESISTANCE OF CONCRETE MASONRY WALLS WITH MEMBRANE CATCHER SYSTEMS SUBJECTED TO BLAST LOADING...Include area code) 29-DEC-2010 Refereed Journal Article 01-OCT-2008 -- 31-DEC-2009 Resistance of Concrete Masonry Walls With Membrane Catcher Systems

  2. The plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism-concepts for organization and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    One of the main differences between plant and animal cells are the walls surrounding plant cells providing structural support during development and protection like an adaptive armor against biotic and abiotic stress. During recent years it has become widely accepted that plant cells use a dedicated system to monitor and maintain the functional integrity of their walls. Maintenance of integrity is achieved by modifying the cell wall and cellular metabolism in order to permit tightly controlled changes in wall composition and structure. While a substantial amount of evidence supporting the existence of the mechanism has been reported, knowledge regarding its precise mode of action is still limited. The currently available evidence suggests similarities of the plant mechanism with respect to both design principles and molecular components involved to the very well characterized system active in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There the system has been implicated in cell morphogenesis as well as response to abiotic stresses such as osmotic challenges. Here the currently available knowledge on the yeast system will be reviewed initially to provide a framework for the subsequent discussion of the plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism. The review will then end with a discussion on possible design principles for the cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism and the function of the plant turgor pressure in this context.

  3. Experiments on fracture toughness of thick-wall cylinder for modes I, II, III

    SciTech Connect

    Saegusa, T.; Urabe, N.; Ito, C.; Shirai, K.; Kosaki, A.

    1999-07-01

    There have been few data on fracture toughness for Mode 2 and 3 as compared with those for Mode 1. Experimental data on fracture toughness of plates made of ductile cast iron (ASTM A874-89) and forged steel (ASME SA350 LF5 C1.1) were obtained at a temperature range from 77K to 293K for Mode 1, 2 and 3. The results showed: J{sub IC} < J{sub IIC} < J{sub IIIC}, and K{sub IC} < K{sub IIC} K{sub IIIC}. Integrity of a thick-wall cylinder with artificial flaw was demonstrated against brittle fracture at 233K for Mode 1, 2 and 3, which is one of the design requirements of containers shipping radioactive materials.

  4. Lamb mode selection for accurate wall loss estimation via guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, P.; Ribichini, R.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Cawley, P.

    2014-02-18

    Guided wave tomography offers a method to accurately quantify wall thickness losses in pipes and vessels caused by corrosion. This is achieved using ultrasonic waves transmitted over distances of approximately 1–2m, which are measured by an array of transducers and then used to reconstruct a map of wall thickness throughout the inspected region. To achieve accurate estimations of remnant wall thickness, it is vital that a suitable Lamb mode is chosen. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of the fundamental modes, S{sub 0} and A{sub 0}, which are of primary interest in guided wave tomography thickness estimates since the higher order modes do not exist at all thicknesses, to compare their performance using both numerical and experimental data while considering a range of challenging phenomena. The sensitivity of A{sub 0} to thickness variations was shown to be superior to S{sub 0}, however, the attenuation from A{sub 0} when a liquid loading was present was much higher than S{sub 0}. A{sub 0} was less sensitive to the presence of coatings on the surface of than S{sub 0}.

  5. EFFICACY AND MODES OF ACTION OF RESISTANCE INDUCERS ON TWO WHEAT SPECIES AGAINST MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA.

    PubMed

    Somai-Jemmali, L; Randoux, B; Siah, A; Ors, M; Halama, P; Reignault, Ph; Hamada, W

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance inducers could be an alternative to conventional fungicides to control in a more durable and environmentally friendly manner fungal pathogens. Here, we tested the protection efficacy and the modes of action of four resistance inducers (R1, R2, R3 and R4) against the causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch, Mycosphaerella graminicola, the most frequently occurring pathogen on wheat crops worldwide. The four inducers were tested on two wheat cultivars, Premio (a French bread wheat cultivar) and Karim (a Tunisian durum wheat cultivar), each inoculated with a bread-wheat or a durum-wheat adapted isolate; respectively. All inducers exhibited in the greenhouse a significant protection level on both cultivars regarding disease symptoms (necrosis and chlorosis) and sporulation (pycnidium density). The most efficient inducer was R3 which showed 84% symptom reduction, while the less efficient one was R2 with only a 39% reduction. None of the studied inducers showed direct biocide effect against the fungus, except R4 which displayed a significant in planta inhibition of spore germination. Further investigations revealed that all inducers elicited the plant defence enzymes peroxidase and lipoxygenase, but the activity levels varied depending on the considered inducer. In addition, the effect of resistance inducers on the infection process and the fungal cell-wall degrading enzymes xylanases and glucanases was also investigated. Our study allowed us to find out four efficient resistance inducers on wheat against M. graminicola and to establish data about the modes of action of these inducers.

  6. Normal modes of magnetic domain wall motion in a confined stripe domain lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Spreen, J.H.; Argyle, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    We report the observation of standing wave modes in an array of stripe domains confined by a pair of parallel cracks in a Gd, Ga:YIG film. These modes appear in the response spectrum of the confined lattice as shallow minima or maxima at frequencies lower than that of the usual domain wall resonance peak. A simple model, analogous to the forced response of a membrane clamped at the edges, fits the spatial patterns of wall motion observed at the frequencies of the maxima and minima. Experimental frequency-wave vector values, interpreted with guidance from this analogy, provide the first experimental dispersion curve for a stripe domain lattice. We compare this result with recent theoretical calculations. The experimental value of the uniform mode frequency is 41.5 +- 0.2 MHz, with a long wavelength group velocity of 330 +- 50 m/sec. A surprising conclusion from the observed extrema of the spatial patterns is that the damping of the waves is an order of magnitude less than expected from the damping of the uniform mode. The estimated decay length for a propagating wave is 400 ..mu...

  7. Acoustical modes in lined ducts with flexible walls - A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, R. J.

    A unified variational scheme is set forth for calculating axial wavenumbers, attenuations, and pressure distributions for acoustical modes propagating in flexible lined ducts. The technique accounts for the effects of bulk liners, flexible walls, and mean flow in the airway by describing a variational statement of the dispersion relationship for the propagation of fundamental modes. The variational statement can be applied as a Rayleigh-Ritz finite-element scheme to compute the eigenmodes for these ducts. The approach therefore unifies the computation of the fundamental dispersion relationships and the more complex modes described with high-resolution meshes. The approach is used to describe an experimental test duct without flow, and the Rayleigh-Ritz solution provides results that are similar to those of the full numerical solution. The present treatment is of practical interest to the design and fabrication of silencers and acoustically lined moving ductwork.

  8. A nonlocal shell model for mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shi, M X; Li, Q M; Huang, Y

    2009-11-11

    A second-order strain gradient nonlocal shell model is established to study the mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Nonlocal length is calibrated carefully for SWCNTs in reference to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through analysis of nonlocal length effects on the frequencies of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) and its effects on mode transformation. All analyses show that only a negative second-order nonlocal shell model is appropriate to SWCNTs. Nonlocal length is evidently related to vibration modes and the radius-to-thickness ratio. It is found that a nonlocal length is approximately 0.1 nm in an average sense when RBM frequency is concerned. A nonlocal length of 0.122-0.259 nm is indicated for the mode transformation in a selected group of armchair SWCNTs. 2:1 and 1:1 internal resonances are found for the same SWCNT based on different models, which implies that the internal resonance mechanism depends on the model employed. Furthermore, it is shown that an effective thickness of approximately 0.1 nm is more appropriate to SWCNTs than 0.066 nm.

  9. Cell wall alterations in the leaves of fusariosis-resistant and susceptible pineapple cultivars.

    PubMed

    de Farias Viégas Aquije, Glória Maria; Zorzal, Poliana Belisário; Buss, David Shaun; Ventura, José Aires; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno; Fernandes, Antonio Alberto Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Fusariosis, caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. ananas (Syn. F. guttiforme), is one of the main phytosanitary threats to pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus). Identification of plant cell responses to pathogens is important in understanding the plant-pathogen relationship and establishing strategies to improve and select resistant cultivars. Studies of the structural properties and phenolic content of cell walls in resistant (Vitoria) and susceptible (Perola) pineapple cultivars, related to resistance to the fungus, were performed. The non-chlorophyll base of physiologically mature leaves was inoculated with a conidia suspension. Analyses were performed post-inoculation by light, atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds. Non-inoculated leaves were used as controls to define the constitutive tissue characteristics. Analyses indicated that morphological differences, such as cell wall thickness, cicatrization process and lignification, were related to resistance to the pathogen. Atomic force microscopy indicated a considerable difference in the mechanical properties of the resistant and susceptible cultivars, with more structural integrity, associated with higher levels of cell wall-bound phenolics, found in the resistant cultivar. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids were shown to be the major phenolics bound to the cell walls and were found in higher amounts in the resistant cultivar. Leaves of the resistant cultivar had reduced fungal penetration and a faster and more effective cicatrization response compared to the susceptible cultivar.

  10. Resistive-Wall Instability in the Damping Rings of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; /SLAC

    2006-07-05

    In the damping rings of the International Linear Collider (ILC), the resistive-wall instability is one of the dominant transverse instabilities. This instability directly influences the choice of material and aperture of the vacuum pipe, and the parameters of the transverse feedback system. This paper investigates the resistive-wall instabilities in an ILC damping ring under various conditions of beam pipe material, aperture, and fill pattern.

  11. Antifungal agents: mode of action, mechanisms of resistance, and correlation of these mechanisms with bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, M A; Rice, L B

    1999-10-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of resistance. In this review, the mode of action of antifungals and their mechanisms of resistance are discussed. Additionally, an attempt is made to discuss the correlation between fungal and bacterial resistance. Antifungals can be grouped into three classes based on their site of action: azoles, which inhibit the synthesis of ergosterol (the main fungal sterol); polyenes, which interact with fungal membrane sterols physicochemically; and 5-fluorocytosine, which inhibits macromolecular synthesis. Many different types of mechanisms contribute to the development of resistance to antifungals. These mechanisms include alteration in drug target, alteration in sterol biosynthesis, reduction in the intercellular concentration of target enzyme, and overexpression of the antifungal drug target. Although the comparison between the mechanisms of resistance to antifungals and antibacterials is necessarily limited by several factors defined in the review, a correlation between the two exists. For example, modification of enzymes which serve as targets for antimicrobial action and the involvement of membrane pumps in the extrusion of drugs are well characterized in both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

  12. Vibrational modes and thermal transformation of purified single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong

    Vibrational modes of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) were studied using Raman scattering and/or Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopies, Variations in a three-step purification scheme to remove amorphous carbon and residual catalyst were studied: (step 1) Oxidation, (step 2) Acid Reflux, and (step 3) Thermal Annealing were found to remove most amorphous carbon (oxidation step) and residual metal catalyst (acid reflux step) which were the major impurity phases. By combining IR and Raman, we found considerable wall damage and functional groups (e.g.-COOH and-OH) could be introduced via H2O2 and HNO3 reflux. Surprisingly, vacuum annealing at ˜1100°C for a few hours was found to remove most wall damage and functional groups. Methods to break up large (purified) bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to individual tubes were also investigated. Amide solvents with ultrasound were found to be very effective in debundling; initial purification treatment strongly impacted the outcome. SWNT material decorated with functional groups (e.g., -COOH) tended to produce higher yields of single tubes. Length and diameter distributions of individual tubes were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. Aggressive chemical debundling processes were found to lead to more functionalization, higher degree of debundling and shorter tubes. The IR-active modes of SWNTs was observed for the first time by transmission method, some ten years after the discovery of the Raman-active modes. In concert with theoretical calculations, we were able to assign much of the sharp structure in the IR with anticipated one- and two-phonon lattice mode bands. Thermal evolution of bundled SWNT materials produced in the electric arc (ARC) and by CVD in CO gas (HiPCO) was also investigated. Although both ARC and HiPCO evolved thermally to multi-walled tubes (MWNTs), we found using electron microscopy that for T>2000°C ARC SWNTs (with significantly narrower

  13. SpoVG Regulates Cell Wall Metabolism and Oxacillin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain N315

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    Increasing cases of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in healthy individuals have raised concerns worldwide. MRSA strains are resistant to almost the entire family of β-lactam antibiotics due to the acquisition of an extra penicillin-binding protein, PBP2a. Studies have shown that spoVG is involved in oxacillin resistance, while the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we have found that SpoVG plays a positive role in oxacillin resistance through promoting cell wall synthesis and inhibiting cell wall degradation in MRSA strain N315. Deletion of spoVG in strain N315 led to a significant decrease in oxacillin resistance and a dramatic increase in Triton X-100-induced autolytic activity simultaneously. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that the expression of 8 genes related to cell wall metabolism or oxacillin resistance was altered in the spoVG mutant. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that SpoVG can directly bind to the putative promoter regions of lytN (murein hydrolase), femA, and lytSR (the two-component system). These findings suggest a molecular mechanism in which SpoVG modulates oxacillin resistance by regulating cell wall metabolism in MRSA. PMID:27001809

  14. Carotid wall stress calculated with continuous intima-media thickness assessment using B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascaner, A. F.; Craiem, D.; Casciaro, M. E.; Danielo, R.; Graf, S.; Guevara, E.

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular risk is normally assessed using clinical risk factors but it can be refined using non-invasive infra-clinical markers. Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) is recognized as an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. Carotid Wall Stress (CWS) can be calculated using arterial pressure and carotid size (diameter and IMT). Generally, IMT is measured during diastole when it reaches its maximum value. However, it changes during the cardiac cycle and a time-dependant waveform can be obtained using B-mode ultrasound images. In this work we calculated CWS considering three different approaches for IMT assessment: (i) constant IMT (standard diastolic value), (ii) estimated IMT from diameter waveform (assuming a constant cross-sectional wall area) and (iii) continuously measured IMT. Our results showed that maximum wall stress depends on the IMT estimation method. Systolic CWS progressively increased using the three approaches (p<0.024). We conclude that maximum CWS is highly dependent on wall thickness and accurate IMT measures during systole should be encouraged.

  15. Mosquitocidal bacterial toxins: diversity, mode of action and resistance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Charles, J F; Nielsen-LeRoux, C

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria active against dipteran larvae (mosquitoes and black flies) include a wide variety of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus strains, as well as isolates of Brevibacillus laterosporus and Clostridium bifermentans. All display different spectra and levels of activity correlated with the nature of the toxins, mainly produced during the sporulation process. This paper describes the structure and mode of action of the main mosquitocidal toxins, in relationship with their potential use in mosquito and/or black fly larvae control. Investigations with laboratory and field colonies of mosquitoes that have become highly resistant to the B. sphaericus Bin toxin have shown that several mechanisms of resistance are involved, some affecting the toxin/receptor binding step, others unknown.

  16. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  17. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  18. Disentangling the physical contributions to the electrical resistance in magnetic domain walls: a multiscale study.

    PubMed

    Seemann, K M; Garcia-Sanchez, F; Kronast, F; Miguel, J; Kákay, A; Schneider, C M; Hertel, R; Freimuth, F; Mokrousov, Y; Blügel, S

    2012-02-17

    We analyze the origin of the electrical resistance arising in domain walls of perpendicularly magnetized materials by considering a superposition of anisotropic magnetoresistance and the resistance implied by the magnetization chirality. The domain wall profiles of L1(0)-FePd and L1(0)-FePt are determined by micromagnetic simulations based on which we perform first-principles calculations to quantify electron transport through the core and closure region of the walls. The wall resistance, being twice as high in L1(0)-FePd than in L1(0)-FePt, is found to be clearly dominated in both cases by a high gradient of magnetization rotation, which agrees well with experimental observations.

  19. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  20. Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-03-15

    Velocity boundary conditions appropriate for magnetohydrodynamic simulations have been controversial recently. A comparison of numerical simulations of sideways wall force in disruptions is presented for Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, and DEBS boundary conditions. It is shown that all the boundary conditions give qualitatively similar results. It is shown that Dirichlet boundary conditions are valid in the small Larmor radius limit of electromagnetic sheath boundary conditions.

  1. Nanoenhanced polyurea as a blast resistant coating for concrete masonry walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Heather Kathryn Daniell

    Blast impact is a major concern in the world today. The leading cause of death due to blast impacts is rapidly moving debris. To prevent this many researchers are looking for methods of improved blast resistance for concrete masonry walls. However, many available protective coatings are not flame retardant. This thesis focuses on nanoenhanced polyurea for applications in improving blast resistance, while possessing improved flame retardancy, of concrete masonry walls. The polyurea that is being researched is enhanced with nanoadditives in an effort improve both blast and fire resistance. These materials are dynamically tested and those showing marked improvement are chosen for experimental and computational testing.

  2. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode, with ΔW = 0.7 MJ mitigated edge localized modes (ELMs). Tungsten (W) is the material now decided for the divertor plasma-facing components from the start of plasma operations. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during ELMs are expected to be the dominant source under the partially detached divertor conditions required for safe ITER operation. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of plasma-wall interaction during ELMs is important and a primary input for this is the energy of incoming ions during an ELM event. In this paper, coupled Infrared thermography and Langmuir Probe (LP) measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall unseeded H-mode experiments with ITER relevant ELM energy drop have been used to estimate the impact energy of deuterium ions (D+) on the divertor target. This analysis gives an ion energy of several keV during ELMs, which makes D+ responsible for most of the W sputtering in unseeded H-mode discharges. These LP measurements were possible because of the low electron temperature (Te) during ELMs which allowed saturation of the ion current. Although at first sight surprising, the observation of low Te at the divertor target during ELMs is consistent with the ‘Free-Streaming’ kinetic model which predicts a near-complete transfer of parallel energy from electrons to ions in order to maintain quasi-neutrality of the ELM filaments while they are transported to the divertor targets.

  3. Putative role of pith cell wall phenylpropanoids in Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Butron, Ana; Arnason, John T; Reid, Lana M; Souto, Xose C; Malvar, Rosa A

    2006-03-22

    The stem borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefèbvre) is the most important insect pest that attacks maize, Zea mays L., in northwestern Spain. Host plant resistance to this borer was investigated in relation to the cell wall phenylpropanoids content in the pith. Eight inbred lines that differ in resistance were analyzed. Three major simple phenolic acids, p-coumaric, trans-ferulic, and cis-ferulic acids, and three isomers of diferulic acid, 8-5', 8-O-4', and 8-5'b (benzofuran form), were identified. The amount of all these compounds was correlated with the resistance level in the genotypes, with the resistant inbreds having the highest concentrations. The role of these compounds in cell wall fortification and lignification is well-documented, suggesting their possible intervention in S. nonagrioides resistance. Future studies that focus on these compounds could be useful to enhance S. nonagroides resistance.

  4. Resistive edge mode instability in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M.; Weiland, J.

    2008-09-01

    Geometrical effects on linear stability of electrostatic resistive edge modes are investigated in the three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis, Nucl. Fusion 7, S1, S285 (2007)]-like equilibria. An advanced fluid model is used for the ions together with the reduced Braghinskii equations for the electrons. Using the ballooning mode representation, the drift wave problem is set as an eigenvalue equation along a field line and is solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. A significantly larger magnetic shear and a less unfavorable normal curvature in the tokamak equilibrium are found to give a stronger finite-Larmor radius stabilization and a more narrow mode spectrum than in the stellarator. The effect of negative global magnetic shear in the tokamak is found to be stabilizing. The growth rate on a tokamak magnetic flux surface is found to be comparable to that on a stellarator surface with the same global magnetic shear but the eigenfunction in the tokamak is broader than in the stellarator due to the presence of large negative local magnetic shear (LMS) on the tokamak surface. A large absolute value of the LMS in a region of unfavorable normal curvature is found to be stabilizing in the stellarator, while in the tokamak case, negative LMS is found to be stabilizing and positive LMS destabilizing.

  5. Resistive edge mode instability in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M.; Weiland, J.

    2008-09-15

    Geometrical effects on linear stability of electrostatic resistive edge modes are investigated in the three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis, Nucl. Fusion 7, S1, S285 (2007)]-like equilibria. An advanced fluid model is used for the ions together with the reduced Braghinskii equations for the electrons. Using the ballooning mode representation, the drift wave problem is set as an eigenvalue equation along a field line and is solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. A significantly larger magnetic shear and a less unfavorable normal curvature in the tokamak equilibrium are found to give a stronger finite-Larmor radius stabilization and a more narrow mode spectrum than in the stellarator. The effect of negative global magnetic shear in the tokamak is found to be stabilizing. The growth rate on a tokamak magnetic flux surface is found to be comparable to that on a stellarator surface with the same global magnetic shear but the eigenfunction in the tokamak is broader than in the stellarator due to the presence of large negative local magnetic shear (LMS) on the tokamak surface. A large absolute value of the LMS in a region of unfavorable normal curvature is found to be stabilizing in the stellarator, while in the tokamak case, negative LMS is found to be stabilizing and positive LMS destabilizing.

  6. Selective coherent phonon-mode generation in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-02-08

    The pulse-train technique within ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is theoretically investigated to excite a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period of the pulse train matches with the integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude can be maintained while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition period of a half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM can be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition period that matches with the integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses having a property of "magic ratio" of the G-band and RBM periods.

  7. Selective coherent phonon-mode generation in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-02-01

    The pulse-train technique within ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is theoretically investigated to excite a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period of the pulse train matches with the integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude can be maintained while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition period of a half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM can be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition period that matches with the integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses having a property of “magic ratio” of the G-band and RBM periods.

  8. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process. PMID:25161657

  9. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process.

  10. Cell wall and membrane changes associated with ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, M; Khuller, G K

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical variations accompanying the acquisition of ethambutol (EMB) resistance in a single-step mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra were analyzed. Comparative analysis of phospholipids revealed a reduced content in the EMB-resistant strain, particularly in the cell membrane fraction. Significant alterations were observed in the individual phospholipid content and phospholipid fatty acyl group composition of whole cells and subcellular fractions. Quantitative changes were seen in the chemical constituents of the cell walls of resistant cultures in comparison with those of EMB-susceptible cultures of M. tuberculosis. Alterations in the binding of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate to whole cells of an EMB-resistant strain indicated structural changes on the cell surface. Structural changes in the cell wall may play an important role in the resistance of M. tuberculosis H37Ra to EMB. PMID:2126690

  11. The relationships between edge localized modes suppression, pedestal profiles and lithium wall coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, D. P.; Maingi, R.; Snyder, P. B.; Manickam, J.; Osborne, T.H.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated with wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX.

  12. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  13. Impact of cell wall composition on maize resistance to pests and diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A

    2013-03-27

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases.

  14. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The mode I crack growth resistance of metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Fleck, N. A.; Lu, T. J.

    2001-02-01

    A Dugdale-type cohesive zone model is used to predict the mode I crack growth resistance ( R-curve) of metallic foams, with the fracture process characterised by an idealised traction-separation law that relates the crack surface traction to crack opening displacement. A quadratic yield function, involving the von Mises effective stress and mean stress, is used to account for the plastic compressibility of metallic foams. Finite element calculations are performed for the crack growth resistance under small scale yielding and small scale bridging in plane strain, with K-field boundary conditions. The following effects upon the fracture process are quantified: material hardening, bridging strength, T-stress (the non-singular stress acting parallel to the crack plane), and the shape of yield surface. To study the failure behaviour and notch sensitivity of metallic foams in the presence of large scale yielding, a study is made for panels embedded with either a centre-crack or an open hole and subjected to tensile stressing. For the centre-cracked panel, a transition crack size is predicted for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to elastic-brittle fracture. Likewise, for a panel containing a centre-hole, a transition hole diameter exists for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to a local maximum stress criterion at the edge of the hole.

  16. Rigid fire-resistant foams for walls and floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous techniques for fabricating rigid fire-resistant polyimide foams by compressing already-foamed precursor have been supplanted by one-step constrained-rise process. Precursor mixed with reinforcing fillers is placed between rigid substrates that constrain expansion of foam as it is heated by microwave energy. Process works for both liquid and powder precursors and can also be adapted to attach woven fiberglass skins at same time prcursor is being foamed.

  17. Prediction of radial breathing-like modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes with arbitrary chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with arbitrary chirality are investigated by a simple analytical model. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through van der Waals (vdW) forces between two adjacent tubes. Lennard-Jones potential and a molecular mechanics model are used to calculate the vdW forces and to predict the mechanical properties, respectively. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experimental results. Finally, a new approach is proposed to determine the diameters and the chiral indices of the inner and outer tubes of the DWCNTs with high precision.

  18. Enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes with edge coherent modes achieved by RF heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Ding, S. Y.; Yan, N.; Wang, L.; Gong, X. Z.; Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2014-12-01

    Two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes, named low-enhanced-recycling (LER) and high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode regimes, with edge coherent modes, have been achieved by lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak. In the LER H-mode regime, the density and radiation increase during the ELM-free phase until the onset of edge-localized modes (ELMs), while in the HER H-mode regime, the density and radiation are well controlled without the presence of ELMs. Both LER and HER H-modes exhibit a low-frequency (frequency <100 kHz) edge quasi-coherent mode (ECM) with an initial frequency chirping down phase, following the L-H transition. In addition, an electromagnetic high-frequency coherent mode (HFM) with frequency >170 kHz appears shortly (<1 ms) after the transition during HER H-modes. Both ECM and HFM propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction in the lab frame with a low poloidal wavelength and may be responsible for enhanced recycling during the ELM-free phase. These two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes may have significant implications for long-pulse high-performance operations in future fusion experiments.

  19. Resistance of a single domain wall in (Co/Pt)7 multilayer nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hassel, C; Brands, M; Lo, F Y; Wieck, A D; Dumpich, G

    2006-12-01

    Single (Co/Pt)_{7} multilayer nanowires prepared by electron beam lithography with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are locally modified by means of Ga-ion implantation generating 180 degrees domain walls which are pinned at the edges of underlying thin Pt wires. Since we can exclude contributions from the anisotropic and the Lorentz magnetoresistance this allows us to determine the resistance of a single domain wall at room temperature. We find a positive relative resistance increase of DeltaR/R=1.8% inside the domain wall which agrees well with the model of Levy and Zhang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 5110 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevLett.79.5110].

  20. The Effect of an Oxide Layer on Resistive-Wall Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    Shorter and shorter electron bunches are now used in the FEL designs. The fine structure of the wall of a beam vacuum pipe plays more noticeable role in the wake field generation. Additionally to the resistance and roughness, the wall may have an oxide layer, which is usually a dielectric. It is important for aluminium pipe, which have Al2O3 layer. The thickness of this layer may vary in a large range: 1-100 nm. We study this effect for the very short (20-1000 nm) ultra relativistic bunches in an infinite round pipe. We solved numerically the Maxwell equations for the fields in the metal and ceramics. Results showed that the oxide layer may considerably increase the wavelength and the decay time of the resistive-wall wake fields, however the loss factor of the very short bunches does not change much.

  1. Hydraulic resistance of plane channels and annulus with different roughness on opposite walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsun, A. S.; Kutsenko, K. V.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Balberkina, Y. N.

    2017-03-01

    A new method for prediction of hydraulic resistance for a turbulent flow in plane channels and annulus is proposed. In spite of the importance of this issue, only very few publications devoted to the investigation into hydrodynamics in these channels are available, and there are no methods for predicting hydraulic resistance of a flow in these channels at all. The flow in channels with different roughness on the walls is described using the Prandtl semiempirical theory of a turbulent boundary layer. The flow in a channel cross-section is divided into two noninteracting layers of different thickness flowing along the walls with different roughness. The basic balance correlations are derived for a plane channel. To match the velocity profiles of both layers at the interface point, a logarithmic velocity profile is used. This yields a closed system of equations for predicting hydraulic resistance in plane channels with a given different roughness on opposite walls. It is demonstrated that the obtained correlation may be used for predicting hydraulic resistance in annulus as well. Experiments were carried out with a water flow in an annulus. Each annuli consisted of a pipe having a smooth wall into which a rod with artificial roughness on the surface was inserted coaxially. Two types of roughness were investigated: trapezoid and threadlike ones. Comparison of the predictions with the experimental data confirmed the validity of the proposed method. It can be used in designing flowpaths of various power installations.

  2. Experimental observation of exchange-mode spin-wave via domain wall annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Delaney, Tristan; Beach, Geoffrey

    2014-03-01

    Spin waves (SWs) in magnetic nanostructures have generated great interest recently, motivated by the possibility of high-speed, low-power magnonic devices applications. A number of micromagnetic researches, therefore, have been conducted, revealing the particular behaviors of SWs in nanostructured ferromagnets. However, SWs' short attenuation length prevents them from being observed and used experimentally. Generating large-amplitude exchange-mode SWs, which is thus indispensable for real device applications, are still challenging because their very short wavelengths cannot be directly excited. Here, we present the first experimental evidence of the exchange-mode SWs. Using micromagnetics, we firstly show that the annihilation of two DWs releases their exchange energy by a mean of localized SW burst, which has broad range band and intense amplitude. Another micromagnetic result also shows that the collision-induced SWs inside a nanowire can cause the depinning of a DW with an assisting magnetic field. By taking advantage of an anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) effect and relative electrical measurements, we observe the generation/annihilation of DWs and the contribution of generated SWs to the DW depinning process experimentally. The additional depinning field of ~ 8 Oe caused by SWs can be readily achieved, enough to propagate a standstill DW in a well-defined pinning-free nanostructure. This work shows the first experimental observation of exchange-mode SWs and highlights a new route towards SW-integrated spintronic devices. This is the corresponding author of this work.

  3. A 31 mW, 280 fs passively mode-locked fiber soliton laser using a high heat-resistant SWNT/P3HT saturable absorber coated with siloxane.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takato; Hori, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2012-10-08

    We report a substantial increase in the heat resistance in a connector-type single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) saturable absorber by sealing SWNT/P3HT composite with siloxane. By applying the saturable absorber to a passively mode-locked Er fiber laser, we successfully demonstrated 280 fs, 31 mW pulse generation with a fivefold improvement in heat resistance.

  4. Tracking Random Walk of Individual Domain Walls in Cylindrical Nanomagnets with Resistance Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrita; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik; Ghosh, Arindam

    2010-08-01

    The stochasticity of domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic nanowires has been probed by measuring slow fluctuations, or noise, in electrical resistance at small magnetic fields. By controlled injection of DWs into isolated cylindrical nanowires of nickel, we have been able to track the motion of the DWs between the electrical leads by discrete steps in the resistance. Closer inspection of the time dependence of noise reveals a diffusive random walk of the DWs with a universal kinetic exponent. Our experiments outline a method with which electrical resistance is able to detect the kinetic state of the DWs inside the nanowires, which can be useful in DW-based memory designs.

  5. Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-02-01

    A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Resistive effects on line-tied magnetohydrodynamic modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, John M.

    2007-09-15

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on the linear stability of line-tied magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is presented in cylindrical geometry, based on the method recently developed in the paper by Evstatiev et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072902 (2006)]. The method uses an expansion of the full solution of the problem in one-dimensional radial eigenfunctions. This method is applied to study sausage modes (m=0, m being the poloidal wavenumber), kink modes (m=1), and m=2 modes. All these modes can be resistively unstable. It is found that m{ne}0 modes can be unstable below the ideal MHD threshold due to resistive diffusion of the field lines, with growth rates proportional to resistivity. For these resistive modes, there is no indication of tearing, i.e., current sheets or boundary layers due to ideal MHD singularities. That is, resistivity acts globally on the whole plasma column and not in layers. Modes with m=0, on the other hand, can exist as tearing modes if the equilibrium axial magnetic field reverses sign within the plasma.

  7. Adsorption effects on radial breathing mode of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiashi, Shohei; Kono, Kaname; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shitaba, Junpei; Homma, Naoki; Beniya, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    For elucidation of the adsorption effects on the vibration properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), photoluminescence and Raman scattering spectra from SWNTs at different vapor pressure of water were simultaneously measured and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed. The water vapor pressure dependence and its tube diameter (dtube) dependence of the frequency of the radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks (ωRBM) and the optical transition energy (Ei i) indicate that the physical adsorption is quite important, and both ωRBM and Ei i clearly depend on the number density of adsorption molecules on the SWNT surface. A simple adsorption model, where the vibrational coupling between the surrounding adsorption layer and SWNTs via van der Waals interaction is considered for RBM, reproduces the experimental and MD simulation results of ωRBM in a wide dtube range for various SWNTs, such as isolated SWNTs in vacuum, SWNTs with adsorption water layer, and even bundled SWNTs. On the basis of the model, the variation of the relationship between ωRBM and Ei i in a Kataura plot for various SWNT samples can also be understood generally as the "environmental effects."

  8. Nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Circumferential flexural modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Matteo; Smirnov, Valeri V.; Manevitch, Leonid I.; Milani, Massimo; Pellicano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied. The Sanders-Koiter theory is applied to model the nonlinear dynamics of the system in the case of finite amplitude of vibration. The SWNT deformation is described in terms of longitudinal, circumferential and radial displacement fields. Simply supported, clamped and free boundary conditions are considered. The circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) are investigated. Two different approaches based on numerical and analytical models are compared. In the numerical model, an energy method based on the Lagrange equations is used to reduce the nonlinear partial differential equations of motion to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which is solved by using the implicit Runge-Kutta numerical method. In the analytical model, a reduced form of the Sanders-Koiter theory assuming small circumferential and tangential shear deformations is used to get the nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion, which are solved by using the multiple scales analytical method. The transition from energy beating to energy localization in the nonlinear field is studied. The effect of the aspect ratio on the analytical and numerical values of the nonlinear energy localization threshold for different boundary conditions is investigated. Time evolution of the total energy distribution along the axis of a simply supported SWNT

  9. Zero-line modes at stacking faulted domain walls in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhee; Kim, Gunn; Jung, Jeil; Min, Hongki

    2016-09-01

    Rhombohedral multilayer graphene is a physical realization of the chiral two-dimensional electron gas that can host zero-line modes (ZLMs), also known as kink states, when the local gap opened by inversion symmetry breaking potential changes sign in real space. Here we study how the variations in the local stacking coordination of multilayer graphene affects the formation of the ZLMs. Our analysis indicates that the valley Hall effect develops whenever an interlayer potential difference is able to open up a band gap in stacking faulted multilayer graphene, and that ZLMs can appear at the domain walls separating two distinct regions with imperfect rhombohedral stacking configurations. Based on a tight-binding formulation with distant hopping terms between carbon atoms, we first show that topologically distinct domains characterized by the valley Chern number are separated by a metallic region connecting AA and AA' stacking line in the layer translation vector space. We find that gapless states appear at the interface between the two stacking faulted domains with different layer translation or with opposite perpendicular electric field if their valley Chern numbers are different.

  10. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  11. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  12. Hyper-resistivity produced by tearing mode turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    Tearing mode turbulence produces a hyperresistivity or effective anomalous electron viscosity. The hyperresistivity is calculated for the mean magnetic field quasi-linearly, and for long-wavelength modes using the direct interaction approximation. The hyperresistivity accounts for current relaxation in reversed-field pinch experiments, and gives a magnetic fluctuation scaling of S to the -1/3. It causes enhanced tearing mode growth rates in the turbulent phase of tokamak disruptions. In astrophysics, it limits magnetic energy growth because of the dynamo effect, and may explain rapid reconnection phenomena such as solar flares.

  13. Self-Resistance and Cell Wall Composition in the Glycopeptide Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina▿

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Hüttel, Stephan; Kulik, Andreas; Röttgen, Marlene; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Stegmann, Evi

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing resistance mechanism against glycopeptides in Gram-positive pathogens involves reprogramming the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan precursors, resulting in d-alanyl-d-lactate depsipeptide termini. Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-like glycopeptide balhimycin and therefore has to protect itself from the action of the glycopeptide. We studied the roles of the accessory resistance gene orthologs vanYb, vnlRb, and vnlSb, which are part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster (represented by the subscript “b”). The VanYb carboxypeptidase cleaved the terminal d-Ala from peptidoglycan precursors, and its heterologous expression enhanced glycopeptide resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor. The VanRS-like two component system VnlRSb was not involved in glycopeptide resistance or in the expression of the vanHAX glycopeptide resistance genes. Mature A. balhimycina peptidoglycan contained mainly tri- and tetrapeptides, with only traces of the d-Ala-d-Ala-ending pentapeptides that are binding sites for the antibiotic produced. The structure of the peptidoglycan precursor is consistent with the presence of vanHAX genes, which were identified outside the balhimycin synthesis cluster. Both wild-type and non-antibiotic-producing mutant strains synthesized peptidoglycan precursors ending mainly with d-Lac, indicating constitutive synthesis of a resistant cell wall. A. balhimycina could provide a model for an ancestral glycopeptide producer with constitutively expressed resistance genes. PMID:21690280

  14. 177 fs erbium-doped fiber laser mode locked with a cellulose polymer film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, V. I.; Kryukov, P. G.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Dianov, E. M.

    2008-04-01

    A mode-locked soliton erbium-doped fiber laser generating 177fs pulses is demonstrated. The laser pumped by a 85mW, 980nm laser diode emits 7mW at 1.56μm at a pulse repetition rate of 50MHz. Passive mode locking is achieved with a saturable absorber made of a high-optical quality film based on cellulose derivative with dispersed carbon single-wall nanotubes. The film is prepared with the original technique by using carbon nanotubes synthesized by the arc-discharge method.

  15. Vancomycin Tolerant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Reveals the Effects of Vancomycin on Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Ochoa, Sara A.; Escalona, Gerardo; Arellano-Galindo, José; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; López-Villegas, Edgar O.; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes both healthcare- and community-acquired infections. An increase in the incidence of these infections may lead to a substantial change in the rate of vancomycin usage. Incidence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has been increasing worldwide for the last few years, conferring different levels of resistance to vancomycin as well as producing changes in the cell wall structure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vancomycin on cell wall thickening in clinical isolates of vancomycin-tolerant (VT) MRSA obtained from pediatric patients. From a collection of 100 MRSA clinical isolates from pediatric patients, 12% (12/100) were characterized as VT-MRSA, and from them, 41.66% (5/12) exhibited the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) phenotype. Multiplex-PCR assays revealed 66.66% (8/12), 25% (3/12), and 8.33% (1/12) of the VT-MRSA isolates were associated with agr group II, I, and III polymorphisms, respectively; the II-mec gene was amplified from 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates, and the mecIVa gene was amplified from 16.66% (2/12) of the isolates. Pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprint analysis showed 62% similarity among the VT-MRSA isolates. Thin transverse sections analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an average increase of 24 nm (105.55%) in the cell wall thickness of VT-MRSA compared with untreated VT-MRSA isolates. In summary, these data revealed that the thickened cell walls of VT-MRSA clinical isolates with agr type II and SCCmec group II polymorphisms are associated with an adaptive resistance to vancomycin. PMID:25793280

  16. Vancomycin tolerant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus reveals the effects of vancomycin on cell wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Ochoa, Sara A; Escalona, Gerardo; Arellano-Galindo, José; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes both healthcare- and community-acquired infections. An increase in the incidence of these infections may lead to a substantial change in the rate of vancomycin usage. Incidence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has been increasing worldwide for the last few years, conferring different levels of resistance to vancomycin as well as producing changes in the cell wall structure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vancomycin on cell wall thickening in clinical isolates of vancomycin-tolerant (VT) MRSA obtained from pediatric patients. From a collection of 100 MRSA clinical isolates from pediatric patients, 12% (12/100) were characterized as VT-MRSA, and from them, 41.66% (5/12) exhibited the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) phenotype. Multiplex-PCR assays revealed 66.66% (8/12), 25% (3/12), and 8.33% (1/12) of the VT-MRSA isolates were associated with agr group II, I, and III polymorphisms, respectively; the II-mec gene was amplified from 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates, and the mecIVa gene was amplified from 16.66% (2/12) of the isolates. Pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprint analysis showed 62% similarity among the VT-MRSA isolates. Thin transverse sections analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an average increase of 24 nm (105.55%) in the cell wall thickness of VT-MRSA compared with untreated VT-MRSA isolates. In summary, these data revealed that the thickened cell walls of VT-MRSA clinical isolates with agr type II and SCCmec group II polymorphisms are associated with an adaptive resistance to vancomycin.

  17. Chest-wall thickness and percent thoracic fat estimation by B-mode ultrasound: system and procedure review

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Lane, B.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Accurate measurement of chest wall thickness is necessary for estimation of lung burden of transuranic elements in humans. To achieve tis capability, the ORNL Whole Body Counter has acquired a B-mode ultrasonic imaging system for defining the structure within the thorax of the body. This report contains a review of the ultrasound system in use at the ORNL Whole Body Counter, including its theory of operation, and te procedure for use of the system. Future developmental plans are also presented.

  18. Modes and Modulations of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Depardieu, Florence; Podglajen, Isabelle; Leclercq, Roland; Collatz, Ekkehard; Courvalin, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    Since antibiotic resistance usually affords a gain of function, there is an associated biological cost resulting in a loss of fitness of the bacterial host. Considering that antibiotic resistance is most often only transiently advantageous to bacteria, an efficient and elegant way for them to escape the lethal action of drugs is the alteration of resistance gene expression. It appears that expression of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is frequently regulated, which indicates that modulation of gene expression probably reflects a good compromise between energy saving and adjustment to a rapidly evolving environment. Modulation of gene expression can occur at the transcriptional or translational level following mutations or the movement of mobile genetic elements and may involve induction by the antibiotic. In the latter case, the antibiotic can have a triple activity: as an antibacterial agent, as an inducer of resistance to itself, and as an inducer of the dissemination of resistance determinants. We will review certain mechanisms, all reversible, that bacteria have elaborated to achieve antibiotic resistance by the fine-tuning of the expression of genetic information. PMID:17223624

  19. Distortion of Magnetic Domain Wall Measured by Magneto-Resistance Changes in a Co Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-01-01

    The electrical anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) measurements were performed to see the formation of a 360 degree magnetic domain wall (360 DW) and distortion of the magnetic moments in a Co nanoring structure. Since the 360 DW is consisted of two 180 degree DWs, a decrease of the resistance was found in the switching process from the vortex to reverse onion state by the AMR effects, which is consistent with micromagnetic simulations. In addition, a decrease of the resistance in the switching process from the onion to vortex state was observed by the distortion of the local magnetic moments due to an applied magnetic field. The stochastic behavior in the switching process is caused by thermally induced magnetic moments changes.

  20. Alternative Pathway to a Glycopeptide-Resistant Cell Wall in the Balhimycin Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kalan, Lindsay; Kilian, Regina; Martin, Tobias; Wright, Gerard D; Stegmann, Evi

    2015-06-12

    Balhimycin, a vancomycin-type glycopeptide, is a lipid II targeting antibiotic produced by Amycolatopsis balhimycina. A. balhimycina has developed a self-resistance mechanism based on the synergistic action of different enzymes resulting in modified peptidoglycan. The canonical resistance mechanism against glycopeptides is the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending with acyl-d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) rather than acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala). This reprogramming is the result of the enzymes VanH, VanA, and VanX. VanH and VanA are required to produce d-Ala-d-Lac; VanX cleaves cytosolic pools of d-Ala-d-Ala, thereby ensuring that peptidoglycan is enriched in d-Ala-d-Lac. In A. balhimycina, the ΔvanHAXAb mutant showed a reduced glycopeptide resistance in comparison to the wild type. Nevertheless, ΔvanHAXAb was paradoxically still able to produce d-Ala-d-Lac containing resistant cell wall precursors suggesting the presence of a novel alternative glycopeptide resistance mechanism. In silico analysis, inactivation studies, and biochemical assays led to the characterization of an enzyme, Ddl1Ab, as a paraloguous chromosomal d-Ala-d-Lac ligase able to complement the function of VanAAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. Furthermore, A. balhimycina harbors a vanYAb gene encoding a d,d-carboxypeptidase. Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulated expression of vanYAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. VanYAb cleaves the endstanding d-Ala from the pentapeptide precursors, reducing the quantity of sensitive cell wall precursors in the absence of VanXAb. These findings represent an unprecedented coordinated layer of resistance mechanisms in a glycopeptide antibiotic producing bacterium.

  1. Understanding the destabilization of a resistive drift mode in EAST core plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erzhong; Xu, L.; Guo, W.; Chen, K.; Lyu, B.; Shen, Y.; Hu, L.

    2017-02-01

    A low-frequency oscillation driven by heavy impurities is frequently observed in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) H-mode discharges accompanied by an Edge Localized Mode-free duration. This instability has been identified as a resistive drift mode according to a two-fluid simulation, showing that the mode stability is determined by the gradient of resistivity profile. Furthermore, the analytic theory also demonstrates that the mode is destabilized by the sharp impurity density gradient agreeing to the observation of intrinsic Mo (Molybdenum) concentration. The destabilization conditions have been derived like LN ,z<2/3 LT ,z ( LN ,z and LT ,z are the scale lengths of density and temperature of impurity, respectively). Calculations based on the analytical theory reproduce the characteristic of the mode, which is in agreement with the experimental observations.

  2. Cell wall structure and formation of maturing fibres of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) increase buckling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Ren, Haiqing; Zhang, Bo; Fei, Benhua; Burgert, Ingo

    2012-05-07

    The mechanical stability of the culms of monocotyledonous bamboos is highly attributed to the proper embedding of the stiff fibre caps of the vascular bundles into the soft parenchymatous matrix. Owing to lack of a vascular cambium, bamboos show no secondary thickening growth that impedes geometrical adaptations to mechanical loads and increases the necessity of structural optimization at the material level. Here, we investigate the fine structure and mechanical properties of fibres within a maturing vascular bundle of moso bamboo, Phyllostachys pubescens, with a high spatial resolution. The fibre cell walls were found to show almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils, and the stiffness and hardness of the central part of the cell wall remained basically consistent for the fibres at different regions across the fibre cap. A stiffness gradient across the fibre cap is developed by differential cell wall thickening which affects tissue density and thereby axial tissue stiffness in the different regions of the cap. The almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils in the fibre walls maximize the longitudinal elastic modulus of the fibres and their lignification increases the transverse rigidity. This is interpreted as a structural and mechanical optimization that contributes to the high buckling resistance of the slender bamboo culms.

  3. [The role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Ufuk

    2007-04-01

    mechanisms and global activator proteins (MarA, SoxS, Rob) are significant in the induction of overexpression of these efflux pump systems. Outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria with its unique lipopolysaccharide rich structure also contributes to drug efflux and other antimicrobial resistance mechanisms by reducing the influx rate of toxic antimicrobial compunds. Multidrug efflux pump proteins found in Gram positive bacteria and mycobacteria are usually the members of protein super families other than RND family and their substrate profiles are more limited. However, some of these efflux proteins (NorA, MsrA, QacA in Staphylococcus aureus; PmrA and EmeA in Streptococcus pneumoniae) have clinical significance in the resistance to several antimicrobial agents (fluoroquinolones, macrolids) and toxic substances (quarternery ammonium compounds). In this review article, the role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria have been discussed.

  4. Effect of inter-particle rolling resistance on passive earth pressure against a translating rigid retaining wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; He, Jie; Liu, Fang; Wang, Huaning

    2013-06-01

    The presence of the inter-particle rolling resistance of soil grains results in higher bulk shear strength in the soil, which relates to the earth pressure calculation based on the classic theory. This paper focuses on the effect of the inter-particle rolling resistance on the earth pressure against a rigid retaining wall. A particle contact model considering the inter-particle rolling resistance was implemented into the distinct element code PFC2D, which was then used to simulate a rigid wall retaining a sandy backfill. The passive earth pressure against the wall subjected to a translational displacement was analyzed and compared with results without considering the inter-particle rolling resistance. The influence of the inter-particle rolling resistance was examined from the microscopic scale (e.g., averaged micro-pure rotation-rate) as well as the macroscopic scale (e.g., the magnitude and action point of resultant earth pressures). The results show that the inter-particle rolling resistance of the backfill strongly affects the value of passive thrust behind the wall, but it has no significant effect on the action position of the thrust. The distribution of micro-pure rotation-rate (APR) in the backfill provides an insight into the connection between inter-particle rolling resistance to the energy dissipation in the shear zone behind the wall.

  5. A resistive magnetodynamics analysis of sawtooth driven tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenping; Wang, Jiaqi; Liu, Dongjian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is applied to study the effect of sawtooth driven on classical/neoclassical tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. In a model of forced reconnection, the sawtooth is considered as a boundary disturbance for m >1 modes and causes the islands growth of m/n = 2/1 and 3/2 modes through toroidal coupling. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the linear growth of the modes is driven by precursors of the sawtooth through the linear mode coupling, while differential rotation has great effect on both the linear and the nonlinear development of the modes. It is believed that the tearing mode can be suppressed by control of the sawtooth by radio frequency heating or current drive.

  6. Wall mode instability driven transition to turbulence in a soft microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Sagar; v, Kumaran

    Transition to turbulence has been triggered due to structure fluid interaction at Reynolds number (Re) much lower than hard wall transition Re, in a soft walled micro channel of dimensions 40mm*1.5mm*0.16mm. Mixing index analysis indicates high degree of mixing accompanied by lower pressure drop as the channel deforms. Flow after transition velocity statistics has been extensively studied using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) along streamwise-wallnormal direction. The reduced plots of streamwise mean velocity are shown with the absence of viscous sublayer and presence of logarithmic layer with von Karman constants different from rigid wall channel. The one-point cross correlation between velocity fluctuations is non-zero at the soft surface which is in contrast to flow in hard walled channel. This indicates that the additional fluid stress exerted on the soft surface by the fluid velocity fluctuations result in net energy transfer due to shear work done at the interface. The structure fluid interface acts as a source of energy for the mean turbulent kinetic energy which is typically zero at the interface for hard walled channel. We also detect the onset of wall-oscillations primarily tangential to the surface at the transition Re. Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India.

  7. Resistive sensor and electromagnetic actuator for feedback stabilization of liquid metal walls in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, S. M. H.; Volpe, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors will be subject to instabilities, turbulence, induced currents, error fields and temperature gradients that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun to actively stabilize static or flowing free-surface liquid metal layers by locally applying forces in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present resistive sensors of liquid metal thickness and demonstrate \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} actuators, to locally control it.

  8. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  9. Mycolic Acid Cyclopropanation is Essential for Viability, Drug Resistance, and Cell Wall Integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Daniel; Liu, Zhen; Sacchettini, James C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains a major global health problem complicated by escalating rates of antibiotic resistance. Despite the established role of mycolic acid cyclopropane modification in pathogenesis, the feasibility of targeting this enzyme family for antibiotic development is unknown. We show through genetics and chemical biology that mycolic acid methyltransferases are essential for M. tuberculosis viability, cell wall structure, and intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. The tool compound dioctylamine, which we show acts as a substrate mimic, directly inhibits the function of multiple mycolic acid methyltransferases, resulting in loss of cyclopropanation, cell death, loss of acid fastness, and synergistic killing with isoniazid and ciprofloxacin. These results demonstrate that mycolic acid methyltransferases are a promising antibiotic target and that a family of virulence factors can be chemically inhibited with effects not anticipated from studies of each individual enzyme.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 Can Use Depsi-Lipid II Derived from Vancomycin-Resistant Strains for Cell Wall Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Jun; Yamashiro, Hidenori; Miya, Hiroto; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Maki, Hideki; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2013-09-02

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (VRSA) uses depsipeptide-containing modified cell-wall precursors for the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Transglycosylase is responsible for the polymerization of the peptidoglycan, and the penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) plays a major role in the polymerization among several transglycosylases of wild-type S. aureus. However, it is unclear whether VRSA processes the depsipeptide-containing peptidoglycan precursor by using PBP2. Here, we describe the total synthesis of depsi-lipid I, a cell-wall precursor of VRSA. By using this chemistry, we prepared a depsi-lipid II analogue as substrate for a cell-free transglycosylation system. The reconstituted system revealed that the PBP2 of S. aureus is able to process a depsi-lipid II intermediate as efficiently as its normal substrate. Moreover, the system was successfully used to demonstrate the difference in the mode of action of the two antibiotics moenomycin and vancomycin.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 Can Use Depsi-Lipid II Derived from Vancomycin-Resistant Strains for Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Yamashiro, Hidenori; Miya, Hiroto; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Maki, Hideki; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (VRSA) uses depsipeptide-containing modified cell-wall precursors for the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Transglycosylase is responsible for the polymerization of the peptidoglycan, and the penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) plays a major role in the polymerization among several transglycosylases of wild-type S. aureus. However, it is unclear whether VRSA processes the depsipeptide-containing peptidoglycan precursor by using PBP2. Here, we describe the total synthesis of depsi-lipid I, a cell-wall precursor of VRSA. By using this chemistry, we prepared a depsi-lipid II analogue as substrate for a cell-free transglycosylation system. The reconstituted system revealed that the PBP2 of S. aureus is able to process a depsi-lipid II intermediate as efficiently as its normal substrate. Moreover, the system was successfully used to demonstrate the difference in the mode of action of the two antibiotics moenomycin and vancomycin. PMID:23873669

  12. The Changing Paradigm of Outflow Resistance Generation: Towards Synergistic Models of the JCT and Inner Wall Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Darryl R.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous humor outflow resistance is the primary determinant of intraocular pressure (IOP), and increased outflow resistance is the basis for elevated IOP associated with glaucoma. Experimental evidence suggests that the bulk of outflow resistance is generated in the vicinity of the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal, its basement membrane and the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT). However, attempts to sort out the contribution of each of these tissues to total outflow resistance have not been successful. Conventional understanding of outflow resistance assumes that the resistance of each tissue strata (i.e., the inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and JCT) in the outflow pathway adds in series to contribute to total outflow resistance generation. However, this perspective leads to a paradox where the apparent resistances of all tissues in the outflow pathway are much lower than the measured total resistance. To resolve this paradox, we explore synergistic models of outflow resistance generation where hydrodynamic interactions between different tissue strata lead to a total resistance that is greater than the sum of the individual tissue resistances. We closely examine the “funneling” hypothesis that has emerged as a leading synergistic model, and we review the basis of funneling, mechanical and biological requirements for funneling and evidence in support of this hypothesis. We also propose refinements to the funneling model and describe how funneling may relate to segmental variability of aqueous humor outflow patterns observed within the trabecular meshwork. Pressure gradients across the JCT and inner wall endothelium will generate mechanical loads that influence the morphology of these tissues. Because tissue morphology may in turn affect outflow resistance, there exists the potential for a two-way coupling or a “fluid-solid interaction” between outflow hydrodynamics and the mechanical behavior of the inner wall and JCT

  13. Braking of tearing mode rotation by ferromagnetic conducting walls in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-09-01

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a "forbidden band" of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band, there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode "locks" to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). On the other hand, if the ferromagnetism becomes too large, then the forbidden band of mode rotation frequencies is suppressed, and the mode frequency consequently varies smoothly and reversibly with the mode amplitude.

  14. Braking of tearing mode rotation by ferromagnetic conducting walls in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-09-15

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a “forbidden band” of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band, there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode “locks” to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). On the other hand, if the ferromagnetism becomes too large, then the forbidden band of mode rotation frequencies is suppressed, and the mode frequency consequently varies smoothly and reversibly with the mode amplitude.

  15. Appearance of radial breathing modes in Raman spectra of multi-walled carbon nanotubes upon laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Mohapatra, Dipti R.; Hazra, K. S.; Misra, D. S.; Ghatak, Jay; Satyam, P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Raman spectra of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes are studied with the laser power of 5-20 mW. We observe the Raman bands at ˜1352, 1581, 1607, and 2700 cm -1 with 5 mW laser power. As the laser power is increased to 10, 15 and 20 mW, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) appear in the range 200-610 cm -1. The diameter corresponding to the highest RBM is ˜0.37 nm, the lowest reported so far. The RBMs are attributed to the local synthesis of the SWNTs at the top surface of the samples at higher laser power.

  16. Observation of n=1 Resistive Interchange Mode in low-β Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Y.; Ramos, J. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Snipes, J.; Wolfe, S.; Taylor, G.

    1999-11-01

    A localized MHD perturbation, which is identified as a resistive interchange mode, has been observed during the current ramp of Alcator C-Mod, when βN is as low as 0.15. Using two grating polychromators which can cover more than half of the whole plasma profile, very localized (within 2cm) Te fluctuations were observed in the core region, which has a hollow equilibrium Te profile. Based on magnetic diagnostics, the toroidal mode number is n=1. The pressure gradients at the channels where the fluctuations were observed were positive (p^' >0) and they were located close to an inner rational surface of the reversed q-profile with q = 5. According to resistive interchange mode theory(GLASSER, A.H. et al., Phys. Fluids. 19) (1976) 567, such a hollow pressure profile with q > 1 in a low-β plasma can be unstable. A resistive MHD analysis of this equilibrium, using the MARS(BONDESON, A. et al, Phys. Fluids B4) (1992) 1889 code, predicts such an unstable mode with toroidal mode number, n=1. Unlike DIII-D observations(CHU, M.S. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 )(1996) 2710, this resistive interchange mode during low-β plasma is due to the inverted pressure gradient in the core, not to high β.

  17. Magnetic domain configurations and huge wall resistivity in half-metallic chromium dioxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaojing

    We have fabricated, studied and compared the electrical and magnetic behavior of several sub-micron-sized polycrystalline and epitaxial chromium dioxide (CrO2) nanostructures, grown using selective-area growth technique. Magnetic domain structures were studied by magnetic force microscopy, and in-plane, lamellar domain structure with fragmented walls aligned along the magnetic easy axis direction have been observed, indicating the existence of a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 nanostructures. Low-temperature transport measurements on nanowires have shown that the dc resistivity of polycrystalline CrO2 wires is strongly dependent on the linewidth. Below a critical temperature, a transition from a positive to a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity have been observed, which we attribute to a competition between the scattering of the conduction electrons inside the grains and scattering across the grain boundaries. Using a model based on grain boundary scattering, we estimate a mean transmission probability through the grain boundaries to be on the order of 10-1 . Furthermore, magnetoresistance (MR) measurement indicates that the MR behavior of polycrystalline CrO2 wires is dominated by the shape anisotropy; however, for epitaxial CrO2 wires, both the shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy play important roles, and the resulting MR properties are found to be closely related to the orientation of the wire axis. By studying the MR curves, we inferred the internal magnetic domain structures in various single crystal CrO2 wires and found that the spin-dependent transport is much stronger across a grain boundary than a magnetic domain wall. We have also studied the magnetotransport properties of CrO2 nanoscale continuous contacts. Manipulating the domain walls using a large dc current in the contact area yields a magnetoresistance of up to 25%, which is the largest ever seen in a single ferromagnetic film. The single domain-wall-resistance

  18. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-12-10

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  19. 90-fs diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser mode-locked using single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuangeng; Petrov, Valentin; Griebner, Uwe; Zhang, Xingyu; Choi, Sun Young; Gwak, Ji Yoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Mateos, Xavier; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2014-03-10

    A diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser is mode-locked with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) for the first time. Pulse durations as short as 90 fs are obtained at ~1049 nm with 0.4% output coupler, the shortest pulses to our knowledge for a diode-pumped 1-µm laser applying SWCNTs as saturable absorber. Using 3% output coupler, the maximum average output power reached 90 mW at a repetition frequency of 83 MHz.

  20. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-07

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  1. Interaction between static magnetic islands and interchange modes in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kinya; Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    2010-06-15

    Fundamental mechanism of the nonlinear interaction between static magnetic islands generated by an external field and a resistive interchange mode is investigated in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity by using a numerical method based on the reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations. The behavior of the magnetic islands is examined at the steady state after the nonlinear saturation of the interchange mode. The width and the phase of the magnetic islands are changed by the mode evolution. These changes are almost determined by the linear combination of the two perturbed poloidal magnetic fluxes, the flux imposed externally and the flux attributed to the interchange mode, in spite of the fact that the changes result from the nonlinear process. It is also obtained that the amount of the local change of the pressure at the resonant surface in the saturation state depends on the phase of the static magnetic islands.

  2. Empirical Mode Decomposition and k-Nearest Embedding Vectors for Timely Analyses of Antibiotic Resistance Trends

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. Objective To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. Methods We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. Results The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. Conclusion The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends. PMID:23637796

  3. Using surface and cross-hole resistivity tomography in an urban environment: An example of imaging the foundations of the ancient wall in Thessaloniki, North Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokas, G. N.; Tsourlos, P. I.; Vargemezis, G. N.; Pazaras, N. Th.

    This work describes the application of the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technique, in both surface and cross-hole modes, for subsurface exploration in an urban environment. The objective was to image the foundations of the Thessaloniki city walls (Region of Macedonia, North Greece) at locations that will be affected by the construction of a new underground Metro line. The surface ERT survey was performed along lines crossing directly over the wall on areas where it had partly collapsed. ERT surveys were also applied at places where the main over ground structure of the walls had been completely destroyed and what is left now is primarily only the ancient subsurface foundations. In addition, the present day ground surface is partially covered by concrete pavement slabs. In both cases, nonconventional electrodes were partially used to carry out a number of ERTs on the ground surface. This was necessary in order not to destroy the pavement slabs and most importantly not to damage in any way the monuments. An example of cross-hole ERT is also presented. Cross-hole ERTs were conducted because detailed measurements employing surface ERT were not possible due to limitations imposed by the urban environment. The way that the boreholes were instrumented is also presented. The combined surface and borehole tomographies produced images of the buried structures allowing the assessment of their geometrical shape and of the dimensions of the foundations of the ancient wall.

  4. Mode of Action of the Polyene Antibiotic Candicidin: Binding Factors in the Wall of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. M.; Kliger, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    The polyene antibiotic candicidin produces a rapid efflux of K+ ions from a suspension of Candida albicans. Onset of K+ leakage depends on the culture age, stationary-phase yeasts leaking K+ more slowly than exponential-phase yeasts. The time taken for potassium leakage to begin represents the time taken by the antibiotic to cross the cell wall and produce membrane damage. It was shown that there were factors in the cell wall of C. albicans that increased their total binding capacity and their affinity for candicidin during growth. An attempt was made to relate changes in the lipid content of the yeast cell with the increased time taken to produce membrane damage. PMID:773298

  5. Braking of Tearing Mode Rotation by Ferromagnetic Conducting Walls in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a ``forbidden band'' of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick, and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode ``locks'' to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  6. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  7. Screening of the resistive-wall impedance by a cylindrical electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khateeb, A.; Hasse, R. W.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hofmann, I.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of an electron cloud on the longitudinal coupling impedance is studied by idealizing it as a cold and uniformly distributed non-neutral plasma of electrons. The beam pipe is assumed to be of circular cross section with a thick resistive wall and the beam charge is idealized as a uniform disk. The electron contribution to the charge and current densities is obtained from the collective electron response to the beam passage through the pipe. In the presence of the electron background, a general closed formula for the longitudinal coupling impedance is obtained. The screening of the coupling impedance with the density of the electron plasma is studied and discussed for typical parameters in an accelerator beam pipe for the under-dense and the over-dense plasma regions.

  8. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Cell wall polysaccharide synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains in oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Briolay, Anne; Bouzenzana, Jamel; Guichardant, Michel; Deshayes, Christian; Sindt, Nicolas; Bessueille, Laurence; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The pathways responsible for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis are vital in eukaryotic microorganisms. The corresponding synthases are potential targets of inhibitors such as fungicides. Despite their fundamental and economical importance, most polysaccharide synthases are not well characterized, and their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. With the example of Saprolegnia monoica as a model organism, we show that chitin and (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) in oomycetes, a phylum that comprises some of the most devastating microorganisms in the agriculture and aquaculture industries. Interestingly, no cellulose synthase activity was detected in the DRMs. The purified DRMs exhibited similar biochemical features as lipid rafts from animal, plant, and yeast cells, although they contained some species-specific lipids. This report sheds light on the lipid environment of the (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan and chitin synthases, as well as on the sterol biosynthetic pathways in oomycetes. The results presented here are consistent with a function of lipid rafts in cell polarization and as platforms for sorting specific sets of proteins targeted to the plasma membrane, such as carbohydrate synthases. The involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of major cell wall polysaccharides in eukaryotic microorganisms suggests a function of lipid rafts in hyphal morphogenesis and tip growth.

  10. Dual-mode self-validating resistance/Johnson noise thermometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, Robert L.; Blalock, Theron V.; Roberts, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    A dual-mode Johnson noise and DC resistance thermometer capable of use in control systems where prompt indications of temperature changes and long term accuracy are needed. A resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) tuned circuit produces a continuous voltage signal for Johnson noise temperature measurement. The RLC circuit provides a mean-squared noise voltage that depends only on the capacitance used and the temperature of the sensor. The sensor has four leads for simultaneous coupling to a noise signal processor and to a DC resistance signal processor.

  11. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  12. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  13. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  14. The role of resistivity on line-tied kink modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, G. L.; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, J. M.

    2007-07-15

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on linear line-tied kink modes is presented in cylindrical geometry. A region near marginal stability, where the line-tied system is stable in ideal magnetohydrodynamics but unstable with resistivity, is shown. In this region, the growth rate is found to be proportional to resistivity. There is no signature of the tearing-like scaling, which occurs in the corresponding system with periodic boundary conditions, or of the formation of boundary layers near the end plates. Instead, the resistive scaling is due to global resistivity, leading to imperfect line-tying. This feature is common to equilibrium pitch profiles that increase or decrease monotonically with radius and is not influenced by viscosity.

  15. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  16. Nonlinear evolution of the first mode supersonic oblique waves in compressible boundary layers. Part 1: Heated/cooled walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of an oblique mode propagating in a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer is considered under the long wave-length approximation. The growth rate of the wave is assumed to be small so that the concept of unsteady nonlinear critical layers can be used. It is shown that the spatial/temporal evolution of the mode is governed by a pair of coupled unsteady nonlinear equations for the disturbance vorticity and density. Expressions for the linear growth rate show clearly the effects of wall heating and cooling and in particular how heating destabilizes the boundary layer for these long wavelength inviscid modes at O(1) Mach numbers. A generalized expression for the linear growth rate is obtained and is shown to compare very well for a range of frequencies and wave-angles at moderate Mach numbers with full numerical solutions of the linear stability problem. The numerical solution of the nonlinear unsteady critical layer problem using a novel method based on Fourier decomposition and Chebychev collocation is discussed and some results are presented.

  17. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  18. Investigation of oxidation resistance of carbon based first-wall liner materials of fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H. K.; Krüssenberg, A.-K.; Stauch, B.; Wu, C. H.

    1994-09-01

    One important aspect in selection of carbon based first-wall liner materials in fusion reactors is a sufficient oxidation resistance against steam and oxygen; this is because during accidents like loss of coolant into vacuum or loss of vacuum these oxidizing media can enter the vacuum vessel and may cause some corrosion of carbon followed by release of adsorbed tritium; in addition other consequences of oxidation like formation of burnable gases and their explosions have to be examined. Based on extensive experience on nuclear graphite oxidation in HTRs KFA has started in cooperation with NET some experimental investigations on oxidation of fusion reactor carbons. Results of first experiments on CFCs, Ti- and Si-doped carbons and graphites in steam (1273-1423 K) and oxygen (973 K) are reported. It was found that most materials have a similar reactivity as HTR nuclear graphites (which is much smaller than those of usual technical carbons); Si-doped CFCs however have a remarkably better oxidation resistance than those, which is probably due to the formation of a protecting layer of SiO 2. The measured kinetic data will be used in safety analyses for above mentioned accidents.

  19. Contact resistance of multi-walled carbon nanotube/natural rubber nanocomposites with metallic ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Tomoyoshi; Fujishige, Masatsugu; Noguchi, Toru; Ueki, Hiroyuki; Niihara, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on the contact resistance (Rc) between carbon filler/natural rubber (NR) nanocomposite and gold ball: three varieties of nanocomposites were prepared from carbon black (CB) and two kinds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different diameter. Rc of MWCNT/NR nanocomposite was remarkably less than that of CB/NR nanocomposites. The relationship between Rc of MWCNT/NR nanocomposites and applied load was expressed in the formula, Rc=C·P-n (P: load, C and n: constant): for the MWCNTs (diameters of 13 nm)/NR and MWCNTs (diameters of 67 nm)/ NR nanocomposites, they were expressed as Rc=1724·P-0.6 and Rc=344·P-0.37, respectively. The former (MWCNT, ϕ13 nm) showed higher Rc than the latter (MWCNT, ϕ67 nm) over whole region of applied load. The mechanical hardness of the former was higher (90 HsA) than that of the latter (82 HsA). Therefore, the smaller contact area between the nanocomposite and gold ball of the former resulted in higher Rc. The apparent specific contact resistivity was calculated from the observed values of Rc and contact area: 130 Ω mm2 and 127 Ω mm2 for the former (MWCNT, ϕ13 nm) and the latter (MWCNT, ϕ67 nm), respectively.

  20. Contact-damage-resistant ceramic/single-wall carbon nanotubes and ceramic/graphite composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotong; Padture, Nitin P; Tanaka, Hidehiko

    2004-08-01

    There has been growing interest in incorporating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as toughening agents in brittle ceramics. Here we have prepared dense Al(2)O(3)/SWNT composites using the spark-plasma sintering (SPS) method. Vickers (sharp) and Hertzian (blunt) indentation tests reveal that these composites are highly contact-damage resistant, as shown by the lack of crack formation. However, direct toughness measurements, using the single-edge V-notch beam method, show that these composites are as brittle as dense Al(2)O(3) (having a toughness of 3.22 MPa m(0.5)). This type of unusual mechanical behaviour was also observed in SPS-processed, dense Al(2)O(3)/graphite composites. We argue that the highly shear-deformable SWNTs or graphite heterogeneities in the composites help redistribute the stress field under indentation, imparting the composites with contact-damage resistance. These composites may find use in engineering and biomedical applications where contact loading is important.

  1. Nonpolar resistive memory switching with all four possible resistive switching modes in amorphous LaHoO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Fachini, Esteban; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the resistive memory switching in pulsed laser deposited amorphous LaHoO3 (a-LHO) thin films for non-volatile resistive random access memory applications. Nonpolar resistive switching (RS) was achieved in Pt/a-LHO/Pt memory cells with all four possible RS modes (i.e., positive unipolar, positive bipolar, negative unipolar, and negative bipolar) having high RON/ROFF ratios (in the range of ˜104-105) and non-overlapping switching voltages (set voltage, VON ˜ ±3.6-4.2 V and reset voltage, VOFF ˜ ±1.3-1.6 V) with a small variation of about ±5-8%. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics indicated the metallic conduction in low resistance states (LRS). We believe that the formation (set) and rupture (reset) of mixed conducting filaments formed out of oxygen vacancies and metallic Ho atoms could be responsible for the change in the resistance states of the memory cell. Detailed analysis of I-V characteristics further corroborated the formation of conductive nanofilaments based on metal-like (Ohmic) conduction in LRS. Simmons-Schottky emission was found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism in the high resistance state.

  2. Cell wall elongation mode in Gram-negative bacteria is determined by peptidoglycan architecture.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert D; Hurd, Alexander F; Cadby, Ashley; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Cellular integrity and morphology of most bacteria is maintained by cell wall peptidoglycan, the target of antibiotics essential in modern healthcare. It consists of glycan strands, cross-linked by peptides, whose arrangement determines cell shape, prevents lysis due to turgor pressure and yet remains dynamic to allow insertion of new material, and hence growth. The cellular architecture and insertion pattern of peptidoglycan have remained elusive. Here we determine the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics during growth in rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Peptidoglycan is made up of circumferentially oriented bands of material interspersed with a more porous network. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals an unexpected discontinuous, patchy synthesis pattern. We present a consolidated model of growth via architecture-regulated insertion, where we propose only the more porous regions of the peptidoglycan network that are permissive for synthesis.

  3. Cell Wall Biomolecular Composition Plays a Potential Role in the Host Type II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Lahlali, Rachid; Kumar, Saroj; Wang, Lipu; Forseille, Li; Sylvain, Nicole; Korbas, Malgorzata; Muir, David; Swerhone, George; Lawrence, John R.; Fobert, Pierre R.; Peng, Gary; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease of wheat worldwide. Cultivar resistance to FHB depends on biochemical factors that confine the pathogen spread in spikes. Breeding for cultivar resistance is considered the most practical way to manage this disease. In this study, different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques were applied to discriminate resistance in wheat genotypes against FHB. Synchrotron-based spectroscopy and imaging techniques, including focal plane array infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were used to understand changes in biochemical and nutrients in rachis following FHB infection. Sumai3 and Muchmore were used to represent resistant and susceptible cultivars to FHB, respectively, in this study. The histological comparison of rachis showed substantial differences in the cell wall thickness between the cultivars after infection. Synchrotron-based infrared imaging emphasized substantial difference in biochemical composition of rachis samples between the two cultivars prior to visible symptoms; in the resistant Sumai3, infrared bands representing lignin and hemicellulose were stronger and more persistent compared to the susceptible cultivar. These bands may be the candidates of biochemical markers for FHB resistance. Focal plane array infrared imaging (FPA) spectra from the rachis epidermis and vascular bundles revealed a new band (1710 cm−1) related to the oxidative stress on the susceptible cultivar only. XRF spectroscopy data revealed differences in nutrients composition between cultivars, and between controls and inoculated samples, with substantial increases observed for Ca, K, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si in the resistant cultivar. These nutrients are related to cell wall stability, metabolic process, and plant defense mechanisms such as lignification pathway and callose deposition. The combination of cell wall composition and lignification plays a role in the mechanism of type II host resistance to FHB. Biochemical profiling

  4. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  5. The effects of differential flow between rational surfaces on toroidal resistive MHD modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Dylan; Halfmoon, Michael; Rhodes, Dov; Cole, Andrew; Okabayashi, Michio; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Finn, John

    2016-10-01

    Differential flow between resonant surfaces can strongly affect the coupling and penetration of resonant components of resistive modes, and yet this mechanism is not yet fully understood. This study focuses on the evolution of tearing instabilities and the penetration of imposed resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamak configurations relevant to DIII-D and ITER, including equilibrium flow shear. It has been observed on DIII-D that the onset of tearing instabilities leading to disruption is often coincident with a loss of differential rotation between a higher m/n tearing surface (normally the 4/3 or 3/2) and a lower m/n tearing surface (normally the 2/1). Imposing RMPs can strongly affect this coupling and the torques between the modes. We apply the nonlinear 3-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD to study the mechanisms by which these couplings occur. Reduced MHD analyses are applied to study the effects of differential flow between resonant surfaces in the simulations. Interaction between resonant modes can cause significant energy transfer between them, effectively stabilizing one mode while the other grows. The flow mitigates this transfer, but also affects the individual modes. The combination of these effects determines the nonlinear outcome. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-SC0014005 and DE-SC0014119.

  6. Comparison of shear flow formation between resonant and non-resonant resistive interchange modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unemura, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-11-01

    It is known that the poloidal shear flow is produced from the nonlinear resistive interchange modes(A. Hasegawa and M. Wakatani, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59) 1581 (1987)(B.A. Carreras and V. E. Lynch, Phys. Fluids B 5) 1795 (1993). Since the non-resonant resistive modes also become unstable(K. Ichiguchi, Y. Nakamura and M. Wakatani, Nucl. Fusion 31) 2073 (1991), the nonlinear behavior is compared between the resonant and non-resonant modes from the point of view of poloidal flow formation. For understanding the difference, we studied single helicity (m,n)=(3,2) mode in a cylindrical geometry.Rotational transform profile, ι(r), was changed. First, we assumed ι(r)=0.51+0.39r^2, and increased ι(0). This change represents a finite beta effect in currentless stellarators. When the resonant surface exists with ι(r_s)=2/3, the poloidal flow are created near the resonant surface. And, in the case when no resonant surface exists but ι_min ~ 2/3, the non-resonant (3,2) mode grows and poloidal shear flow is also generated; however, the magnitude decreases sharply with the increase of ι_min.

  7. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  8. Mutations in mmpL and in the cell wall stress stimulon contribute to resistance to oxadiazole antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiaobin; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections, which exhibit broad resistance to various antibiotics. We recently disclosed the discovery of the oxadiazole class of antibiotics, which has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We report herein that MmpL, a putative member of the resistance, nodulation, and cell division (RND) family of proteins, contributes to oxadiazole resistance in the S. aureus strain COL. Through serial passages, we generated two S. aureus COL variants that showed diminished susceptibilities to an oxadiazole antibiotic. The MICs for the oxadiazole against one strain (designated S. aureus COL(I)) increased reproducibly 2-fold (to 4 μg/ml), while against the other strain (S. aureus COL(R)), they increased >4-fold (to >8 μg/ml, the limit of solubility). The COL(R) strain was derived from the COL(I) strain. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 31 mutations in S. aureus COL(R), of which 29 were shared with COL(I). Consistent with our previous finding that oxadiazole antibiotics inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, we found 13 mutations that occurred either in structural genes or in promoters of the genes of the cell wall stress stimulon. Two unique mutations in S. aureus COL(R) were substitutions in two genes that encode the putative thioredoxin (SACOL1794) and MmpL (SACOL2566). A role for mmpL in resistance to oxadiazoles was discerned from gene deletion and complementation experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a cell wall-acting antibiotic selects for mutations in the cell wall stress stimulon and the first to implicate MmpL in resistance to antibiotics in S. aureus.

  9. Anisotropic electrical resistance in mesoscopic LaAlO3/SrTiO3 devices with individual domain walls.

    PubMed

    Goble, Nicholas J; Akrobetu, Richard; Zaid, Hicham; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Gao, Xuan P A

    2017-03-15

    The crystal structure of bulk SrTiO3(STO) transitions from cubic to tetragonal at around 105 K. Recent local scanning probe measurements of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interfaces indicated the existence of spatially inhomogeneous electrical current paths and electrostatic potential associated with the structural domain formation in the tetragonal phase of STO. Here we report a study of temperature dependent electronic transport in combination with the polarized light microscopy of structural domains in mesoscopic LAO/STO devices. By reducing the size of the conductive interface to be comparable to that of a single tetragonal domain of STO, the anisotropy of interfacial electron conduction in relationship to the domain wall and its direction was characterized between T = 10-300 K. It was found that the four-point resistance measured with current parallel to the domain wall is larger than the resistance measured perpendicular to the domain wall. This observation is qualitatively consistent with the current diverting effect from a more conductive domain wall within the sample. Among all the samples studied, the maximum resistance ratio found is at least 10 and could be as large as 10(5) at T = 10 K. This electronic anisotropy may have implications on other oxide hetero-interfaces and the further understanding of electronic/magnetic phenomena found in LAO/STO.

  10. Anisotropic electrical resistance in mesoscopic LaAlO3/SrTiO3 devices with individual domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Goble, Nicholas J.; Akrobetu, Richard; Zaid, Hicham; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Gao, Xuan P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of bulk SrTiO3(STO) transitions from cubic to tetragonal at around 105 K. Recent local scanning probe measurements of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interfaces indicated the existence of spatially inhomogeneous electrical current paths and electrostatic potential associated with the structural domain formation in the tetragonal phase of STO. Here we report a study of temperature dependent electronic transport in combination with the polarized light microscopy of structural domains in mesoscopic LAO/STO devices. By reducing the size of the conductive interface to be comparable to that of a single tetragonal domain of STO, the anisotropy of interfacial electron conduction in relationship to the domain wall and its direction was characterized between T = 10–300 K. It was found that the four-point resistance measured with current parallel to the domain wall is larger than the resistance measured perpendicular to the domain wall. This observation is qualitatively consistent with the current diverting effect from a more conductive domain wall within the sample. Among all the samples studied, the maximum resistance ratio found is at least 10 and could be as large as 105 at T = 10 K. This electronic anisotropy may have implications on other oxide hetero-interfaces and the further understanding of electronic/magnetic phenomena found in LAO/STO. PMID:28295058

  11. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  12. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  13. Passive mode locking in a Ti:sapphire laser using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber at a wavelength of 810 nm.

    PubMed

    Khudyakov, Dmitry V; Lobach, Anatoly S; Nadtochenko, Viktor A

    2010-08-15

    We report mode locking in a Ti:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser at the wavelength of 810 nm using a polymer film with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) applied as a saturable absorber. Pulses with 600 fs duration and 0.4 nJ energy were generated from the Ti:Sa laser with polymer-SWNT composite film for cw passive mode locking.

  14. Explosive Magnetic Reconnection in Double-current Sheet Systems: Ideal versus Resistive Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Hubert

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic reconnection associated with the tearing instability occurring in double-current sheet systems is investigated within the framework of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. A special emphasis on the existence of fast and explosive phases is taken. First, we extend the recent theory on the ideal tearing mode of a single-current sheet to a double-current layer configuration. A linear stability analysis shows that, in long and thin systems with (length to shear layer thickness) aspect ratios scaling as {S}L9/29 (S L being the Lundquist number based on the length scale L), tearing modes can develop on a fast Alfvénic timescale in the asymptotic limit {S}L\\to ∞ . The linear results are confirmed by means of compressible resistive MHD simulations at relatively high S L values (up to 3× {10}6) for different current sheet separations. Moreover, the nonlinear evolution of the ideal double tearing mode (IDTM) exhibits a richer dynamical behavior than its single-tearing counterpart, as a nonlinear explosive growth violently ends up with a disruption when the two current layers interact trough the merging of plasmoids. The final outcome of the system is a relaxation toward a new state, free of magnetic field reversal. The IDTM dynamics is also compared to the resistive double tearing mode dynamics, which develops in similar systems with smaller aspect ratios, ≳ 2π , and exhibits an explosive secondary reconnection, following an initial slow resistive growth phase. Finally, our results are used to discuss the flaring activity in astrophysical magnetically dominated plasmas, with a particular emphasis on pulsar systems.

  15. Influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-06-01

    The influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes, dubbed ''fishbones'' in the literature, is explored. A general dispersion relation, which recovers the ideal theory in its appropriate limit, is derived and analyzed. An important implication of the theory for present generation fusion devices such as the Joint European Torus (Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, London, 1984), Vol I, p.11) is that they will be stable to fishbone activity.

  16. Transform-limited pulse generation in normal cavity dispersion erbium doped single-walled carbon nanotubes mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, M A; Krylov, A A; Ogleznev, A A; Arutyunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D; Dianov, E M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate an erbium doped fiber ring laser mode-locked with a carboxymetylcellulose high-optical quality film with dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The laser with large normal net cavity dispersion generates near bandwidth-limited picosecond inverse modified soliton pulses at 1.56 µm.

  17. The rotating wall machine: A device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hannum, D. A.; Kendrick, R.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-12-01

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high β ( {le} p> {2μ _0}/{B_z^2}), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  18. Fracture resistance of welded thick-walled high-pressure vessels in power plants. Report No. 1. Statistical analysis of defects and fracture resistance of vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gorynin, I.V.; Filatov, V.M.; Ignatov, V.A.; Timofeev, B.T.; Zvezdin, Yu. I.

    1986-07-01

    Data from plant radiographic inspection of reactor vessels and boilers in power plants of 440- and 1000-MW capacity were subjected to statistical analysis. It was found that, given the current technology for making and constructing 440- and 1000-MW power plants, the limiting defect size in the vessels of the plants is no more than 10% of the wall thickness according to the results of statistical analysis. This finding makes it possible to increase the tolerable stresses by a factor of 1.6 compared to the current estimate of resistance to brittle fracture, which presumes the presence of a semielliptical surface crack of a depth corresponding to 25% of the wall thickness. The fracture resistance of steel increase with a decrease in defect size and as a result of the damping capacity of the anticorrosive hardfacing applied.

  19. Improvement on wear resistance property of polyurethane film by compositing plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are composited into a polyurethane (PU) film. In this journal article, we especially focused on one of mechanical properties of PU film, the wear resistance, to find how the plasma-treated CNTs give contributions to improve the resistance. Our experimental results showed that plasma-treated CNTs enhanced the wear resistance, in particular, when the CNTs treated with the plasma that was made of nitrogen-oxygen mixture gas. Then, we made measurements with infrared absorption spectroscopy to find the possible causes of the improvement. The measurement showed that the surface of the CNTs treated with nitrogen-oxygen plasma had an indication of isocyanate group, which generally hardens PU film. The plasma likely attached the functional group on CNTs, and then the CNTs added extra wear resistance of a polyurethane film.

  20. Effect of wall edge suction on the performance of a short annular dump diffuser with exit passage flow resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of wall edge suction on the performance of a short annular dump diffuser having a perforated plate flow resistance device in the exit passage was evaluated. Testing was conducted with air at near ambient pressure and temperature at inlet Mach numbers of 0.18 and 0.27 with suction rates up to 13.5 percent. Results show that pressure recovery downstream of the perforated plate was improved significantly by suction. Optimum performance was obtained with the flow resistance plate located at one inlet passage height downstream of the dump plane.

  1. A temperature correlation for the radiation resistance of a thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Cline, J. G.; Jones, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    It is often useful to know the radiation impedance of an unflanged but thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas into relatively cold surroundings. The reactive component is shown to be insensitive to temperature, but the resistive component is shown to be temperature dependent. A temperature correlation is developed permitting prediction of the radiation resistance from a knowledge of the temperature difference between the ambient air and the gas flowing from the duct, and a physical basis for this correlation is presented.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber for a diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Jie; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    A reflective single-walled carbon nanotube as saturable absorber has been firstly adopted to a passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 crystal. Without any dispersion compensation, the stably mode-locked laser delivers pulses with pulse width as short as 1.7 ps, repetition rate of 107.8 MHz and center wavelength of 1056 nm. The oscillator produces maximum average output power of 319 mW corresponding with a high slope efficiency of 20.2%. The single pulse energy and the peak power are 2.96 nJ and 1.74 kW, respectively. The experimental results show that single-walled carbon nanotube is an excellent saturable absorber for mode-locked lasers.

  3. A computational modeling of Raman radial breathing-like mode frequencies of fullerene encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2017-02-01

    Raman radial breathing-like mode (RBLM) frequencies of an infinite nanopeapods are calculated within the framework of a continuum-molecular based model. The nanotube-fullerene interaction is modeled via the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential. An analytical formulation is developed and is justified due to its good agreement with the experimental and atomistic-based results. Furthermore, we propose new relationships for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction coefficients between the atoms of this hybrid nanostructure. Numerical results are also obtained for various nanopeapods on the basis of the present formulation. The RBLM frequency upshifts are predicted for small single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The frequency shifts can be adequately explained by the vdW intermolecular interactions acting between the fullerene and the SWCNTs atoms. To the best of our knowledge, a simple theoretical method which can predict the Raman RBLM frequencies of the nanopeapods with high precision has not been provided hitherto. We believe that the present study is likely to fill the gap.

  4. On the magnetic reconnection of resistive tearing mode with the dynamic flow effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan Kishimoto, Y.

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic reconnection usually occurs in turbulent environments, which may not only provide anomalous resistivity to enhance reconnection rates but also significantly modify the reconnection process through direct nonlinear interaction with magnetic islands. This study presents numerical simulations investigating the effects of an imposed dynamic flow on magnetic reconnection, based on a two-dimensional reduced resistive MHD model. Results show that while the linear stability properties of the resistive tearing mode are moderately affected by the dynamic flow, nonlinear evolution is significantly modified by radial parity, amplitude, and frequency of the dynamic flow. After the slowly evolving nonlinear Rutherford stage, the reconnection process is found to progress in two phases by including the dynamic flow. A Sweet-Parker like current sheet is formed in the first phase. Afterwards, plasmoid instability is triggered in the second phase, where multiple plasmoids are continuously generated and ejected along the current sheet, leading to an impulsive bursty reconnection. The reconnection rate is considerably enhanced in the range of low resistivity as compared to without flow. We found that plasmoid instability onset and evolution are strongly influenced by the frequency and radial parity of the dynamic flows. The scaling of effective reconnection rates with the flow is found to be independent of resistivity.

  5. Antibiotic resistance modulation and modes of action of (-)-α-pinene in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jasna; Šimunović, Katarina; Wu, Zuowei; Klančnik, Anja; Bucar, Franz; Zhang, Qijing; Možina, Sonja Smole

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mode of action of (-)-α-pinene in terms of its modulation of antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter jejuni. Broth microdilution and ethidium bromide accumulation assays were used to evaluate the (-)-α-pinene antimicrobial activity, modulation of antimicrobial resistance, and inhibition of antimicrobial efflux. The target antimicrobial efflux systems were identified using an insertion mutagenesis approach, and C. jejuni adaptation to (-)-α-pinene was evaluated using DNA microarrays. Knock-out mutants of the key up-regulated transcriptional regulators hspR and hrcA were constructed to investigate their roles in C. jejuni adaptation to several stress factors, including osmolytes, and pH, using Biolog phenotypical microarrays. Our data demonstrate that (-)-α-pinene efficiently modulates antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni by decreasing the minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and triclosan by up to 512-fold. Furthermore, (-)-α-pinene promotes increased expression of cmeABC and another putative antimicrobial efflux gene, Cj1687. The ethidium bromide accumulation was greater in the wild-type strain than in the antimicrobial efflux mutant strains, which indicates that these antimicrobial efflux systems are a target of action of (-)-α-pinene. Additionally, (-)-α-pinene decreases membrane integrity, which suggests that enhanced microbial influx is a secondary mode of action of (-)-α-pinene. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that (-)-α-pinene disrupts multiple metabolic pathways, and particularly those involved in heat-shock responses. Thus, (-)-α-pinene has significant activity in the modulation of antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni, which appears to be mediated by multiple mechanisms that include inhibition of microbial efflux, decreased membrane integrity, and metabolic disruption. These data warrant further studies on (-)-α-pinene to develop its use in the control of antibiotic resistance

  6. Resistance of Membrane Retrofit Concrete Masonry Walls to Lateral Pressure (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    equation is derived for the wall curvature as crack grows: (15) 2R crAlso: O’cr =-- (16) t And: (17) Setting: (18) Then: LlerG = fJ Ller (19...Defense Finite Element gram kiloPascal kilometer per hour meter millimeter Newton Simply Supported University of Alabama at Birmingham Wall

  7. Observation and Analysis of Resistive Instabilities in Negative Central Shear in DIII-D Discharges with L-Mode Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Austin, M.E.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Luce, T.C.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.

    2002-07-01

    In DIII-D plasmas with L-mode edge and negative central shear (q{sub axis}-q{sub min} {approx}0.3 to 0.5), an interchange-like instability has been observed [1]. The instability and a subsequent tearing mode cause reduction of the core electron temperature and plasma rotation, and therefore the instability affects discharge evolution and the desired high performance is not achieved. Stability analyses indicate robust ideal stability, while the Resistive Interchange Mode criterion is marginal and the instability appears to be localized initially. Based on this, we believe that the mode is, most likely, a Resistive Interchange Mode. The amplitude of the instability is correlated with the location of the q{sub min} surface and inversely with the fast-ion pressure. There is indication that the interchange-like instability may be ''seeding'' the tearing mode that sometimes follows the interchange-like instability.

  8. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Hoon-Sang; CHO, Kyu-Jeong; PARK, Su-Jung; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; HWANG, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Material and Methods Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. Results The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. Conclusion In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity. PMID:24037066

  9. Listeria monocytogenes is resistant to lysozyme through the regulation, not the acquisition, of cell wall-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas P; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood.

  10. Bacillus subtilis as a platform for molecular characterisation of regulatory mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chong; Stiegeler, Emanuel; Cook, Gregory M; Mascher, Thorsten; Gebhard, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To combat antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms, particularly of antibiotic detection, signal transduction and gene regulation is needed. Because molecular studies in this bacterium can be challenging, we aimed at exploiting the genetically highly tractable Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis as a heterologous host. Two fundamentally different regulators of E. faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics, the bacitracin sensor BcrR and the vancomycin-sensing two-component system VanSB-VanRB, were produced in B. subtilis and their functions were monitored using target promoters fused to reporter genes (lacZ and luxABCDE). The bacitracin resistance system BcrR-BcrAB of E. faecalis was fully functional in B. subtilis, both regarding regulation of bcrAB expression and resistance mediated by the transporter BcrAB. Removal of intrinsic bacitracin resistance of B. subtilis increased the sensitivity of the system. The lacZ and luxABCDE reporters were found to both offer sensitive detection of promoter induction on solid media, which is useful for screening of large mutant libraries. The VanSB-VanRB system displayed a gradual dose-response behaviour to vancomycin, but only when produced at low levels in the cell. Taken together, our data show that B. subtilis is a well-suited host for the molecular characterization of regulatory systems controlling resistance against cell wall active compounds in E. faecalis. Importantly, B. subtilis facilitates the careful adjustment of expression levels and genetic background required for full functionality of the introduced regulators.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas P.; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood. PMID:25157076

  12. Spontaneous bacteriocin resistance in Listeria monocytogenes as a susceptibility screen for identifying different mechanisms of resistance and modes of action by bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macwana, Sunita; Muriana, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    A practical system was devised for grouping bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based on mode of action as determined by changes in inhibitory activity to spontaneously-acquired bacteriocin resistance (Bac(R)). Wild type Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 was sensitive to five bacteriocins produced by 3 genera of LAB: pediocin PA-1 and pediocin Bac3 (Pediococcus), lacticin FS97 and lacticin FS56 (Lactococcus), and curvaticin FS47 (Lactobacillus). A spontaneous Bac(R) derivative of L. monocytogenes 39-2 obtained by selective recovery against lacticin FS56 provided complete resistance to the bacteriocin made by Lactococcus lactis FS56. The lacticin FS56-resistant strain of L. monocyotgenes 39-2 was also cross-resistant to curvaticin FS47 and pediocin PA-1, but not to lacticin FS97 or pediocin Bac3. The same pattern of cross-resistance was also observed with Bac(R) isolates obtained with L. monocytogenes Scott A-2. A spontaneous mutation that renders a strain cross-resistant to different bacteriocins indicates that they share a common mechanism of resistance due to similar modes of action of the bacteriocins. Spontaneous resistance was acquired to other bacteriocins (in aggregate) by following the same procedure against which the Bac(R) strain was still sensitive. In subsequent challenge assays, mixtures of bacteriocins of different modes of action provided greater inhibition than mixtures of bacteriocins of the same mode of action (as determined by our screening method). This study identifies a methodical approach to classify bacteriocins into functional groups based on mechanism of resistance (i.e., mode of action) that could be used for identifying the best mixture of bacteriocins for use as biopreservatives.

  13. Combining Organophosphate Treated Wall Linings and Long-lasting Insecticidal Nets for Improved Control of Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Ngufor, Corine; Tchicaya, Emile; Koudou, Benjamin; N'Fale, Sagnon; Dabire, Roch; Johnson, Paul; Ranson, Hilary; Rowland, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background New approaches to delivering insecticides need to be developed to improve malaria vector control. Insecticidal durable wall lining (DL) and net wall hangings (NWH) are novel alternatives to indoor residual spraying which can be produced in a long-lasting format. Non-pyrethroid versions could be used in combination with long-lasting insecticidal nets for improved control and management of insecticide resistant vector populations. Methods Experimental hut trials were carried out in Valley du Kou, Burkina Faso to evaluate the efficacy of pirimiphos methyl treated DL and NWH either alone or in combination with LLINs against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae ss. Comparison was made with pyrethroid DL. Mosquitoes were genotyped for kdr and ace-1R resistant genes to investigate the insecticide resistance management potential of the combination. Results The overall kdr and ace-1R allele frequencies were 0.95 and 0.01 respectively. Mortality with p-methyl DL and NWH alone was higher than with pyrethroid DL alone (>95% vs 40%; P<0.001). Combining pyrethroid DL with LLINs did not show improvement in mortality (48%) compared to the LLIN alone (44%) (P>0.1). Combining p-methyl DL or NWH with LLINs reduced biting rates significantly (8–9%) compared to p-methyl DL and NWH alone (>40%) and killed all An gambiae that entered the huts. Mosquitoes bearing the ace-1R gene were more likely to survive in huts with p-methyl DL alone (p<0.03) whereas all resistant and susceptible genotypes were killed by the combination. Conclusion P-methyl DL and NWH outperformed pyrethroid DL. Combining p-methyl DL and NWH with LLINs could provide significant epidemiological benefits against a vector population which is resistant to pyrethroids but susceptible to organophosphates. There was evidence that the single intervention would select kdr and ace-1R resistance genes and the combination intervention might select less strongly. Technology to bind organophosphates to plastic wall

  14. Nonlinear coupling of tearing modes with self-consistent resistivity evolution in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Waddell, B.V.

    1980-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of tearing modes of different helicity is studied for realistic values of the tokamak parameters of resistivity and parallel heat conduction. The self-consistent evolution of the resistivity is taken into account through the electron heat conduction equation. For equilibrium q profiles inferred from electron temperature profile measured before a tokamak disruption, the essential result is that the (m = 2; n = 1) model nonlinearly destabilizes other modes on a rapid time scale. Because of the development of magnetic islands of different helicity, the toroidal current density is severely deformed. These islands overlap and field lines become stochastic in a sizable plasma volume, flattening the temperature profile in this region through parallel heat transport. The deformation of the toroidal current produces a rapid decrease in the self-inductance of the plasma, and the voltage at the limiter decreases, becoming increasingly negative. An extensive survey of equilibria and initial conditions has been conducted, and a simple prescription for their nonlinear stability properties is given.

  15. Overexpression of Rice Wall-Associated Kinase 25 (OsWAK25) Alters Resistance to Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Harkenrider, Mitch; Sharma, Rita; De Vleesschauwer, David; Tsao, Li; Zhang, Xuting; Chern, Mawsheng; Canlas, Patrick; Zuo, Shimin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall-associated kinases comprise a sub-family of receptor-like kinases that function in plant growth and stress responses. Previous studies have shown that the rice wall-associated kinase, OsWAK25, interacts with a diverse set of proteins associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here, we show that wounding and BTH treatments induce OsWAK25 transcript expression in rice. We generated OsWAK25 overexpression lines and show that these lines exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype and enhanced expression of rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1), OsPAL2, PBZ1 and PR10. Furthermore, these lines show resistance to the hemibiotrophic pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Magnaporthe oryzae, yet display increased susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Cochliobolus miyabeanus. PMID:26795719

  16. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in WHD and 3.4 ± 0.8% (P < 0.01) in PLA, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.01). Proximal patellar tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.1 ± 3.2% (P = 0.054) for WHD and PLA, respectively, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.05), with no effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P < 0.001) and 12-63% (P < 0.05), respectively, with no group or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode.

  17. Covalent cross-linking of cell-wall polysaccharides through esterified diferulates as a maize resistance mechanism against corn borers.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Santiago, Rogelio; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Malvar, Rosa A

    2015-03-04

    There is strong evidence to suggest that cross-linking of cell-wall polymers through ester-linked diferulates has a key role in plant resistance to pests; however, direct experimentation to provide conclusive proof is lacking. This study presents an evaluation of the damage caused by two corn borer species on six maize populations particularly selected for divergent diferulate concentrations in pith stem tissues. Maize populations selected for high total diferulate concentration had 31% higher diferulates than those selected for low diferulates. Stem tunneling by corn borer species was 29% greater in the population with the lowest diferulates than in the population with the highest diferulates (31.7 versus 22.6 cm), whereas total diferulate concentration was negatively correlated with stem tunneling by corn borers. Moreover, orthogonal contrasts between groups of populations evaluated showed that larvae fed in laboratory bioassays on pith stem tissues from maize populations with higher diferulates had 30-40% lower weight than larvae fed on the same tissues from maize populations with lower diferulates. This is the first report that shows a direct relationship between diferulate deposition in maize cell walls and corn borer resistance. Current findings will help to develop adapted maize varieties with an acceptable level of resistance against borers and be useful in special kinds of agriculture, such as organic farming.

  18. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:26870060

  19. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum).

  20. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  1. Effects of Velocity Spread and Wall Resistivity on the Gain and Bandwidth of the Gyrotron Travelling-Wave Amplifier.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-12

    this Report) Appo7 fo bi e~s.dsn on unlimited, OITI7. UTOt hi Roer’) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY MOTES oScience Applications, Inc., McLean, VA **B-K Dynamics ...Resistive Wall on the Dynamics of the Electron Beam..................................................................18 I Ac~cession For NTIS DDC TAB Jui...part by NAVELEX, Task XF54581007. REFERENCES " Science Applications, Inc. 00 B.-K. Dynamics 1. J.L. Seftor, V.L. Granatstein, K.R. Chu, P. Sprangle

  2. Overlap valence on 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion configurations with deflation and low-mode substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.; Alexandru, A.; Lee, F. X.; Chen, Y.; Doi, T.; Dong, S. J.; Draper, T.; Gong, M.; Horvath, I.; Liu, K. F.; Hasenfratz, A.; Mathur, N.; Streuer, T.; Zhang, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    The overlap fermion propagator is calculated on 2+1 flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations on 16{sup 3}x32, 24{sup 3}x64 and 32{sup 3}x64 lattices. With hyper-cubic (HYP) smearing and low eigenmode deflation, it is shown that the inversion of the overlap operator can be expedited by {approx}20 times for the 16{sup 3}x32 lattice and {approx}80 times for the 32{sup 3}x64 lattice. The overhead cost for calculating eigenmodes ranges from 4.5 to 7.9 propagators for the above lattices. Through the study of hyperfine splitting, we found that the O(m{sup 2}a{sup 2}) error is small and these dynamical fermion lattices can adequately accommodate quark mass up to the charm quark. A preliminary calculation of the low-energy constant {Delta}{sub mix} which characterizes the discretization error of the pion made up of a pair of sea and valence quarks in this mixed-action approach is carried out via the scalar correlator with periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. It is found to be small which shifts a 300 MeV pion mass by {approx}10 to 19 MeV on these sets of lattices. We have studied the signal-to-noise issue of the noise source for the meson and baryon. We introduce a new algorithm with Z{sub 3} grid source and low eigenmode substitution to study the many-to-all meson and baryon correlators. It is found to be efficient in reducing errors for the correlators of both mesons and baryons. With 64-point Z{sub 3} grid source and low-mode substitution, it can reduce the statistical errors of the light quark (m{sub {pi}{approx}2}00-300 MeV) meson and nucleon correlators by a factor of {approx}3-4 as compared to the point source. The Z{sub 3} grid source itself can reduce the errors of the charmonium correlators by a factor of {approx}3.

  3. Modes of action, resistance and toxicity of insecticides targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-02-06

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels (cys-loop LGICs) and mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the nervous system of insects. The completion of many insect genome projects has greatly enhanced our understanding of the individual subunits that make up nAChR gene families from an insect genetic model organism (Drosophila melanogaster), crop pests, disease vectors and beneficial (pollinator) species. In addition to considerable insect nAChR subunit diversity, individual subunits can be subject to alternative splicing and RNA editing and these post-transcriptional modifications can add significantly to the diversity of nAChR receptor subtypes. The actions of insecticides targeting nAChRs, notably cartap, neonicotinoids, sulfoximines, flupyradifurone, spinosyns and triflumezopyrim are reviewed. Structural studies obtained using an acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) co-crystallised with neonicotinoids have yielded important new insights into the requirements for neonicotinoid insecticide - nAChR interactions. The persistent application of insecticides to crop pests leads to the onset of resistance and several examples of resistance to insecticides targeting nAChRs have been documented. Understanding the molecular basis of resistance can inform our understanding of the mechanism of insecticide action. It also provides an important driver for the development of new chemistry, diagnostic tests for resistance and the adoption of application strategies designed to attenuate such problems. Finally, we consider toxicity issues relating to nAChR-active insecticides, with particular reference to beneficial insect species (pollinators) as well as mammalian and avian toxicity. This review is part of the special issue "Insecticide Mode of Action: From Insect to Mammalian Toxicity.".

  4. Sheet resistance characterization of locally anisotropic transparent conductive films made of aligned metal-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hosung; Kim, Duckjong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-09-21

    One-dimensional conductive fillers such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be aggregated and aligned during transparent conductive film (TCF) formation by the vacuum filtration method. The potential error of analysing the average sheet resistance of these anisotropic films, using the four-point probe in-line method and the conversion formula developed assuming uniform isotropic material properties, was systematically investigated by finite element analysis and experiments. The finite element analysis of anisotropic stripe-patterned TCFs with alternating low (ρ1) and high (ρ2) resistivities revealed that the estimated average sheet resistance approached ρ1/t when the probes were parallel to the aligned nanotubes. The thickness of the film is t. It was more close to ρ2/t when the probes were perpendicular to the aligned tubes. Indeed, TCFs fabricated by the vacuum filtration method using metal-enriched SWNTs exhibited highly anisotropic local regions where tubes were aggregated and aligned. The local sheet resistances of randomly oriented, aligned, and perpendicular tube regions of the TCF at a transmittance of 89.9% were 5000, 2.4, and 12 300 Ω □(-1), respectively. Resistivities of the aggregated and aligned tube region (ρ1 = 1.2 × 10(-5) Ω cm) and the region between tubes (ρ2 = 6.2 × 10(-2) Ω cm) could be approximated with the aid of finite element analysis. This work demonstrates the potential error of characterizing the average sheet resistance of anisotropic TCFs using the four-point probe in-line method since surprisingly high or low values could be obtained depending on the measurement angle. On the other hand, a better control of aggregation and alignment of nanotubes would realize TCFs with a very small anisotropic resistivity and a high transparency.

  5. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  6. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-29

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  7. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-01-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers. PMID:27126900

  8. Experimental analysis and WallDYN simulations of the global nitrogen migration in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisl, G.; Schmid, K.; Oberkofler, M.; Krieger, K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Reimold, F.; Lunt, T.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-03-01

    This work presents ASDEX Upgrade experiments, where the nitrogen deposition and re-erosion on divertor manipulator samples and the effect of its transport through the plasma were studied. These results are compared to WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations based on SOLPS plasma backgrounds and employing an improved WallDYN model, which includes the effusion of nitrogen from saturated surfaces. On one hand, this allows the WallDYN code and the new saturation model with a comprehensive data set to be benchmarked, on the other hand the simulations help in the interpretation of the experimental results. Both, experimental results and simulations, show that the N content in the region of the outer strike line reaches its steady-state value within one discharge. The simulations also reproduce the experimentally observed nitrogen content in samples exposed to N2-seeded discharges. With respect to the boron deposition, the nitrogen deposition in a non-seeded discharge and the re-erosion of nitrogen discrepancies to the WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations are observed. Based on SDTrimSP simulations, these are attributed to the missing depth resolution of the WallDYN surface model. A detailed comparison of spectroscopic measurements to WallDYN simulations, based on a novel synthetic spectroscopy diagnostic for WallDYN, shows that the nitrogen fluxes in the plasma are well described by the simulations. From a comparison of several WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations employing customized onion-skin model plasma backgrounds the physical processes controlling the nitrogen concentration in the core plasma and the applicability of onion-skin model plasma backgrounds are discussed. From these simulations the private flux zone with the gas valve, the outer baffle and the high field side main wall are identified as the main sources for the nitrogen content of the core plasma.

  9. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Thompson, L.; Li, G.

    2016-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equilibrium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent variables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium configuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  10. Uniformity of glycyl bridge lengths in the mature cell walls of fem mutants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Kim, Sung Joon; Labischinski, Harald; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) composition in intact cells of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its isogenic Fem mutants has been characterized by measuring the glycine content of PG bridge structures by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The glycine content estimated from integrated intensities (rather than peak heights) in the cell walls of whole cells was increased by approximately 30% for the FemA mutant and was reduced by 25% for the FemB mutant relative to expected values for homogeneous structures. In contrast, the expected compositions were observed in isolated cell walls of the same mutants. For FemA mutant whole cells, the increase was due to the presence of triglycyl bridge PG units (confirmed directly by mass spectrometric analysis), which constituted 10% of the total PG. These species were coalesced in some sort of a lattice or aggregate with spatial proximity to other PG bridges. This result suggests that the triglycyl-bridged PG units form a PG-like structure that is not incorporated into the mature cell wall.

  11. Managing insecticide resistance in malaria vectors by combining carbamate-treated plastic wall sheeting and pyrethroid-treated bed nets

    PubMed Central

    Djènontin, Armel; Chabi, Joseph; Baldet, Thierry; Irish, Seth; Pennetier, Cédric; Hougard, Jean-Marc; Corbel, Vincent; Akogbéto, Martin; Chandre, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Pyrethroid resistance is now widespread in Anopheles gambiae, the major vector for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. This resistance may compromise malaria vector control strategies that are currently in use in endemic areas. In this context, a new tool for management of resistant mosquitoes based on the combination of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and carbamate-treated plastic sheeting was developed. Methods In the laboratory, the insecticidal activity and wash resistance of four carbamate-treated materials: a cotton/polyester blend, a polyvinyl chloride tarpaulin, a cotton/polyester blend covered on one side with polyurethane, and a mesh of polypropylene fibres was tested. These materials were treated with bendiocarb at 100 mg/m2 and 200 mg/m2 with and without a binding resin to find the best combination for field studies. Secondly, experimental hut trials were performed in southern Benin to test the efficacy of the combined use of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and the carbamate-treated material that was the most wash-resistant against wild populations of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Results Material made of polypropylene mesh (PPW) provided the best wash resistance (up to 10 washes), regardless of the insecticide dose, the type of washing, or the presence or absence of the binding resin. The experimental hut trial showed that the combination of carbamate-treated PPW and a pyrethroid-treated bed net was extremely effective in terms of mortality and inhibition of blood feeding of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae. This efficacy was found to be proportional to the total surface of the walls. This combination showed a moderate effect against wild populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, which were strongly resistant to pyrethroid. Conclusion These preliminary results should be confirmed, including evaluation of entomological, parasitological, and clinical parameters. Selective pressure on resistance mechanisms within the vector

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarS, the Wall Teichoic Acid β-glycosyltransferase Involved in Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    King, Dustin T.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Baumann, Lars; Gale, Robert T.; Brown, Eric D.; Withers, Stephen G.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in teichoic acids as targets for antibiotic drug design against major clinical pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, reflecting the disquieting increase in antibiotic resistance and the historical success of bacterial cell wall components as drug targets. It is now becoming clear that β-O-GlcNAcylation of S. aureus wall teichoic acids plays a major role in both pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. Here we present the first structure of S. aureus TarS, the enzyme responsible for polyribitol phosphate β-O-GlcNAcylation. Using a divide and conquer strategy, we obtained crystal structures of various TarS constructs, mapping high resolution overlapping N-terminal and C-terminal structures onto a lower resolution full-length structure that resulted in a high resolution view of the entire enzyme. Using the N-terminal structure that encapsulates the catalytic domain, we furthermore captured several snapshots of TarS, including the native structure, the UDP-GlcNAc donor complex, and the UDP product complex. These structures along with structure-guided mutants allowed us to elucidate various catalytic features and identify key active site residues and catalytic loop rearrangements that provide a valuable platform for anti-MRSA drug design. We furthermore observed for the first time the presence of a trimerization domain composed of stacked carbohydrate binding modules, commonly observed in starch active enzymes, but adapted here for a poly sugar-phosphate glycosyltransferase. PMID:27973583

  13. Linear growth rates of resistive tearing modes with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. N.; Ma, Z. W.

    2014-07-15

    The tearing instability with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow along the external magnetic field is investigated using resistive MHD simulation. It is found that the growth rate of the tearing mode instability is larger than that without the streaming flow. With the streaming flow, there exist two Alfvén resonance layers near the central current sheet. The larger perturbation of the magnetic field in two closer Alfvén resonance layers could lead to formation of the observed cone structure and can largely enhance the development of the tearing mode for a narrower streaming flow. For a broader streaming flow, a larger separation of Alfvén resonance layers reduces the magnetic reconnection. The linear growth rate decreases with increase of the streaming flow thickness. The growth rate of the tearing instability also depends on the plasma beta (β). When the streaming flow is embedded in the current sheet, the growth rate increases with β if β < β{sub s}, but decreases if β > β{sub s}. The existence of the specific value β{sub s} can be attributed to competition between the suppressing effect of β and the enhancing effect of the streaming flow on the magnetic reconnection. The critical value β{sub s} increases with increase of the streaming flow strength.

  14. Computational modeling of neoclassical and resistive MHD tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Gianakon, Thomas A.

    1996-02-01

    Numerical studies of the linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic tearing type modes in three-dimensional toroidal geometry are presented. In addition to traditional resistive MHD effects, where the parameter Δ' determines the stability properties, neoclassical effects have been included for the first time in such models. The inclusion of neoclassical physics introduces and additional free-energy source for the nonlinear formation of magnetic islands through the effects of a bootstrap current in Ohm`s law. The neoclassical tearing mode is demonstrated to be destabilized in plasmas which are otherwise Δ' stable, albeit once an island width threshold is exceeded. The simulations are based on a set of neoclassical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three-dimensional toroidal geometry derived from the two-fluid equations in the limit of small inverse aspect ratio ε and low plasma pressure β with neoclassical closures for the viscous force ∇• $\\vec{π}$. The poloidal magnetic flux Ψ, the toroidal vorticity ωζ, and the plasma pressure p are time advanced using the parallel projection of Ohm`s law, the toroidal projection of the curl of the momentum equation, and a pressure evolution equation with anisotropic pressure transport parallel to and across magnetic field lines. The equations are implemented in an initial value code which Fourier decomposes equilibrium and perturbation quantities in the poloidal and toroidal directions, and finite differences them radially based on a equilibrium straight magnetic field line representation. An implicit algorithm is used to advance the linear terms; the nonlinear terms are advanced explicitly. The simulations are benchmarked linearly and nonlinearly against single and multiple helicity Δ' tearing modes in toroidal geometry in the absence of neo-classical effects.

  15. On the abrupt growth dynamics of nonlinear resistive tearing mode and the viscosity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-05-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the resistive tearing mode exhibits an abrupt growth after an X-point collapse once the magnetic island exceeds a certain critical width Δ′w{sub c} for large instability parameter Δ′, leading to a current sheet formation [N. F. Loureiro et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235003 (2005)]. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of the X-point collapse as well as the current sheet formation including the viscosity effects, based on a secondary instability analysis. The secondary instability is excited due to the quasilinear current modification by the zonal current. In particular, it is identified that the current peaking effect is plausibly responsible for the onset of the X-point collapse and the current sheet formation, leading to the explosive growth of reconnected flux. In the presence of finite viscosity, the Δ′w{sub c} scaling with the resistivity gets modified. A transition behavior is revealed at P{sub r}≈1 for the viscosity dependence of Δ′w{sub c} and the linear tearing instability. However, the explosive growth seems to be independent of the viscosity in the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub r}<1 regime, while large viscosity plays a strong dissipation role.

  16. New triazoles and echinocandins: mode of action, in vitro activity and mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Fera, Maria Teresa; La Camera, Erminia; De Sarro, Angelina

    2009-10-01

    against important basidiomycetes, including Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. This review attempts to deliver the most up-to-date knowledge on the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to triazoles and echinocandins in fungal pathogens. In addition, the in vitro activity data available on triazoles and echinocandins are reported.

  17. Study of collective radial breathing-like modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes: combination of continuous two-dimensional membrane theory and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, Dmitry I.; Avramenko, Marina V.; Than, Xuan-Tinh; Michel, Thierry; Arenal, Raul; Paillet, Matthieu; Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Rochal, Sergei B.; Yuzyuk, Yuri I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Radial breathing modes (RBMs) are widely used for the atomic structure characterization and index assignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from resonant Raman spectroscopy. However, for double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), the use of conventional ωRBM(d) formulas is complicated due to the van der Waals interaction between the layers, which strongly affects the frequencies of radial modes and leads to new collective vibrations. This paper presents an alternative way to theoretically study the collective radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of DWNTs and to account for interlayer interaction, namely the continuous two-dimensional membrane theory. We obtain an analytical ωRBLM(do,di) relation, being the equivalent of the conventional ωRBM(d) expressions, established for SWNTs. We compare our theoretical predictions with Raman data, measured on individual index-identified suspended DWNTs, and find a good agreement between experiment and theory. Moreover, we show that the interlayer coupling in individual DWNTs strongly depends on the interlayer distance, which is manifested in the frequency shifts of the RBLMs with respect to the RBMs of the individual inner and outer tubes. In terms of characterization, this means that the combination of Raman spectroscopy data and predictions of continuous membrane theory may give additional criteria for the index identification of DWNTs, namely the interlayer distance.

  18. Transparency, gas barrier, and moisture resistance of large-aspect-ratio vermiculite nanobrick wall thin films.

    PubMed

    Priolo, Morgan A; Holder, Kevin M; Greenlee, Stephen M; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2012-10-24

    The ability to incorporate large-aspect-ratio vermiculite (VMT) clay into thin films fabricated using the layer-by-layer assembly techinique is reported for the first time. Thin films of branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and VMT were analyzed for their growth rate, clay composition, transparency, and gas barrier behavior. These films consist of >96 wt% clay, are >95% transparent, and, because of their nanobrick wall structure, exhibit super gas barrier behavior at thicknesses of <165 nm. When coupled with flexibility, the optical clarity and super barrier that these coatings can impart make them superb candidates for a variety of packaging applications.

  19. Anomalous resistivity at the field null of the FRC: a quasi-linear expression based upon flute-type modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwin, R.

    1983-10-01

    In the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRC) experiment, the poloidal flux is observed to be lost at a rate several times greater than classical resistivity would allow. Thus, there must be anomalous resistivity at the field null. Assuming that an electromagnetic microinstability of the flute mode type is responsible for this, we derived a general expression for the anomalous resistivity at the field null based upon a quasi-linear model of the microturbulence. This general expression does not depend upon the details of the ion-species model, for example, whether the ions are fluid or kinetic.

  20. Phenylthiazole Antibacterial Agents Targeting Cell Wall Synthesis Exhibit Potent Activity in Vitro and in Vivo against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Haroon; Younis, Waleed; Chen, Lu; Peters, Christine E; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit; Cooper, Bruce; Zhang, Jianan; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman; Oldfield, Eric; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-03-23

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial species, such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. Here, we investigate the spectrum of antibacterial activity of three phenylthiazole-substituted aminoguanidines. These compounds possess potent activity against VRE, inhibiting growth of clinical isolates at concentrations as low as 0.5 μg/mL. The compounds exerted a rapid bactericidal effect, targeting cell wall synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis suggested three possible targets: YubA, YubB (undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP)), and YubD. Both UPPP as well as undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase were inhibited by compound 1. YubA and YubD are annotated as transporters and may also be targets because 1 collapsed the proton motive force in membrane vesicles. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that two compounds (1, 3, at 20 μg/mL) retain potent activity in vivo, significantly reducing the burden of VRE in infected worms. Taken altogether, the results indicate that compounds 1 and 3 warrant further investigation as novel antibacterial agents against drug-resistant enterococci.

  1. Estimation of adsorption energy for water molecules on a multi-walled carbon nanotube thin film by measuring electric resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokabu, Takuya; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2016-11-01

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotube (CNT) films have attracted attention owing to their low power consumption. For further development of these sensors, we need to understand the surface interaction of the films with gas molecules. In our previous research, we investigated the influence of water molecules on the electrical conductance of multi-walled CNT films and explained this phenomenon using a two-layer adsorption model. This work motivated us to measure the adsorption energy of CNT-H2O. In this study, we focused on the first-layer adsorption and investigated the sheet resistance to water vapor pressure at various temperatures using the transmission line method (TLM). The results were fitted to Langmuir adsorption model and the adsorption equilibrium constant was determined. The temperature dependence of the sheet resistance followed a model of fluctuation induced tunneling (FIT), in which the energy barrier at the CNT junction is regarded as the main factor influencing the electrical conductance of the CNT film. The sheet resistance and equilibrium constant decreased as temperature increased. This result was consistent with the adsorption phenomenon. Finally, the adsorption energy was determined to be 0.22-0.31 eV, which is larger than the previously calculated value. It was also reported that the adsorption energy of the gas molecules in the interstitial site between two carbon nanotubes was larger than that on the CNT surface. These results indicate that the CNT junction plays a key role in the detection of gas molecules.

  2. Stabilizing Effect of Resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode Discharge in Lithium-conditioned NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    The stabilizing effect of edge resistivity on the edge localized modes (ELMs) has been recently recovered through analyzing NSTX experimental profiles of Lithium-conditioned ELM-free H-mode discharge. Comparative studies of ELM-free and a reference NSTX ELMy-H mode equilibriums have been performed using both resistive and 2-fluid MHD models implemented in the initial value extended MHD code NIMROD. Our results indicate that in addition to the pedestal profile refinement in electron pressure, the inclusion of enhanced resistivity due to the increase in the effective electric charge number Zeff, which is observed after Lithium-conditioning in experiment, is further required to account for the full stabilization of the low- n edge localized modes. Such a stabilization from the enhanced edge resistivity only becomes effective when the two-fluid diamagnetic and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects are considered in the MHD model. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Steven D.; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; Shrader, Carl D.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; Chantler, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7–8, 12–13, and 16–17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7–8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  4. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS.

  5. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  6. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and “weakest” microstructural resistance. PMID:20409579

  7. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Launey, Maximilien E; Ritchie, Robert O

    2010-07-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I+II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and "weakest" microstructural resistance.

  8. Passively mode-locking erbium-doped fiber lasers with 0.3 nm Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xintong; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Ling; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Yongqin; Zhang, Min; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by using the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a diameter of 0.3 nm as the saturable absorber. These ultrasmall SWNTs are fabricated in the elliptical nanochannels of a ZnAPO4-11 (AEL) single crystal. By placing an AEL crystal into an EDFL cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode, stable passive mode-locking is achieved for a threshold pump power of 280 mW, and 73 ps pulses at 1563.2 nm with a repetition rate of 26.79 MHz. PMID:25342292

  9. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P < 0.001), while pSRF protein levels increased similarly by 48% with both CONC and ECC exercise (P < 0.001). Prolonged ECC and CONC training equally stimulated muscle hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). No changes occurred for total SRF protein. There was no effect of whey protein supplementation. These results show that resistance exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations.

  10. rf resistance and inductance of massively parallel single walled carbon nanotubes: Direct, broadband measurements and near perfect 50 Ω impedance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherglen, Chris; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter

    2008-08-01

    We report using dielectrophoresis to accumulate hundred to thousands of solubilized single walled carbon nanotubes in parallel to achieve impedance values very close to 50Ω. This allows us to clearly measure the real (resistive) and imaginary (inductive) impedance over a broad frequency range. We find a negligible to mild frequency dependent resistance for the devices and an imaginary impedance that is significantly smaller then the resistance over the range of dc to 20GHz. This clearly and unambiguously demonstrates that kinetic inductance is not the major issue facing nanotube array interconnects, when compared to the real impedance (the resistance).

  11. The Putative Lactococcal Extracytoplasmic Function Anti-Sigma Factor Llmg2447 Determines Resistance to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Pérez, Verónica; Campelo, Ana B.; Blanco, Diego; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a cell wall-active bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis. In this work, the transcriptomes of the Lcn972-resistant (Lcnr) mutant L. lactis D1 and its parent strain were compared to identify factors involved in Lcn972 resistance. Upregulated genes included members of the cell envelope stress (CesSR) regulon, the penicillin-binding protein pbpX gene and gene llmg2447, which may encode a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) anti-sigma factor. The gene llmg2447 is located downstream of the nonfunctional ECF gene sigXpseudo. Nisin-controlled expression of llmg2447 led to high Lcn972 resistance in L. lactis, with no cross-resistance to other cell wall-active antimicrobials. Upregulation of llmg2447 in L. lactis D1 (Lcnr) was linked to the integration of insertion element IS981 into the llmg2447 promoter region, replacing the native −35 box and activating the otherwise silent promoter P2447. This is the first example of an orphan ECF anti-sigma factor involved in bacteriocin resistance. This new role in neutralizing cell wall-active compounds (e.g., Lcn972) could have evolved from a putative primary function of Llmg2447 in sensing cell envelope stress. PMID:22890757

  12. Vascular wall dysfunction in JCR:LA-cp rats: effects of age and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    O'brien, S F; Russell, J C; Davidge, S T

    1999-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging and insulin resistance interact to increase vascular dysfunction by comparing the function of isolated mesenteric resistance arteries in obese, insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats and lean, insulin-sensitive rats of the same strain at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo of age. The peak constrictor responses to norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and high potassium were elevated in arteries from obese rats. Responses to these agents increased with age in both obese and lean rats. An eicosanoid constrictor contributed substantially to vasoconstriction in the arteries from both lean and obese animals. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increased the vasoconstrictor response to norepinephrine in both obese and lean rats. This effect increased with age in lean rats only. Vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was impaired in the obese rats and did not alter with age. The results suggest that obese JCR:LA-cp rats have enhanced maximal constriction, which originates in the arterial smooth muscle and increases with age. There is evidence that the ability of the arteries to compensate for the enhanced contractility is impaired in obese rats, particularly with advanced age.

  13. Preparation of the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Nickel Composite Coating with Superior Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Gu, Yang; Shi, Tian; Peng, Dai; Tang, Mingkai; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-12-01

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nickel (MWCNTs/Ni) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Cu substrate by electro-deposition method in the electrolyte with well-dispersed MWCNTs. Surface morphologies of the composite coatings with protrusion structures were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer were used to characterize the phase structures, functional groups, and elements distribution of the coatings as well as the incorporated MWCNTs. In addition, the effect of MWCNTs percentage on thickness, hardness, wear, and corrosion resistance of the coatings was also investigated. Results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNTs positively affected the hardness of coatings for their strengthening skeletons effect. Meanwhile, the coating with the MWCNTs concentration of 0.2 g/L could achieve the lowest friction coefficient, wear rate as well as the mass loss in the tribological test by a ball-on-disk tribometer. And also, the optimal corrosion resistance with the highest corrosion potential ( E corr) and the lowest corrosion current density ( I corr) of the composite coating was finally proved after the potentiodynamic polarization evaluation, which could promote the potential applications in preparing the functional nanocomposite materials.

  14. Vascular wall function in insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats: role of male and female sex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S F; Russell, J C; Dolphin, P J; Davidge, S T

    2000-08-01

    Vascular wall function was assessed in obese insulin-resistant (cp/cp) and lean normal (+/?), male and female, JCR:LA-cp rats. Both male and female cp/cp rats showed enhanced maximum contractility in response to norepinephrine; impaired smooth muscle in response to sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide (NO) donor; and impaired relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh), compared with their lean counterparts. The abnormalities were similar in male and female cp/cp rats. The NO synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inhibited ACh-mediated relaxation significantly in male rats, both cp/cp and +/?. The inhibition of ACh-mediated relaxation by L-NAME in +/? females was less, with no reduction in maximal relaxation, and was absent in cp/cp females. These effects suggest that the relative importance of NO in the endothelial modulation of smooth muscle contractility is greater in male rats. The results are consistent with a decreased role for endothelial NO in the cp/cp rats of both sexes and a reduction in NO-independent cholinergic relaxation in the male cp/cp rat. This NO-independent mechanism is not affected in the female cp/cp rats. The relatively small differences between males and females in smooth muscle cell and vascular function may contribute to sex-related differences in the atherogenesis, vasospasm, and ischemic damage associated with the obese insulin-resistant state.

  15. Phonon contribution to electrical resistance of acceptor-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes assembled into transparent films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsebro, V. I.; Tonkikh, A. A.; Rybkovskiy, D. V.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Obraztsova, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    The electrical resistance of pristine and acceptor-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes assembled into transparent films was measured in the temperature range of 5 to 300 K. The doping was accomplished by filling the nanotubes with iodine or CuCl from the gas phase. After doping the films resistance appeared to drop down by one order of magnitude, to change the nonmonotonic temperature behavior, and to reduce the crossover temperature. The experimental data have been perfectly fitted in frames of the known heterogeneous model with two contributions: from the nanotube bundles (with quasi-one-dimensional conductivity) and from the interbundle electron tunneling. The doping was observed to decrease the magnitudes of both contributions. In this paper we have revealed the main reason of changes in the nanotube part. It is considered to be connected with the involvement of low-energy phonons, which start to participate in the intravalley scattering due to the shift of the Fermi level after doping. The values of the Fermi level shift into the valence band are estimated to be equal to -0.6 eV in the case of iodine doping and -0.9 eV in the case of CuCl doping. These values are in qualitative agreement with the optical absorption data.

  16. D-Alanylation of Lipoteichoic Acids Confers Resistance to Cationic Peptides in Group B Streptococcus by Increasing the Cell Wall Density

    PubMed Central

    Saar-Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkadi; Nezer, Ravit; Shmuel-Galia, Liraz; Firon, Arnaud; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) serve as the first line of defense of the innate immune system against invading microbial pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria can resist CAMPs by modifying their anionic teichoic acids (TAs) with D-alanine, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not fully understood. Here, we utilized various functional and biophysical approaches to investigate the interactions of the human pathogen Group B Streptococcus (GBS) with a series of CAMPs having different properties. The data reveal that: (i) D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) enhance GBS resistance only to a subset of CAMPs and there is a direct correlation between resistance and CAMPs length and charge density; (ii) resistance due to reduced anionic charge of LTAs is not attributed to decreased amounts of bound peptides to the bacteria; and (iii) D-alanylation most probably alters the conformation of LTAs which results in increasing the cell wall density, as seen by Transmission Electron Microscopy, and reduces the penetration of CAMPs through the cell wall. Furthermore, Atomic Force Microscopy reveals increased surface rigidity of the cell wall of the wild-type GBS strain to more than 20-fold that of the dltA mutant. We propose that D-alanylation of LTAs confers protection against linear CAMPs mainly by decreasing the flexibility and permeability of the cell wall, rather than by reducing the electrostatic interactions of the peptide with the cell surface. Overall, our findings uncover an important protective role of the cell wall against CAMPs and extend our understanding of mechanisms of bacterial resistance. PMID:22969424

  17. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric; Chrétien, Pascal; Delprat, Sophie; Bouzehouane, Karim; Schneegans, Olivier; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Tatay, Sergio; Geffroy, Bernard; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  18. Destabilization of low-n peeling modes by trapped energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Mou, Z. Z.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.

    2013-06-15

    The kinetic effect of trapped energetic particles (EPs), arising from perpendicular neutral beam injection, on the stable low-n peeling modes in tokamak plasmas is investigated, through numerical solution of the mode's dispersion relation derived from an energy principle. A resistive-wall peeling mode with m/n=6/1, with m and n being the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively, is destabilized by trapped EPs as the EPs' pressure exceeds a critical value β{sub c}{sup *}, which is sensitive to the pitch angle of trapped EPs. The dependence of β{sub c}{sup *} on the particle pitch angle is eventually determined by the bounce average of the mode eigenfunction. Peeling modes with higher m and n numbers can also be destabilized by trapped EPs. Depending on the wall distance, either a resistive-wall peeling mode or an ideal-kink peeling mode can be destabilized by EPs.

  19. Effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2002-11-01

    The effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are studied. Most RFP machines are equipped with one or more metal shells outside of the vacuum vessel. These shells have finite resistivities. The eddy currents induced in each of the shells contribute to the braking electromagnetic (EM) torque which slows down the plasma rotation. In this work we study the electromagnetic torque acting on the plasma (tearing) modes produced by a system of resistive shells. These shells may consist of several nested thin shells or several thin shells enclosed within a thick shell. The dynamics of the plasma mode is investigated by balancing the EM torque from the resistive shells with the plasma viscous torque. Both the steady state theory and the time-dependent theory are developed. The steady state theory is shown to provide an accurate account of the resultant EM torque if (dω/dt)ω-2≪1 and the time scale of interest is much longer than the response (L/R) time of the shell. Otherwise, the transient theory should be adopted. As applications, the steady state theory is used to evaluate the changes of the EM torque response from the resistive shells in two variants of two RFP machines: (1) modification from Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) [Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)] to the modified RFX: both of them are equipped with one thin shell plus one thick shell; (2) modification from Extrap T2 to Extrap T2R [Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]: both of them are equipped with two thin shells. The transient theory has been applied numerically to study the time evolution of the EM torque during the unlocking of a locked tearing mode in the modified RFX.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against antibiotic-resistant strains of the cell wall-free bacteria Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Hillitt, K L; Jenkins, R E; Spiller, O B; Beeton, M L

    2017-03-01

    The susceptibility of the cell wall-free bacterial pathogens Ureaplasma spp. to Manuka honey was examined. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Manuka honey for four Ureaplasma urealyticum and four Ureaplasma parvum isolates was determined. Sensitivity to honey was also compared to clinical isolates with resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Finally step-wise resistance training was utilized in an attempt to induce increased tolerance to honey. The MIC was dependent on the initial bacterial load with 7·5 and 18·0% w/v honey required to inhibit U. urealyticum at 1 and 10(6) colour changing units (CCU), respectively, and 4·8 and 15·3% w/v required to inhibit U. parvum at 1 and 10(6)  CCU respectively. MIC values were consistently lower for U. parvum compared with U. urealyticum. Antimicrobial activity was seen against tetracycline-resistant, erythromycin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates at 10(5)  CCU. No resistance to honey was observed with 50 consecutive challenges at increasing concentrations of honey. This is the first report of the antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against a cell wall-free bacterial pathogen. The antimicrobial activity was retained against antibiotic-resistant strains and it was not possible to generate resistant mutants.

  1. Structure-driven nonlinear instability as the origin of the explosive reconnection dynamics in resistive double tearing modes.

    PubMed

    Janvier, M; Kishimoto, Y; Li, J Q

    2011-11-04

    The onset of abrupt magnetic reconnection events, observed in the nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes (DTM), is investigated via reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We have identified the critical threshold for the parameters characterizing the linear DTM stability leading to the bifurcation to the explosive dynamics. A new type of secondary instability is discovered that is excited once the magnetic islands on each rational surface reach a critical structure characterized here by the width and the angle rating their triangularization. This new instability is an island structure-driven nonlinear instability, identified as the trigger of the subsequent nonlinear dynamics which couples flow and flux perturbations. This instability only weakly depends on resistivity.

  2. Liquid Metal Walls and the Belt Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, Michael; Dorland, W.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J.; Miller, R.

    2000-10-01

    High flux reactor designs have placed the MHD stabilizing shell well away from the first wall due to breeding and reliability issues. Liquid metal shells containing Li may allow close shells, with much higher elongation (kappa), beta and power density. MHD stability of equilibria with kappa = 2 - 6 and high bootstrap fraction are examined using JSOLVER plus PEST and TOQ plus BALOO. Compared to kappa = 2, stable beta increases by 2.5 for kappa = 3 and 5 for kappa = 6 (with little change in normalized beta). External mode stability (n = 1-10 ) with a wall is similar for kappa = 2-6; a wall at b/a 1.2-1.3 give stability. Resistive wall mode evolution is examined using the new code WALLMODE; feedback power is evaluated using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations (similar to ARIES studies). N = 0 vertical modes are acceptable with a 2-4 cm Li shell at b/a 1.05 -1.1. Resistive wall kink modes for model current profiles are stabilizable by feedback and/or liquid flow as low as 20 m/s; interfacing with PEST is in progress to examinine realistic equilibria. Modest indendation gives bootstrap island stability. Comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 find a strong improvement with kappa for 1) ExB shearing compared to ITG/drift mode growth rates and 2) transport in nonlinear ETG simulations. Also, low edge recycling (density) boundary conditions substantially improve H mode pedestal stabilty, for additional global confinement improvement. Even with H mode scaling law confinement, kappa =6 gives ignition in a .8 m major radius device with Cu coils (12T at the coil).

  3. Nonpolar resistive memory switching with all four possible resistive switching modes in amorphous LaHoO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Fachini, Esteban; Scott, James F.

    2015-09-07

    We studied the resistive memory switching in pulsed laser deposited amorphous LaHoO{sub 3} (a-LHO) thin films for non-volatile resistive random access memory applications. Nonpolar resistive switching (RS) was achieved in Pt/a-LHO/Pt memory cells with all four possible RS modes (i.e., positive unipolar, positive bipolar, negative unipolar, and negative bipolar) having high R{sub ON}/R{sub OFF} ratios (in the range of ∼10{sup 4}–10{sup 5}) and non-overlapping switching voltages (set voltage, V{sub ON} ∼ ±3.6–4.2 V and reset voltage, V{sub OFF} ∼ ±1.3–1.6 V) with a small variation of about ±5–8%. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I–V) characteristics indicated the metallic conduction in low resistance states (LRS). We believe that the formation (set) and rupture (reset) of mixed conducting filaments formed out of oxygen vacancies and metallic Ho atoms could be responsible for the change in the resistance states of the memory cell. Detailed analysis of I–V characteristics further corroborated the formation of conductive nanofilaments based on metal-like (Ohmic) conduction in LRS. Simmons-Schottky emission was found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism in the high resistance state.

  4. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  5. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G; Pla, Jesus; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    We have morphologically characterizedCandida tropicalisisolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization ofGalleria mellonellalarvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host.

  6. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C.; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C.; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G.; Pla, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    We have morphologically characterized Candida tropicalis isolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization of Galleria mellonella larvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host. PMID:26833156

  7. The role of carbon and nitrogen on the H-mode confinement in ASDEX Upgrade with a metal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Dunne, M. G.; Frassinetti, L.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Fischer, R.; Järvinen, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Laggner, F. M.; McDermott, R. M.; Potzel, S.; Schweinzer, J.; Tardini, G.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    Carbon (CD4) and nitrogen (N2) have been seeded in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) with a tungsten wall and have both led to a 20-30% confinement improvement. The reference plasma is a standard target plasma with I p /B T  =  1 MA/2.5 T, total input power P tot ~ 12 MW and normalized pressure of β N ~ 1.8. Carbon and nitrogen are almost perfectly exchangeable for the core, pedestal and divertor plasma in this experiment where impurity concentrations of C and N of 2% are achieved and Z eff only mildly increases from ~1.3 to ~1.7. As the radiation potentials of C and N are similar and peak well below 100 eV, both impurities act as divertor radiators and radiate well outside the pedestal region. The outer divertor is purposely kept in an attached state when C and N are seeded to avoid confinement degradation by detachment. As reported in earlier publications for nitrogen, carbon is also seen to reduce the high field side high density (the so-called HFSHD) in the scrape off layer above the inner divertor strike point by about 50%. This is accompanied by a confinement improvement for both low (δ ~ 0.25) and high (δ ~ 0.4) triangularity configurations for both seeding gases, due to an increase of pedestal temperature and stiff core temperature profiles. The electron density profiles show no apparent change due to the seeding. As an orthogonal effect, increasing the triangularity leads to an additionally increased pedestal density, independent of the impurity seeding. This experiment further closes the gap in understanding the confinement differences observed in carbon and metal wall devices; the absence of carbon can be substituted by nitrogen which leads to a similar confinement benefit. So far, no definite physics explanation for the confinement enhancement has been obtained, but the experimental observations in this paper provide input for further model development.

  8. Ultra-high oxidation resistance of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube bundles grown by an "all-laser" process.

    PubMed

    Yi, J H; Aïssa, B; El, Khakani M A

    2007-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were laterally grown on SiO2/Si substrates by means of an "all-laser" growth process. Our "all-laser" process stands out by its exclusive use of the same pulsed UV laser, first, to deposit the CoNi nanocatalyst and, second, to grow SWCNTs through the laser ablation of a pure graphite target. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs generally self-assemble into bundles (5-15 nm-diam.) sprouting from the CoNi nanocatalyst and laterally bridging the 2 microm gap separating adjacent catalysed electrodes (in either "suspended" or "on-substrate" geometries). A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of both suspended and on-substrate SWCNTs was achieved. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs were subjected to annealing under flowing oxygen at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1100 degrees C. Systematic scanning electron microscopy observations combined with micro-Raman analyses revealed that more than 20% of suspended nanotubes were still stable at temperatures as high as 900 degrees C under flowing O2 while the on-substrate counterpart were completely burnt out at this temperature. Accordingly, the activation energy, as deduced from the Arrhenius plot, of the suspended SWCNTs is found to be as high as approximately 180 kJ mol(-1) (approximately 9 times higher than that of the on-substrate ones). The high quality (almost defect-free) of the nanotubes synthesized by the "all-laser" approach, their protected tips into the embedded CoNi catalyst nanolayer together with their suspended geometry are thought to be responsible for their unprecedented ultra-high oxidation resistance. This opens up new prospects for the use of these suspended nanotubes into nanodevices that have to operate under highly oxidizing environments.

  9. Fracture resistance and failure mode of posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two zirconia CAD/CAM systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Suárez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Peláez, Jesús; Rodríguez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an improvement of zirconia ceramic materials to replace posterior missing teeth. To date little in vitro studies has been carried out on the fracture resistance of zirconia veneered posterior fixed dental prostheses. This study investigated the fracture resistance and the failure mode of 3-unit zirconia-based posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two CAD/CAM systems. Material and Methods Twenty posterior fixed dental prostheses were studied. Samples were randomly divided into two groups (n=10 each) according to the zirconia ceramic analyzed: Lava and Procera. Specimens were loaded until fracture under static load. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon´s rank sum test and Wilcoxon´s signed-rank test (P<0.05). Results Partial fracture of the veneering porcelain occurred in 100% of the samples. Within each group, significant differences were shown between the veneering and the framework fracture resistance (P=0.002). The failure occurred in the connector cervical area in 80% of the cases. Conclusions All fracture load values of the zirconia frameworks could be considered clinically acceptable. The connector area is the weak point of the restorations. Key words:Fixed dental prostheses, zirconium-dioxide, zirconia, fracture resistance, failure mode. PMID:26155341

  10. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  11. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement. PMID:28287159

  12. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C T; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-13

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  13. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, Annika Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  14. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, Annika; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at IP = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  15. Loss-of-Function Mutation of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 in Arabidopsis Leads to Reduced Cell Wall Acetylation and Increased Resistance to Botrytis cinerea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Nafisi, Majse; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Orfila, Caroline; Gille, Sascha; Rautengarten, Carsten; Cherk, Candice; Marcus, Susan E.; Somerville, Shauna; Pauly, Markus; Knox, J. Paul; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all polysaccharides in plant cell walls are O-acetylated, including the various pectic polysaccharides and the hemicelluloses xylan, mannan, and xyloglucan. However, the enzymes involved in the polysaccharide acetylation have not been identified. While the role of polysaccharide acetylation in vivo is unclear, it is known to reduce biofuel yield from lignocellulosic biomass by the inhibition of microorganisms used for fermentation. We have analyzed four Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homologs of the protein Cas1p known to be involved in polysaccharide O-acetylation in Cryptococcus neoformans. Loss-of-function mutants in one of the genes, designated REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 (RWA2), had decreased levels of acetylated cell wall polymers. Cell wall material isolated from mutant leaves and treated with alkali released about 20% lower amounts of acetic acid when compared with the wild type. The same level of acetate deficiency was found in several pectic polymers and in xyloglucan. Thus, the rwa2 mutations affect different polymers to the same extent. There were no obvious morphological or growth differences observed between the wild type and rwa2 mutants. However, both alleles of rwa2 displayed increased tolerance toward the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. PMID:21212300

  16. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  17. Arabidopsis wat1 (walls are thin1)-mediated resistance to the bacterial vascular pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum, is accompanied by cross-regulation of salicylic acid and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Denancé, Nicolas; Ranocha, Philippe; Oria, Nicolas; Barlet, Xavier; Rivière, Marie-Pierre; Yadeta, Koste A; Hoffmann, Laurent; Perreau, François; Clément, Gilles; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Savelli, Bruno; Fournier, Sylvie; Aubert, Yann; Pelletier, Sandra; Thomma, Bart P H J; Molina, Antonio; Jouanin, Lise; Marco, Yves; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of Arabidopsis WAT1 (Walls Are Thin1), a gene required for secondary cell-wall deposition, conferred broad-spectrum resistance to vascular pathogens, including the bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and the fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum. Introduction of NahG, the bacterial salicylic acid (SA)-degrading salicylate hydroxylase gene, into the wat1 mutant restored full susceptibility to both R. solanacearum and X. campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, SA content was constitutively higher in wat1 roots, further supporting a role for SA in wat1-mediated resistance to vascular pathogens. By combining transcriptomic and metabolomic data, we demonstrated a general repression of indole metabolism in wat1-1 roots as shown by constitutive down-regulation of several genes encoding proteins of the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway and reduced amounts of tryptophan (Trp), indole-3-acetic acid and neoglucobrassicin, the major form of indole glucosinolate in roots. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the wat1 mutant to R. solanacearum was partially restored when crossed with either the trp5 mutant, an over-accumulator of Trp, or Pro35S:AFB1-myc, in which indole-3-acetic acid signaling is constitutively activated. Our original hypothesis placed cell-wall modifications at the heart of the wat1 resistance phenotype. However, the results presented here suggest a mechanism involving root-localized metabolic channeling away from indole metabolites to SA as a central feature of wat1 resistance to R. solanacearum.

  18. Regulation of the expression of cell wall stress stimulon member gene msrA1 in methicillin-susceptible or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pechous, Roger; Ledala, Nagender; Wilkinson, Brian J; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K

    2004-08-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling studies of the response of Staphylococcus aureus to cell wall-active antibiotics have led to the discovery of a cell wall stress stimulon of genes induced by these agents. msrA1, encoding methionine sulfoxide reductase, is a highly induced member gene of this stimulon. In the present study we show that msrA1 induction by oxacillin is common to all methicillin-susceptible strains studied but did not occur in two homogeneous and two heterogeneous methicillin-resistant strains. However, msrA1 was induced by vancomycin and/or D-cycloserine in methicillin-resistant strains. Lysozyme and lysostaphin treatment did not induce msrA1 expression. Oxacillin-induced msrA1 expression was enhanced by ca. 30% in a SigB+ derivative (SH1000) of the SigB-defective RN450 (NCTC 8325-4) strain. msrA1 expression was not affected in mutants in the global regulatory systems agr and sar. Glycerol monolaurate, an inhibitor of signal transduction, inhibited the oxacillin-induced transcription of msrA1 and other cell wall stress stimulon member genes, vraS and dnaK. These observations suggest that the cell wall stress stimulon is induced by inhibition of the process of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and the inhibitory effects of glycerol monolaurate indicate that gene expression is dependent on a signal transduction pathway.

  19. Tempo and mode of plant RNA virus escape from RNA interference-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Lafforgue, Guillaume; Martínez, Fernando; Sardanyés, Josep; de la Iglesia, Francisca; Niu, Qi-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Solé, Ricard V; Chua, Nam-Hai; Daròs, José-Antonio; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-10-01

    A biotechnological application of artificial microRNAs (amiRs) is the generation of plants that are resistant to virus infection. This resistance has proven to be highly effective and sequence specific. However, before these transgenic plants can be deployed in the field, it is important to evaluate the likelihood of the emergence of resistance-breaking mutants. Two issues are of particular interest: (i) whether such mutants can arise in nontransgenic plants that may act as reservoirs and (ii) whether a suboptimal expression level of the transgene, resulting in subinhibitory concentrations of the amiR, would favor the emergence of escape mutants. To address the first issue, we experimentally evolved independent lineages of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) (family Potyviridae) in fully susceptible wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and then simulated the spillover of the evolving virus to fully resistant A. thaliana transgenic plants. To address the second issue, the evolution phase took place with transgenic plants that expressed the amiR at subinhibitory concentrations. Our results show that TuMV populations replicating in susceptible hosts accumulated resistance-breaking alleles that resulted in the overcoming of the resistance of fully resistant plants. The rate at which resistance was broken was 7 times higher for TuMV populations that experienced subinhibitory concentrations of the antiviral amiR. A molecular characterization of escape alleles showed that they all contained at least one nucleotide substitution in the target sequence, generally a transition of the G-to-A and C-to-U types, with many instances of convergent molecular evolution. To better understand the viral population dynamics taking place within each host, as well as to evaluate relevant population genetic parameters, we performed in silico simulations of the experiments. Together, our results contribute to the rational management of amiR-based antiviral resistance in plants.

  20. Effects of divergent resistance exercise contraction mode and dietary supplementation type on anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis and muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Farup, Jean; Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Holm, Lars; Jessen, Niels; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-01

    Greater force produced with eccentric (ECC) compared to concentric (CONC) contractions, may comprise a stronger driver of muscle growth, which may be further augmented by protein supplementation. We investigated the effect of differentiated contraction mode with either whey protein hydrolysate and carbohydrate (WPH + CHO) or isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation on regulation of anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Twenty-four human participants performed unilateral isolated maximal ECC versus CONC contractions during exercise habituation, single-bout exercise and 12 weeks of training combined with WPH + CHO or CHO supplements. In the exercise-habituated state, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, p-rpS6 increased by approximately 42, 206 and 213 %, respectively, at 1 h post-exercise, with resistance exercise per se; whereas, the phosphorylation was exclusively maintained with ECC at 3 and 5 h post-exercise. This acute anabolic signalling response did not differ between the isocaloric supplement types, neither did protein fractional synthesis rate differ between interventions. Twelve weeks of ECC as well as CONC resistance training augmented hypertrophy with WPH + CHO group compared to the CHO group (7.3 ± 1.0 versus 3.4 ± 0.8 %), independently of exercise contraction type. Training did not produce major changes in basal levels of Akt-mTOR pathway components. In conclusion, maximal ECC contraction mode may constitute a superior driver of acute anabolic signalling that may not be mirrored in the muscle protein synthesis rate. Furthermore, with prolonged high-volume resistance training, contraction mode seems less influential on the magnitude of muscle hypertrophy, whereas protein and carbohydrate supplementation augments muscle hypertrophy as compared to isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation .

  1. Asparaginase Therapy in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on the Mode of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    Asparaginase is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. The therapeutic efficacy (e.g., chemoresistance) and adverse effects of asparaginase (e.g., hypersensivity and pancreatitis) have been investigated over the past four decades. It was suggested early on that leukemic cells are resistant to asparaginase because of their increased asparagine synthetase activity. Afterward, other mechanisms associated with asparaginase resistance were reported. Not only leukemic cells but also patients themselves may play a role in causing asparaginase resistance, which has been associated with unfavorable outcome in children with ALL. This article will briefly review asparaginase therapy in children with ALL and comprehensively analyze recent reports on the potential mechanisms of asparaginase resistance.

  2. Electromigration failure mode concerning negative resistance shift of Cu interconnects buried in porous low-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Yin, Binfeng; Yu, Hewei; Chen, Leigang; Gao, Lin; Zhou, Ke; Kuo, Chinte

    2017-02-01

    Electromigration failure mode concerning a negative resistance shift of 4%-11% and cathode burnout was reported for Cu interconnects buried in porous low-k in this paper. Evidence for oxidation and debonding of Ta/TaN liner at high temperature was revealed, which was demonstrated to have been enabled by the unsealed porous low-k due to moisture uptake. The cathode burnout was thus attributed to severe Joule heating induced in the insulated liner after oxidation. The resistance decay of Cu also exhibited to be mainly consistent with the calculation from specularity recovery of electron scattering at the Cu/Ta interface after oxidation and debonding of the liner, although other factors like strain relaxation may also have some contribution.

  3. Antifungal agents commonly used in the superficial and mucosal candidiasis treatment: mode of action and resistance development

    PubMed Central

    Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Kurzątkowski, Wiesław

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in medical sciences and therapy resulted in an increased number of immunocompromised individuals. Candida albicans is the leading opportunistic fungal pathogen causing infections in humans, ranging from superficial mucosal lesions to disseminated or bloodstream candidiasis. Superficial candidiasis not always presents a risk to the life of the infected host, however it significantly lowers the quality of life. Superficial Candida infections are difficult to treat and their frequency of occurrence is currently rising. To implement successful treatment doctors should be up to date with better understanding of C. albicans resistance mechanisms. Despite high frequency of Candida infections there is a limited number of antimycotics available for therapy. This review focuses on current understanding of the mode of action and resistance mechanisms to conventional and emerging antifungal agents for treatment of superficial and mucosal candidiasis. PMID:24353489

  4. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Methods Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. stephensi was assessed using adult bioassay tests. In the laboratory, determination of diagnostic dose, assessment of residual activity on different substrates, cross-resistance pattern with different insecticides and potentiation studies using piperonyl butoxide were undertaken by following standard procedures. Potential cross-resistance patterns were assessed on field populations of An. culicifacies. Results A dose of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as the diagnostic concentration for assessing susceptibility applying the WHO tube test method in anopheline mosquitoes with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period. The DDT-resistant/malathion-deltamethrin-susceptible strain of An. culicifacies species C showed higher LD50 and LD99 (0.67 and 2.39% respectively) values than the DDT-malathion-deltamethrin susceptible An. culicifacies species A (0.41 and 2.0% respectively) and An. stephensi strains (0.43 and 2.13% respectively) and there was no statistically significant difference in mortalities among the three mosquito species tested (p > 0.05). Residual activity of chlorfenapyr a.i. of 400 mg/m2 on five fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement + distemper was found to be effective up to 24 weeks against An. culicifacies and up to 34 weeks against An. stephensi. No cross-resistance to DDT, malathion, bendiocarb and deltamethrin was observed with chlorfenapyr in laboratory-reared strains of An. stephensi and field-caught An. culicifacies. Potentiation studies

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins: mode of action, insect resistance and consequences for crop protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are insect pathogens that produce different Cry and Cyt toxins to kill their hosts. Here we review the group of three-domain Cry (3d-Cry) toxins. Expression of these 3d-Cry toxins in transgenic crops has contributed to efficient control of insect pests and a reduction in the use of chemical insecticides. The mode of action of 3d-Cry toxins involves sequential interactions with several insect midgut proteins that facilitate the formation of an oligomeric structure and induce its insertion into the membrane, forming a pore that kills midgut cells. We review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these Cry toxins and focus our attention on the different mechanisms of resistance that insects have evolved to counter their action, such as mutations in cadherin, APN and ABC transporter genes. Activity of Cry1AMod toxins, which are able to form toxin oligomers in the absence of receptors, against different resistant populations, including those affected in the ABC transporter and the role of dominant negative mutants as antitoxins, supports the hypothesis that toxin oligomerization is a limiting step in the Cry insecticidal activity. Knowledge of the action of 3d-Cry toxin and the resistance mechanisms to these toxins will set the basis for a rational design of novel toxins to overcome insect resistance, extending the useful lifespan of Cry toxins in insect control programs.

  6. Dual mode of action of Bt proteins: Protoxin efficacy against resistant insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins for pest control are grown extensively, but insect adaptation can reduce their effectiveness. Established mode of action models assert that Bt proteins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac are produced in an inactive protoxin form that requires conver...

  7. Simulations of drift resistive ballooning L-mode turbulence in the edge plasma of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Umansky, M. V.; Nevins, W. M.; Makowski, M. A.; Boedo, J. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Groebner, R. J.

    2013-05-15

    Results from simulations of electromagnetic drift-resistive ballooning turbulence for tokamak edge turbulence in realistic single-null geometry are reported. The calculations are undertaken with the BOUT three-dimensional fluid code that solves Braginskii-based fluid equations [X. Q. Xu and R. H. Cohen, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36, 158 (1998)]. The simulation setup models L-mode edge plasma parameters in the actual magnetic geometry of the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 807 (2002)]. The computations track the development of drift-resistive ballooning turbulence in the edge region to saturation. Fluctuation amplitudes, fluctuation spectra, and particle and thermal fluxes are compared to experimental data near the outer midplane from Langmuir probe and beam-emission-spectroscopy for a few well-characterized L-mode discharges in DIII-D. The simulations are comprised of a suite of runs in which the physics model is varied to include more fluid fields and physics terms. The simulations yield results for fluctuation amplitudes, correlation lengths, particle and energy fluxes, and diffusivities that agree with measurements within an order of magnitude and within factors of 2 or better for some of the data. The agreement of the simulations with the experimental measurements varies with respect to including more physics in the model equations within the suite of models investigated. The simulations show stabilizing effects of sheared E × B poloidal rotation (imposed zonal flow) and of lower edge electron temperature and density.

  8. Real-time control of divertor detachment in H-mode with impurity seeding using Langmuir probe feedback in JET-ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Lennholm, M.; Harrison, J.; Carvalho, I.; Valcarcel, D.; Felton, R.; Griph, S.; Hogben, C.; Lucock, R.; Matthews, G. F.; Perez Von Thun, C.; Pitts, R. A.; Wiesen, S.; contributors, JET

    2017-04-01

    Burning plasmas with 500 MW of fusion power on ITER will rely on partially detached divertor operation to keep target heat loads at manageable levels. Such divertor regimes will be maintained by a real-time control system using the seeding of radiative impurities like nitrogen (N), neon or argon as actuator and one or more diagnostic signals as sensors. Recently, real-time control of divertor detachment has been successfully achieved in Type I ELMy H-mode JET-ITER-like wall discharges by using saturation current (I sat) measurements from divertor Langmuir probes as feedback signals to control the level of N seeding. The degree of divertor detachment is calculated in real-time by comparing the outer target peak I sat measurements to the peak I sat value at the roll-over in order to control the opening of the N injection valve. Real-time control of detachment has been achieved in both fixed and swept strike point experiments. The system has been progressively improved and can now automatically drive the divertor conditions from attached through high recycling and roll-over down to a user-defined level of detachment. Such a demonstration is a successful proof of principle in the context of future operation on ITER which will be extensively equipped with divertor target probes.

  9. Self-mode-locking in erbium-doped fibre lasers with saturable polymer film absorbers containing single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, Anton V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the ring and linear schemes of erbium-doped fibre lasers in which passive mode locking was achieved with the help of saturable absorbers made of high-optical quality films based on cellulose derivatives with dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes. The films were prepared by the original method with the use of nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method. The films exhibit nonlinear absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. Pulses in the form of optical solitons of duration 1.17 ps at a avelength of 1.56 μm were generated in the ring scheme of the erbium laser. The average output power was 1.1 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz upon pumping by the 980-nm, 25-mW radiation from a laser diode. The pulse duration in the linear scheme was reduced to 466 fs for the output power up to 4 mW and a pulse repetition rate of 28.5 MHz. The specific feature of these lasers is a low pump threshold in the regime of generation of ultrashort pulses.

  10. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K. D.; Groth, M.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Książek, I.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Meigs, A. G.; Menmuir, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are used together with bolometric measurements to determine the radiated power and its composition. The analysis shows the importance of D line radiation in contributing to the divertor radiated power, while contributions from D radiative recombination are smaller than expected. Simulations with W divertor plates underestimate the Be content in the divertor, since no allowance is made for Be previously deposited on the plates being re-eroded. An improved version of EDGE2D-EIRENE is used to test the importance of the deposited layer in which the sputtering yield from supposed pure Be divertor plates is reduced to match the spectroscopic signals, while keeping the sputtering yield for the Be main chamber walls unchanged.

  11. Tetracycline Antibiotics: Mode of Action, Applications, Molecular Biology, and Epidemiology of Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ian; Roberts, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Tetracyclines were discovered in the 1940s and exhibited activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, rickettsiae, and protozoan parasites. They are inexpensive antibiotics, which have been used extensively in the prophlylaxis and therapy of human and animal infections and also at subtherapeutic levels in animal feed as growth promoters. The first tetracycline-resistant bacterium, Shigella dysenteriae, was isolated in 1953. Tetracycline resistance now occurs in an increasing number of pathogenic, opportunistic, and commensal bacteria. The presence of tetracycline-resistant pathogens limits the use of these agents in treatment of disease. Tetracycline resistance is often due to the acquisition of new genes, which code for energy-dependent efflux of tetracyclines or for a protein that protects bacterial ribosomes from the action of tetracyclines. Many of these genes are associated with mobile plasmids or transposons and can be distinguished from each other using molecular methods including DNA-DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and DNA sequencing. A limited number of bacteria acquire resistance by mutations, which alter the permeability of the outer membrane porins and/or lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane, change the regulation of innate efflux systems, or alter the 16S rRNA. New tetracycline derivatives are being examined, although their role in treatment is not clear. Changing the use of tetracyclines in human and animal health as well as in food production is needed if we are to continue to use this class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials through the present century. PMID:11381101

  12. Observation of an Energetic-Particle-Driven Instability in the Wall-Stabilized High-beta Plasmas in the JT-60U Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Isayama, A.; Takechi, M.; Suzuki, T.; Oyama, N.; Asakura, N.; Kamada, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2009-07-24

    We have observed a bursting mode in the high-beta plasmas above the ideal beta limit without a conducting wall. The mode frequency is chirping down as the mode amplitude increases, and its initial value is close to the precession frequency of the trapped energetic particle from the perpendicular neutral beams. The mode structure is radially extended with a peak around the q=2 surface. This mode can finally trigger the resistive wall mode (RWM) despite enough plasma rotation for RWM stabilization. It is concluded that the mode is driven by trapped energetic particles. The mode is attributed to the interaction between the trapped energetic particles and a marginally stable mode in the wall-stabilized high-beta{sub N} region.

  13. A study of mode I delamination resistance of a thermoplastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiang; He, Tianbai; Li, Binyao; Liu, Weilian; Chen, Tianlu

    This paper describes the mode I delamination behavior of a unidirectional carbon-fiber/poly(phenylene ether ketone)(PEK-C) composite. Tests have been performed on double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. Several data reduction schemes are used to obtain the critical strain energy release rate, and the results are compared. It is shown that when using a DCB test to determine the fracture toughness, corrections must be employed. Experimental methods are described for ascertaining the correction terms, and the results are consistent after modification.

  14. Characterization of SCO4439, a D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase involved in spore cell wall maturation, resistance, and germination in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Rioseras, Beatriz; Yagüe, Paula; López-García, María Teresa; Gonzalez-Quiñonez, Nathaly; Binda, Elisa; Marinelli, Flavia; Manteca, Angel

    2016-01-01

    This work contributes to the understanding of cell wall modifications during sporulation and germination in Streptomyces by assessing the biological function and biochemical properties of SCO4439, a D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase (DD-CPase) constitutively expressed during development. SCO4439 harbors a DD-CPase domain and a putative transcriptional regulator domain, separated by a putative transmembrane region. The recombinant protein shows that DD-CPase activity is inhibited by penicillin G. The spores of the SCO4439::Tn5062 mutant are affected in their resistance to heat and acid and showed a dramatic increase in swelling during germination. The mycelium of the SCO4439::Tn5062 mutant is more sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and teicoplanin). The DD-CPase domain and the hydrophobic transmembrane region are highly conserved in Streptomyces, and both are essential for complementing the wild type phenotypes in the mutant. A model for the biological mechanism behind the observed phenotypes is proposed, in which SCO4439 DD-CPase releases D-Ala from peptidoglycan (PG) precursors, thereby reducing the substrate pool for PG crosslinking (transpeptidation). PG crosslinking regulates spore physical resistance and germination, and modulates mycelium resistance to glycopeptides. This study is the first demonstration of the role of a DD-CPase in the maturation of the spore cell wall. PMID:26867711

  15. Resistance mutation conserved between insects and mites unravels the benzoylurea insecticide mode of action on chitin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Douris, Vassilis; Steinbach, Denise; Panteleri, Rafaela; Livadaras, Ioannis; Pickett, John Anthony; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Nauen, Ralf; Vontas, John

    2016-12-20

    Despite the major role of chitin biosynthesis inhibitors such as benzoylureas (BPUs) in the control of pests in agricultural and public health for almost four decades, their molecular mode of action (MoA) has in most cases remained elusive. BPUs interfere with chitin biosynthesis and were thought to interact with sulfonylurea receptors that mediate chitin vesicle transport. Here, we uncover a mutation (I1042M) in the chitin synthase 1 (CHS1) gene of BPU-resistant Plutella xylostella at the same position as the I1017F mutation reported in spider mites that confers etoxazole resistance. Using a genome-editing CRISPR/Cas9 approach coupled with homology-directed repair (HDR) in Drosophila melanogaster, we introduced both substitutions (I1056M/F) in the corresponding fly CHS1 gene (kkv). Homozygous lines bearing either of these mutations were highly resistant to etoxazole and all tested BPUs, as well as buprofezin-an important hemipteran chitin biosynthesis inhibitor. This provides compelling evidence that BPUs, etoxazole, and buprofezin share in fact the same molecular MoA and directly interact with CHS. This finding has immediate effects on resistance management strategies of major agricultural pests but also on mosquito vectors of serious human diseases such as Dengue and Zika, as diflubenzuron, the standard BPU, is one of the few effective larvicides in use. The study elaborates on how genome editing can directly, rapidly, and convincingly elucidate the MoA of bioactive molecules, especially when target sites are complex and hard to reconstitute in vitro.

  16. Pericyte response to contraction mode-specific resistance exercise training in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; De Lisio, Michael; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Bjerre, Jonas; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Boppart, Marni D; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-11-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are important for muscle repair and hypertrophy in response mechanical stimuli. Neuron-glial antigen 2-positive (NG2(+)) and alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)) pericytes may provide an alternative source of myogenic progenitors and/or secrete paracrine factors to induce Pax7(+) SC proliferation and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate NG2(+) and ALP(+) cell quantity, as well as SC content and activation, in human skeletal muscle following prolonged concentric (Conc) or eccentric (Ecc) resistance training. Male subjects engaged in unilateral resistance training utilizing isolated Ecc or Conc contractions. After 12 wk, muscle biopsies were analyzed for NG2(+) and ALP(+) pericytes, total Pax7(+) SCs, activated SCs (Pax7(+)MyoD(+)), and differentiating myogenic cells (Pax7(-) MyoD(+)). NG2(+) cells localized to CD31(+) vessels and the majority coexpressed ALP. NG2(+) pericyte quantity decreased following both Conc and Ecc training (P < 0.05). ALP(+) pericyte quantity declined following Conc (P < 0.05) but not Ecc training. Conversely, total Pax7(+) SC content was elevated following Conc only (P < 0.001), while Pax7(+)MyoD(+) SC content was increased following Conc and Ecc (P < 0.001). Follow up analyses demonstrated that CD90(+) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα)(+) mononuclear cell proliferation was also increased in response to both Conc and Ecc training (P < 0.01). In summary, resistance training results in a decline in pericyte quantity and an increase in mesenchymal progenitor cell proliferation, and these events likely influence SC pool expansion and increased activation observed posttraining.

  17. Illumination Variation-Resistant Video-Based Heart Rate Measurement Using Joint Blind Source Separation and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Chen, Xun; Xu, Lingxi; Wang, Z Jane

    2016-10-06

    Recent studies have demonstrated that heart rate (HR) could be estimated using video data (e.g., exploring human facial regions of interest (ROIs)) under well controlled conditions. However, in practice, the pulse signals may be contaminated by motions and illumination variations. In this paper, tackling the illumination variation challenge, we propose an illuminationrobust framework using joint blind source separation (JBSS) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to effectively evaluate HR from webcam videos. The framework takes the hypotheses that both facial ROI and background ROI have similar illumination variations. The background ROI is then considered as a noise reference sensor to denoise the facial signals by using the JBSS technique to extract the underlying illumination variation sources. Further, the reconstructed illumination-resisted green channel of the facial ROI is detrended and decomposed into a number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using EEMD to estimate the HR. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed framework could estimate HR more accurately than the state-of-the-art methods. The Bland-Altman plots showed that it led to better agreement with HR ground truth with the mean bias 1.15 beat per minute (bpm), with 95 % limits from -15.43 bpm to 17.73 bpm, and the correlation coefficient 0.53. This study provides a promising solution for realistic non-contact and robust HR measurement applications.

  18. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  19. Antibacterial Activities and Possible Modes of Action of Acacia nilotica (L.) Del. against Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Muhammad Bilal; Tarning, Joel; Aye Cho, Tay Zar; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-14

    Medicinal plants are frequently used for the treatment of various infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity and mode of action of Acacia nilotica and the antibiogram patterns of foodborne and clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The mechanism of action of acacia extracts against E. coli and Salmonella was elucidated by observing morphological damages including cell integrity and cell membrane permeability, as well as changes in cell structures and growth patterns in kill-time experiments. The clinical isolates of E. coli and Salmonella were found resistant to more of the tested antibiotics, compared to food isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of acacia leaf extracts were in the ranges of 1.56-3.12 mg/mL and 3.12-6.25 mg/mL, respectively, whereas pods and bark extracts showed somewhat higher values of 3.12-6.25 mg/mL and 6.25-12.5 mg/mL, respectively, against all tested pathogens. The release of electrolytes and essential cellular constituents (proteins and nucleic acids) indicated that acacia extracts damaged the cellular membrane of the pathogens. These changes corresponded to simultaneous reduction in the growth of viable bacteria. This study indicates that A. nilotica can be a potential source of new antimicrobials, effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogens.

  20. Resistance Spot Weld Failure Mode and Weld Performance for Aluminium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin

    2010-01-30

    In this chapter, we present the strength and failure modes of reactive NanoFoil® bonded joints for similar and dissimilar lightweight materials. NanoFoil® is a multi-layer foil fabricated through the growth of thousands of nanoscale layers of aluminum and nickel by vapor deposition. Initiated by an energy impulse, the like-like bonds of the atoms of each layer in the foil are exchanged for more stable unlike bonds between atoms from neighboring layers. As the atoms of each layer mix, heat is generated, creating a self-sustaining reaction traveling along the length of the foil. The instantaneous release of heat energy by this reaction is controlled by the nanolayer thickness and lay-up, such that accurate control of a highly localized heat source can be realized, allowing bonding without compromising the properties/integrities of the base materials. First, solder and braze joints for similar and dissimilar material combinations of steel, aluminum and magnesium are fabricated. Static bond strength tests under tensile shear loading condition are then performed to quantify the bond strength for different material combinations. The through-thickness microstructure changes and modifications by the bonding process are quantified using SEM. Depending on the base material combinations, it is shown that the nanofoil bond strength is comparable to those of the conventional structural adhesive bonds.

  1. A Novel Explanation of the Greenwald Density Limit-Thermal-Resistive Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Qian; Brennan, Dylan; Delgado-Aparicio, Luis; Gates, David; Swerdlow, Josh; White, Roscoe

    2015-11-01

    R.B. White et. al. showed that the asymmetry of a magnetic island created by a tearing mode is crucial to understand its evolution. An island is thermally isolated, the internal temperature given by the balance of radiation loss and Ohmic heating. When radiation loss from the island dominates, the cooling of the island, coupled to the asymmetry, can cause rapid growth, leading to a potential mechanism to explain the Greenwald density limit. In this work we successfully reproduced the density limit with experiment-relevant parameters using this model. Using simple equilibrium profiles and assuming internal inductance evolution with density, we simulated the equilibrium evolution as a function of density. The modeling of internal inductance is motivated by D.A. Gates and L. Delgado-Aparicio's finding that the density limit is accompanied with internal inductance increasing. Given reasonable numbers for geometric size, electric and magnetic field, we calculated power balance inside island. The simulation showed local power balance criterion agrees with the density limit within 2%. The very sharp limit is determined by the strong dependence of radiative loss on density. Next work is to use a toroidal model and experimentally obtained equilibria to compare with experiments directly.

  2. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in duck and fish production ponds with integrated or non-integrated mode.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Xu, Yan-Bin; Xu, Jia-Xin; Ling, Jia-Yin; Chen, Jin-Liang; Zhou, Jia-Le; Zheng, Li; Du, Qing-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging micropollutants with environmental persistence. Aquaculture environments are considered as potential reservoirs for ARGs pollution and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). This study analyzed water and sediment from eight culture ponds (integrated culture: duck-fish pond; monoculture: duck pond and fish pond) and a control pond (without any aquaculture activity) in Zhongshan, South China. Seventeen types of ARGs were detected in all ponds, which conferring resistance to four classes of antibiotics including tetracycline (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetE, tetG, tetL, tetA-P, tetM, tetO, tetS, tetW and tetX), AmpC beta-lactamase products (EBC and FOX), sulfonamide (sul1 and sul2) and erythromycin (ermA), with class 1 integron (intI1) as motility gene. The total concentrations of detected ARGs in culture pond water were much higher than control (about 1.6-4.0 times). Integrated culture showed lowest absolute abundance of ∑ARGs in water (3.686 × 10(7) copies mL(-1)) and the highest in sediment (4.574 × 10(8) copies g(-1)). Monoculture ponds showed higher relative abundance of ∑ARGs both in water (fish pond: 0.5149) and sediment (duck pond: 0.4919). As the main contributor to the ARGs abundance and significant correlations with ∑tet, ∑ARGs and intI1 (P < 0.01), tetA was suggested to be a potential indicator for the abundance of tetracycline resistance genes in these classes of aquaculture modes in the Pearl River Delta. This study provides a case for the ARGs abundance in aquaculture and as a reference for the upcoming health risk assessment in aquatic environment.

  3. Multi-wall carbon nanotube-embedded lithium cobalt phosphate composites with reduced resistance for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Kyoung; Rustomji, Cyrus S.; Cho, Hyung-Man; Chun, Dongwon; Jung, Jae-Young; Caldwell, Elizabeth; Kim, Youngjin; Han, Jun Hyun; Jin, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    Lithium cobalt phosphate (LCP) is a high-voltage cathode material used in highenergy- density lithium-ion batteries. With a novel composite synthesis method, multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-embedded LCP nanocomposites (LCPCNT composites) are synthesized to enhance the electrical conductance of LCP particles, reducing charge-transfer resistance. The LCP-CNT composites with enhanced electrical conductance approximately doubled cell capacity compared to a cell with a bare LCP cathode. The crystal structure of LCP-CNT composite particles is characterized by X-ray diffraction; the microstructures of the embedded MWCNTs inside LCP particles are confirmed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam procedures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows the charge-transfer resistance of the cell with the LCP-CNT composite (1.0 wt. % CNT) cathode decreases to ~80 Ω, much smaller than the ~150 Ω charge-transfer resistance of the bare-LCP cathode cell. Based on battery test and impedance analysis, the main factors affecting the capacity increment are the reduced charge transfer resistance and the uniform distribution of MWCNTs, which is formed during the gelation step of the LCP synthesis procedure. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Coexistence of unipolar and bipolar modes in Ag/ZnO/Pt resistive switching memory with oxygen-vacancy and metal-Ag filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Han-Lu; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Xu, Hai-Yang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Han, Man-Shu; Ma, Jian-Gang; Liu, Yi-Chun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the unipolar resistive switching (URS) and bipolar resistive switching (BRS) are demonstrated to be coexistent in the Ag/ZnO/Pt memory device, and both modes are observed to strongly depend on the polarity of forming voltage. The mechanisms of the URS and BRS behaviors could be attributed to the electric-field-induced migration of oxygen vacancies (VO) and metal-Ag conducting filaments (CFs) respectively, which are confirmed by investigating the temperature dependences of low resistance states in both modes. Furthermore, we compare the resistive switching (RS) characteristics (e.g., forming and switching voltages, reset current and resistance states) between these two modes based on VO- and Ag-CFs. The BRS mode shows better switching uniformity and lower power than the URS mode. Both of these modes exhibit good RS performances, including good retention, reliable cycling and high-speed switching. The result indicates that the coexistence of URS and BRS behaviors in a single device has great potential applications in future nonvolatile multi-level memory. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China for Excellent Young Scholars (Grant No. 51422201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51172041, 51372035, 11304035, 61574031, and 61404026), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB933703), the “111” Project, China (Grant No. B13013), the Fund from Jilin Province, China (Grant Nos. 20140520106JH and 20140201008GX), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20130043110004), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2412015KJ008 and 2412016KJ003).

  5. Blastocystis Isolate B Exhibits Multiple Modes of Resistance against Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Yason, John Anthony; Ajjampur, Sitara Swarna Rao

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis is one of the most common eukaryotic organisms found in humans and many types of animals. Several reports have identified its role in gastrointestinal disorders, although its pathogenicity is yet to be clarified. Blastocystis is transmitted via the fecal-to-oral route and colonizes the large intestines. Epithelial cells lining the intestine secrete antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including beta-defensins and cathelicidin, as a response to infection. This study explores the effects of host colonic antimicrobial peptides, particularly LL-37, a fragment of cathelicidin, on different Blastocystis subtypes. Blastocystis is composed of several subtypes that have genetic, metabolic, and biological differences. These subtypes also have various outcomes in terms of drug treatment and immune response. In this study, Blastocystis isolates from three different subtypes were found to induce intestinal epithelial cells to secrete LL-37. We also show that among the antimicrobial peptides tested, only LL-37 has broad activity on all the subtypes. LL-37 causes membrane disruption and causes Blastocystis to change shape. Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7), however, showed relative resistance to LL-37. An isolate, ST7 isolate B (ST7-B), from this subtype releases proteases that can degrade the peptide. It also makes the environment acidic, which causes attenuation of LL-37 activity. The Blastocystis ST7-B isolate was also observed to have a thicker surface coat, which may protect the parasite from direct killing by LL-37. This study determined the effects of LL-37 on different Blastocystis isolates and indicates that AMPs have significant roles in Blastocystis infections. PMID:27217421

  6. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  7. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; ...

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplificationmore » of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.« less

  8. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.

  9. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A; Rodermel, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions.

  10. Resistance of Escherichia coli to nourseothricin (streptothricin): reduced penetrability of the cell wall as an additional, possibly unspecific mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, G

    1989-01-01

    The resistance of E. coli strains to the antibiotic nourseothricin is known to be caused by an acetyltransferase acetylating the beta-lysine chain of the antibiotic. In addition, most of the resistant strains exhibit reduced penetrability of the outer membrane, presumably caused by a reduced amount of available negative charges. This was shown using crystal violet, Congo red, or the hydrophobic antibiotic novobiocin as indicators.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum localized PerA is required for cell wall integrity, azole drug resistance, and virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dawoon; Thammahong, Arsa; Shepardson, Kelly M.; Blosser, Sara J.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary GPI-anchoring is a universal and critical post-translational protein modification in eukaryotes. In fungi, many cell wall proteins are GPI-anchored, and disruption of GPI-anchored proteins impairs cell wall integrity. After being synthesized and attached to target proteins, GPI anchors undergo modification on lipid moieties. In spite of its importance for GPI-anchored protein functions, our current knowledge of GPI lipid remodeling in pathogenic fungi is limited. In this study, we characterized the role of a putative GPI lipid remodeling protein, designated PerA, in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. PerA localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and loss of PerA leads to striking defects in cell wall integrity. A perA null mutant has decreased conidia production, increased susceptibility to triazole antifungal drugs, and is avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Interestingly, loss of PerA increases exposure of β-glucan and chitin content on the hyphal cell surface, but diminished TNF production by bone marrow derived macrophages relative to wild type. Given the structural specificity of fungal GPI-anchors, which is different from humans, understanding GPI lipid remodeling and PerA function in A. fumigatus is a promising research direction to uncover a new fungal specific antifungal drug target. PMID:24779420

  12. Modeling MHD Equilibrium and Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Resistive Walls in LTX and HBT-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C.; Levesque, J.; Bialek, J.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J.

    2016-10-01

    In experimental magnetized plasmas, currents in the first wall, vacuum vessel, and other conducting structures can have a strong influence on plasma shape and dynamics. These effects are complicated by the 3D nature of these structures, which dictate available current paths. Results from simulations to study the effect of external currents on plasmas in two different experiments will be presented: 1) The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-Tet is applied to study linear and non-linear plasma dynamics in the High Beta Tokamak (HBT-EP) focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. 2) Equilibrium reconstructions of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) in the presence of non-axisymmetric eddy currents. An axisymmetric model is used to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium, using the PSI-Tri code, along with a set of fixed eddy current distributions. Current distributions are generated using 3D time-dependent, thin-wall, eddy current simulations using VALEN or PSI-Tet. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-Tet code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-Tet will also be presented. Work supported by US DOE.

  13. Scaling of the frequencies of the type one edge localized modes and their effect on the tungsten source in JET ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Meyer, O.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    A database of 250 pulses taken randomly during the experimental campaigns of JET with the ITER-like wall (ILW) is used to study the frequency dependences of the type I edge localized modes (ELM). A scaling of the ELM frequency is presented as a function of the pedestal density drop dN ped and a very simple model to interpret this scaling is discussed. In this model, the frequency of the ELMs is governed by the time needed by the neutral flux to refill the density of the pedestal. The filling rate is the result of a small imbalance between the neutral flux filling the pedestal and the outward flux that expels the particles to the SOL. The ELM frequency can be governed by such a mechanism if the recovery time of the temperature of the pedestal in JET occurs before or at the same time as the one of the density. This is observed to be the case. An effect of the fuelling is measured when the number of injected particles is less than 1  ×  1022 particles s-1. In that case an increase of the inter-ELM time is observed which is related to the slower recovery of the density pedestal. Additionally, a scaling is found for the source of tungsten during the ELMs. The number of tungsten atoms eroded by the ELMs per second is proportional to dN ped multiplied by the ELM frequency. This is possible only if the tungsten sputtering yield is independent of the energy of the impinging particle hitting the divertor. This result is in agreement with Guillemault et al (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 085006) and is compatible with the D+  ions hitting the divertor having energies above 2 keV. Finally, by plotting the Wcontent/Wsource ratio during ELM crash, a global decreasing behaviour with the ELM frequency is found. However at frequencies below 40 Hz a scatter towards upper values is found. This scatter is found to correlate with the gas injection level. In a narrow ELM frequency band around 20 Hz, it is found that both the ratio Wcontent/Wsource and Wsource

  14. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  15. The Role of mgrA and sarA in Autolysis and Resistance to Cell Wall-Active Antibiotics in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Trotonda, María Pilar; Xiong, Yan Q.; Memmi, Guido; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cheung, Ambrose L.

    2009-01-01

    Background We have previously shown the importance of mgrA and sarA in controlling autolysis of Staphylococcus aureus, with MgrA and SarA both being negative regulators of murein hydrolases. Methods In this study, we analyzed the effects of mgrA and sarA on antibiotic-mediated lysis in vitro, and on the responses to cell wall-active antibiotic therapy in an experimental endocarditis model using two representative MRSA strains: laboratory strain COL and community-acquired clinical isolate, MW2. Results We found that mgrA and sarA independently down-regulated sarV (a marker for autolysis), although the alteration in sarV expression did not correlate directly with the autolysis profiles of single mgrA and sarA mutants. Importantly, the mgrA/sarA double mutants of both strains were more autolytic in vitro as compared with the single mutants. In vivo, we demonstrated that, despite equivalent intrinsic virulence between the parents and their isogenic mgrA/sarA double mutants in the endocarditis model, oxacillin and vancomycin treatment of the mgrA/sarA double mutants of MRSA strains COL and MW2 yielded significant reductions in vegetation bacterial densities vs. their respective parents. Conclusions These results suggest that down-regulation of mgrA/sarA in combination with cell wall-active antibiotics may represent a novel approach to treat MRSA infections. PMID:19072553

  16. Influence of preparation design and ceramic thicknesses on fracture resistance and failure modes of premolar partial coverage restorations

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Petra C.; Schultheis, Stefan; Wolkewitz, Martin; Zhang; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem Preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses are key factors for the long-term success of minimally invasive premolar partial coverage restorations. However, only limited information is presently available on this topic. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and failure modes of ceramic premolar partial coverage restorations with different preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses. Material and methods Caries-free human premolars (n= 144) were divided into 9 groups. Palatal onlay preparation comprised reduction of the palatal cusp by 2 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Thin), or 0.5 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Complete-coverage onlay preparation additionally included the buccal cusp (Occlusal-Onlay-Standard; Occlusal-Onlay-Thin; Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Labial surface preparations with chamfer reductions of 0.8 mm (Complete-Veneer-Standard), 0.6 mm (Complete-Veneer-Thin) and 0.4 mm (Complete-Veneer-Ultra-Thin) were implemented for complete veneer restorations. Restorations were fabricated from a pressable lithium-disilicate ceramic (IPS-e.max-Press) and cemented adhesively (Syntac-Classic/Variolink-II). All specimens were subjected to cyclic mechanical loading (F= 49 N, 1.2 million cycles) and simultaneous thermocycling (5°C to 55°C) in a mouth-motion simulator. After fatigue, restorations were exposed to single-load-to-failure. Two-way ANOVA was used to identify statistical differences. Pair-wise differences were calculated and P-values were adjusted by the Tukey–Kramer method (α= .05). Results All specimens survived fatigue. Mean (SD) load to failure values (N) were as follows: 837 (320/Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1055 (369/Palatal-Onlay-Thin), 1192 (342/Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 963 (405/Occlusal-Onlay-Standard), 1108 (340/Occlusal-Onlay-Thin), 997 (331/Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 1361 (333/Complete-Veneer-Standard), 1087 (251/Complete-Veneer-Thin), 883 (311/Complete

  17. A comparative study of 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance in multiwall and single-wall carbon nanotube bolometers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongtao; Kamal, Rayyan; Wu, Judy Z

    2011-07-01

    The 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) are investigated in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film bolometers since both affect the bolometer detectivity directly. A comparison is made between the MWCNT film bolometers and their single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) counterparts. The intrinsic noise level in the former has been found at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in the latter, which outweighs the moderately lower TCR absolute values in the former and results in higher bolometer detectivity in MWCNT bolometers. Interestingly, reduced noise and enhanced TCR can be obtained by improving the inter-tube coupling using thermal annealing in both SWCNT and MWCNT films, suggesting much higher detectivity may be achieved via engineering the inter-tube coupling.

  18. The Cerato-Platanin protein Epl-1 from Trichoderma harzianum is involved in mycoparasitism, plant resistance induction and self cell wall protection.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Eriston Vieira; Costa, Mariana do Nascimento; de Paula, Renato Graciano; de Azevedo, Rafael Ricci; da Silva, Francilene Lopes; Noronha, Eliane F; Ulhoa, Cirano José; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2015-12-09

    Trichoderma harzianum species are well known as biocontrol agents against important fungal phytopathogens. Mycoparasitism is one of the strategies used by this fungus in the biocontrol process. In this work, we analyzed the effect of Epl-1 protein, previously described as plant resistance elicitor, in expression modulation of T. harzianum genes involved in mycoparasitism process against phytopathogenic fungi; self cell wall protection and recognition; host hyphae coiling and triggering expression of defense-related genes in beans plants. The results indicated that the absence of Epl-1 protein affects the expression of all mycoparasitism genes analyzed in direct confrontation assays against phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum as well as T. harzianum itself; the host mycoparasitic coiling process and expression modulation of plant defense genes showing different pattern compared with wild type strain. These data indicated the involvement T. harzianum Epl-1 in self and host interaction and also recognition of T. harzianum as a symbiotic fungus by the bean plants.

  19. The glutathione peroxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species resistance, fungicide sensitivity and cell wall construction in the citrus fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siwy Ling; Yu, Pei-Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2016-03-01

    The ability to detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for pathogenicity in the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. We report a glutathione peroxidase 3 (AaGPx3) involved in the complex signalling network that is essential for the detoxification of cellular stresses induced by ROS and for A. alternata pathogenesis in citrus. AaGPx3 deletion mutants displayed increased sensitivity to H2 O2 and many ROS-generating compounds. AaGPx3 is required for correct fungal development as the AaGPx3 mutant strains showed a severe reduction in conidiation. AaGPx3 mutants accumulated higher chitin content than the wild-type and were less sensitive to the cell wall-targeting compounds calcofluor white and Congo red, as well as the fungicides fludioxonil and vinclozolin, suggesting a role of the glutathione systems in fungal cell wall construction. Virulence assays revealed that AaGPx3 is required for full virulence. The expression of AaGPx3 was downregulated in fungal strains carrying defective NADPH oxidase (Nox) or the oxidative stress responsive regulators YAP1 and HOG1, all implicated in ROS resistance. These results further support the important role of ROS detoxification during A. alternata pathogenesis in citrus. Overall, our study provides genetic evidence to define the central role of AaGPx3 in the biological and pathological functions of A. alternata.

  20. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  1. Application of the low-frequency energy principle to wall modesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, R.; Manickam, J.

    2005-05-01

    The effects of trapped particles on the stability of the n =1 resistive wall mode are investigated by means of a generalized energy principle. The analysis is carried out for the stationary high-β plasma equilibrium of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ K. Tomabechi Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)] advanced-tokamak scenario. It is found that the trapped particle compressibility and the dissipation induced by the mode resonance with the trapped particle precession motion are stabilizing. By retaining the contribution of trapped thermal ions, electrons, and α particles, the resistive wall mode growth rate is significantly reduced and the mode almost fully suppressed. This effect vanishes for fast flowing plasmas rotating toroidally with a frequency above the ion diamagnetic frequency.

  2. A novel mode of regulation of the Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin-resistance-associated response regulator VraR mediated by Stk1 protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Canova, Marc J; Baronian, Grégory; Brelle, Solène; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Bischoff, Markus; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-25

    The Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin-resistance-associated response regulator VraR is known as an important response regulator, member of the VraTSR three-component signal transduction system that modulates the expression of the cell wall stress stimulon in response to a number of different cell wall active antibiotics. Given its crucial role in regulating gene expression in response to antibiotic challenges, VraR must be tightly regulated. We report here for the first time in S. aureus convergence of two major signal transduction systems, serine/threonine protein kinase and two (three)-component systems. We demonstrate that VraR can be phosphorylated by the staphylococcal Ser/Thr protein kinase Stk1 and that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding properties. Mass spectrometric analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified Thr106, Thr119, Thr175 and Thr178 as phosphoacceptors. A S. aureus ΔvraR mutant expressing a VraR derivative that mimics constitutive phosphorylation, VraR_Asp, still exhibited markedly decreased antibiotic resistance against different cell wall active antibiotics, when compared to the wild-type, suggesting that VraR phosphorylation may represent a novel and presumably more general mechanism of regulation of the two (three)-component systems in staphylococci.

  3. Effect of Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors on Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Resistance of Composite Laminates Under Mode I Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2006-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimens of a glass/epoxy composite material with embedded piezoelectric sensors were tested both statically and under fatigue loading to determine the effect of the embedded material on the Mode I fracture toughness and fatigue resistance compared to baseline data without the embedded elements. A material known as LaRC-Macrofiber Composite (LaRC-MFC (TradeMark)), or MFC, was embedded at the midplane of the specimen during the layup. Specimens were manufactured with the embedded MFC material either at the loaded end of the specimen to simulate an initial delamination; or with the MFC material located at the delaminating interface, with a Teflon film at the loaded end to simulate an initial delamination. There were three types of specimens with the embedded material at the delaminating interface: co-cured with no added adhesive; cured with a paste adhesive applied to the embedded element; or cured with a film adhesive added to the embedded material. Tests were conducted with the sensors in both the passive and active states. Results were compared to baseline data for the same material without embedded elements. Interlaminar fracture toughness values (G(sub Ic)) for the passive condition showed little change when the MFC was at the insert end. Passive results varied when the MFC was at the delaminating interface. For the co-cured case and with the paste adhesive, G(sub Ic) decreased compared to the baseline toughness, whereas, for the film adhesive case, G(sub Ic) was significantly greater than the baseline toughness, but the failure was always catastrophic. When the MFC was in the active state, G(sub Ic) was generally lower compared to the passive results. Fatigue tests showed little effect of the embedded material whether it was active or passive compared to baseline values.

  4. Fabrication of Au nanoparticle/double-walled carbon nanotube film/TiO2 nanotube array/Ti heterojunctions with low resistance state for broadband photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Guowei; Dong, Zhanmin; Wei, Jinquan; Zhu, Jia-Lin; Sun, Jia-Lin

    2017-03-01

    A broadband photodetector based on Au nanoparticle/double-walled carbon nanotube film/TiO2 nanotube array /Ti multilayer heterojunction structures has been fabricated. A pre-electroforming process at a voltage bias of 35 V was used to switch the photodetector from a high resistance state to a low resistance state. At a voltage bias of 1 V under 532-nm laser illumination in air, the photoresponsivity of the device reached 15.41 mA W-1, which is enhanced by approximately 1.91 times when compared with that of device before deposition of Au nanoparticles. In addition, in a vacuum under a voltage bias of 1 V, the photoresponsivity of the device reached 23.29 mA W-1 and 6.85 mA W-1 at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. The surface plasmon polaritons of the Au nanoparticles allowed extension of the sensitivity of the photosensitive regions into the mid-infrared range. The experimental results show that the device photoresponsivity reached 2.26 mA W-1 at a voltage bias of 1 V under 10.6-μm laser illumination in air.

  5. Alagebrium inhibits neointimal hyperplasia and restores distributions of wall shear stress by reducing downstream vascular resistance in obese and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongfeng; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Kersten, Judy R.; Toth, Jeffrey M.; Passerini, Anthony G.; Rajamani, Anita; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of restenosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are incompletely elucidated, but advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-induced vascular remodeling likely contributes. We tested the hypothesis that AGE-related collagen cross-linking (ARCC) leads to increased downstream vascular resistance and altered in-stent hemodynamics, thereby promoting neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in T2DM. We proposed that decreasing ARCC with ALT-711 (Alagebrium) would mitigate this response. Abdominal aortic stents were implanted in Zucker lean (ZL), obese (ZO), and diabetic (ZD) rats. Blood flow, vessel diameter, and wall shear stress (WSS) were calculated after 21 days, and NH was quantified. Arterial segments (aorta, carotid, iliac, femoral, and arterioles) were harvested to detect ARCC and protein expression, including transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Downstream resistance was elevated (60%), whereas flow and WSS were significantly decreased (44% and 56%) in ZD vs. ZL rats. NH was increased in ZO but not ZD rats. ALT-711 reduced ARCC and resistance (46%) in ZD rats while decreasing NH and producing similar in-stent WSS across groups. No consistent differences in RAGE or TGF-β expression were observed in arterial segments. ALT-711 modified lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor 1 but not RAGE expression by cells on decellularized matrices. In conclusion, ALT-711 decreased ARCC, increased in-stent flow rate, and reduced NH in ZO and ZD rats through RAGE-independent pathways. The study supports an important role for AGE-induced remodeling within and downstream of stent implantation to promote enhanced NH in T2DM. PMID:26254329

  6. Study on the resistance mechanism via outer membrane protein OprD2 and metal β-lactamase expression in the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuangqi; Chen, Yiqiang; Song, Dezhi; Kong, Jinliang; Wu, Yanbin; Lu, Huasong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the imipenem-resistant mechanism via the outer membrane protein (OMP) OprD2 and metal β-lactamase expression in the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa was clinically separated and validated by VITEK-2 full-automatic bacteria analyzer. Drug resistance, sensitive antibiotics and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were tested using the drug sensitivity analysis system. The phenotype positive strains of MBL genes were screened using the Kirby-Bauer diffusion method by adding metal ion-chelating agent EDTA on the imipenem susceptibility paper. IMP-1, VIM-1 and SPM metaloenzyme genes were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). The OMP OprD2 genes were tested by PCR-TRAP, and the protein expression was tested using western blot analysis. The location of OMP OprD2 was confirmed using the sodium salicylate inhibition test. The results showed that 80 portions (40%) of MBL-positive strains were screened out of 200 specimens. Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) and MIC values were significantly higher than quality control bacteria and control bacteria (P<0.05). A total of 35 cases with IMP-1 positive, 20 with VIM-1 positive, 16 with SPM positive, 5 with 2 positive genes and 4 with 3 positive genes were screened among MBL positive strains. A total of 150 portions (75%) of OprD2 deficiencies were screened from 200 specimens. The standard strains and sensitive strains showed OprD2 protein bands at 45 kDa while no OprD2 protein bands appeared in OprD2 deficiency strains. It was in accordance with gene detection. In conclusion, OMP OprD2 deficiency and MBL phenotype positivity may be important mechanisms of IRPA.

  7. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits and its application in galloping mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ting; Yan, Zhimiao

    2017-03-01

    The electromechanical decoupled distributed parameter model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits is proposed. The modified natural frequency and electrical damping for series and parallel inductive-resistive cases are derived, which are functions of the first natural frequency of the cantilever beam, capacitance of the piezoelectric layers, load resistance, inductance and electromechanical coupling term. As a demonstration, we apply the decoupled model to cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters operated in the galloping mode. The average harvested power is derived as an algebraic expression of the electrical damping in addition to the wind speed, aerodynamic parameters of the bluff body and mechanical properties of the cantilever beam. Besides these impacts, the amplitude of the tip displacement also depends on its modified natural frequency. The electromechanical decoupled model and its analytical solutions are confirmed by the numerical solutions of the coupled model for the galloping mode. The theoretical expressions for the maximal harvested power and corresponding tip displacement at the optimal electrical damping are then developed. The cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvester with the inductive-resistive circuit has multiple solution sets of the modified natural frequency and electrical damping. Any optimal electrical damping can be realized by series or parallel inductive-resistive circuit, which cannot be accomplished by pure resistive circuit. By introducing the inductance to the circuit of the galloping piezoelectric energy harvester, the performance of such a system is improved with larger maximal harvested power at high wind speed and smaller amplitude of the tip displacement. This study provides a theoretical approach to capture the intrinsic effects of the inductance in addition to the load resistance on the performance of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters.

  8. Inheritance Mode and Realized Heritability of Resistance to Imidacloprid in the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stal) (Homoptera: Delphacidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) is a serious pest which causes enormous losses to the rice crop in Asia. The genetic basis of imidacloprid resistance was investigated in N. lugens. RESULTS: The resistant strain, selected for imidacloprid resistance from a laboratory pop...

  9. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Boom, J. E.; Meneses, L.; Abreu, P.; Belonohy, E.; Lupelli, I.

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  10. Adsorption of mercury from water by modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes: adsorption behaviour and interference resistance by coexisting anions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Paris Honglay; Hsu, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, David Dah-wei; Lu, Yen-Ming; Huang, Winn-Jung

    2014-08-01

    This investigation reports the use of modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with various functional groups for adsorbing inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) from water samples. To elucidate the behaviours and mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption by modified MWCNTs, their adsorption capacity was studied by considering adsorption isotherms and kinetics. Particular attention was paid to interference of coexisting inorganic ions with Hg(II) adsorption. The results reveal that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups improved the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of the MWCNTs. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was closely described by the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models, suggesting that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was significantly affected by chemical adsorption. The kinetic results were also analysed using the intraparticle diffusion model, which revealed that intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling mechanism. The adsorption of Hg(II) on MWCNTs fell drastically as the ionic strength increased from 0 to 1.0mol/L chloride ions, and declined significantly as the pH increased from 2.2 to 10.5. The elemental maps obtained by energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed the formation of surface complexes of chloride ions with functional groups on MWCNTs, which reduced the number of available sites for the adsorption of Hg(II) and strengthened the repulsive forces between Hg(II) and MWCNTs. The EDS results suggest that chloride ions are important in controlling Hg(II) speciation and adsorption on the surfaces of MWCNTs.

  11. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Energization from Low Mach Number Fast Mode Shocks Using the Moving Wall Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Jared C.; Park, J.; Blackman, E.; Ren, C.; Siller, R.

    2012-05-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often studied in the high Mach number limit but weakly compressive fast shocks can occur in magnetic reconnection outflows and are considered to be a site of particle energization in solar flares. Here we study the microphysics of such perpendicular, low Mach number collisionless shocks using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a reduced ion/electron mass ratio and employ a moving wall boundary method for initial generation the shock. This moving wall method allows for more control of the shock speed, smaller simulation box sizes, and longer simulation times than the commonly used fixed wall, reflection method of shock formation. Our results, which are independent of the shock formation method, reveal the prevalence shock drift acceleration (SDA) of both electron and ions in a purely perpendicular shock with Alfven Mach number MA = 6.8 and ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure β = 8. We determine the respective minimum energies required for electrons and ions to incur SDA. We derive an theoretical electron distribution via SDA that compares favorably to the simulation results. We also show that a modified two-stream instability due to the incoming and reflecting ions in the shock transition region acts as the mechanism to generate collisionless plasma turbulence that sustains the shock.

  12. BnLATE, a Cys2/His2-Type Zinc-Finger Protein, Enhances Silique Shattering Resistance by Negatively Regulating Lignin Accumulation in the Silique Walls of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhangsheng; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2017-01-01

    Silique shattering resistance is one of the most important agricultural traits in oil crop breeding. Seed shedding from siliques prior to and during harvest causes devastating losses in oilseed yield. Lignin biosynthesis in the silique walls is thought to affect silique-shattering resistance in oil crops. Here, we identified and characterized B. napus LATE FLOWERING (BnLATE), which encodes a Cys2/His2-type zinc-finger protein. Heterologous expression of BnLATE under the double enhanced CaMV 35S promoter (D35S) in wild-type Arabidopsis plants resulted in a marked decrease in lignification in the replum, valve layer (carpel) and dehiscence zone. pBnLATE::GUS activity was strong in the yellowing silique walls of transgenic lines. Furthermore, the expression pattern of BnLATE and the lignin content gradient in the silique walls at 48 days after pollination (DAP) of 73290, a B. napus silique shattering-resistant line, are similar to those in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing BnLATE. Transcriptome sequencing of the silique walls revealed that genes encoding peroxidases, which polymerize monolignols and lignin in the phenylpropanoid pathway, were down-regulated at least two-fold change in the D35S::BnLATE transgenic lines. pBnLATE::BnLATE transgenic lines were further used to identify the function of BnLATE, and the results showed that lignification in the carpel and dehiscence zone of yellowing silique also remarkably decreased compared with the wild-type control, the silique shattering-resistance and expression pattern of peroxidase genes are very similar to results with D35S::BnLATE. These results suggest that BnLATE is a negative regulator of lignin biosynthesis in the yellowing silique walls, and promotes silique-shattering resistance in B. napus through restraining the polymerization of monolignols and lignin. PMID:28081140

  13. Enzymatic Resistance of Corneas Crosslinked Using Riboflavin in Conjunction With Low Energy, High Energy, and Pulsed UVA Irradiation Modes

    PubMed Central

    Aldahlawi, Nada H.; Hayes, Sally; O'Brart, David P. S.; Akhbanbetova, Alina; Littlechild, Stacy L.; Meek, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of various riboflavin/ultraviolet light (UVA) crosslinking (CXL) protocols on corneal enzymatic resistance. Methods A total of 66 enucleated porcine eyes, with the corneal epithelium removed, were divided into 6 groups. Group 1 remained untreated. Groups 2 to 6 received riboflavin/dextran for 30 minutes. Group 3 underwent standard CXL (SCXL) with 3 mW/cm2 UVA for 30 minutes (total energy dose 5.4 J/cm2). Groups 4 and 5 underwent high intensity CXL (HCXL) using 30 mW/cm2 UVA for 3 minutes (5.4 J/cm2) and 30 mW/cm2 for 4 minutes (7.2 J/cm2), respectively. Group 6 was exposed to 8 minutes of 30 mW/cm2 UVA in a 10-second on/10-second off pulsed-radiation mode (p-HCXL; 7.2 J/cm2). A central 8-mm disk from each cornea was submerged in pepsin digest solution at 23°C and measured daily. After 13 days, the dry weight was recorded from 5 samples in each group. Results The CXL-treated corneas took longer to digest than nonirradiated corneas (P < 0.0001). Differences in digestion time also were observed between CXL groups, such that, HCXL (5.4 J/cm2) < SCXL (5.4 J/cm2) < HCXL (7.2 J/cm2) < p-HCXL (7.2 J/cm2; P < 0.0001). The dry weight of the SCXL (5.4 J/cm2) group was higher than the HCXL (5.4 and 7.2 J/cm2; P < 0.001) and p-HCXL 7.2 J/cm2 (P <0.05) groups. No difference was detected between the HCXL and p-HCXL 7.2 J/cm2 groups. Conclusions The intensity and distribution of the crosslinks formed within the cornea vary with different UVA protocols. The precise location and amount of crosslinking needed to prevent disease progression is unknown. PMID:27046119

  14. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J. S.; Nikita, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABMFIRF2, which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABMFIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMAPWL) and longitudinal (LMAPWL) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMAPTS), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSIPL) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSIPL), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OFLK(WLS) and ABMKF-K2, MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers.

  15. Common, but complex, mode of resistance of Plutella xylostella to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Ali H; Gatsi, Roxani; Ibiza-Palacios, M Sales; Escriche, Baltasar; Wright, Denis J; Crickmore, Neil

    2005-11-01

    A field collected population of Plutella xylostella (SERD4) was selected in the laboratory with Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins Cry1Ac (Cry1Ac-SEL) and Cry1Ab (Cry1Ab-SEL). Both subpopulations showed similar phenotypes: high resistance to the Cry1A toxins and little cross-resistance to Cry1Ca or Cry1D. A previous analysis of the Cry1Ac-SEL showed incompletely dominant resistance to Cry1Ac with more than one factor, at least one of which was sex influenced. In the present study reciprocal mass crosses between Cry1Ab-SEL and a laboratory susceptible population (ROTH) provided evidence that Cry1Ab resistance was also inherited as incompletely dominant trait with more than one factor, and at least one of the factors was sex influenced. Analysis of single pair mating indicated that Cry1Ab-SEL was still heterogeneous for Cry1Ab resistance genes, showing genes with different degrees of dominance. Binding studies showed a large reduction of specific binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac to midgut membrane vesicles of the Cry1Ab-SEL subpopulation. Cry1Ab-SEL was found to be more susceptible to trypsin-activated Cry1Ab toxin than protoxin, although no defect in toxin activation was found. Present and previous results indicate a common basis of resistance to both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac in selected subpopulations and suggest that a similar set of resistance genes are responsible for resistance to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac and are selected whichever toxin was used. The possibility of an incompletely dominant trait of resistant to these toxins should be taken into account when considering refuge resistance management strategies.

  16. Artemisinin-based antimalarial research: application of biotechnology to the production of artemisinin, its mode of action, and the mechanism of resistance of Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Muangphrom, Paskorn; Seki, Hikaru; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is a worldwide disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. A sesquiterpene endoperoxide artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua was discovered and has been accepted for its use in artemisinin-based combinatorial therapies, as the most effective current antimalarial treatment. However, the quantity of this compound produced from the A. annua plant is very low, and the availability of artemisinin is insufficient to treat all infected patients. In addition, the emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium has been reported recently. Several techniques have been applied to enhance artemisinin availability, and studies related to its mode of action and the mechanism of resistance of malaria-causing parasites are ongoing. In this review, we summarize the application of modern technologies to improve the production of artemisinin, including our ongoing research on artemisinin biosynthetic genes in other Artemisia species. The current understanding of the mode of action of artemisinin as well as the mechanism of resistance against this compound in Plasmodium parasites is also presented. Finally, the current situation of malaria infection and the future direction of antimalarial drug development are discussed.

  17. A crossbar resistance switching memory readout scheme with sneak current cancellation based on a two-port current-mode sensing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woorham; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    2016-12-02

    This paper describes a novel readout scheme that enables the complete cancellation of sneak currents in resistive switching random-access memory (RRAM) crossbar array. The current-mode readout is employed in the proposed readout, and a few critical advantages of the current-mode readout for crossbar RRAM are elucidated in this paper. The proposed scheme is based on a floating readout scheme for low power consumption, and one more sensing port is introduced using an additional reference word line. From the additional port, information on the sneak current amount is collected, and simple current-mode arithmetic operations are implemented to cancel out the sneak current from the sensing current. In addition, a simple method of handling the overestimated-sneak-current issue is described. The proposed scheme is verified using HSPICE simulation. Moreover, an example of a current-mode sense amplifier realizing the proposed cancelling technique is presented. The proposed sense amplifier can be implemented with less hardware overhead compared to the previous works.

  18. A crossbar resistance switching memory readout scheme with sneak current cancellation based on a two-port current-mode sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Woorham; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a novel readout scheme that enables the complete cancellation of sneak currents in resistive switching random-access memory (RRAM) crossbar array. The current-mode readout is employed in the proposed readout, and a few critical advantages of the current-mode readout for crossbar RRAM are elucidated in this paper. The proposed scheme is based on a floating readout scheme for low power consumption, and one more sensing port is introduced using an additional reference word line. From the additional port, information on the sneak current amount is collected, and simple current-mode arithmetic operations are implemented to cancel out the sneak current from the sensing current. In addition, a simple method of handling the overestimated-sneak-current issue is described. The proposed scheme is verified using HSPICE simulation. Moreover, an example of a current-mode sense amplifier realizing the proposed cancelling technique is presented. The proposed sense amplifier can be implemented with less hardware overhead compared to the previous works.

  19. The Root Hair Specific SYP123 Regulates the Localization of Cell Wall Components and Contributes to Rizhobacterial Priming of Induced Systemic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Salinas-Grenet, Hernán; Sandoval, Omar; Recabarren, Camilo; Arraño-Salinas, Paulina; Soto-Alvear, Sylvana; Orellana, Ariel; Blanco-Herrera, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are important for nutrient and water uptake and are also critically involved the interaction with soil inhabiting microbiota. Root hairs are tubular-shaped outgrowths that emerge from trichoblasts. This polarized elongation is maintained and regulated by a robust mechanism involving the endomembrane secretory and endocytic system. Members of the syntaxin family of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) in plants (SYP), have been implicated in regulation of the fusion of vesicles with the target membranes in both exocytic and endocytic pathways. One member of this family, SYP123, is expressed specifically in the root hairs and accumulated in the growing tip region. This study shows evidence of the SYP123 role in polarized trafficking using knockout insertional mutant plants. We were able to observe defects in the deposition of cell wall proline rich protein PRP3 and cell wall polysaccharides. In a complementary strategy, similar results were obtained using a plant expressing a dominant negative soluble version of SYP123 (SP2 fragment) lacking the transmembrane domain. The evidence presented indicates that SYP123 is also regulating PRP3 protein distribution by recycling by endocytosis. We also present evidence that indicates that SYP123 is necessary for the response of roots to plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) in order to trigger trigger induced systemic response (ISR). Plants with a defective SYP123 function were unable to mount a systemic acquired resistance in response to bacterial pathogen infection and ISR upon interaction with rhizobacteria. These results indicated that SYP123 was involved in the polarized localization of protein and polysaccharides in growing root hairs and that this activity also contributed to the establishment of effective plant defense responses. Root hairs represent very plastic structures were many biotic and abiotic factors can affect the number, anatomy and physiology of

  20. The Root Hair Specific SYP123 Regulates the Localization of Cell Wall Components and Contributes to Rizhobacterial Priming of Induced Systemic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Salinas-Grenet, Hernán; Sandoval, Omar; Recabarren, Camilo; Arraño-Salinas, Paulina; Soto-Alvear, Sylvana; Orellana, Ariel; Blanco-Herrera, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are important for nutrient and water uptake and are also critically involved the interaction with soil inhabiting microbiota. Root hairs are tubular-shaped outgrowths that emerge from trichoblasts. This polarized elongation is maintained and regulated by a robust mechanism involving the endomembrane secretory and endocytic system. Members of the syntaxin family of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) in plants (SYP), have been implicated in regulation of the fusion of vesicles with the target membranes in both exocytic and endocytic pathways. One member of this family, SYP123, is expressed specifically in the root hairs and accumulated in the growing tip region. This study shows evidence of the SYP123 role in polarized trafficking using knockout insertional mutant plants. We were able to observe defects in the deposition of cell wall proline rich protein PRP3 and cell wall polysaccharides. In a complementary strategy, similar results were obtained using a plant expressing a dominant negative soluble version of SYP123 (SP2 fragment) lacking the transmembrane domain. The evidence presented indicates that SYP123 is also regulating PRP3 protein distribution by recycling by endocytosis. We also present evidence that indicates that SYP123 is necessary for the response of roots to plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) in order to trigger trigger induced systemic response (ISR). Plants with a defective SYP123 function were unable to mount a systemic acquired resistance in response to bacterial pathogen infection and ISR upon interaction with rhizobacteria. These results indicated that SYP123 was involved in the polarized localization of protein and polysaccharides in growing root hairs and that this activity also contributed to the establishment of effective plant defense responses. Root hairs represent very plastic structures were many biotic and abiotic factors can affect the number, anatomy and physiology of

  1. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed.

  2. The effect of incomplete crown ferrules on fracture resistance and failure modes of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with quartz fiber post, composite core, and crowns

    PubMed Central

    Muangamphan, Panorjit; Sattapan, Boonrat; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Thammasitboon, Kewalin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the fracture resistance of restored endodontically treated teeth (RETT) with fiber posts, cores, and crowns with limited ferrules. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction, and then divided into 6 groups of 10 teeth each; Group circumferential ferrule (2FR), Group ferrule in the labial, mesial, and palatal region (2FR-LaMPa), Group ferrule in the labial, and palatal region (2FR-LaPa), Group 2FR-Pa and 2FR-La respectively, and Group 0FR (no ferrule). All 60 prepared teeth were then restored with quartz fiber posts, resin composite cores, and metal crowns. The specimens were subjected to load until failure occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined under a stereoscope. Results: A statistical significant difference was found among groups 2FR-LaMPa, 2FR-Pa, 2FR-LaPa, and 2FR from the group 2FR-La, and from the group 0FR (P < 0.01). The predominant mode of failure was an oblique palatal to labial root fracture for the groups with remaining ferrules. Conclusion: For RETT that have incomplete crown ferrules, the location of the ferrules may affect their fracture resistance. PMID:26069401

  3. Improved magnetic feedback system on the fast rotating kink mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian

    This thesis presents an improved feedback system on HBT-EP and suppression of the fast rotating kink mode using this system. HBT-EP is an experimental tokamak at Columbia University designed to study the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in confined fusion. The most damaging instabilities are global long wavelength kink modes, which break the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic structure and lead to plasma disruption and termination. When a tokamak is surrounded by a close fitting conducting wall, then the single helicity linear dispersion relation of the kink instability has two dominating branches: one is the "slow mode", rotating at the time scale of wall time, known as resistive wall mode (RWM), the other is the fast mode, that becomes unstable near the ideal wall stability limit. Both instabilities are required to be controlled by the feedback system in HBT-EP. In this thesis, improvements have been made upon the previous GPU-based system to enhance the feedback performance and obtain clear evidence of the feedback suppression effect. Specifically, a new algorithm is implemented that maintains an accurate phase shift between the applied perturbation and the unstable mode. This prevents the excitation of the slow kink mode observed in previous studies and results in high gain suppression for fast mode control at all frequency for the first time. When the system is turned off, suppression is lost and the fast mode is observed to grow back. The feedback performance is tested with several wall configurations including the presence of ferritic material. This provides the first comparison of feedback control between the ferritic and stainless wall. The effect of plasma rotation on feedback control is tested by applying a static voltage on a bias probe. As the mode rotation being slowed by the radial current flow, a higher gain on the kink mode is required to achieve feedback suppression. The change in plasma rotation also modifies the plasma response to the

  4. Effect of thick blanket modules on neoclassical tearing mode locking in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2017-01-01

    The rotation of m/n  =  2/1 tearing modes can be slowed and stopped (i.e. locked) by eddy currents induced in resistive walls in conjunction with residual error fields that provide a final ‘notch’ point. This is a particular issue in ITER with large inertia and low applied torque (m and n are poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively). Previous estimates of tolerable 2/1 island widths in ITER found that the ITER electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) system could catch and subdue such islands before they persisted long enough and grew large enough to lock. These estimates were based on a forecast of initial island rotation using the n  =  1 resistive penetration time of the inner vacuum vessel wall and benchmarked to DIII-D high-rotation plasmas, However, rotating tearing modes in ITER will also induce eddy currents in the blanket as the effective first wall that can shield the inner vessel. The closer fitting blanket wall has a much shorter time constant and should allow several times smaller islands to lock several times faster in ITER than previously considered; this challenges the ECCD stabilization. Recent DIII-D ITER baseline scenario (IBS) plasmas with low rotation through small applied torque allow better modeling and scaling to ITER with the blanket as the first resistive wall.

  5. Van Kampen modes for bunch longitudinal motion

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Conditions for existence, uniqueness and stability of bunch steady states are considered. For the existence uniqueness problem, simple algebraic equations are derived, showing the result both for the action and Hamiltonian domain distributions. For the stability problem, van Kampen theory is used. Emerging of discrete van Kampen modes show either loss of Landau damping, or instability. This method can be applied for an arbitrary impedance, RF shape and beam distribution function Available areas on intensity-emittance plane are shown for resistive wall wake and single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening RF configurations. Language of van Kampen modes is a powerful tool for studying beam stability. Its unique efficiency reveals itself in those complicated cases, when the dielectric function cannot be obtained, as it is for the longitudinal bunch motion. Emergence of a discrete mode means either loss of Landau damping or instability. By definition, the discrete modes lie outside the continuous incoherent spectrum, but they still may stay within the bucket. In the last case, the discrete mode would disappear after a tiny portion of resonant particles would be added. However, if the discrete mode lie outside the bucket, the Landau damping cannot be restored by tiny perturbation of the particle distribution; LLD is called radical in that case. For a given bunch emittance and RF voltage, the intensity is limited either by reduction of the bucket acceptance or by (radical) LLD. In this paper, results are presented for longitudinal bunch stability in weak head-tail approximation and resistive wall impedance; three RF configurations are studied: single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening. It is shown that every RF configuration may be preferable, depending on the bunch emittance and intensity.

  6. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasiu, C. V.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  7. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide levels and feeding modes on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Li, Xiang-Fei; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Tian, Hong-Yan; Li, Jun-Yi; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) levels and its feeding modes on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). Fish (12.5 ± 0.5 g) were subjected to three FOS levels (0, 0.4% and 0.8%) and two feeding modes (supplementing FOS continuously and supplementing FOS two days interval 5 days) according to a 3 × 2 factorial design. At the end of 8-week feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila with concentration of 1 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. Fish fed 0.4% FOS continuously (D2) and fish fed the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days (D5) showed admirable growth performance. The highest plasma lysozyme, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities as well as complement component 3, total protein and immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were all observed in fish fed D5. They were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group and/or fish fed 0.8% FOS continuously, but exhibited no statistical difference (P > 0.05) with that of fish fed D2. A similar trend was also observed in antioxidant capability as well as the expression of Leap-I and Leap-Ⅱ. Mortality showed an opposite trend with the immune response with the lowest rate observed in fish fed D5. The results indicated that diet supplementing FOS in appropriate levels and feeding modes could improve the growth, immune response and antioxidant capability of fish, as might consequently lead to enhanced disease resistance. It can be speculated that the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days was most suitable for blunt snout bream.

  8. Antibacterial mode of action of violacein from Chromobacterium violaceum UTM5 against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aruldass, Claira Arul; Masalamany, Santhana Raj Louis; Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2017-03-31

    Violacein, violet pigment produced by Chromobacterium violaceum, has attracted much attention recently due to its pharmacological properties including antibacterial activity. The present study investigated possible antibacterial mode of action of violacein from C. violaceum UTM5 against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. Violet fraction was obtained by cultivating C. violaceum UTM5 in liquid pineapple waste medium, extracted, and fractionated using ethyl acetate and vacuum liquid chromatography technique. Violacein was quantified as major compound in violet fraction using HPLC analysis. Violet fraction displayed bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.9 μg/mL. Fluorescence dyes for membrane damage and scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed the inhibitory effect by disruption on membrane integrity, morphological alternations, and rupture of the cell membranes of both strains. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed membrane damage, mesosome formation, and leakage of intracellular constituents of both bacterial strains. Mode of action of violet fraction on the cell membrane integrity of both strains was shown by release of protein, K(+), and extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) with 110.5 μg/mL, 2.34 μg/mL, and 87.24 ng/μL, respectively, at 48 h of incubation. Violet fraction was toxic to human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and human fetal lung fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines with LC50 value of 0.998 ± 0.058 and 0.387 ± 0.002 μg/mL, respectively. Thus, violet fraction showed a strong antibacterial property by disrupting the membrane integrity of S. aureus and MRSA strains. This is the first report on the possible mode of antibacterial action of violet fraction from C. violaceum UTM5 on S. aureus and MRSA strains.

  9. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maxwell Z; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2016-02-09

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal-bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA's cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed.

  10. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal–bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA’s cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed. PMID:26802120

  11. Beta-limiting instabilities and global mode stabilization in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2003-01-01

    Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment @M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 ~2000!#, that has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a;1.27 at plasma current exceeding 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE ITER89P.2). Toroidal and normalized beta have exceeded 25% and 4.3, respectively, in q;7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase and then saturate with increasing li . The stability factor bN /li has reached 6, limited by sudden beta collapses. Increased pressure peaking leads to a decrease in bN . Ideal stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT @L. L. Lao et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1611 ~1985!# shows that the plasmas are at the no-wall beta limit for the n51 kink/ballooning mode. Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and mode stability is not highly effected by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. The resistive wall mode has been observed in plasmas exceeding the ideal no-wall beta limit and leads to rapid toroidal rotation damping across the plasma core.

  12. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  13. Resistive reduced MHD modeling of multi-edge-localized-mode cycles in Tokamak X-point plasmas.

    PubMed

    Orain, F; Bécoulet, M; Huijsmans, G T A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Hoelzl, M; Morales, J; Garbet, X; Nardon, E; Pamela, S; Passeron, C; Latu, G; Fil, A; Cahyna, P

    2015-01-23

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements.

  14. Evidence for dual mode of action of a thiosemicarbazone, NSC73306: A potent substrate of the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Shukla, Suneet; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance due to reduced drug accumulation is a phenomenon predominantly caused by the overexpression of members of the ATP-binding cassette transporters, including ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 and several ABCC family members (MRPs). We previously reported that a thiosemicarbazone derivative, NSC73306, is cytotoxic to carcinoma cells that overexpress functional P-glycoprotein and it re-sensitizes these cells to chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the effect of NSC73306 on cells overexpressing other ABC drug transporters, including ABCG2, MRP1, MRP4 and MRP5. Our findings demonstrated that NSC73306 is not more toxic to cells that overexpress these transporters compared to their respective parental cells, and these transporters do not confer resistance to NSC73306 either. In spite of this, we observed that NSC73306 is a transport substrate for ABCG2 that can effectively inhibit ABCG2-mediated drug transport and reverse resistance to both mitoxantrone and topotecan in ABCG2-expressing cells. Interactions between NSC73306 and the ABCG2 drug-binding site(s) were confirmed by its stimulatory effect on ATPase activity (140–150 nM concentration required for 50% stimulation) and by inhibition of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling (50% inhibition at 250–400 nM) of the substrate-binding site(s). Overall, NSC73306 appears to be a potent modulator of ABCG2 that does not interact with MRP1, MRP4 or MRP5. Collectively, these data suggest that NSC73306 can potentially be used, due to its dual mode of action, as an effective agent to overcome drug resistance by eliminating P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cells, and by acting as a potent modulator that re-sensitizes ABCG2-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutics. PMID:18089722

  15. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  16. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  17. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  18. Transposon-induced mutations in two loci of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a result in phage resistance and lack of N-acetylglucosamine in the teichoic acid of the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Tran, H L; Fiedler, F; Hodgson, D A; Kathariou, S

    1999-11-01

    Teichoic acid-associated N-acetylglucosamine and rhamnose have been shown to serve as phage receptors in Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a. We generated and characterized two single-copy Tn916DeltaE mutants which were resistant to phage A118 and several other serotype 1/2a-specific phages. In one mutant the insertion was immediately upstream of the recently identified ptsHI locus, which encodes two proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate uptake system, whereas in the other the insertion was immediately upstream of an operon whose most distal gene was clpC, involved in stress responses and virulence. Transduction experiments confirmed the association of the phage-resistant phenotype of these mutants with the transposon insertion. Phage A118 resistance of the mutants could be attributed to inability of the phage to adsorb onto the mutant cells, and biochemical analysis of cell wall composition showed that the teichoic acids of both mutants were deficient in N-acetylglucosamine. Rhamnose and other teichoic acid and cell wall components were not affected.

  19. The Influence of Modes of Deposition of Coatings on the Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Steels in Acidic Media;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Selivanov, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, effect of welding on corrosion of welded joints of austenitic steel 12KH18N10T. It is shown that the use of pulsed - arc welding steel 12KH18N10T allows you to create a protective coating with dispersed structure with less thermal impact on the zone of the welded joint. Coating is of such structure allows 1.5 to 6 times to reduce the corrosion rate of welded joints of steel 12KH18N10T in active chemical environments. Pulse the process of deposition of coatings on welded joint of steels can be effectively used for the protection against corrosion in the repair of equipment of chemical industry. The results obtained can be recommended for use when welding a protective corrosion - resistant coatings on working surfaces of equipment of chemical productions.

  20. Excitation of external kink mode by trapped energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Xu, X. Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-05-01

    An unstable fishbone-like non-resonant external kink mode (FLEM) is numerically found to be driven by the precessional drift motion of trapped energetic particles (EPs) in both reversed-field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas, even under the ideal wall boundary condition. In the presence of a sufficiently large fraction of trapped energetic ions in high beta plasmas, the FLEM instability may occur. The excitation condition is discussed in detail. The frequency of the FLEM is linked to the precessional drift frequency of EPs, and varies with the plasma flow speed. Therefore, it is usually much higher than that of the typical resistive wall mode (RWM). In general, the growth rate of FLEM does not depend on the wall resistivity. However, the wall position can significantly affect the mode’s property. The drift kinetic effects from thermal particles (mainly due to the transit resonance of passing particles) play a stabilizing role on FLEMs. In the presence of EPs, the FLEM and the RWM can co-exist or even couple to each other, depending on the plasma parameters. The FLEM instabilities in RFP and tokamaks have rather similar physics nature, although certain sub-dominant characters appear differently in the two configurations.

  1. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  2. The cotyledon cell wall of the common bean (phaseolus vulgaris) resists digestion in the upper intestine and thus may limit iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strategies that enhance the Fe bioavailability from the bean are of keen interest to nutritionists, bean breeders and growers. In beans, the cotyledon contains 75-80% of the total seed Fe, most of which appears to be located within the cotyledon cell. The cotyledon cell wall is known to be resistan...

  3. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  4. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  5. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  6. Shear Tests and Calculation of Shear Resistance with the PC Program RFEM from Thin Partition Walls of Brick in Old Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenic, Sinan; Nowak, Bernhard; Löffler, Philipp; Vašková, Anna

    2015-11-01

    This paper is about the shear capacity of partition walls in old buildings based on shear tests which were carried out under real conditions in an existing building. There were experiments conducted on different floors and in each case, the maximum recordable horizontal force and the horizontal displacement of the respective mortar were measured. At the same time material studies and material investigations were carried out in the laboratory. The material parameters were used for the calculation of the precise shear capacity of each joint. In the shear tests, the maximum displacement of a mortar joint was determined at a maximum of two to four millimetres. Furthermore, no direct linear relationship between the theoretical load (wall above it) and the shear stress occurred could be detected in the analysis of the experiment, as it was previously assumed.

  7. Engineering of contact resistance between transparent single-walled carbon nanotube films and a-Si:H single junction solar cells by gold nanodots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Augustin J; Chandra, Bhupesh; Tulevski, George S; Sadana, Devendra K

    2012-04-10

    The viability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a transparent conducting electrode on a-Si:H based single junction solar cells was explored. A Schottky barrier formed at a SWCNT/a-Si:H interface was removed by introducing high work function gold nanodots at the SWCNT/a-Si:H interface. This allows comparable device performance from SWCNT-electrode-based a-Si:H solar cells to that obtained by using conventional transparent conducting oxides.

  8. Shaking table experimental study of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Cao, Wanlin; Meng, Shaobin; Yu, Cheng; Dong, Hongying

    2014-06-01

    In this study, four 1/5 scaled shaking table tests were conducted to investigate the seismic performance of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures with different recycled aggregates replacement rates and concealed bracing detail. The four tested structures included one normal concrete model, one recycled coarse aggregate concrete model, and two recycled coarse and fine aggregate concrete models with or without concealed bracings inside the shear walls. The dynamic characteristics, dynamic response and failure mode of each model were compared and analyzed. Finite element models were also developed and nonlinear time-history response analysis was conducted. The test and analysis results show that the seismic performance of the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure is slightly worse than the normal concrete structure. The seismic resistance capacity of the recycled concrete frame-shear wall structure can be greatly improved by setting up concealed bracings inside the walls. With appropriate design, the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure and recycled concrete structure with concealed bracings inside the walls can be applied in buildings.

  9. The Influence of Prior Modes of Growth, Temperature, Medium, and Substrate Surface on Biofilm Formation by Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Teh, Amy Huei Teen; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bacterial gastrointestinal food-borne infection worldwide. It has been suggested that biofilm formation may play a role in survival of these bacteria in the environment. In this study, the influence of prior modes of growth (planktonic or sessile), temperatures (37 and 42 °C), and nutrient conditions (nutrient broth and Mueller-Hinton broth) on biofilm formation by eight C. jejuni strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles was examined. The ability of these strains to form biofilm on different abiotic surfaces (stainless steel, glass, and polystyrene) as well as factors potentially associated with biofilm formation (bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, and initial attachment) was also determined. The results showed that cells grown as sessile culture generally have a greater ability to form biofilm (P < 0.05) compared to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilm was also greater (P < 0.05) in lower nutrient media, while growth at different temperatures affects biofilm formation in a strain-dependent manner. The strains were able to attach and form biofilms on different abiotic surfaces, but none of them demonstrated strong, complex, or structured biofilm formation. There were no clear trends between the bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, attachment, and biofilm formation by the strains. This finding suggests that environmental factors did affect biofilm formation by C. jejuni, and they are more likely to persist in the environment in the form of mixed-species rather than monospecies biofilms.

  10. Simulation studies of the transverse dipole mode multibunch instability for the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Lopez, G.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program that assumes a point-like structure of the bunches, called TADIMMI, has been devised to study the dipole mode multibunch instability in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Collider ring due to a single Positron-Electron Project (PEP) test rf cavity and the resistive wall. For the rf cavity, the following cases are considered: symmetric filling, where good agreement is obtained with ZAP code; nonsymmetric filling; elimination of the most dangerous mode of the cavity; De-Q of the cavity, where a damping ratio is obtained for the cavity; and the feedback system, where it is verified that the proposed system for the Collider will work. For the resistive wall, a resonator impedance model approximation is used, which allows use of the same computer program to study the instabilities and the associated feedback system. Comparison with the analytical approach (ZAP) is also made.

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins in the roots of resistant and susceptible wax gourd cultivars in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Benincasae infection and fusaric acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dasen; Ma, Li; Samaj, Jozef; Xu, Chunxiang

    2011-08-01

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) play a defensive role in host-pathogen interactions. However, specific roles of individual HRGPs in plant defense against pathogen are poorly understood. Changes in extracellular distribution and abundance of individual cell wall HRGPs were investigated on root sections of two wax gourd (Benincasa hispida Cogn.) cultivars (Fusarium wilt resistant and susceptible, respectively), which were analyzed by immunolabelling with 20 monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes of extensins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) after being inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Benincasae or treated with fusaric acid (FA). These analyses revealed the following: (1) The levels of JIM11 and JIM20 interacting extensins were higher in the resistant cultivar. Either treatment caused a dramatic decrease in signal in both cultivars, but some new signal appeared in the rhizodermis. (2) The AGPs or rhamnogalacturonan containing CCRCM7-epitope were enhanced in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible one by either treatment. (3) Either treatment caused a slight increase in the levels of the AGPs recognized by LM2 and JIM16, but there were no differences between two cultivars. (4) The MAC204 signal nearly disappeared after FA treatment, but this was not the case with pathogen attack. (5) The LM14 signal slightly decreased after both treatments in both cultivars, but a less decrease was observed with the resistant cultivar. These results indicate that the CCRCM7 epitope likely contributed to the resistance of wax gourd to this pathogen, and JIM11 and JIM20 interacting extensins as well as LM2, LM14, MAC204 and JIM16 interacting AGPs were involved in the host-pathogen interaction.

  12. Tilting and shifting modes in a spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; Chance, M.S.; Dewar, R.L.; Grimm, R.C.; Monticello, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    In the absence of a conducting wall, typical spheromak plasmas are unstable to tilting and/or shifting modes. The effects of the cross-sectional shape, aspect ratio, and the location of a conducting wall on the stability of these modes are investigated.

  13. The Allosteric Site for the Nascent Cell Wall in Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a: An Achilles' Heel of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Acebrón, Iván; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to resist the effect of a wide range of antibiotics makes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) a leading global human pathogen. A key determinant of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in this organism is penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), an enzyme that catalyzes the crosslinking reaction between two adjacent peptide stems during the peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The recently published crystal structure of the complex of PBP2a with ceftaroline, a cephalosporin antibiotic that shows efficacy against MRSA, has revealed the allosteric site at 60-Å distance from the transpeptidase domain. Binding of ceftaroline to the allosteric site of PBP2a triggers conformational changes that lead to the opening of the active site from a closed conformation, where a second molecule of ceftaroline binds to give inhibition of the enzyme. The discovery of allostery in MRSA remains the only known example of such regulation of cellwall biosynthesis and represents a new paradigm in fighting MRSA. This review summarizes the present knowledge of the allosteric mechanism, the conformational changes allowing PBP2a catalysis and the means by which some clinical strains have acquired resistance to ceftaroline by disrupting the allosteric mechanism.

  14. A Model of Energetic Ion Effects on Pressure Driven Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, M. R.; Brennan, D. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous analysis of toroidal confinement experiments has shown that energetic ions interact with and affect MHD mode stability, which has been modeled and simulated for ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall modes. In addition, the 2/1 tearing mode was found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions, with significant effects on the slow growing resistive mode. This study focuses on the mode-particle interactions between energetic ions and pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes which have been shown to be driven unstable in experiments as pressure increases. Using a reduced analytic description of a high aspect ratio tokamak equilibrium with a fixed total current and variable magnetic shear; we add in the effects of high energy particles as a modification to the perturbed pressure. We find the importance of global magnetic shear (s =1/q dq/dr) on the particle precession drift frequency, which determines whether or not the energetic particle population resonates with the mode. We find that for s>scrit at the radial position of the pressure jump, particles have a stabilizing effect on the 2/1 tearing mode. However, we find that for smode development.

  15. Ferrocene and (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes of the natural anticancer naphthoquinone plumbagin with enhanced efficacy against resistant cancer cells and a genuine mode of action.

    PubMed

    Spoerlein-Guettler, Cornelia; Mahal, Katharina; Schobert, Rainer; Biersack, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    A series of ferrocene and (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes attached to the naturally occurring anticancer naphthoquinones plumbagin and juglone was tested for efficacy against various cancer cell lines and for alterations in the mode of action. The plumbagin ferrocene and (p-cymene)Ru(II) conjugates 1c and 2a overcame the multi-drug drug resistance of KB-V1/Vbl cervix carcinoma cells and showed IC50 (72 h) values around 1 μM in growth inhibition assays using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). They were further investigated for their influence on the cell cycle of KB-V1/Vbl and HCT-116 colon carcinoma cells, on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the latter cell line, for their substrate character for the P-glycoprotein drug eflux pump via the calcein-AM efflux assays, and for DNA affinity by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The derivatives 1c and 2a increased the number of dead cancer cells (sub-G0/G1 fraction) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ROS levels were significantly increased upon treatment with 1c and 2a. These compounds also showed a greater affinity to linear DNA than plumbagin. While plumbagin did not affect calcein-AM transport by P-glycoprotein the derivatives 1c and 2a exhibited a 50% or 80% inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein-AM efflux relative to the clinically established sensitizer verapamil.

  16. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  17. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  18. Mode converters for generating the HE11 (near-Gaussian) mode from gyrotron TEOn modes at 140 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, M.; Sturm, H.

    1985-11-01

    The structure of wall perturbations (superposition of 2 or 3 different periods) in rippled wall mode converters and the curvature distribution in bent smooth-walled TEO1-to-TM11 mode transducers were optimized by numerically solving the corresponding coupled-mode differential equations. Computer-aided optimization of circumferentially corrugated mode converters was achieved with a scattering matrix code employing the modal field expansion technique. In all cases the predicted overall efficiency of the complete mode converter system from Sigma TEOn (predominantly TEO3) to HE11 in the desired mode is 90% to 92% (ohmic attenuation is included). Low-power measurements on the efficiency of a 140 GHz TEO1-to-TM11 mode transducer (ao = 13.9 mm) are in excellent agreement with the predicted value of 95.2% (including ohmic attenuation).

  19. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  20. Optimization of Modes of Vacuum Carburizing of Gears from Heat-Resistant Steel VKS-7 on the Basis of Computational Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. Yu.; Smirnov, A. E.; Fakhurtdinov, R. S.; Ospennikova, O. G.; Gromov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Mathematical simulation is used to develop modes of vacuum carburizing providing the specified level of operating properties in high-load gears from steel VKS-7. The computed values of the operating properties are compared to experimental data obtained by testing check pieces subjected to vacuum carburizing by the modes developed.

  1. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Siva R. K.; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J.; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:26637593

  2. Analytical model of wall forces produced by kink perturbations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, D. V.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-05-15

    Analytical model of the electromagnetic forces produced by kink modes on the tokamak wall [H. R. Strauss et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082505 (2010)] is revisited. One of the main conclusions of the mentioned paper is that the largest force occurs at γτ{sub w}≈1, where γ is the kink growth rate and τ{sub w} is the wall penetration time. In the present study, a similar approach is developed under less restrictive assumptions on the plasma and dynamics of perturbation, and a different result is obtained: the force increases with γ and must be maximal at γτ{sub w}→∞. Additionally, the dependence of its amplitude on the plasma parameters is clarified. All distinctions and their reasons are explained in detail. The analysis is performed in the cylindrical model incorporating a resistive wall treated without traditional thin-wall constraints and covering therefore a full range in γτ{sub w}. It is applicable to either locked or rotating modes. Estimates of the sideways force are presented and compared with earlier forecasts.

  3. Enhancement of a Sunspot Light Wall with External Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Erdélyi, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Based on the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations, we study the response of a solar sunspot light wall to external disturbances. A flare occurrence near the light wall caused material to erupt from the lower solar atmosphere into the corona. Some material falls back to the solar surface and hits the light bridge (i.e., the base of the light wall), then sudden brightenings appear at the wall base followed by the rise of wall top, leading to an increase of the wall height. Once the brightness of the wall base fades, the height of the light wall begins to decrease. Five hours later, another nearby flare takes place, and a bright channel is formed that extends from the flare toward the light bridge. Although no obvious material flow along the bright channel is found, some ejected material is conjectured to reach the light bridge. Subsequently, the wall base brightens and the wall height begins to increase again. Once more, when the brightness of the wall base decays, the wall top fluctuates to lower heights. We suggest, based on the observed cases, that the interaction of falling material and ejected flare material with the light wall results in the brightenings of wall base and causes the height of the light wall to increase. Our results reveal that the light wall can be not only powered by the linkage of p-mode from below the photosphere, but may also be enhanced by external disturbances, such as falling material.

  4. Far Scrape-Off Layer and Near Wall Plasma Studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D; Boedo, J; Moyer, R; Brooks, N; Doerner, R; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Hollmann, E; Krashennijov, S; Lasnier, C; Mahdavi, M; McKee, G; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Wampler, W; Watkins, J; West, W; Whyte, D; Wong, C

    2004-12-03

    Far scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma parameters in DIII-D depend strongly on the discharge density and confinement regime. In L-mode, cross-field transport increases with the average discharge density and elevates the far SOL density, thus increasing plasma-wall contact. Far SOL density near the low field side (LFS) of the main chamber wall also increases with decreasing plasma current and with decreasing outer wall gap. In H-mode, between edge localized modes (ELMs), plasma-wall contact is weaker than in L-mode. During ELMs plasma fluxes to the LFS wall increase to, or above the L-mode levels. A large fraction of the net cross-field fluxes is convected through the SOL by large amplitude intermittent transport events. In high density L-mode and during ELMs in H-mode, intermittent events propagate all the way to the LFS wall and may cause sputtering.

  5. Lantibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry.

  6. Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lorraine A.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  7. Two Small RNAs Conserved in Enterobacteriaceae Provide Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics Targeting the Cell Wall Biosynthesis Enzyme Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muna A.; Göpel, Yvonne; Milewski, Slawomir; Görke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Formation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) by enzyme GlcN6P synthase (GlmS) represents the first step in bacterial cell envelope synthesis. In Escherichia coli, expression of glmS is controlled by small RNAs (sRNAs) GlmY and GlmZ. GlmZ activates the glmS mRNA by base-pairing. When not required, GlmZ is bound by adapter protein RapZ and recruited to cleavage by RNase E inactivating the sRNA. The homologous sRNA GlmY activates glmS indirectly. When present at high levels, GlmY sequesters RapZ by an RNA mimicry mechanism suppressing cleavage of GlmZ. The interplay of both sRNAs is believed to adjust GlmS synthesis to the needs of the cell, i.e., to achieve GlcN6P homeostasis. Bacilysin (tetaine) and Nva-FMDP are dipeptide antibiotics that impair cell envelope synthesis by inhibition of enzyme GlmS through covalent modification. However, although taken up efficiently, these antibiotics are less active against E. coli for reasons unknown so far. Here we show that the GlmY/GlmZ circuit provides resistance. Inhibition of GlmS causes GlcN6P deprivation leading to activation of GlmY and GlmZ, which in turn trigger glmS overexpression in a dosage-dependent manner. Mutation of glmY or glmZ disables this response and renders the bacteria highly susceptible to GlmS inhibitors. Thus, E. coli compensates inhibition of GlmS by increasing its synthesis through the GlmY/GlmZ pathway. This mechanism is also operative in Salmonella indicating that it is conserved in Enterobacteriaceae possessing these sRNAs. As GlmY apparently responds to GlcN6P, co-application of a non-metabolizable GlcN6P analog may prevent activation of the sRNAs and thereby increase the bactericidal activity of GlmS inhibitors against wild-type bacteria. Initial experiments using glucosamine-6-sulfate support this possibility. Thus, GlcN6P analogs might be considered for co-application with GlmS inhibitors in combined therapy to treat infections caused by pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27379045

  8. Sequential buckling of an elastic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bico, Jose; Bense, Hadrien; Keiser, Ludovic; Roman, Benoit; Melo, Francisco; Abkarian, Manouk

    A beam under quasistatic compression classically buckles beyond a critical threshold. In the case of a free beam, the lowest buckling mode is selected. We investigate the case of a long ``wall'' grounded of a compliant base and compressed in the axial compression. In the case of a wall of slender rectangular cross section, the selected buckling mode adopts a nearly fixed wavelength proportional to the height of the wall. Higher compressive loads only increase the amplitude of the buckle. However if the cross section has a sharp shape (such as an Eiffel tower profile), we observe successive buckling modes of increasing wavelength. We interpret this unusual evolution in terms of scaling arguments. At small scales, this variable periodicity might be used to develop tunable optical devices. We thank ECOS C12E07, CNRS-CONICYT, and Fondecyt Grant No. N1130922 for partially funding this work.

  9. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    SciTech Connect

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2015-11-02

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  10. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  11. Targeted therapy of the XIAP/proteasome pathway overcomes TRAIL-resistance in carcinoma by switching apoptosis signaling to a Bax/Bak-independent 'type I' mode.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, B; Richter, A; Richter, A; Overkamp, T; Essmann, F; Hemmati, P G; Preissner, R; Belka, C; Daniel, P T

    2013-05-23

    TRAIL is a promising anticancer agent, capable of inducing apoptosis in a wide range of treatment-resistant tumor cells. In 'type II' cells, the death signal triggered by TRAIL requires amplification via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Consequently, deregulation of the intrinsic apoptosis-signaling pathway, for example, by loss of Bax and Bak, confers TRAIL-resistance and limits its application. Here, we show that despite resistance of Bax/Bak double-deficient cells, TRAIL-treatment resulted in caspase-8 activation and complete processing of the caspase-3 proenzymes. However, active caspase-3 was degraded by the proteasome and not detectable unless the XIAP/proteasome pathway was inhibited. Direct or indirect inhibition of XIAP by RNAi, Mithramycin A or by the SMAC mimetic LBW-242 as well as inhibition of the proteasome by Bortezomib overcomes TRAIL-resistance of Bax/Bak double-deficient tumor cells. Moreover, activation and stabilization of caspase-3 becomes independent of mitochondrial death signaling, demonstrating that inhibition of the XIAP/proteasome pathway overcomes resistance by converting 'type II' to 'type I' cells. Our results further demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase XIAP is a gatekeeper critical for the 'type II' phenotype. Pharmacological manipulation of XIAP therefore is a promising strategy to sensitize cells for TRAIL and to overcome TRAIL-resistance in case of central defects in the intrinsic apoptosis-signaling pathway.

  12. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  13. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  14. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  15. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  16. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  17. Fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1989-01-01

    The present investigation of the fracture of alumina and zirconia polycrystalline ceramic specimens of precracked-disk type, in diametral compression, evaluated fracture toughness in pure mode I, combined mode I/mode II, and pure mode II, depending on the alignment of the center crack relative to the loading diameter. The mixed-mode fracture-toughness envelope thus obtained exhibits significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II, relative to the predictions of linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Crack-surface resistance due to grain-interlocking and abrasion are identified as the primary sources of increased fracture resistance in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics.

  18. Hydrodynamic interaction of micro-swimmers near a wall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gao-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of an archetypal low-Reynolds number swimmer, called “squirmer”, near a wall has been numerically studied. For a single squirmer, depending on the swimming mechanism, three different modes are distinguished: (a) the squirmer escaping from the wall, (b) the squirmer swimming along the wall at a constant distance and orientation angle, and (c) the squirmer swimming near the wall in a periodic trajectory. The role of inertial effects on the near-wall motion of the squirmer is quantified. The dynamics of multiple squirmers swimming between two walls is found to be very different from a single squirmer. Near-wall accumulation of squirmers are observed. At a relatively small concentration c = 0.1, around 60 – 80% of the squirmers are accumulated near the walls and attraction of pushers and pullers towards the wall is stronger than neutral squirmers. Near-wall squirmers orient normal to the wall, while in the bulk region, the squirmers are mostly oriented parallel to the wall. At a high concentration, c = 0.4, the percentage of the near-wall squirmers is around 40%. The orientation angle of squirmers in the bulk region is more uniformly distributed at high concentrations. In the near-wall region, pullers repel each other, while pushers are attracted to each other and form clusters. PMID:25122372

  19. Determination of the primary target of a quinolone drug and the effect of quinolone resistance-conferring mutations by measuring quinolone sensitivity based on its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Emily S; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    We used an assay to measure quinolone sensitivity as a shift in the position of the cleavage-religation equilibrium. This assay was found to be useful in identifying the primary target of a quinolone drug and assessing the effect of quinolone resistance-conferring mutations.

  20. Resistance switching mode transformation in SrRuO3/Cr-doped SrZrO3/Pt frameworks via a thermally activated Ti out-diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yongcheol; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Jongmin; Woo, Hyeonseok; Han, Jaeseok; Kim, Hyungsang; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Im, Hyunsik

    2014-12-08

    This work reports on a mechanism for irreversible resistive switching (RS) transformation from bipolar to unipolar RS behavior in SrRuO3 (SRO)/Cr-doped SrZrO3 (SZO:Cr)/Pt capacitor structures prepared on a Ti/SiO2/Si substrate. Counter-clockwise bipolar RS memory current-voltage (I-V) characteristics are observed within the RS voltage window of -2.5 to +1.9 V, with good endurance and retention properties. As the bias voltage increases further beyond 4 V under a forward bias, a forming process occurs resulting in irreversible RS mode transformation from bipolar to unipolar mode. This switching mode transformation is a direct consequence of thermally activated Ti out-diffusion from a Ti adhesion layer. Transition metal Ti effectively out-diffuses through the loose Pt electrode layer at high substrate temperatures, leading to the unintended formation of a thin titanium oxide (TiO(x) where x < 2) layer between the Pt electrode and the SZO:Cr layer as well as additional Ti atoms in the SZO:Cr layer. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth-profile measurements provided apparent evidence of the Ti out-diffusion phenomenon. We propose that the out-diffusion-induced additional Ti atoms in the SZO:Cr layer contributes to the creation of the metallic filamentary channels.

  1. Dual-Mode Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia has conducted an investigation of the mixing and combustion processes in a hydrogen fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The experiment essentially consisted of the "direct connect" continuous operation of a Mach 2 rectangular combustor with a single unswept ramp fuel injector. The stagnation enthalpy of the test flow simulated a flight Mach number of 5. Measurements were obtained using conventional wall instrumentation and laser based diagnostics. These diagnostics included, pressure and wall temperature measurements, Fuel Plume Imaging (FPI) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A schematic of the combustor configuration and a summary of the measurements obtained are presented. The experimental work at UVa was parallel by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) work at NASA Langley. The numerical and experiment results are compared in this document.

  2. Avoidance of Tearing Mode Locking and Disruption with Electro-Magnetic Torque Introduced by Feedback-based Mode Rotation Control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Here we have demonstrated a very promising scheme to avoid such disruptions by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque to the modes is created by a toroidal phase shift between the externally-applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss due to the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance is provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two vastly different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high βN plasmas in a non-circular divertor tokamak. In RFX-mod, the plasma was ohmically-heated plasma with ultralow safety factor in a circular limiter discharge of active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. The internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited to this purpose.

  3. Quantum processes in resonators with moving walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimov, A. B.; Dodonov, V. V.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of an electromagnetic field in an ideal cavity with an oscillating boundary is considered in the resonance long-time limit. The rates of photon creation from the vacuum and thermal states are evaluated. The squeezing coefficients for the field modes are found, as well as the backward reaction of the field on the vibrating wall.

  4. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  5. Internal Mode Structure of Resonant Field Amplification in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanctot, M. J.; Navratil, G.; Reimerdes, H.; Bogatu, I. N.; in, Y.; Chu, M. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of high-β plasmas to error fields is caused by a paramagnetic plasma response to error fields with a topology that is resonant with the structure of weakly-damped resistive wall modes (RWM), a phenomenon referred to as resonant field amplification (RFA) [1]. The RFA has been driven in DIII-D H-mode plasmas by applying slowly-rotating, low-n magnetic fields with a set of 12 coils located inside the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the RFA mode structure have been obtained using a pair of soft x-ray photodiode cameras. A virtual diagnostic has been developed to compare the measurements to the eigenfunctions for the free boundary external kink and the RWM, which were calculated using the stability codes GATO and MARS-F. Details of the analysis will be presented. 6pt [1] A.H. Boozer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5059 (2001).

  6. Characterization of Flow and Ohm's Law in the Rotating Wall Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannum, David; Brookhart, M.; Forest, C. B.; Kendrick, R.; Mengin, G.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2010-11-01

    The rotating wall machine is a linear screw-pinch built to study the role of different electromagnetic boundary conditions on the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM). Its plasma is created by an array of electrostatic washer guns which can be biased to discharge up to 1 kA of current each. Individual flux ropes from the guns shear, merge, and expand into a 20 cm diameter, ˜1 m long plasma column. Langmuir (singletip) and tri-axial B-dot probes move throughout the column to measure radial and axial profiles of key plasma parameters. As the plasma current increases, more H2 fuel is ionized, raising ne to 5 x10^20 m-3 while Te stays at a constant 3 eV. The electron density expands to the wall while the current density (Jz) stays pinched to the central axis. E xB and diamagnetic drifts create radially and axially sheared plasma rotation. Plasma resistivity follows the Spitzer model in the core while exceeding it at the edge. These measurements improve the model used to predict the RWM growth rate.

  7. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  8. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  9. Pressure-induced low-lying phonon modes softening and enhanced thermal resistance in β -M g2A l4S i5O18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiran; Tian, Zhilin; Luo, Yixiu; Wang, Jiemin; Sun, Luchao; Zheng, Liya; Wang, Jingyang

    2017-02-01

    Lattice thermal conductivities of β -M g2A l4S i5O18 were predicted at various hydrostatic pressures based on some theoretical models. An abnormal decrement on lattice thermal conductivity is observed for compressed crystal structure. A rigorous analysis of structural stability, bonding characteristics, vibration modes, group velocities, and mode Grüneisen parameters helps us to recognize the origin of this anomalous behavior. We attribute the negative dependent trend to the softening of low frequency phonons and strengthening of anharmonicity at elevated pressure, both of which arise from the specific corner-linked tetrahedral framework in the crystal structure. To validate theoretical calculations, we synthesized pure and dense β -M g2A l4S i5O18 ceramic by using a two-step processing method and determined its intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity by successfully eliminating the phonon scattering from defects and high-temperature thermal radiation. The experimental intrinsic values agreed quite well with the theoretical predictions. This paper reports an anomalous pressure-induced reduction of lattice thermal conductivity and also provides a key insight into the interesting phonon modification mechanism through tailoring the crystal structure of complex compounds.

  10. Hierarchical order in wall-bounded shear turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, F.; Aubry, N.

    1996-04-01

    Since turbulence at realistic Reynolds numbers, such as those occurring in the atmosphere or in the ocean, involve a high number of modes that cannot be resolved computationally in the foreseeable future, there is a strong motivation for finding techniques which drastically decrease the number of such required modes, particularly under inhomogeneous conditions. The significance of this work is to show that wall-bounded shear turbulence, in its strongly inhomogeneous direction (normal to the wall), can be decomposed into one (or a few) space{endash}time mother mode(s), with each mother generating a whole family of modes by stretching symmetry. In other words, the generated modes are similar, dilated copies of their mother. In addition, we show that the nature of all previous modes strongly depends on the symmetry itself. These findings constitute the first scaling theory of inhomogeneous turbulence. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  12. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  13. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  14. Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic engineered barriers must provide a period of absolute containment to high-level radioactive waste in geological repositories. Candidate materials include copper alloys, carbon steels, stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys. The national programs of nuclear waste management have to identify and assess the anticipated degradation modes of the selected materials in the corresponding repository environment, which evolves in time. Commonly assessed degradation modes include general corrosion, localized corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen-assisted cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. Laboratory testing and modeling in metallurgical and environmental conditions of similar and higher aggressiveness than those expected in service conditions are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials. This review focuses on the anticipated degradation modes of the selected or reference materials as corrosion-resistant barriers in nuclear repositories. These degradation modes depend not only on the selected alloy but also on the near-field environment. The evolution of the near-field environment varies for saturated and unsaturated repositories considering backfilled and unbackfilled conditions. In saturated repositories, localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the initial aerobic stage, while general corrosion and hydrogen-assisted cracking are the main degradation modes in the anaerobic stage. Unsaturated repositories would provide an oxidizing environment during the entire repository lifetime. Microbiologically influenced corrosion may be avoided or minimized by selecting an appropriate backfill material. Radiation effects are negligible provided that a thick-walled container or an inner shielding container is used.

  15. SQ109 targets MmpL3, a membrane transporter of trehalose monomycolate involved in mycolic acid donation to the cell wall core of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tahlan, Kapil; Wilson, Regina; Kastrinsky, David B; Arora, Kriti; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth; Barnes, S Whitney; Walker, John R; Alland, David; Barry, Clifton E; Boshoff, Helena I

    2012-04-01

    SQ109, a 1,2-diamine related to ethambutol, is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis, but its mode of action remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SQ109 disrupts cell wall assembly, as evidenced by macromolecular incorporation assays and ultrastructural analyses. SQ109 interferes with the assembly of mycolic acids into the cell wall core of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as bacilli exposed to SQ109 show immediate inhibition of trehalose dimycolate (TDM) production and fail to attach mycolates to the cell wall arabinogalactan. These effects were not due to inhibition of mycolate synthesis, since total mycolate levels were unaffected, but instead resulted in the accumulation of trehalose monomycolate (TMM), the precursor of TDM and cell wall mycolates. In vitro assays using purified enzymes showed that this was not due to inhibition of the secreted Ag85 mycolyltransferases. We were unable to achieve spontaneous generation of SQ109-resistant mutants; however, analogs of this compound that resulted in similar shutdown of TDM synthesis with concomitant TMM accumulation were used to spontaneously generate resistant mutants that were also cross-resistant to SQ109. Whole-genome sequencing of these mutants showed that these all had mutations in the essential mmpL3 gene, which encodes a transmembrane transporter. Our results suggest that MmpL3 is the target of SQ109 and that MmpL3 is a transporter of mycobacterial TMM.

  16. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  17. NMR-based analysis of aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4'): the pattern of OH/NH3(+) substitution determines the preferred antibiotic binding mode and is critical for drug inactivation.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Julia; Vacas, Tatiana; Torrado, Mario; Corzana, Francisco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Menendez, Margarita; Bastida, Agatha; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2008-04-16

    The most significant mechanism of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides is the enzymatic inactivation of the drug. Herein, we analyze several key aspects of the aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus, employing NMR complemented with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and measurements of the enzymatic activity on newly synthesized kanamycin derivatives. From a methodological perspective, this analysis provides the first example reported for the use of transferred NOE (trNOE) experiments in the analysis of complex molecular recognition processes, characterized by the existence of simultaneous binding events of the ligand to different regions of a protein receptor. The obtained results show that, in favorable cases, these overlapping binding processes can be isolated employing site-directed mutagenesis and then independently analyzed. From a molecular recognition perspective, this work conclusively shows that the enzyme ANT(4') displays a wide tolerance to conformational variations in the drug. Thus, according to the NMR data, kanamycin-A I/II linkage exhibits an unusual anti-Psi orientation in the ternary complex, which is in qualitative agreement with the previously reported crystallographic complex. In contrast, closely related, kanamycin-B is recognized by the enzyme in the syn-type arrangement for both glycosidic bonds. This observation together with the enzymatic activity displayed by ANT(4') against several synthetic kanamycin derivatives strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of positive charges within the aminoglycoside scaffold is the key feature that governs its preferred binding mode to the protein catalytic region and also the regioselectivity of the adenylation reaction. In contrast, the global shape of the antibiotic does not seem to be a critical factor. This feature represents a qualitative difference between the target A-site RNA and the resistance enzyme ANT(4') as aminoglycoside

  18. A photonic wall pressure sensor for fluid mechanics applications.

    PubMed

    Manzo, M; Ioppolo, T; Ayaz, U K; Lapenna, V; Ötügen, M V

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a micro-optical wall pressure sensor concept based on the optical modes of dielectric resonators. The sensing element is a spherical micro-resonator with a diameter of a few hundred micrometers. A latex membrane that is flush mounted on the wall transmits the normal pressure to the sensing element. Changes in the wall pressure perturb the sphere's morphology, leading to a shift in the optical modes. The wall pressure is measured by monitoring the shifts in the optical modes. Prototype sensors with polydimethylsiloxane micro-spheres are tested in a steady two-dimensional channel flow and in a plane wave acoustic tube. Results indicate sensor resolutions of ∼20 mPa and bandwidth of up to 2 kHz.

  19. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA; FINN, JOHN M.; CHACON, LUIS

    2007-02-08

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  20. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99 % similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanced anti-MRSA compound production. The pure bioactive compound was isolated using silica gel column chromatography and Semi-preparative High-performance liquid chromatography (Semi-preparative HPLC). The Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton NMR ((1)H NMR) analysis indicated the phenolic nature of the compound. The molecular mass of the purified compound was 507 Da as revealed by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The compound inhibited the growth of MRSA with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.5 µg mL(-1). MRSA bacteria exposed to 4× MIC of the compound and the cell viability was determined using flow cytometric analysis. Scanning electron microscope and Transmission electron microscope analysis was used to determine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria. This is the first report on isolation of anti-MRSA compound from halophilic B. amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and could act as a promising biocontrol agent.

  1. Antibacterial Mode of Action of Cinnamomum verum Bark Essential Oil, Alone and in Combination with Piperacillin, Against a Multi-Drug-Resistant Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Krishnan, Thiba; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of the cinnamon bark essential oil (CB), when used singly and also in combination with piperacillin, for its antimicrobial and synergistic activity against beta-lactamase TEM-1 plasmid-conferred Escherichia coli J53 R1. Viable count of this combination showed a complete killing profile at 20 h and further confirmed its synergistic effect by reducing the bacteria cell numbers. Analysis on the stability of treated cultures for cell membrane permeability by CB when tested against sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that the bacterial cell membrane was disrupted by the essential oils. Scanning electron microscopy observation and bacterial surface charge measurement also revealed that CB causes irreversible membrane damage and reduces the bacterial surface charge. In addition, bioluminescence expression of Escherichia coli [pSB1075] and E. coli [pSB401] by CB showed reduction, indicating the possibility of the presence of quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors. Gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry of the essential oil of Cinnamomum verum showed that trans-cinnamaldehyde (72.81%), benzyl alcohol (12.5%), and eugenol (6.57%) were the major components in the essential oil. From this study, CB has the potential to reverse E. coli J53 R1 resistance to piperacillin through two pathways; modification in the permeability of the outer membrane or bacterial QS inhibition.

  2. Experimental Approach and Diagnostics for the Rotating Wall Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergerson, W.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.; Hannum, D.; Kendrick, R.; Sarff, J. S.

    2002-11-01

    A new screw pinch experiment is under construction to study stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) using differentially rotating shells. The experiment consists of a magnetized cylindrical plasma column surrounded by two concentric copper shells, the outer rotating with respect to a stationary inner shell. An ideal kink unstable with a stationary shell boundary can theoretically be stabilized with sufficient differential rotation of the double shell geometry. Flexible control of the current density and safety factor profiles is provided by a plasma gun array, which also sources the plasma. The key RWM diagnostic is a 2D array of radial magnetic field sensors on the outer surface of in the inner copper shell, designed with sub-Gauss sensitivity. The array is constructed using flexible printed circuit film technology to provide simple installation and accurate alignment. Magnetic sensors inside the inner shell will be used to discriminate the slowing growing RWM from possible resistive (e.g., tearing) instabilities. The first phase experiment will examine the RWM for a variety of conditions without the second rotating shell, followed by the addition of the rotating shell and re-examination of the RWM behavior. A third phase experiment where the rotating copper shell is replaced by a flowing liquid sodium shell is under design. This work is supported by US DoE DE-FG02-00ER54603.

  3. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  4. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  5. Equilibrium and global MHD stability study of KSTAR high beta plasmas under passive and active mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Chung, J.; Hahn, S. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, M.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2010-02-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research, KSTAR, is designed to operate a steady-state, high beta plasma while retaining global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability to establish the scientific and technological basis of an economically attractive fusion reactor. An equilibrium model is established for stability analysis of KSTAR. Reconstructions were performed for the experimental start-up scenario and experimental first plasma operation using the EFIT code. The VALEN code was used to determine the vacuum vessel current distribution. Theoretical high beta equilibria spanning the expected operational range are computed for various profiles including generic L-mode and DIII-D experimental H-mode pressure profiles. Ideal MHD stability calculations of toroidal mode number of unity using the DCON code shows a factor of 2 improvement in the wall-stabilized plasma beta limit at moderate to low plasma internal inductance. The planned stabilization system in KSTAR comprises passive stabilizing plates and actively cooled in-vessel control coils (IVCCs) designed for non-axisymmetric field error correction and stabilization of slow timescale MHD modes including resistive wall modes (RWMs). VALEN analysis using standard proportional gain shows that active stabilization near the ideal wall limit can be reached with feedback using the midplane segment of the IVCC. The RMS power required for control using both white noise and noise taken from NSTX active stabilization experiments is computed for beta near the ideal wall limit. Advanced state-space control algorithms yield a factor of 2 power reduction assuming white noise while remaining robust with respect to variations in plasma beta.

  6. Low-cost sustainable wall construction system

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1998-07-01

    Houses with no wall cavities, such as those made of adobe, stone, brick, or block, have poor thermal properties but are rarely insulated because of the cost and difficulty of providing wall insulation. A simple, low-cost technique using loose-fill indigenous materials has been demonstrated for the construction of highly insulated walls or the retrofit of existing walls in such buildings. Locally available pumice, in sandbags stacked along the exterior wall of an adobe house in New Mexico, added a thermal resistance (R) of 16 F{sm{underscore}bullet}ft{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}h/Btu (2.8 m{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}K/W). The total cost of the sandbag insulation wall retrofit was $3.76 per square foot ($40.50/m{sup 2}). Computer simulations of the adobe house using DOE 2.1E show savings of $275 per year, corresponding to 50% reduction in heating energy consumption. The savings-to-investment ratio ranges from 1.1 to 3.2, so the cost of conserved energy is lower than the price of propane, natural gas and electric heat, making the system cost-effective. Prototype stand-alone walls were also constructed using fly ash and sawdust blown into continuous polypropylene tubing, which was folded between corner posts as it was filled to form the shape of the wall. Other materials could also be used. The inexpensive technique solves the problem of insulating solid-wall hours and constructing new houses without specialized equipment and skills, thereby saving energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving comfort for people in many countries. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has filed patent applications on this technology, which is part of a DOE initiative on sustainable building envelope materials and systems.

  7. Influencing factors on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Bing, Chen; Gang, Liu; Baoxi, Wei; Xu, Xu

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to characterize the effects of fuel type, injector configuration, inflow total temperature and fuel injection distribution on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet combustor. High enthalpy vitiated air was heated to three total temperatures by the hydrogen-oxygen combustion, entering the isolator entrance at a Mach number of 2.0. Fuel was injected through a four-hole aero-ramp or transverse injector, and ignited by a gas-pilot flame. At an inflow stagnation condition of P0=0.85 MPa and T0=1200 K, three combustion modes, namely Pure Scram Mode, Dual-Mode Scram Mode and Dual-Mode Ram Mode, were classified through the wall pressure distributions, one-dimensional performance analysis, and optical visualization. Two critical fuel equivalence ratios were selected to divide three combustion modes. At the lower transition point, ERlc, the transition from Pure Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Scram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.23; while at the upper transition point, ERuc, the transition from Dual-Mode Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Ram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.34. The transition width, ERw, was defined as the difference of two transition points. In this limited range, the combustor was operating in the Dual-Mode Scram Mode. The ERuc was estimated based on the Rayleigh flow relation, and the applicability of the analytic equation was testified through a series of experiments with different boundary conditions. The experimental results showed that two transition points in the ethylene case were higher in ER than in the hydrogen case, and the measured ERuc of two fuels were all 2.5 times larger than the predicted values. However, two fuels had little difference on the transition width. Due to the angled injection, two transition points in the aero-ramp case were higher in ER than in the transverse injector case; while the influence of injector

  8. Degradation Modes of Alloy 22 in Yucca Mountain Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, F; Gordon, G M; Mon, K G; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

  9. DEGRADATION MODES OF ALLOY 22 IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; G.M. Gordon; R.B. Rebak

    2005-10-13

    The nuclear waste package design for Yucca Mountain (Nevada, USA), in its current configuration, consists of a double wall cylindrical container fabricated using a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 for the outer barrier and type 316 stainless steel for the inner structural vessel. A mailbox-shaped drip shield fabricated primarily using Ti Grade 7 will cover the waste packages. The environmental degradation of the relevant materials have been extensively studied and modeled for over ten years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation modes of Alloy 22 (N06022) due to its interaction with the predicted in-drift mountain conditions including temperature and types of electrolytes. Subjects discussed include thermal aging and phase stability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking.

  10. Segmented Liner to Control Mode Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic performance of duct liners can be improved by segmenting the treatment. In a segmented liner treatment, one stage of liner reduces the target sound and scatters energy into other acoustic modes, which are attenuated by a subsequent stage. The Curved Duct Test Rig is an experimental facility in which sound incident on the liner can be generated in a specific mode and the scatter of energy into other modes can be quantified. A series of experiments is performed in which the baseline configuration is asymmetric, that is, a liner is on one side wall of the test duct and the wall opposite is acoustically hard. Segmented liner treatment is achieved by progressively replacing sections of the hard wall opposite with liner in the axial direction, from 25% of the wall surface to 100%. It is found that the energy scatter from the (0,0) to the (0,1) mode reduces as the percentage of opposite wall treatment increases, and the frequency of peak attenuation shifts toward higher frequency. Similar results are found when the incident mode is of order (0,1) and scatter is into the (0,0) mode. The propagation code CDUCT-LaRC is used to predict the effect of liner segmenting on liner performance. The computational results show energy scatter and the effect of liner segmentation that agrees with the experimental results. The experiments and computations both show that segmenting the liner treatment is effective to control the scatter of incident mode energy into other modes. CDUCT-LaRC is shown to be a valuable tool to predict trends of liner performance with liner configuration.

  11. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    The motion of domain walls due to the spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport is of considerable interest for the development of spintronic devices. We model the charge and spin transport through domain walls in ferromagnetic semiconductors for various systems. With an appropriate model Hamiltonian for the spin-dependent potential, we calculate wavefunctions inside the domain walls which are then used to calculate transmission and reflection coefficients, which are then in turn used to calculate current and spin torque. Starting with a simple approximation for the change in magnetization inside the domain wall, and ending with a sophisticated transfer matrix method, we model the common pi wall, the less-studied 2pi wall, and a system of two pi walls separated by a variable distance. We uncover an interesting width dependence on the transport properties of the domain wall. 2pi walls in particular, have definitive maximums in resistance and spin torque for certain domain wall widths that can be seen as a function of the spin mistracking in the system---when the spins are either passing straight through the domain wall (narrow walls) or adiabatically following the magnetization (wide walls), the resistance is low as transmission is high. In the intermediate region, there is room for the spins to rotate their magnetization, but not necessarily all the way through a 360 degree rotation, leading to reflection and resistance. We also calculate that there are widths for which the total velocity of a 2pi wall is greater than that of a same-sized pi wall. In the double-wall system, we model how the system reacts to changes in the separation of the domain walls. When the domain walls are far apart, they act as a spin-selective resonant double barrier, with sharp resonance peaks in the transmission profile. Brought closer and closer together, the number and sharpness of the peaks decrease, the spectrum smooths out, and the domain walls brought together have a

  12. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  13. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  14. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  15. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  16. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial effects of carbon nanomaterials against copper-resistant Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuping; Liu, Xueqin; Han, Heyou

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial activity and the action mode of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) against the copper-resistant plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersion was found to show the strongest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by graphene oxide (GO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and fullerene (C(60)). Our investigation of the antibacterial mechanism of SWCNTs and GO indicated that the damage to the cell membrane leads to the release of cytoplasm materials from the bacterium, which is the causative factor for the inactivation of R. solanacearum bacterial cells. The superior antibacterial effect, and the novel antibacterial mode of SWCNTs and GO suggest that those carbon nanomaterials may have important applications in the control of plant bacterial diseases.

  18. Heat Transfer Measurements with Surface Mounted Foil-Sensors in an Active Mode: A Comprehensive Review and a New Design

    PubMed Central

    Mocikat, Horst; Herwig, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive review of film-sensors shows that they are primarily operated in a passive mode, i.e. without being actively heated to an extent, whereby they create a heat transfer situation on their own. Only when these sensors are used for wall shear stress measurements, the detection of laminar/turbulent transition, or the measurement of certain flow velocities, they are operated in an active mode, i.e. heated by an electrical current (after an appropriate calibration). In our study we demonstrate how these R(T)-based sensors (temperature dependence of the electrical resistance R) can also be applied in an active mode for heat transfer measurements. These measurements can be made on cold, unheated bodies, provided certain requirements with respect to the flow field are fulfilled. Our new sensors are laminated nickel- and polyimide-foils manufactured with a special technology, which is also described in detail. PMID:22574060

  19. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  20. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  1. ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Monakhov, I.; Sirinelli, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Campergue, A-L.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Klepper, C. C.; Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D.; Milanesio, D.; Mlynar, J.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall material on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation was assessed and also the properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF were studied. No substantial change of the antenna coupling resistance was observed with the ILW as compared with the carbon wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing) are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can well reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. Some experimental facts indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions; the W content is also increased in ICRF-heated limiter plasmas; and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong and long lasting reduction of the impurity level. The ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 20%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating efficiency; The ICRF power can be deposited at plasma centre and the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core could be observed.

  2. Avoidance of tearing mode locking with electro-magnetic torque introduced by feedback-based mode rotation control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    DOE PAGES

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.; ...

    2016-11-25

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. We have demonstrated a promising scheme to avoid mode locking by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque is delivered to the modes by a toroidal phase shift between the externally applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss through the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance ismore » provided by a feedback scheme. We have explor