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Sample records for resistive wall modes

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  2. Effect of Trapped Energetic Particles on the Resistive Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-07-01

    A stability analysis for the resistive wall mode is studied in the presence of trapped energetic particles (EPs). When the EPs' beta exceeds a critical value, a fishbonelike bursting mode (FLM) with an external kink eigenstructure can exist. This offers the first analytic interpretation of the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001 (2009)]. The mode-particle resonances for the FLM and the q=1 fishbone occur in different regimes of the precession frequency of EPs. In certain ranges of the plasma rotation speed and the EPs' beta, a mode conversion can occur between the resistive wall mode and FLM.

  3. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  4. Resistive wall modes in the Reversatron II RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Barrick, G.; Greene, P.; Robertson, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Reversatron 2 RFP (R/a=50cm/8cm) has been operated with interchangeable shells to investigate resistive wall modes. Shell penetration times are 610, 100, and 4 {mu}sec (no shell). With the 610 {mu}sec shell, the plasma current is {le} 65 kA and the duration {le} 550 {mu}sec. With no shell, helium discharges are more resistive and hydrogen discharges cannot be sustained. An m=1, n=-6 mode resonant on axis grows to a relative amplitude of 20% during the setting-up phase. With the 100{mu}sec shell, deuterium discharges can be sustained but are degraded due to a broad spectrum of modes. The increased plasma resistance can be correlated with the flux intersecting the wall. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation in advanced tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, G.

    1996-03-01

    By combining previous results of Betti and Freidberg [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995)] and Eriksson [Phys. Plasmas 2, 3095 (1995)], a fully analytical description is obtained for the stabilizing effect of toroidal plasma rotation in a large aspect ratio tokamak surrounded by a resistive wall. As in advanced tokamak configurations with a large fraction of bootstrap current, it is assumed that the current gradient near the plasma edge is large. This assumption enables an analytical analysis of external kink modes with low poloidal mode numbers. An expression is obtained, showing explicitly how the window of stable wall distances depends on the current profile.

  6. Study on resistive wall mode based on plasma response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2006-07-01

    A uniform framework, based on the frequency dependent plasma response model (PRM), is proposed to study the physics and control of the resistive wall mode (RWM). The PRM is constructed, respectively, from the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model, from a cylindrical theory with multiple RWM, and, finally, from toroidal calculations. Based on the PRM, several important aspects of the RWM physics are studied, including the interplay between active feedback and plasma rotation to stabilize the mode, the efficiency of external versus internal active coils for the mode control and the resonant field amplification effect due to a rotationally damped RWM.

  7. Study of the Resistive Wall Mode in DIII--D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Strait, E. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; DIII-D Team; Rice, B. W.

    1997-11-01

    Stability analysis of DIII--D discharges showed kink mode stabilization by a resistive wall in D-shaped plasmas with βN exceeding the expected no-wall ideal βN limit by a factor of 1.3.(E.J. Strait, et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2483 (1995). We will call this factor a wall stability enhancement factor, E_w: Ew = βN (experiment)/ βN (no-wall limit, MHD model). Recent DIII--D experiments were aimed at achieving a value of Ew > 1.3 in lower single null, JET-like plasmas with B_t=2.0--2.1 T and Ip = 1.8 MA. A lower plasma internal inductance of l_i ~ 0.7 (and thus lower no-wall βN limit) was produced using early neutral beam injection and a fast positive current ramp during beam injection in an H--mode plasma. Preliminary analysis shows a slowly rotating (25 Hz) n = 1 mode growing in a 40 ms time scale just before a β collapse, similar to what was observed in Ref. 2. The results of detailed stability studies using ideal (GATO) and resistive (MARS) MHD codes will be presented.

  8. Flow stabilization of the ideal MHD resistive wall mode^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time in a numerical calculation that for a typical circular cylindrical equilibrium, the ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be completely stabilized by bulk equilibrium plasma flow, V, for a window of wall locations without introducing additional dissipation into the system. The stabilization is due to a resonance between the RWM and the Doppler shifted ideal MHD sound continuum. Our numerical approach introduces^2 u=φξ+ iV .∇ξ and the perturbed wall current^3 as variables, such that the eigenvalue, φ, only appears linearly in the linearized stability equations, which allows for the use of standard eigenvalue solvers. The wall current is related to the plasma displacement at the boundary by a Green's function. With the introduction of the resistive wall, we find that it is essential that the finite element grid be highly localized around the resonance radius where the parallel displacement, ξ, becomes singular. We present numerical convergence studies demonstrating that this singular behavior can be approached in a limiting sense. We also report on progress toward extending this calculation to an axisymmetric toroidal geometry. ^1Work supported by a DOE FES fellowship through ORISE and ORAU. ^2L.Guazzotto, J.P Freidberg, and R. Betti, Phys.Plasmas 15, 072503 (2008). ^3S.P. Smith and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 080701 (2008).

  9. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  10. Control of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed field pinches with a resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A. S.; Finn, J. M.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2010-11-15

    Numerical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with feedback control in reversed field pinches (RFPs) are presented. Specifically, investigations are performed of the stability of m=1 modes in RFPs with control based on sensing the normal and tangential magnetic fields at the resistive wall and applying two-parameter feedback proportional to these fields. The control scheme is based on that of [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)], which is here modified to use a more realistic plasma model. The plasma model now uses full resistive MHD rather than reduced MHD, and it uses three realistic classes of equilibrium parallel current density profiles appropriate to RFPs. Results with these modifications are in qualitative agreement with [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)]: the feedback can stabilize tearing modes (with resistive or ideal-wall) and resistive wall ideal modes. The limit for stabilization is again found to be near the threshold for ideal modes with an ideal-wall. In addition to confirming these predictions, the nature of the instabilities limiting the range of feedback stabilization near the ideal-wall ideal-plasma threshold are studied, and the effects of viscosity, resistive wall time, and plasma resistivity are reported.

  11. Feedback Stabilization of Resistive Wall Modes in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzonella, Tommaso

    2006-10-01

    The search of efficient strategies for active control of MHD instabilities is one of the main missions of existing devices and one active field of research where important contributions can come not only from tokamak devices but also from alternative configurations. Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instabilities are known in particular to limit plasma performances in all toroidal devices with plasma duration exceeding the penetration time of the resistive magnetic boundary surrounding the plasma. RWMs are the main limit for tokamak high-beta advanced scenarios, where a high fraction of non-inductive current is requested to study long (in the limit steady state) operations. Historically RWMs were first observed in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) devices, where the current gradient plays the role of the drive, typically with multi-mode spectrum whose composition depends on magnetic equilibrium field profiles. RFX-mod device is a large RFP (R=2 m, a=0.46 m) where active control of MHD instabilities is intensively studied by means of a system of 192 active saddle coils placed outside the resistive shell (50 ms for Bv diffusion time) fully covering its external surface and driven by a digital controller. This system provides a very powerful and flexible environment where the study of RWMs physics and their active stabilisation under different experimental conditions is possible. Recent results from RFX-mod show that the complete stabilisation of multi-mode RWM spectrum at high plasma currents (Ip=1 MA) is possible allowing discharges longer than 6 times the diffusion time of the shell. Different control schemes are tested as well, such as open loop operations (intrinsic error field correction and Resonant Field Amplification studies), feedback operations using different measurement systems or incomplete set of coils to simulate systems with partial coverage by active coils.

  12. Kinetic damping of resistive wall modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Liu, Y. Q.; Graves, J. P.; Jucker, M.

    2012-05-15

    Full drift kinetic modelling including finite orbit width effects has been used to assess the passive stabilisation of the resistive wall mode (RWM) that can be expected in the ITER advanced scenario. At realistic plasma rotation frequency, the thermal ions have a stabilising effect on the RWM, but the stability limit remains below the target plasma pressure to achieve Q = 5. However, the inclusion of damping arising from the fusion-born alpha particles, the NBI ions, and ICRH fast ions extends the RWM stability limit above the target {beta} for the advanced scenario. The fast ion damping arises primarily from finite orbit width effects and is not due to resonance between the particle frequencies and the instability.

  13. Kinetic damping of resistive wall modes in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Liu, Y. Q.; Asunta, O.; Graves, J. P.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.

    2012-05-01

    Full drift kinetic modelling including finite orbit width effects has been used to assess the passive stabilisation of the resistive wall mode (RWM) that can be expected in the ITER advanced scenario. At realistic plasma rotation frequency, the thermal ions have a stabilising effect on the RWM, but the stability limit remains below the target plasma pressure to achieve Q = 5. However, the inclusion of damping arising from the fusion-born alpha particles, the NBI ions, and ICRH fast ions extends the RWM stability limit above the target β for the advanced scenario. The fast ion damping arises primarily from finite orbit width effects and is not due to resonance between the particle frequencies and the instability.

  14. Effects of Multiple Resistive Walls and Mode Coupling on Mode Locking in RFPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2001-10-01

    Locked dynamo modes give rise to a serious deterioration of confinement at the plasma edge during the high current phase of reversed field pinches (RFP) operations. This is caused by the large braking torque exerted by the eddy currents on the resistive vacuum vessel on the dynamo modes1. The torque is strong enough to reduce the rotation frequency to an extremely small value. These tearing modes are then readily stopped (wall-locked) by a small external fixed error field. Several RFP devices are equipped with one or two thin (or thick) shells outside the vessel. This can, in principle, alleviate the locked mode problem. The present work presents a systematic calculation of the braking torques of multiple resistive walls (including both thin and thick shells) on a rotating tearing mode. The evolution of the frequency and the amplitude of a single representative tearing mode under the effect of multiple resistive walls is investigated. Numerical examples are provided for the modified RFX and other relevant devices. Generalization to the case of multiple(three) coupled modes and in the presence of externally applied helical rotating magnetic field2 will also be presented. 1. R. Fitzpatrick, S.C. Guo, D. J. Den Hartog and C. C. Hegna; Phys. of Plasmas, 6(10) 3878 (1999). 2. S. C. Guo and M. S. Chu; Phys. of Plasmas, 8(7) 3342 (2001).

  15. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  16. Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode and Error Field Reduction by a Rotating Conducting Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    The hypothesis that the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) can be stabilized by high-speed differentially-rotating conducting walls is tested in a linear device. This geometry allows the use of cylindrical solid metal walls, whereas a torus would require a flowing liquid metal. Experiments over the past year have for the first time explored RWM stability with a rotating copper wall capable of achieving speeds (rΩw) of up to 280 km/h, equivalent to a magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) of 5. The main results are: 1) Wall rotation increases the stability window of the RWM, allowing ~ 25% more plasma current (Ip) at Rm = 5 while maintaining MHD stability. 2) Error field reduction below a critical value allows the observation of initial mode rotation, followed by braking, wall-locking, and subsequent faster growth. 3) Locking is found to depend on the direction of wall rotation (Ω̂w) with respect to the intrinsic plasma rotation, with locking to both the static wall (vacuum vessel) and rotating wall observed. Additionally, indirect effects on RWM stability are observed via the effect of wall rotation on device error fields. Wall rotation shields locking error fields, which reduces the braking torque and inhibits mode-locking. The linear superposition of error fields from guide field (Bz) solenoid misalignments and current-carrying leads is also shown to break symmetry in Ω̂w , with one direction causing stronger error fields and earlier locking irrespective of plasma flow. Vacuum field measurements further show that rotation decreases the error field penetration time and advects the field to a different orientation, as predicted by theory. Experiments are conducted on the Rotating Wall Machine, a 1.2 m long and 16 cm diameter screw-pinch with Bz ~ 500 G, where hollow-cathode injectors are biased to source up to 7 kA of Ip, exciting current-driven RWMs. MHD activity is measured through 120 edge Br, Bθ, Bz probes as well as internal Bdot, Langmuir and Mach probes. RWM

  17. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  18. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-01

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  19. Power Supply Changes for NSTX Resistive Wall Mode Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S S.

    2013-06-28

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. Prior to 2004, the NSTX power system was feeding twelve (12) circuits in the machine. In 2004 the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) Coils were installed on the machine to correct error fields. There are six of these coils installed around the machine in the mid-plane. Since these coils need fast and accurate controls, a Switching Power Amplifier (SPA) with three sub-units was procured, installed and commissioned along with other power loop components. Two RWM Coils were connected in series and fed from one SPA sub-unit. After the initial RWM campaign, operational requirements evolved such that each of the RWM coils now requires separate power and control. Hence a second SPA with three sub-units has been procured and installed. The second unit is of improved design and has the controls and power components completely isolated. The existing thyristor rectifier is used as DC Link to both of the Switching Power Amplifiers. The controls for the RWM are integrated into the overall computer control of the DC Power systems for NSTX. This paper describes the design changes in the RWM Power system for NSTX.

  20. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.

    2014-01-01

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  1. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z. Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-01-15

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs.

  2. Kinetic versus ideal magnetohydrodynamic modelling of the resistive wall mode in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulec, M.; Ivanov, I. B.; Heyn, M. F.; Kernbichler, W.

    2012-03-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWMs) are studied within the kinetic model proposed by Heyn et al. [Nucl. Fusion 46, S159 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 18, 022501 (2011)], which accounts for Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and Coulomb collisions in cylindrical geometry. Results for the reversed field pinch plasma are compared to the magnetohydrodynamic results obtained by Guo et al., [Phys. Plasmas 6, 3868 (1999)]. Stabilization of the external kink mode by an ideal wall as well as stabilization of the resistive wall mode by toroidal plasma rotation is obtained. In contrast to MHD modelling, which predicts a stability window for the resistive wall position, kinetic modelling predicts a one sided window only, i.e., the resistive wall must be sufficiently close to plasma to achieve rotational stabilization of the mode but there is no lower limit on the wall position. Stabilizing rotation speeds are found somewhat smaller when compared to MHD results. In addition, for the present plasma configuration, the kinetic model predicts resistive wall mode stabilization only in one direction of toroidal rotation. In the opposite direction, a destabilizing effect is observed. This is in contrast to MHD where mode stabilization is symmetric with respect to the direction of the toroidal plasma rotation.

  3. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  4. Kinetic calculation of the resistive wall mode and fishbone-like mode instability in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Yang, S. X.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, A. K.; He, H. D.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic effects of both trapped thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode (RWM) and on the fishbone-like mode (FLM) are investigated in theory. Here, the trapped thermal particles include both ions and electrons. The FLM is driven by trapped energetic particles. The results demonstrate that thermal particle collisions can either stabilize or destabilize the RWM, depending on the energetic particle pressure βh . Furthermore, the critical value of βh for triggering the FLM is increased when the thermal particle contribution is taken into account. The critical value sensitively depends on the plasma collision frequency. In addition, the plasma inertia is found to have a negligible influence on the FLM.

  5. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW Stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The pursuit of steady-state economic production of thermonuclear fusion energy has led to research on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode. Advances in both experiment and theory, together with improvements in diagnostics, heating and feedback methods have led to substantial and steady progress in the understanding and stabilization of these instabilities. Many of the theory and experimental techniques and results that have been developed are useful not only for the stabilization of the resistive wall mode. They can also be used to improve the general performance of fusion confinement devices. The conceptual foundations and experimental results on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode are reviewed.

  7. Resonant field amplification with feedback-stabilized regime in current driven resistive wall mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-07-15

    The stability and resonant field response of current driven resistive wall modes are numerically studied for DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low pressure plasmas. The resonant field response of the feedback-stabilized resistive wall mode is investigated both analytically and numerically, and compared with the response from intrinsically stable or marginally stable modes. The modeling qualitatively reproduces the experimental results. Furthermore, based on some recent results and on the indirect numerical evidence in this work, it is suggested that the mode stability behavior observed in DIII-D experiments is due to the kink-peeling mode stabilization by the separatrix geometry. The phase inversion radius of the computed plasma displacement does not generally coincide with the radial locations of rational surfaces, also supporting experimental observations.

  8. Investigation of the n  =  1 resistive wall modes in the ITER high-mode confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.

    2017-06-01

    The n  =  1 resistive wall mode (RWM) stability of ITER high-mode confinement is investigated with bootstrap current included for equilibrium, together with the rotation and diamagnetic drift effects for stability. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. We use the CORSICA code for computing the free boundary equilibrium and AEGIS code for stability. We find that the inclusion of bootstrap current for equilibrium is critical. It can reduce the local magnetic shear in the pedestal, so that the infernal mode branches can develop. Consequently, the n  =  1 modes become unstable without a stabilizing wall at a considerably lower beta limit, driven by the steep pressure gradient in the pedestal. Typical values of the wall position stabilize the ideal mode, but give rise to the ‘pedestal’ resistive wall modes. We find that the rotation can contribute a stabilizing effect on RWMs and the diamagnetic drift effects can further improve the stability in the co-current rotation case. But, generally speaking, the rotation stabilization effects are not as effective as the case without including the bootstrap current effects on equilibrium. We also find that the diamagnetic drift effects are actually destabilizing when there is a counter-current rotation.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic instability excited by interplay between a resistive wall mode and stable ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Hirota, M.

    2015-08-15

    In a rotating toroidal plasma surrounded by a resistive wall, it is shown that linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can be excited by interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and stable ideal MHD modes, where the RWM can couple with not only a stable external kink mode but also various stable Alfvén eigenmodes that abound in a toroidal plasma. The RWM growth rate is shown to peak repeatedly as the rotation frequency reaches specific values for which the frequencies of the ideal MHD modes are Doppler-shifted to the small RWM frequency. Such destabilization can be observed even when the RWM in a static plasma is stable. A dispersion relation clarifies that the unstable mode changes from the RWM to the ideal MHD mode destabilized by wall resistivity when the rotation frequency passes through these specific values. The unstable mode is excited at these rotation frequencies even though plasma rotation also tends to stabilize the RWM from the combination of the continuum damping and the ion Landau damping.

  10. Effects Of Three-Dimensional Conducting Structures On Resistive Wall Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, Fabio

    2008-11-01

    This paper illustrates the effect of three-dimensional conducting structures on the evolution of Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) occurring in toroidal fusion devices. The CarMa code is used to derive the model, which then is used to design a feedback controller of RWMs. Some examples of application to the ITER geometry are reported.

  11. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  12. Shape, Pressure, and Kinetic Effects on the Resistive Wall Mode in Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    A comprehensive theory of the resistive wall mode is carried out, including the effects of finite ellipticity, finite beta, and plasma rotation. In the circular-cylindrical limit, the resistive wall mode (RWM) is an external kink mode without singular surfaces inside the plasma column. In a tokamak, the noncircularity, the toroidicity, and the finite pressure of the plasma column induce the coupling of the poloidal harmonics, and the mode sidebands have singular surfaces inside the plasma. At such surfaces, the radial electric field is large and so is the power dissipated by the mode. It is well known that such a dissipation, combined with the plasma rotation, creates a window of stability in beta(R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995).) and in b/a (wall radius/plasma radius).(A. Bondeson and D. J. Ward, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994).) The size of the stability window is modified by the stabilizing contribution of the trapped-particle compressibility and the plasma resistivity. The size of the stability window is determined for highly elongated plasmas where the ellipticity is comparable or larger than the toroidicity. The minimum rotation velocity for stabilization is derived, and the implications for tokamak design are discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-93ER54215.

  13. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values β{sub rp,rw} < β{sub rp,iw} < β{sub ip,rw} < β{sub ip,iw} (resistive plasma, resistive wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below β{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above β{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with β > β{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below β{sub rp,iw}.

  14. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-01

    An array of saddle coils having Nc=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n ,n' that fulfill the condition ∣n-n'∣=Nc are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  15. Simulation and design of feedback control on resistive wall modes in Keda Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chenguang; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong

    2014-12-15

    The feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) (Liu et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 094009 (2014)) is investigated by simulation. A linear model is built to describe the growth of the unstable modes in the absence of feedback and the resulting mode suppression due to feedback, given the typical reversed field pinch plasma equilibrium. The layout of KTX with two shell structures (the vacuum vessel and the stabilizing shell) is taken into account. The feedback performance is explored both in the scheme of “clean mode control” (Zanca et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1425 (2007)) and “raw mode control.” The discrete time control model with specific characteristic times will mimic the real feedback control action and lead to the favored control cycle. Moreover, the conceptual design of feedback control system is also presented, targeting on both RWMs and tearing modes.

  16. Identification of a Low Plasma-Rotation Threshold for Stabilization of the Resistive-Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Takechi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Fujita, T.; Ozeki, T.; Koide, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kurita, G.; Isayama, A.; Kamada, Y.

    2007-02-02

    The plasma rotation necessary for stabilization of resistive-wall modes (RWMs) is investigated by controlling the toroidal plasma rotation with external momentum input by injection of tangential neutral beams. The observed threshold is 0.3% of the Alfven velocity and much smaller than the previous experimental results obtained with magnetic braking. This low critical rotation has a very weak {beta} dependence as the ideal wall limit is approached. These results indicate that for large plasmas such as in future fusion reactors with low rotation, the requirement of the additional feedback control system for stabilizing RWM is much reduced.

  17. A fast technique applied to the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes with 3D conducting structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinacci, Guglielmo Liu, Yueqiang

    2009-03-20

    This paper illustrates the development of a 'fast' technique for the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) in fusion devices with three-dimensional conducting structures, by means of the recently developed CarMa code. Thanks to its peculiar features, the computational cost scales almost linearly with the number of discrete unknowns. Some large scale problems are solved in configurations of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  18. Status of FARTECH's Multi-Sensor Real-Time Resistive Wall Mode Identification Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, Y. B.; Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Leuer, J. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-11-01

    Early detection of resistive wall mode (RWM) identification (ID) is possible utilizing multiple sensors to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and mode structure recognition with a pre-modeled numerical structure, assuming similar equilibria to be reproduced. Magnetic probes, and internal and external saddle loops are currently used. The predicted structures are modeled via FARVAC(D.H. Edgell, FARTECH, Inc. Report FT020523, May (2002).) and VACUUM using the GATO linear RWM mode. The RWM structures are then matched to the experimental data in real-time. For better algorithm and understanding of the modes, other sensors such as soft x-ray data are being incorporated in the program. In addition, an equilibrium and stability code is being developed for basic understanding of the RWM physics such as RWM rotation and dissipation. Systematic implementation and communication of our mode identification to the DIII-D PCS are being developed and tested.

  19. Evidence for the Importance of Trapped Particle Resonances for Resistive Wall Mode Stability in High Beta Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Berkery, J. W.; Lanctot, M. J.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2011-05-27

    Active measurements of the plasma stability in tokamak plasmas reveal the importance of kinetic resonances for resistive wall mode stability. The rotation dependence of the magnetic plasma response to externally applied quasistatic n=1 magnetic fields clearly shows the signatures of an interaction between the resistive wall mode and the precession and bounce motions of trapped thermal ions, as predicted by a perturbative model of plasma stability including kinetic effects. The identification of the stabilization mechanism is an essential step towards quantitative predictions for the prospects of ''passive'' resistive wall mode stabilization, i.e., without the use of an ''active'' feedback system, in fusion-alpha heated plasmas.

  20. Combined effects of trapped energetic ions and resistive layer damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yuling; Liu, Yue E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn; Liu, Chao; Xia, Guoliang; Liu, Yueqiang E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn; Wang, Aike; Hao, Guangzhou; Li, Li; Cui, Shaoyan

    2016-01-15

    A dispersion relation is derived for the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM), which includes both the resistive layer damping physics and the toroidal precession drift resonance damping from energetic ions in tokamak plasmas. The dispersion relation is numerically solved for a model plasma, for the purpose of systematic investigation of the RWM stability in multi-dimensional plasma parameter space including the plasma resistivity, the radial location of the resistive wall, as well as the toroidal flow velocity. It is found that the toroidal favorable average curvature in the resistive layer contributes a significant stabilization of the RWM. This stabilization is further enhanced by adding the drift kinetic contribution from energetic ions. Furthermore, two traditionally assumed inner layer models are considered and compared in the dispersion relation, resulting in different predictions for the stability of the RWM.

  1. Toroidal modeling of interaction between resistive wall mode and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang

    2013-02-15

    The non-linear interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and the toroidal plasma flow is numerically investigated in a full toroidal geometry, by simultaneously solving the initial value problems for the n = 1 RWM and the n = 0 toroidal force balance equation. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque is identified as the major momentum sink that brakes the toroidal plasma flow during the non-linear evolution of the RWM. This holds for a mode that is initially either unstable or stable. For an initially stable RWM, the braking of the flow, and hence the eventual growth of the mode, depends critically on the initial perturbation amplitude.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Wall Mode Control In DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jensen, T. H.; Leuer, J. A.; Nerem, A.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Detailed dynamic response models have been developed for all relevant subsystems comprising the DIII-D resistive wall mode (RWM) closed loop control system. These include the switching power amplifiers (SPA), digital plasma control system (PCS), acquisition and control circuitry, and a fully toroidal model of plasma/vessel dynamics based on specification of the marginal wall position from stability codes such as GATO and DCON. These models have been validated with experimental data, including open-loop excitation of the SPA, PCS, and vacuum vessel dynamic responses, and measurement of the growth rate and mode structure of the unstable plasma. These models are incorporated into a closed-loop control simulation to investigate the control limitations which are due to realistic power supply responses. Consequences of and approaches to the intrinsically multivariable RWM control problem are also investigated.

  3. Stabilization of the resistive wall mode instability by trapped energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Jiang, H. B.; Lu, Gaimin; He, H. D.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-03-15

    A theoretical model for investigating the effect of the trapped energetic particles (EPs) on the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability is proposed. The results demonstrate that the trapped EPs have a dramatic stabilizing effect on the RWM because of resonant interaction between the mode and the magnetic precession drift motion of the trapped EPs. The results also show that the effect of the trapped EPs depends on the wall position. In addition, the stabilizing effect becomes stronger when the plasma rotation is taken into account. For sufficiently fast plasma rotation, the trapped EPs can lead to the complete stabilization of the RWM. Furthermore, the trapped EPs can induce a finite real frequency of the RWM in the absence of plasma rotation.

  4. Modeling resistive wall modes and disruptive instabilities with M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Nm; Jardin, Sc; Pfefferle, D.

    2016-10-01

    Disruptive instabilities pose a significant challenge to the tokamak approach to magnetic fusion energy, and must be reliably avoided in a successful reactor. These instabilities generally involve rapid, global changes to the magnetic field, and electromagnetic interaction with surrounding conducting structures. Here we apply the extended-MHD code M3D-C1 to calculate the stability and evolution of disruptive modes, including their interaction with external conducting structures. The M3D-C1 model includes the effects of resistivity, equilibrium rotation, and resistive walls of arbitrary thickness, each of which may play important roles in the stability and evolution of disruptive modes. The strong stabilizing effect of rotation on resistive wall modes is explored and compared with analytic theory. The nonlinear evolution of vertical displacement events is also considered, including the evolution of non-axisymmetric instabilities that may arise during the current-quench phase of the disruption. It is found that the non-axisymmetric stability of the plasma during a VDE depends strongly on the thermal history of the plasma. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling.

  5. Analysis of Resistive Wall Modes in RFP Plasmas with Rotation and Dissipative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the non-resonant external kink modes under the resistive wall boundary condition in an RFP is analyzed. This topic is especially relevant to the future long pulse discharges. With respect to previous work(R.Nachtrieb, J.P.Freidberg and R.Betti, Reversed Field Pinch Workshop, Madison, WI October 14-16, 1996), the parallel viscosity (Braginskii's stress tensor) effects have been added into the eigenmode equation. Therefore, both the ion sound wave damping and the viscosity effects together with the plasma rotation are taken into account in the analysis. The influence of the equilibrium parameters on the mode instability is carefully studied by employing the conventional α-Θo equilibrium models. It is found that the behaviours of the RWM is rather sensitive to the reversal parameter F of RFPs. In the low β (or zero β) plasma region, there is a stability window in the wall-plasma distance b/a due to the plasma rotation and viscous dissipative effects. For the typical RFP operating parameters, the required rotation velocity to stabilize the modes is in the range of the ion sound speed or even higher. The effects of the viscosity on the instability of the modes are investigated.

  6. Numerical Study of Equilibrium, Stability, and Advanced Resistive Wall Mode Feedback Algorithms on KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    Stability to ideal MHD kink/ballooning modes and the resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated for the KSTAR tokamak. Free-boundary equilibria that comply with magnetic field coil current constraints are computed for monotonic and reversed shear safety factor profiles and H-mode tokamak pressure profiles. Advanced tokamak operation at moderate to low plasma internal inductance shows that a factor of two improvement in the plasma beta limit over the no-wall beta limit is possible for toroidal mode number of unity. The KSTAR conducting structure, passive stabilizers, and in-vessel control coils are modeled by the VALEN-3D code and the active RWM stabilization performance of the device is evaluated using both standard and advanced feedback algorithms. Steady-state power and voltage requirements for the system are estimated based on the expected noise on the RWM sensor signals. Using NSTX experimental RWM sensors noise data as input, a reduced VALEN state-space LQG controller is designed to realistically assess KSTAR stabilization system performance.

  7. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  8. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z. Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  9. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  10. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  11. Resistive wall modes in the setting-up phase of a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, P.; Barrick, G. ); Robertson, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Resistive wall modes during the setting-up phase of a reversed field pinch have been investigated in an experiment (Reversatron II (IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. {bold PS}-{bold 16}, 667 (1988))) operated without a conducting shell. The time for the vertical field to penetrate the vacuum chamber (4 {mu}sec) is much shorter than the rise time of the plasma current (100 {mu}sec). The discharges, when compared to discharges in the same device with a conducting shell, have a greater resistance and lower plasma current. Magnetic probes indicate the growth of a strong {vert bar}{ital n}{vert bar}=6 helical kink resonant with the field on axis.

  12. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  13. Modeling of Resistive Wall Modes in Tokamak and Reversed Field Pinch Configurations of KTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Rui; Zhu, Ping; Bai, Wei; Lan, Tao; Liu, Wandong

    2016-10-01

    Resistive wall mode is believed to be one of the leading causes for macroscopic degradation of plasma confinement in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFP). In this study, we evaluate the linear RWM instability of Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) in both tokamak and RFP configurations. For the tokamak configuration, the extended MHD code NIMROD is employed for calculating the dependence of the RWM growth rate on the position and conductivity of the vacuum wall for a model tokamak equilibrium of KTX in the large aspect-ratio approximation. For the RFP configuration, the standard formulation of dispersion relation for RWM based on the MHD energy principle has been evaluated for a cylindrical α- Θ model of KTX plasma equilibrium, in an effort to investigate the effects of thin wall on the RWM in KTX. Full MHD calculations of RWM in the RFP configuration of KTX using the NIMROD code are also being developed. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant Nos. 2014GB124002, 2015GB101004, 2011GB106000, and 2011GB106003.

  14. Dispersion relations for slow and fast resistive wall modes within the Haney-Freidberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2014-04-01

    The dispersion relation for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is derived by using the trial function for the magnetic perturbation proposed in S. W. Haney and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1637 (1989). The Haney-Freidberg (HF) approach is additionally based on the expansion in dw/s ≪1, where dw is the wall thickness and s is the skin depth. Here, the task is solved without this constraint. The derivation procedure is different too, but the final result is expressed in a similar form with the use of the quantities entering the HF relation. The latter is recovered from our more general relation as an asymptote at dw≪s, which proves the equivalence of the both approaches in this case. In the opposite limit (dw≫s), we obtain the growth rate γ of the RWMs as a function of γHF calculated by the HF prescription. It is shown that γ ∝γHF2 and γ ≫γHF in this range. The proposed relations give γ for slow and fast RWMs in terms of the integrals calculated by the standard stability codes for toroidal systems with and without a perfectly conducting wall. Also, the links between the considered and existing toroidal and cylindrical models are established with estimates explicitly showing the relevant dependencies.

  15. Resistive Wall Mode Stability Forecasting in NSTX and NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Disruption prevention in tokamak fusion plasmas requires accurate identification and prediction of global MHD instabilities. We examine, in the NSTX device and its upgrade NSTX-U, characterization and forecasting of resistive wall modes (RWMs), which are crucial components of disruption event chains. The kinetic RWM growth rate is solved by the MISK code through a dispersion relation combining ideal and kinetic mode energy functionals, δW and δWK . A model for the ideal n = 1 no-wall δW term, depending on parameters measurable in real-time, has been recently developed by using the DCON code on more than 5,000 NSTX equilibria. When applied to NSTX-U discharges at higher aspect ratio, the model accurately predicts the n = 1 no-wall limit calculated by DCON through the aspect ratio dependence of the model. Full MISK calculations of δWK cannot be performed in real time, but a simplified model based on physics insight from MISK takes a form that depends on ExB frequency, collisionality, and energetic particle fraction. The model will examine when the plasma toroidal rotation profile falls into weaker RWM stability regions based upon this kinetic modification to ideal theory, which contains broad stabilizing resonances via mode-particle interaction. This approach enables, for the first time, the ability to anticipate a growing RWM rather than reacting to one. The reduced model results are tested on a database of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs. For each discharge, a newly-written disruption event characterization code (DECAF) finds the chain of events leading to a disruption by applying criteria that define each of the physical events. With a simple threshold test of mode amplitude an RWM event was found in each case, and 59% were within 20 wall times of the disruption. The earlier RWM warnings are not false positives; they caused significant, transient decreases in βN. Supported by U.S. D.O.E. contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M2 = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects.

  17. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  18. Active Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in Low Rotation, High Beta NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    An active feedback system to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is used to maintain plasma stability for greater than 90 RWM growth times. These experiments are the first to demonstrate RWM active stabilization in high beta, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas with toroidal plasma rotation significantly below the critical rotation profile for passive stability and in the range predicted for ITER. Actively stabilized, low rotation plasmas reached normalized beta of 5.6, and the ratio of normalized beta to the toroidal mode number, n = 1 and 2 ideal no-wall stability limits reached 1.2 and 1.15 respectively, determined by DCON stability analysis of the time-evolving reconstructed experimental equilibria. The significant, controlled reduction of the plasma rotation to less than one percent of the Alfven speed was produced by non-resonant magnetic braking by an applied n = 3 field. The observed plasma rotation damping is in quantitative agreement with neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory including trapped particle effects [1]. The active stabilization system employs a mode control algorithm using RWM sensor input analyzed to distinguish the amplitude and phase of the n = 1 mode. During n = 1 stabilization, the n = 2 mode amplitude increases and surpasses the n = 1 amplitude, but the mode remains stable. By varying the system gain, and relative phase between the measured n = 1 RWM phase and the applied control field, both positive and negative feedback were demonstrated. Contrary to past experience in moderate aspect ratio tokamaks with poloidally continuous stabilizing structure, the RWM can become unstable in certain cases by deforming poloidally, an important consideration for feedback system sensor and control coil design in future devices such as ITER and KSTAR. **In collaboration with R.E. Bell, J.E. Menard, D.A. Gates, A.C. Sontag, J.M. Bialek, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, K. Tritz, H. Yuh. [1] W. Zhu, S

  19. Optimized feedback control system modeling of resistive wall modes for burning plasmas experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana Nikolaevna

    A numerical study of active feedback control system performance and optimization for tokamak Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is the subject of this thesis. The ability to accurately model and predict the performance of an active MHD control systems is critical to present and future advanced confinement scenarios and fusion reactor design studies. The computer code VALEN has been designed to calculate the performance of a MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. The simulation of realistic effects in feedback systems, such as noise, time delays and filters is of particular importance. In this work realistic measurement noise analysis was added to VALEN and used to design the RWM feedback control amplifier power level for the DIII-D experiment. Modern control theory based on a state-space formulation obtained from VALEN was applied to design an Optimal Controller and Observer based on a reduced VALEN model. A quantitative low order model of the VALEN state space was derived from the high dimensional intrinsic state space structure of the VALEN using methods of a balanced realization and matched DC gain truncation. These techniques for the design of an optimal controller and optimal observer were applied to models of the DIII-D and ITER experiments and showed an order of magnitude reduction of the required control coil current and voltage in the presence of white noise as compared to a traditional, classical PID controller. This optimal controller for the ITER burning plasma experiment was robust from the no-wall pressure limit to a pressure value well above those achieved with a classical PID controller and could approach the ideal wall limit.

  20. A reduced resistive wall mode kinetic stability model for disruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2017-05-01

    Kinetic modification of ideal stability theory from stabilizing resonances of mode-particle interaction has had success in explaining resistive wall mode (RWM) stability limits in tokamaks. With the goal of real-time stability forecasting, a reduced kinetic stability model has been implemented in the new Disruption Event Characterization and Forecasting ( DECAF ) code, which has been written to analyze disruptions in tokamaks. The reduced model incorporates parameterized models for ideal limits on β, a ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure, which are shown to be in good agreement with DCON code calculations. Increased β between these ideal limits causes a shift in the unstable region of δWK space, where δWK is the change in potential energy due to kinetic effects that is solved for by the reduced model, such that it is possible for plasmas to be unstable at intermediate β but stable at higher β, which is sometimes observed experimentally. Gaussian functions for δWK are defined as functions of E × B frequency and collisionality, with parameters reflecting the experience of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The reduced model was tested on a database of discharges from NSTX and experimentally stable and unstable discharges were separated noticeably on a stability map in E × B frequency, collisionality space. The reduced model failed to predict an unstable RWM in only 15.6% of cases with an experimentally unstable RWM and performed well on predicting stability for experimentally stable discharges as well.

  1. The Role of Kinetic Effects, Including Plasma Rotation and Energetic Particles, in Resistive Wall Mode Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, John W.

    2009-11-01

    Continuous, disruption-free operation of tokamaks requires stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM). Theoretically, the RWM is thought to be stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and other parameters, with kinetic effects being emphasized.footnotetextB. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 057301. Experiments in NSTX show that the RWM can be destabilized in high rotation plasmas while low rotation plasmas can be stable, which calls into question the concept of a simple critical plasma rotation threshold for stability. The present work tests theoretical stabilization mechanisms against experimental discharges with various plasma rotation profiles created by applying non-resonant n=3 braking, and with various fast particle fractions. Kinetic modification of ideal stability is calculated with the MISK code, using experimental equilibrium reconstructions. Analysis of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs predicts near-marginal mode growth rates. Trapped ions provide the dominant kinetic resonances, while fast particles contribute an important stabilizing effect. Increasing or decreasing rotation in the calculation drives the prediction farther from the marginal point, showing that unlike simpler critical rotation theories, kinetic theory allows a more complex relationship between plasma rotation and RWM stability. Results from JT-60U show that energetic particle modes can trigger RWMsfootnotetextG. Matsunaga et al., IAEA FEC 2008 Paper EX/5-2.. Kinetic theory may explain how fast particle loss can trigger RWMs through the loss of an important stabilization mechanism. These results are applied to ITER advanced scenario equilibria to determine the impact on RWM stability.

  2. The role of kinetic effects, including plasma rotation and energetic particles, in resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Betti, R.; Hu, B.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Manickam, J.; Podesta, M.

    2010-08-15

    The resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in high-beta tokamaks is stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and kinetic effects. Kinetic modification of ideal stability calculated with the 'MISK' code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)] is outlined. For an advanced scenario ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] plasma, the present calculation finds that alpha particles are required for RWM stability at presently expected levels of plasma rotation. Kinetic stabilization theory is tested in an experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] that produced marginally stable plasmas with various energetic particle contents. Plasmas with the highest and lowest energetic particle content agree with calculations predicting that increased energetic particle pressure is stabilizing but does not alter the nonmonotonic dependence of stability on plasma rotation due to thermal particle resonances. Presently, the full MISK model, including thermal particles and an isotropic slowing-down distribution function for energetic particles, overpredicts stability in NSTX experiments. Minor alteration of either effect in the theory may yield agreement; several possibilities are discussed.

  3. Impact of plasma poloidal rotation on resistive wall mode instability in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Tokuda, S.

    2011-02-15

    Stability of resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated in a cylindrical plasma and an axisymmetric toroidal plasma by taking into account not only toroidal rotation but also poloidal rotation. Since the Doppler shifted frequency is responsible for the RWM stability, the modification of this Doppler shifted frequency by poloidal rotation affects the rotation effect on RWM. When a poloidal rotation frequency is not so large, the effect of poloidal rotation on the RWM stability can be approximately treated with the modified toroidal rotation frequency. In a toroidal plasma, this modified frequency is determined by subtracting a toroidal component of the rotation parallel to the magnetic field from the toroidal rotation frequency. The poloidal rotation that counteracts the effect of the Doppler shift strongly reduces the stabilizing effect of toroidal rotation, but by changing the rotational direction, the poloidal rotation enhances this stabilizing effect. This trend is confirmed in not only a cylindrical plasma but also a toroidal plasma. This result indicates that poloidal rotation produces the dependence of the critical toroidal rotation frequency for stabilizing RWM on the rotational direction of toroidal rotation in the same magnetic configuration.

  4. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  5. Multimachine Data–Based Prediction of High-Frequency Sensor Signal Noise for Resistive Wall Mode Control in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Gerasimov, S.; Gribov, Y.; Hender, T. C.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.

    2016-11-01

    The high frequency noise, above the frequency of typical resistive wall modes, from magnetic pickup coils is analysed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U and NSTX. Application of a high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics, that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasmas based on the multi-machine database, for the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, for the purpose of feedback stabilisation of the resistive wall mode. The predicted root-mean-square n=1 (n is the toroidal mode number) noise level is 104 -105Gauss/second for the voltage signal, and 0.1-1Gauss for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with the scaling coefficient of about 0.1. These basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modelling based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.

  6. Multimachine Data–Based Prediction of High-Frequency Sensor Signal Noise for Resistive Wall Mode Control in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; ...

    2016-11-01

    The high frequency noise, above the frequency of typical resistive wall modes, from magnetic pickup coils is analysed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U and NSTX. Application of a high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics, that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasmas based on the multi-machine database, for the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, for the purpose of feedback stabilisation of the resistive wall mode. The predicted root-mean-square n=1 (n is the toroidal mode number)more » noise level is 104 -105Gauss/second for the voltage signal, and 0.1-1Gauss for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with the scaling coefficient of about 0.1. These basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modelling based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.« less

  7. Multimachine data–based prediction of high-frequency sensor signal noise for resistive wall mode control in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Gerasimov, S.; Gribov, Y.; Hender, T. C.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.

    2016-08-12

    The high-frequency noise measured by magnetic sensors, at levels above the typical frequency of resistive wall modes, is analyzed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U, and NSTX. A high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasma operation of the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, to be used for resistive wall mode feedback stabilization, based on the multimachine database. The predicted root-mean-square n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number) noise level is 104 to 105 G/s for the voltage signal, and 0.1 to 1 G for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with a scaling coefficient of about 0.1. As a result, these basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modeling-based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.

  8. Multimachine data–based prediction of high-frequency sensor signal noise for resistive wall mode control in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yueqiang; Sabbagh, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; ...

    2016-08-12

    The high-frequency noise measured by magnetic sensors, at levels above the typical frequency of resistive wall modes, is analyzed across a range of present tokamak devices including DIII-D, JET, MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, JT-60U, and NSTX. A high-pass filter enables identification of the noise component with Gaussian-like statistics that shares certain common characteristics in all devices considered. A conservative prediction is made for ITER plasma operation of the high-frequency noise component of the sensor signals, to be used for resistive wall mode feedback stabilization, based on the multimachine database. The predicted root-mean-square n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number)more » noise level is 104 to 105 G/s for the voltage signal, and 0.1 to 1 G for the perturbed magnetic field signal. The lower cutoff frequency of the Gaussian pickup noise scales linearly with the sampling frequency, with a scaling coefficient of about 0.1. As a result, these basic noise characteristics should be useful for the modeling-based design of the feedback control system for the resistive wall mode in ITER.« less

  9. Cross-machine comparison of resonant field amplification and resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bialek, J.M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A.; Sontag, A.C.; Zhu, W.; Hender, T.C.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Howell, D F.; Bigi, M.; Vries, P. de; Liu, Y. Q.

    2006-05-15

    Dedicated experiments in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion, 42, 614 (2002)], the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut, R. J. Bickerton, and B. E. Keen, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)], and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] reveal the commonalities of resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization by sufficiently fast toroidal plasma rotation in devices of different size and aspect ratio. In each device the weakly damped n=1 RWM manifests itself by resonant field amplification (RFA) of externally applied n=1 magnetic fields, which increases with the plasma pressure. Probing DIII-D and JET plasmas with similar ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties with externally applied magnetic n=1 fields, shows that the resulting RFA is independent of the machine size. In each device the drag resulting from RFA slows the toroidal plasma rotation and can lead to the onset of an unstable RWM. The critical plasma rotation required for stable operation in the plasma center decreases with increasing q{sub 95}, which is explained by the inward shift of q surfaces where the critical rotation remains constant. The quantitative agreement of the critical rotation normalized to the inverse Alfven time at the q=2 surface in similar DIII-D and JET plasmas supports the independence of the RWM stabilization mechanism of machine size and indicates the importance of the q=2 surface. At low aspect ratio the required fraction of the Alfven velocity increases significantly. The ratio of the critical rotation in similar NSTX and DIII-D plasmas can be explained by trapped particles not contributing to the RWM stabilization, which is consistent with stabilization mechanisms that are based on ion Landau damping. Alternatively, the ratio of the required rotation to the sound wave velocity remains independent of aspect ratio.

  10. Effects of Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Structures on Resistive-Wall-Mode Stability of Reversed Field Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.

    2008-06-27

    In this Letter, the linear stability of the resistive wall modes (RWMs) in toroidal geometry for a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is studied. Three computational models are used: the cylindrical code ETAW, the toroidal MHD code MARS-F, and the CarMa code, able to take fully into account the effects of a three-dimensional conducting structure which mimics the real shell geometry of a reversed field pinch experimental device. The computed mode growth rates generally agree with experimental data. The toroidal effects and the three-dimensional features of the shell, like gaps, allow a novel interpretation of the RWM spectrum in RFP's and remove its degeneracy. This shows the importance of making accurate modeling of conductors for the RWM predictions also in future devices such as ITER.

  11. Model-based dynamic resistive wall mode identification and feedback control in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    In, Y.; Kim, J.S.; Edgell, D.H.; Strait, E.J.; Humphreys, D.A.; Walker, M.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Chu, M.S.; Johnson, R.; La Haye, R.J.; Okabayashi, M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Reimerdes, H.

    2006-06-15

    A new model-based dynamic resistive wall mode (RWM) identification and feedback control algorithm has been developed. While the overall RWM structure can be detected by a model-based matched filter in a similar manner to a conventional sensor-based scheme, it is significantly influenced by edge-localized-modes (ELMs). A recent study suggested that such ELM noise might cause the RWM control system to respond in an undesirable way. Thus, an advanced algorithm to discriminate ELMs from RWM has been incorporated into this model-based control scheme, dynamic Kalman filter. Specifically, the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] resistive vessel wall was modeled in two ways: picture frame model or eigenmode treatment. Based on the picture frame model, the first real-time, closed-loop test results of the Kalman filter algorithms during DIII-D experimental operation are presented. The Kalman filtering scheme was experimentally confirmed to be effective in discriminating ELMs from RWM. As a result, the actuator coils (I-coils) were rarely excited during ELMs, while retaining the sensitivity to RWM. However, finding an optimized set of operating parameters for the control algorithm requires further analysis and design. Meanwhile, a more advanced Kalman filter based on a more accurate eigenmode model has been developed. According to this eigenmode approach, significant improvement in terms of control performance has been predicted, while maintaining good ELM discrimination.

  12. Improved model predictive control of resistive wall modes by error field estimator in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    Many implementations of a model-based approach for toroidal plasma have shown better control performance compared to the conventional type of feedback controller. One prerequisite of model-based control is the availability of a control oriented model. This model can be obtained empirically through a systematic procedure called system identification. Such a model is used in this work to design a model predictive controller to stabilize multiple resistive wall modes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. Model predictive control is an advanced control method that can optimize the future behaviour of a system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss an additional use of the empirical model which is to estimate the error field in EXTRAP T2R. Two potential methods are discussed that can estimate the error field. The error field estimator is then combined with the model predictive control and yields better radial magnetic field suppression.

  13. Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit widtha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Hao, G. Z.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2014-05-01

    A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

  14. Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit width

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang Chapman, I. T.; Hao, G. Z.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2014-05-15

    A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

  15. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  16. Resistive Wall Mode feedback on DIII-D using Linear Quadratic Gaussian control and a GPU powered control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, M. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Piglowski, D. A.; Penaflor, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) based control system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak for Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) control similar to one implemented at the HBT-EP tokamak. DIII-D can excite RWMs, which are strong, locked or nearly locked kink modes whose rotation frequencies do not evolve quickly and are slow compared to their growth rates. Simulations have predicted that modern control techniques like Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control will perform better than classical control techniques when using control coils external to the vacuum vessel. An LQG control algorithm based on the VALEN model for the RWM has been developed and tested on this system. Early tests have shown the algorithm is able to track and suppress with external control coils the plasma response of an n=1 perturbation driven by internal control coils. An overview of the control hardware, VALEN model, control algorithm and initial results will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Transverse modes and instabilities of a bunched beam with space charge and resistive wall impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Transverse instability of a bunch in a ring accelerator is considered with space charge and wakefield taken into account. It is assumed that space charge tune shift significantly exceeds the synchrotron tune. Bunch spectrum, instability growth rate, and effects of chromaticity are studied with different bunch and wake forms. Fast instability caused by coupling of transverse modes is studied in detail. It is shown that, for monotonic wakes, the transverse mode coupling instability is possible only with a certain sign of the wake. Its threshold and growth rate are calculated precisely over a wide range of parameters.

  18. Modeling of the Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode in Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Chu, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    The VACUUM^1 code is currently being modified to simulate the feedback stabilization of the RWM in the DIII-D device^2. We formulate the problem in terms of the eigenfunctions of the surface Laplacian obtained from the matching of the fields across a thin resistive toroidally symmetric shell. The window pane feedback (C-)coils are modeled accurately in the poloidal angle θ, and approximately by a single harmonic variation in φ. VACUUM relates the perturbations on the various surfaces, i.e., the plasma, both sides of the resistive shell and the C-coil. This results in an operator made up of a set of coupled time dependent equations relating the shell response to the plasma and feedback coil. Various attributes of the system can be calculated, such as the eddy current patterns and the time responses of the eigenmodes of the surface Laplacian operator. As a first appproximation, a PEST or GATO surface eigenmode of an ideal kink is assumed, whose structure remains unchanged during the feedback process, allowing only the magnitude to change. By energizing the C-coils according to the various proposed feedback schemes we propose to correlate with the present experimental results, and also to provide helpful guidance for future runs. rule[1.ex]1.9in.005in This work supported by DoE contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073 ^1 M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas, 4(1997)2161 ^2 A. A. Garofalo et al., Phys. Plasmas 6(1999) 1893

  19. Off-axis fishbone-like instability and excitation of resistive wall modes in JT-60U and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Solomon, W. M.; Budny, R. V.; Manickam, J.; Matsunaga, G.; Takechi, M.; Asakura, N.; Shinohara, K.; Grassie, J. S. de; Strait, E. J.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. B.; In, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-05-15

    An energetic-particle (EP)-driven ''off-axis-fishbone-like mode (OFM)'' often triggers a resistive wall mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D devices, preventing long-duration high-{beta}{sub N} discharges. In these experiments, the EPs are energetic ions (70-85 keV) injected by neutral beams to produce high-pressure plasmas. EP-driven bursting events reduce the EP density and the plasma rotation simultaneously. These changes are significant in high-{beta}{sub N} low-rotation plasmas, where the RWM stability is predicted to be strongly influenced by the EP precession drift resonance and by the plasma rotation near the q=2 surface (kinetic effects). Analysis of these effects on stability with a self-consistent perturbation to the mode structure using the MARS-K code showed that the impact of EP losses and rotation drop is sufficient to destabilize the RWM in low-rotation plasmas, when the plasma rotation normalized by Alfven frequency is only a few tenths of a percent near the q=2 surface. The OFM characteristics are very similar in JT-60U and DIII-D, including nonlinear mode evolution. The modes grow initially like a classical fishbone, and then the mode structure becomes strongly distorted. The dynamic response of the OFM to an applied n=1 external field indicates that the mode retains its external kink character. These comparative studies suggest that an energetic particle-driven 'off-axis-fishbone-like mode' is a new EP-driven branch of the external kink mode in wall-stabilized plasmas, analogous to the relationship of the classical fishbone branch to the internal kink mode.

  20. Off-axis fishbone-like instability and excitation of resistive wall modes in JT-60U and DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; deGrassie, J. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; In, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Reimerdes, H.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Takechi, M.; Asakura, N.; Budny, R. V.; Jackson, G. L.; Hanson, J. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Manickam, J.; Shinohara, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2011-05-01

    An energetic-particle (EP)-driven "off-axis-fishbone-like mode (OFM)" often triggers a resistive wall mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D devices, preventing long-duration high-βN discharges. In these experiments, the EPs are energetic ions (70-85 keV) injected by neutral beams to produce high-pressure plasmas. EP-driven bursting events reduce the EP density and the plasma rotation simultaneously. These changes are significant in high-βN low-rotation plasmas, where the RWM stability is predicted to be strongly influenced by the EP precession drift resonance and by the plasma rotation near the q =2 surface (kinetic effects). Analysis of these effects on stability with a self-consistent perturbation to the mode structure using the MARS-K code showed that the impact of EP losses and rotation drop is sufficient to destabilize the RWM in low-rotation plasmas, when the plasma rotation normalized by Alfvén frequency is only a few tenths of a percent near the q =2 surface. The OFM characteristics are very similar in JT-60U and DIII-D, including nonlinear mode evolution. The modes grow initially like a classical fishbone, and then the mode structure becomes strongly distorted. The dynamic response of the OFM to an applied n =1 external field indicates that the mode retains its external kink character. These comparative studies suggest that an energetic particle-driven "off-axis-fishbone-like mode" is a new EP-driven branch of the external kink mode in wall-stabilized plasmas, analogous to the relationship of the classical fishbone branch to the internal kink mode.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  2. A first attempt at few coils and low-coverage resistive wall mode stabilization of EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R.; Frassinetti, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    The reversed-field pinch features resistive-shell-type instabilities at any (vanishing and finite) plasma pressure. An attempt to stabilize the full spectrum of these modes using both (i) incomplete coverage and (ii) few coils is presented. Two empirically derived model-based control algorithms are compared with a baseline guaranteed suboptimal intelligent-shell-type (IS) feedback. Experimental stabilization could not be achieved for the coil array subset sizes considered by this first study. But the model-based controllers appear to significantly outperform the decentralized IS method.

  3. An analytic scaling relation for the maximum tokamak elongation against n  =  0 MHD resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Freidberg, Jeffrey; Cerfon, Antoine; Greenwald, Martin

    2017-06-01

    A highly elongated plasma is desirable in order to increase plasma pressure and energy confinement to maximize fusion power output. However, there is a limit to the maximum achievable elongation which is set by vertical instabilities driven by the n  =  0 MHD mode. This limit can be increased by optimizing several parameters characterizing the plasma and the wall. The purpose of our study is to explore how and to what extent this can be done. Specifically, we extend many earlier calculations of the n  =  0 mode and numerically determine scaling relations for the maximum elongation as a function of dimensionless parameters describing (1) the plasma profile ({βp} and l i ), (2) the plasma shape (ɛ and δ), (3) the wall radius (b/a) and (4) most importantly the feedback system capability parameter γ {τw} . These numerical calculations rely on a new formulation of n  =  0 MHD theory we recently developed (Freidberg et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 515810607, Lee et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 515810608) that reduces the 2D stability problem into a 1D problem. This method includes all the physics of the ideal MHD axisymmetric instability while reducing the computation time significantly, so that many parameters can be explored during the optimization process. The scaling relations we present include the effects of the optimal triangularity and the finite aspect ratio on the maximum elongation, and can be useful for determining optimized plasma shapes in current experiments and future tokamak designs.

  4. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  5. Investigation of Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization Physics in High-beta Plasmas Using Applied Non-axisymmetric Fields in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Zhu, W.; Menard, J. E.; Bell, R. E.; Bialek, J. M.; Bell, M. G.; Gates, D. A.; Glasser, A. H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Shaing, K. C.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K. L.

    2009-06-16

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) offers an operational space characterized by high-beta (βt = 39%, βN > 7, βN/βno-wall N > 1.5) and low aspect ratio (A > 1.27) to leverage the plasma parameter dependences of RWM stabilization and plasma rotation damping physics giving greater confidence for extrapolation to ITER. Significant new capability for RWM research has been added to the device with the commissioning of a set of six nonaxisymmetric magnetic field coils, allowing generation of fields with dominant toroidal mode number, n, of 1–3. These coils have been used to study the dependence of resonant field amplification on applied field frequency and RWMstabilization physics by reducing the toroidal rotation profile belowits steady-state value through non-resonant magnetic braking. Modification of plasma rotation profiles shows that rotation outside q = 2.5 is not required for passive RWM stability and there is large variation in the RWM critical rotation at the q = 2 surface, both of which are consistent with distributed dissipation models.

  6. Off-axis Fishbone-like Instability and Excitation of the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) in JT-60U and DIII-D Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.

    2010-11-01

    Advanced tokamak experiments in JT-60U [1] and DIII-D [2] have revealed that in high-beta q(0)>1 plasmas, where the resistive wall modes (RWMs) are predicted to be stable by kinetic effects of energetic particles, plasma rotation and a nearby conducting wall, off-axis fishbone-like instabilities often trigger RWMs. The rapid growth of these RWMs prevents high performance operation. The off-axis fishbone-like instability has some similarities to the classic m/n=1/1 internal fishbone instability in terms of its initial frequency near the energetic ion precession frequency, downward frequency-chirping, and a neutron rate drop of ˜20% during each burst. However, there are several unique non-ideal-MHD features in the off-axis fishbone-like instability. The waveform time behavior has strong non-sinusoidal distortion from the q˜2 area to the edge, synchronized with bursting energetic particle losses, while the plasma rotation is rapidly reduced within a few milliseconds. Based on experimental observations the following hypothesis emerges. In plasmas where rotation and kinetic effects are usually sufficient to stabilize the RWM, energetic particles can drive the fishbone instability of several kHz (larger than the inverse of the resistive wall time constant). The reduction of kinetic stabilization due to the resulting energetic particle loss and rapid decrease of plasma rotation makes the plasma more vulnerable to the near-zero frequency RWM. The impact on RWM stability by the off-axis fishbone with its radial and toroidal distortion of the mode structure is assessed by comparing the JT-60U/DIII-D results with theoretical predictions. 6pt [1] G. Matsunaga et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001. (2009). [2] M. Okabayashi et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 125003.

  7. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  8. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  9. Different modes of vancomycin and D-alanyl-D-alanine peptidase binding to cell wall peptide and a possible role for the vancomycin resistance protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, J R; Pratt, R F

    1990-01-01

    A comparison was made of the binding modes of the bacterial cell wall precursor L-lysyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine to the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin and to the D-alanyl-D-alanine-cleaving peptidase of Streptomyces sp. strain R61, a model for cell wall-synthesizing enzymes whose X-ray three-dimensional structure is established. In each of the two pairings (vancomycin with peptide and DD-peptidase with peptide), polypeptide backbones were antiparallel, and the antibiotic or enzyme enveloped the peptide substrate from opposite sides. Hydrogen-bonding groups on the substrate which are involved with the DD-peptidase were shown to be different from the ones reported from nuclear magnetic resonance studies to be involved with vancomycin. Because of steric hindrance, the binding of either molecule to the substrate prevents the binding of the other molecule. Binding to the substrate by a D-alanyl-D-alanine-recognizing protein in a manner similar to that used by the DD-peptidase could explain recent observations of vancomycin resistance, in which a new membrane-associated protein has been detected. PMID:2386365

  10. Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

    2007-06-18

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  11. Transverse Effect Due to Short Range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Chao, Alexander Wu; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  12. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  13. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  14. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    SciTech Connect

    S. P. Smith; Jardin, S. C.

    2008-05-01

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: Α•χ = λΒ• χ. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  15. An improved resistive wall monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenz, Brian; Crisp, Jim

    1998-12-10

    Resistive wall monitors were designed and built for the Fermilab Main Injector project. These devices measure longitudinal beam current from 3 KHz to 4 GHz with a 1 ohm gap impedance. The new design provides a larger aperture and a calibration port to improve the accuracy of single-bunch intensity measurements. Microwave absorber material is used to reduce interference from spurious electromagnetic waves traveling inside the beam pipe. Several types of ferrite materials were evaluated for the absorber. Inexpensive ferrite rods were selected and assembled in an array forming the desired geometry without machining.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic stability spectrum with flow and a resistive wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sterling Paul

    Magnetically confined fusion plasmas are known to develop a variety of instabilities. Some of these instabilities can be understood with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A plasma in MHD equilibrium can be unstable to small perturbations, which are always present in experiments. One particular instability is the external kink mode. While this mode might be stabilized by a perfectly conducting wall, actual walls have some finite resistivity such that the kink still grows on the L/R time of the wall---it is a resistive wall mode (RWM). In this dissertation, the RWM is studied with the ideal MHD equilibrium and stability equations that include equilibrium flow. The stability equation is a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is transformed by the use of an auxiliary variable into a set of linear eigenvalue equations. For a flowing cylindrical plasma, these equations are formulated as a matrix eigenvalue problem by expanding the radial dependence of the perturbations as finite elements. The perturbations at the edge of the plasma are coupled to the surrounding resistive wall by the use of a Green's function for the vacuum fields and by the introduction of an additional unknown that represents the induced current in the wall. The matrix eigenvalue formulation of the RWM problem was solved numerically with a new finite element eigenvalue code. The code is benchmarked both analytically and numerically for the boundary conditions of a close fitting conducting wall, no wall, a perfectly conducting wall, and a resistive wall. The RWM is shown to be stabilized by flow for a window of wall positions, both with and without parallel viscosity, the latter requiring an extrapolation to a grid step size of zero in the region of resonance between the RWM and the sound continuum. Finally, flow shear is introduced, which reveals that the RWM does not move with the plasma at the resonance location, but rather with the plasma at a radial location which is independent of the

  17. Plasma stability theory including the resistive wall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    > Plasma stabilization due to a nearby conducting wall can provide access to better performance in some scenarios in tokamaks. This was proved by experiments with an essential gain in and demonstrated as a long-lasting effect at sufficiently fast plasma rotation in the DIII-D tokamak (see, for example, Strait et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 43, 2003, pp. 430-440). The rotational stabilization is the central topic of this review, though eventually the mode rotation gains significance. The analysis is based on the first-principle equations describing the energy balance with dissipation in the resistive wall. The method emphasizes derivation of the dispersion relations for the modes which are faster than the conventional resistive wall modes, but slower than the ideal magnetohydrodynamics modes. Both the standard thin wall and ideal-wall approximations are not valid in this range. Here, these are replaced by an approach incorporating the skin effect in the wall. This new element in the stability theory makes the energy sink a nonlinear function of the complex growth rate. An important consequence is that a mode rotating above a critical level can provide a damping effect sufficient for instability suppression. Estimates are given and applications are discussed.

  18. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  19. Study on wall locking of multiple tearing modes in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2004-08-01

    The nonlinear interactions between multiple unstable tearing modes and the resistive wall in reversed field pinch plasmas are studied. The nonlinear interactions include the nonlinear electromagnetic interaction between multiple modes, the effect of the eddy currents induced in the resistive wall by the magnetic perturbations of the multiple modes, and the effect of the angular momentum transport due to the viscous diffusion in the plasma. A set of fully time-dependent equations describing the dynamics of the three tearing modes (dynamo modes) has been employed and solved numerically by using the finite element method. Both the time-dependent and the steady state solutions are obtained. It is found that the multiple modes enhance the braking effect of the resistive wall. The "locking threshold" predicted in the case of multiple modes is much smaller than that of the case of the single mode (as far as the same mode is concerned). The formation of the "slinky mode" is clearly demonstrated. The relation of two existing thresholds: "wall locking" and "phase locking" is also discussed. Comparison is made between the time-dependent solution and the steady state solution for two examples, in which the mode amplitudes grow linearly with time. The validity of the steady state assumption, in particular, for the calculation of the viscous torque is discussed. Numerical analysis is applied to the reversed field experiment [F. Gnesotto, P. Sonato, W. R. Baker et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)].

  20. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  1. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  2. Spin waves and domain wall modes in curved magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bocklage, Lars; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Topp, Jesco; Matsuyama, Toru; Meier, Guido

    2014-07-02

    The confinement of spin waves in inhomogeneous fields and spin wave interaction with domain walls has attracted interest due to possible applications in magnonics. We investigate spin waves in curved ferromagnetic nanowires. The field dispersion and localization of spin waves is revealed by comparison to known modes in stripes and taking into account the specific field reversal of the curved wire. In small wires we find a strongly altered mode spectrum in a certain field regime. Micromagnetic simulations show an extended domain wall within the wire in this field region. The domain wall shows several dynamic modes and changes the remaining spin wave modes. We find mode suppression as well as newly arising modes due to the strong inhomogenous internal field of the wall.

  3. Two feedback system schemes for the collider and resistive wall instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.

    1993-10-01

    Two feedback systems proposed for the SSC Collider are studied from the point of view of the capability for controlling the resistive wall instability. The previous kick subtraction feedback scheme can damp the dipole mode resistive wall instability. However, the feedback system with digital filter processing cannot control this instability.

  4. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  5. New 2BPM-1K scheme and resistive wall instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.

    1993-10-01

    One of the main goals of a transverse damping feedback system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is to control the transverse multibunch instabilities. These instabilities arise due to the interaction of the bunches with the wake field left by previous bunches traveling in the ring. The wake field is the electromagnetic field resulting from the interaction of charged particles in the bunch with the surrounding conductors elements, and it can also be characterized by the associated impedance. The instability that arises due to the resistive beam pipe is called resistive wall instability. Since the SSC Collider machine the injection time is higher than one hour and the storage time at high energy (20 TeV) must be at least 20 hours, the control of the resistive wall instability is of fundamental importance for the Collider to be operational. The most dangerous mode of the beam oscillation is the dipole one which has an estimated growth time between 56 msec and 150 msec. Reference 3 shows that the traditional feedback scheme was not good enough to control (with low gain) the Dipole Mode Multibunch Instability (DMMI) due to the resistive wall impedance. Consequently, a novel two BPM-two kickers transverse feedback system was proposed to control the DMMI much better (the gain could be one order of magnitude lower). This novel system was optimized later on, and it is still under study. Since this system has two kickers, one would like to reduce the cost of the system by looking for the possibility of using one single kicker with other correction scheme. In this paper, a new scheme is shown, using two BPM`s and a single kicker, which allows excellent control of the DMMI due to resistive wall impedance and allows a complete cancellation of the coherent oscillations within two turns, when the gain is equal to one and there is no other perturbations.

  6. Adaptive feedback control of wall modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipeng

    The goal of this study is to stabilize the resistive wall modes (RWM) in tokamaks with adaptive stochastic feedback control. This is the first ever attempt at adaptive stochastic feedback optimal control of RWM in tokamaks. Both adaptive optimal state feedback and adaptive output feedback control have been studied. The adaptive optimal state feedback control design successfully stabilizes a slowly time-evolving RWM in a tokamak in a time scale of 4 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output for the time-invariant model is twice the system noise level. For the time-varying model, it is several times larger than the time-invariant case. The adaptive stochastic output feedback can also stabilize the slowly time-evolving RWM. It can do this in a time about 3 times that of the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output is twice as large as that of the state feedback case. In order to avoid the bottleneck encountered in the various sequential computations with big matrices in the feedback algorithms, neural network control has been proposed. It has been used to implement the adaptive stochastic output feedback control. It can stabilize the RWM instability in a time of 3 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized wall modes have the steady state output similar to the output feedback case. The developed algorithms, state feedback, output feedback, neural network control, can be readily applied to other plasma instabilities.

  7. RESISTIVE WALL STABILIZATION OF HIGH BETA PLASMAS IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    STRAIT,EJ; BIALEK,J; BOGATU,N; CHANCE,M; CHU,MS; EDGELL,D; GAROFALO,AM; JACKSON,GL; JENSEN,TH; JOHNSON,LC; KIM,JS; LAHAYE,RJ; NAVRATIL,G; OKABAYASHI,M; REIMERDES,H; SCOVILLE,JT; TURNBULL,AD; WALKER,ML

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 RESISTIVE WALL STABILIZATION OF HIGH BETA PLASMAS IN DIII-D. Recent DIII-D experiments show that ideal kink modes can be stabilized at high beta by a resistive wall, with sufficient plasma rotation. However, the resonant response by a marginally stable resistive wall mode to static magnetic field asymmetries can lead to strong damping of the rotation. Careful reduction of such asymmetries has allowed plasmas with beta well above the ideal MHD no-wall limit, and approaching the ideal-wall limit, to be sustained for durations exceeding one second. Feedback control can improve plasma stability by direct stabilization of the resistive wall mode or by reducing magnetic field asymmetry. Assisted by plasma rotation, direct feedback control of resistive wall modes with growth rates more than 5 times faster than the characteristic wall time has been observed. These results open a new regime of tokamak operation above the free-boundary stability limit, accessible by a combination of plasma rotation and feedback control.

  8. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  9. Decays of bosonic and fermionic modes on a domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    The decays of excited bosonic and excited fermionic modes in the external field of the domain wall are studied. The wave functions of the excited fermionic modes are found analytically in the external field approximation. Some properties of the fermionic modes are investigated. The reflection and transmission coefficients are calculated for fermion scattering from the domain wall. Properties of the reflection and transmission coefficients are studied. The decays of the first excited fermionic mode are investigated to the first order in the Yukawa coupling constant. The amplitudes, angular distributions, and widths of these decays are found by analytical and numerical methods. Decays of the excited bosonic mode are also investigated to the first order in the Yukawa and self-interaction coupling constants. The amplitudes, angular distributions, and widths of these decays are obtained analytically and by numerical methods.

  10. Proportionality between chest wall resistance and elastance.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Fredberg, J J

    1991-02-01

    Fredberg and Stamenovic (J. Appl. Physiol. 67: 2408-2419, 1989) demonstrated a relatively robust phenomenological relationship between resistance (R) and elastance (E) of lung tissue during external forcing. The relationship can be expressed as omega R = eta E, where omega = 2 pi times forcing frequency and eta is hysteresivity; they found eta to be remarkably invariant under a wide range of circumstances. From data gathered in previous experiments, we have tested the adequacy and utility of this phenomenological description for the chest wall (eta w) and its major compartments, the rib cage (eta rc), diaphragm-abdomen (eta d-a), and belly wall (eta bw+). For forcing frequencies and tidal volumes within the normal range of breathing, we found that eta w remained in a relatively narrow range (0.27-0.37) and that neither eta w nor the compartmental eta's changed much with frequency or tidal volume. Compared with eta w, eta rc tended to be slightly low, whereas eta d-a tended to be slightly higher than eta w. However, at higher frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) all eta's increased appreciably with frequency. During various static nonrespiratory maneuvers involving use of respiratory muscles, eta w increased up to twofold. We conclude that in the normal ranges of breathing frequency and tidal volume 1) elastic and dissipative processes within the chest wall appear to be coupled, 2) eta's of the various component parts of the chest wall are well matched, 3) respiratory muscle contraction increases the ratio of cyclic dissipative losses to energy storage, and 4) R of the relaxed chest wall can be estimated from E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  12. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-01

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  13. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.; Lao, L. L.; Shephard, M. S.; Zhang, F.

    2016-05-20

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surround- ing vacuum region are included within the computational domain. Our implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. We use this new capability to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non- axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear and nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically real- istic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.

  14. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.; Lao, L. L.; Shephard, M. S.; Zhang, F.

    2016-05-01

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surrounding vacuum region are included within the computational domain. This implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. This new capability is used to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non-axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear and nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically realistic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.

  15. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, N. M. Lao, L. L.; Jardin, S. C.; Shephard, M. S.; Zhang, F.

    2016-05-15

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surrounding vacuum region are included within the computational domain. This implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. This new capability is used to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non-axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear and nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically realistic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.

  16. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    DOE PAGES

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.; Lao, L. L.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surround- ing vacuum region are included within the computational domain. Our implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. We use this new capability to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non- axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear andmore » nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically real- istic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.« less

  17. Improved feedback control of wall-stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP tokamak can excite strong, saturated kink modes whose growth rates and rotation frequencies evolve on a millisecond timescale. To control such modes, HBT-EP uses a GPU-based feedback system in a low latency architecture. When feedback is applied, the mode amplitude and rotation frequency can change quickly. We describe an improved algorithm that captures the rapid phase changes in the mode while also removing transient amplitude jumps. Additionally, the control coil driving signal is implemented using a current-controller instead of a voltage-controller. The feedback performance is improved and has been tested under more unstable regimes, including different wall configurations and plasmas slowed by a bias probe. Feedback suppression is observed in all cases and the feedback parameters' dependency on different experimental conditions is studied. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  18. Resistance-based biosensor of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kolosovas-Machuca, E S; Vera-Reveles, G; Rodríguez-Aranda, M C; Ortiz-Dosal, L C; Segura-Cardenas, Emmanuel; Gonzalez, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) are a good choice for resistive biosensors due to their great resistance changes when immunoreactions take place, they are also low-cost, more biocompatible than single-walled carbon nanotubes, and resistive measurement equipment is usually not expensive and readily available. In this work a novel resistive biosensor based on the immobilization of an antigen through a silanization process over the surface of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) is reported. Results show that the biosensor increases its conductivity when adding the antigen and decreases when adding the antibody making them good candidates for disease diagnosis.

  19. Higher-spin modes in a domain-wall universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Rahman, Rakibur

    2014-10-01

    We find a consistent set of equations of motion and constraints for massive higher-spin fluctuations in a gravitational background, required of certain characteristic properties but more general than constant curvature space. Of particular interest among such geometries is a thick domain wall-a smooth version of the Randall-Sundrum metric. Apart from the graviton zero mode, the brane accommodates quasi-bound massive states of higher spin contingent on the bulk mass. We estimate the mass and lifetime of these higher-spin resonances, which may appear as metastable dark matter in a braneworld universe.

  20. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  1. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resistive Wall Growth Rate Measurements in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, R.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; Kourbanis, I.

    2016-10-05

    Impedance could represent a limitation of running high intensity beams in the Fermilab recycler. With high intensity upgrades foreseen, it is important to quantify the impedance. To do this,studies have been performed measuring the growth rate of presumably the resistive wall instability. The growth rates at varying intensities and chromaticities are shown. The measured growth rates are compared to ones calculated with the resistive wall impedance.

  3. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Walker, Louise A.; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K.; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A. R.; Munro, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. PMID:26220968

  4. Earthquake resistant structural walls: Test of walls with and without openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, K. N.; Daniel, J. I.; Aristizabal-Ochoa, J. D.; Fiorato, A. E.; Corley, W. G.

    1981-07-01

    Two one-third scale, six-story wal specimens were subjected to inelastic load reversals representing severe earthquake forces exerted by double acting hydraulic rams, located on both sides of the wall specimens, and applied to the top of each wall. The specimens were designed of earthquake resistant reinforced concrete wall elements in coupled wall systems based on the 1976 Uniform Building Code. The loading was calculated using a modified DRAIN two-dimensional computer program with two actual earthquake records used as input ground motion data. One specimen was a solid wall and the other included six openings simulating windows. When data was normalized by yield capacities, the resonse of the two walls to the inelastic loading was similar. The presence of window openings had little effect on the deformation characteristics of the sample walls in response to the cyclic loads.

  5. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  6. Knocking on the heaven's wall: pathogenesis of and resistance to biotrophic fungi at the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2004-08-01

    New findings challenge the traditional view of the plant cell wall as passive structural barrier to invasion by fungal microorganisms. A surveillance system for cell wall integrity appears to sense perturbation of the cell wall structure upon fungal attack and is interconnected with known plant defence signalling pathways. Biotrophic fungi might manipulate this surveillance system for the establishment of biotrophy. The attempts of fungi to invade also induce a sub-cellular polarisation in attacked cells, which activates an ancient vesicle-associated resistance response that possibly enables the focal transport of regulatory cargo and the secretion of toxic cargo. The underlying resistance machinery might have been subverted by biotrophic fungi for pathogenesis.

  7. MHD simulations with resistive wall and magnetic separatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H. R.; Pletzer, A.; Park, W.; Jardin, S.; Breslau, J.; Sugiyama, L.

    2004-12-01

    A number of problems in resistive MHD magnetic fusion simulations describe plasmas with three regions: the core, the halo region, and the resistive boundary. Treating these problems requires maintenance of an adequate resistivity contrast between the core and halo. This can be helped by the presence of a magnetic separatrix, which in any case is required for reasons of realistic modeling. An appropriate mesh generation capability is also needed to include the halo region when a separatrix is present. Finally a resistive wall boundary condition is required, to allow both two dimensional and three dimensional magnetic perturbations to penetrate the wall. Preliminary work is presented on halo current simulations in ITER. The first step is the study of VDE (vertical displacement event) instabilities. The growth rate is consistent with scaling inversely proportional to the resistive wall penetration time. The simulations have resistivity proportional to the -3/2 power of the temperature. Simulations have been done with resistivity contrast between the plasma core and wall of 1000 times, to model the vacuum region between the core and resistive shell. Some 3D simulations are shown of disruptions competing with VDEs. Toroidal peaking factors are up to about 3.

  8. Fracture resistance of zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to possess extraordinary strength, stiffness and ductility properties. Their fracture resistance is an important issue from the perspective of durability and reliability of CNT-based materials and devices. According to existing studies, brittle fracture is one of the important failure modes of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) failure due to mechanical loading. However, based on the authors' knowledge, the fracture resistance of CNTs has not been quantified so far. In this paper, the fracture resistance of zigzag SWNTs with preexisting defects is calculated using fracture mechanics concepts based on atomistic simulations. The interatomic forces are modelled with a modified Morse potential; the Anderson thermostat is used for temperature control. The problem of unstable crack growth at finite temperature, presumably caused by the lattice trapping effect, is circumvented by computing the strain energy release rate through a series of displacement-controlled tensile loading of SWNTs (applied through moving the outermost layer of atoms at one end at constant strain rate of 9.4 × 10-4 ps-1) with pre-existing crack-like defects of various lengths. The strain energy release rate, G, is computed for (17, 0), (28, 0) and (35, 0) SWNTs (each with aspect ratio 4) with pre-existing cracks up to 29.5 Å long. The fracture resistance, Gc, is determined as a function of crack length for each tube at three different temperatures (1, 300 and 500 K). A significant dependence of Gc on crack length is observed, reminiscent of the rising R curve behaviour of metals at the macroscale: for the zigzag nanotubes Gc increases with crack length at small length, and tends to reach a constant value if the tube diameter is large enough. We suspect that the lattice trapping effect plays the role of crack tip plasticity at the atomic scale. For example, at 300 K, Gc for the (35, 0) tube with aspect ratio 4 converges to 6 J m-2 as the crack length exceeds 20

  9. Effects of toroidicity on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, R.; Monticello, D.A.; Manickam, J.; Strauss, H.R.; Grimm, R.; McGuire, K.

    1983-03-01

    A reduced set of resistive MHD equations is solved numerically in three dimensions to study the stability of tokamak plasmas. Toroidal effects are included self-consistently to leading and next order in inverse aspect ratio, epsilon. The equations satisfy an energy integral. In addition, the momentum equation yields the Grad-Shafranov equation correct to all orders in epsilon. Low beta plasma are studied using several different q-profiles. In all cases, the linear growth rates are reduced by finite toroidicity. Excellent agreement with resistive PEST is obtianed. In some cases, toroidal effects lead to complete stabilization of the mode. Nonlinear results show smaller saturated island widths for finite aspect ratio compared to the cylindrical limit. If the current channel is wide enough so as to produce steep gradients towards the outside of the plasma, both the finite aspect ratio cases and cylindrical cases disrupt.

  10. Non-linear dynamics of the wall touching kink mode and Hiro current simulation with DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. A.; Svidzinski, V. A.; Evstatiev, E. G.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2011-10-01

    The Disruption Simulation Code (DSC) was initially implemented in 2D (single helicity) with all basic MHD components of the full 3D version. It performs adaptive, meshless free-boundary ideal one-fluid MHD simulations of plasma separated from conducting in-vessel structures by a vacuum region. Vacuum fields, the plasma surface and wall currents are calculated using both Green's functions and Poisson equation methods. Two non-linear regimes of the wall touching kink mode were simulated for the first time: (a) a fast ideal MHD regime till the saturation due to excitation of the Hiro currents in a tile covered plasma facing surface, and (b) a slower regime of the current quench due to resistive decay of the Hiro currents. Corresponding sideways forces applied to the plasma facing components and to the vacuum vessel were calculated. Progress on the 3D DSC extension of ideal one fluid MHD is presented. Implementation of the full 3D resistive MHD will be outlined. Together with realistic wall model this will enable DSC to address the MHD issues of the entire disruption problem and to move forward for understanding opportunities for mitigation and prediction of disruptions in ITER. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR grant.

  11. Cytoskeleton and cell wall function in penetration resistance.

    PubMed

    Hardham, Adrienne R; Jones, David A; Takemoto, Daigo

    2007-08-01

    Plants successfully repel the vast majority of potential pathogens that arrive on their surface, with most microorganisms failing to breach the outer epidermal wall. Resistance to penetration at the epidermis is a key component of basal defence against disease and critically depends on fortification of the cell wall at the site of attempted penetration through the development of specialised cell wall appositions rich in antimicrobial compounds. Formation of cell wall appositions is achieved by rapid reorganisation of actin microfilaments, actin-dependent transport of secretory products to the infection site and local activation of callose synthesis. Plants are finely tuned to detect the presence of pathogens on their surface, perceiving both chemical and physical signals of pathogen origin. In the on-going evolution of interaction strategies, plants must continually monitor and out manoeuvre pathogen avoidance or suppression of plant defences in order to preserve the effectiveness of penetration resistance.

  12. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  13. Experimental study of lattice dynamics in individual semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes: Tangential G modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, D. I.; Tran, H. N.; Slabodyan, Yu. S.; Osadchii, A. V.; Roshal', S. B.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    The tangential G modes in individual semiconducting double-walled nanotubes have been examined via Raman spectroscopy over a wide laser excitation wavelength range. Individual suspended nanotubes have been synthesized via chemical vapor deposition. The ( n, m) chirality indices are determined via electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The pronounced shift in the tangential modes compared to the analogous modes of single-walled nanotubes has been observed in Raman spectra of double-walled nanotubes. The shift value is shown to depend on the interlayer distance and on the van der Waals interaction between the layers in a double-walled tube.

  14. On gas desorption from the tokamak first wall during edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-11-15

    The effect of gas desorption from the tokamak first wall on the pedestal recovery in the H-mode after an edge-localized-mode burst is considered. Results of FACE code simulations of hydrogen desorption from a beryllium wall are presented. It is found that the wall has a significant effect on plasma processes only at sufficiently low temperatures (of about 400 K), which agrees with qualitative estimates obtained earlier in the zero-dimensional approximation.

  15. Development of an efficient Procedure for Resist Wall Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Higuchi, Sayoko; Kirihata, Kuniaki; Inoue, Yasue; Fujie, Miho; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    The Resist Wall space experiment aims to examine the role of the cortical microtubule-plasma membrane-cell wall continuum in plant resistance to the gravitational force, thereby clarifying the mechanism of gravity resistance. For this purpose, we will cultivate Arabidopsis mutants defective in organization of cortical microtubules (tua6 ) or synthesis of membrane sterols (hmg1 ) as well as the wild type under microgravity and 1 g conditions in the European Modular Cultivation System on the International Space Station up to reproductive stage, and compare phenotypes on growth and development. We will also analyze cell wall properties and gene expression levels using collected materials. However, the amounts of materials collected will be severely limited, and we should develop an efficient procedure for this space experiment. In the present study, we examined the possibility of analyzing various parameters successively using the identical material. On orbit, plant materials will be fixed with RNAlater solution, kept at 4° C for several days and then frozen in a freezer at -20° C. We first examined whether the cell wall extensibility of inflorescence stems can be measured after RNAlater fixation. The gradient of the cell wall extensibility along inflorescence stems was detected in RNAlater-fixed materials as in methanol-killed ones. The sufficient amounts of RNA to analyze the gene expression were also obtained from the materials after measurement of the cell wall extensibility. Furthermore, the levels and composition of cell wall polysaccharides could be measured using the materials after extraction of RNA. These results show that we can analyze the physical and chemical properties of the cell wall as well as gene expression using the identical material obtained in the space experiments.

  16. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; ...

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externallymore » applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.« less

  17. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Navratil, Gerald A.

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.

  18. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  19. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed.

  20. Segmentation of arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution using M-mode ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Craig; Azer, Karim; Ramcharan, Sharmilee L; Bunzel, Michelle; Cambell, Barry R; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Walker, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for segmenting arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution, using the returns from M-mode ultrasound. The technique involves measuring the spatial offset between all pairs of scans from their cross-correlation, converting the spatial offsets to relative wall motion through a global optimization, and finally translating from relative to absolute wall motion by interpolation over the M-mode image. The resulting detailed wall distension waveform has the potential to enhance existing vascular biomarkers, such as strain and compliance, as well as enable new ones.

  1. Cell wall swelling, fracture mode, and the mechanical properties of cherry fruit skins are closely related.

    PubMed

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Knoche, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Cell wall swelling, fracture mode (along the middle lamellae vs. across cell walls), stiffness, and pressure at fracture of the sweet cherry fruit skin are closely related. Skin cracking is a common phenomenon in many crops bearing fleshy fruit. The objectives were to investigate relationships between the mode of fracture, the extent of cell wall swelling, and the mechanical properties of the fruit skin using sweet cherry (Prunus avium) as a model. Cracking was induced by incubating whole fruit in deionised water or by fracturing exocarp segments (ESs) in biaxial tensile tests. The fracture mode of epidermal cells was investigated by light microscopy. In biaxial tensile tests, the anticlinal cell walls of the ES fractured predominantly across the cell walls (rather than along) and showed no cell wall swelling. In contrast, fruit incubated in water fractured predominantly along the anticlinal epidermal cell walls and the cell walls were swollen. Swelling of cell walls also occurred when ESs were incubated in malic acid, in hypertonic solutions of sucrose, or in water. Compared to the untreated controls, these treatments resulted in more frequent fractures along the cell walls, lower pressures at fracture (p fracture), and lower moduli of elasticity (E, i.e., less stiff). Conversely, compared to the untreated controls, incubating the ES in CaCl2 and in high concentrations of ethanol resulted in thinner cell walls, in less frequent fractures along the cell walls, higher E and p fracture. Our study demonstrates that fracture mode, stiffness, and pressure at fracture are closely related to cell wall swelling. A number of other factors, including cultivar, ripening stage, turgor, CaCl2, and malic acid, exert their effects only indirectly, i.e., by affecting cell wall swelling.

  2. Resistive wall wakefield in the LCLS undulator beam pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K

    2004-09-20

    We have shown that, due to the ac resistive wall wakefield, the present LCLS undulator design, with its round copper beam pipe, will result in an unacceptably large energy variation induced within the bunch over the length of the undulator (0.6%). If, instead, we use a flat, aluminum chamber, the energy variation can be reduced to within acceptable limits (less-than-or-similar-to 0.2%). Finally we have shown that the effect of the anomalous skin effect in the beam pipe wall is small, and can be ignored.

  3. Resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Albert, Maximilian; Lequeux, Steven; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Bortolotti, Paolo; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fangohr, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We study resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches in ferromagnetic nanostrips. We demonstrate that a mode's sensitivity to notches depends strongly on the mode's characteristics. For example, the frequencies of modes that involve lateral motion of the wall are the most sensitive to changes in the notch intrusion depth, especially at the narrow, more strongly confined end of the domain wall. In contrast, the breathing mode, whose dynamics are concentrated away from the notches is relatively insensitive to changes in the notches' sizes. We also demonstrate a sharp drop in the translational mode's frequency towards zero when approaching depinning which is confirmed, using a harmonic oscillator model, to be consistent with a reduction in the local slope of the notch-induced confining potential at its edge.

  4. Domain wall resistance in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, D.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Dietl, T.; Ohno, H.

    2007-03-01

    Domain wall (DW) resistance in perpendicularly magnetized (Ga,Mn)As has been investigated. The observed DW resistance is decomposed into extrinsic and intrinsic contributions. The former is explained quantitatively by the zig-zaging current due to an abrupt polarity change of the Hall electric field at DW. The latter is consistent with the disorder-induced mixing of spin channels due to small non-adiabacity of carrier spins subject to spatially varying local magnetic moment and is shown to be an order of magnitude greater than a contribution from anisotropic magnetoresistance.

  5. Scaling and interaction of self-similar modes in models of high Reynolds number wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Moarref, R.; McKeon, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has established the usefulness of the resolvent operator that maps the terms nonlinear in the turbulent fluctuations to the fluctuations themselves. Further work has described the self-similarity of the resolvent arising from that of the mean velocity profile. The orthogonal modes provided by the resolvent analysis describe the wall-normal coherence of the motions and inherit that self-similarity. In this contribution, we present the implications of this similarity for the nonlinear interaction between modes with different scales and wall-normal locations. By considering the nonlinear interactions between modes, it is shown that much of the turbulence scaling behaviour in the logarithmic region can be determined from a single arbitrarily chosen reference plane. Thus, the geometric scaling of the modes is impressed upon the nonlinear interaction between modes. Implications of these observations on the self-sustaining mechanisms of wall turbulence, modelling and simulation are outlined.

  6. Analytical 1D models of the wall thermal resistance of rectangular minichannels applied in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents four 1-dimensional models of thermal resistance of walls in a heat exchanger with rectangular minichannels. The first model is the simplest one, with a single wall separating two fluids. The second model of the so called equivalent wall takes into account total volume of intermediate walls between layers of minichannels and of side walls of minichannels. The next two more complicated models take separately into account thermal resistance of these walls. In these two models side walls are treated as fins. The results of models comparison are presented. It is shown that thermal resistance may be neglected for metal walls but it should be taken into account for the walls made of plastics. For the case of non-neglected wall thermal resistance the optimum wall thickness was derived. Minichannel heat exchangers made of plastic are larger than those built of metal, but are significantly cheaper. It makes possible to use of such exchangers in inexpensive microscale ORC installations.

  7. Transverse Effects Due to Random Displacement of Resistive Wall Segments and Focusing Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    In this paper, we study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics in the presence of random displacements of resistive wall segments and focusing elements. Analytical formulas are obtained for long-range resistive wall wake, together with numerical results for short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS project and some other proposed accelerators.

  8. TRANSVERSE EFFECTS DUE TO RANDOM DISPLACEMENT OF RESISTIVE WALL SEGMENTS AND FOCUSING ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean; Wu, Juhao

    2007-06-18

    In this paper, we study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics in the presence of random displacements of resistive wall segments and focusing elements. Analytical formulas are obtained for long-range resistive wall wake, together with numerical results for short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS project and some other proposed accelerators.

  9. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  10. Influence of plasma resistivity on peeling-ballooning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of plasma resistivity on the edge localized mode is studied with the BOUT++ code. From the linear simulation, it is found that the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning mode is mainly affected by the plasma resistance in the middle of the pedestal, while the resistance on the top or at the bottom of the pedestal plays a lesser role. Furthermore, in the nonlinear simulation, the resistance at the bottom of the pedestal has a more important effect on the energy loss in the turbulent transport phase.

  11. The Resistive-Wall Instability in Multipulse Linear Induction Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2017-05-01

    The resistive-wall instability results from the Lorentz force on the beam due to the beam image charge and current. If the beam pipe is perfectly conducting, the electric force due to the image charge attracts the beam to the pipe wall, and the magnetic force due to the image current repels the beam from the wall. For a relativistic beam, these forces almost cancel, leaving a slight attractive force, which is easily overcome by external magnetic focusing. However, if the beam pipe is not perfectly conducting, the magnetic field due to the image current decays on a magnetic-diffusion time scale.more » If the beam pulse is longer than the magnetic diffusion time, the repulsion of the beam tail will be weaker than the repulsion of the beam head. In the absence of an external focusing force, this causes a head-to-tail sweep of the beam toward the wall. This instability is usually thought to be a concern only for long-pulse relativistic electron beams. However, with the advent of multipulse, high current linear induction accelerators, the possibility of pulse-to-pulse coupling of this instability should be investigated. Lastly, we have explored pulse-to-pulse coupling using the linear accelerator model for Dual Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing beam dynamics code, and we present the results of this paper.« less

  12. Hyper-resistivity due to viscous tearing mode turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John

    2005-10-01

    The quasilinear hyper-resistivity coefficient D for flattening of a current profile (e.g. in RFPs) in resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is computed. It is found that D is independent of Delta-prime, the constant-psi matching parameter, for viscous tearing modes. This is in contrast with the situation for inertial tearing modes, for which D scales as Delta-prime to the -1/5 power. This situation for inertial tearing modes is problematic because D appears to go to infinity as quasilinear saturation is achieved[J. Krommes and C.-B. Kim, personal communication, 1989], and because D becomes complex for negative Delta-prime. It makes physical sense to compute D for viscous rather than for inertial tearing modes for because inertial tearing modes cross over to viscous modes near quasilinear saturation, when their growth rates are sufficiently small.

  13. Domain-Wall Resistance in Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, D.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Dietl, T.; Ohno, H.

    2006-03-01

    A series of microstructures designed to pin domain walls (DWs) in (Ga,Mn)As with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been employed to determine extrinsic and intrinsic contributions to DW resistance. The former is explained quantitatively as resulting from a polarity change in the Hall electric field at DW. The latter is 1 order of magnitude greater than a term brought about by anisotropic magnetoresistance and is shown to be consistent with disorder-induced mistracking of the carrier spins subject to spatially varying magnetization.

  14. Orthogonality breaking induces extraordinary single-mode transparency in an elaborate waveguide with wall corrugations

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhi-Yong; Fan, Ya-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Orthogonality plays a fundamental role in various mathematical theorems and in physics. The orthogonal eigenfunctions that represent the intrinsic motions of various physical systems can also be regarded as transverse wave modes in a straight waveguide. Because of their orthogonality, these modes propagate independently, without mutual interference. When the wall separation fluctuates, the former mode orthogonality is destroyed because of the change in the Euclidean space of the system. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the extraordinary single-mode transparency that arises as a result of the intense mode interference induced by orthogonality breaking in a waveguide with a varying cross section. A mode diagram is also introduced to illuminate these mode interactions. In particular, measurements of the transverse field distributions indicate that a three-mode interaction leads to a single high-order mode that penetrates through the lower-mode bandgaps when the wall period is carefully selected. The observation of Bessel-like transverse distributions is promising for applications in wave-control engineering. PMID:25403089

  15. Quantum interference effects on the intensity of the G modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Tran, Huy Nam; Blancon, Jean-Christophe Robert; Arenal, Raul; ...

    2017-05-08

    The effects of quantum interferences on the excitation dependence of the intensity of G modes have been investigated on single-walled carbon nanotubes [Duque et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.108, 117404 (2012)]. In this work, by combining optical absorption spectroscopy and Raman scattering on individual index identified double-walled carbon nanotubes, we examine the experimental excitation dependence of the intensity of longitudinal optical and transverse optical G modes of the constituent inner and outer single-walled carbon nanotubes. The observed striking dependencies are understood in terms of quantum interference effects. Considering such effects, the excitation dependence of the different components of the G modesmore » permit to unambiguously assign each of them as originating from the longitudinal or transverse G modes of inner and outer tubes.« less

  16. Design of Wall Segments for Ferritic Wall Mode Studies on HBT-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2012-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO [1]. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will be crucial physics for these experiments. Although there has been a linear FRWM experiment [2], the FRWM has not yet been observed in toroidal geometry. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics, HBT-EP will explore the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with ferromagnetic materials. We describe simple models [3] for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, and compare material options for magnetic properties, cost, and ease of fabrication. Also, initial modeling, design, and installation of moderate permeability (1<μ<10) wall segments on HBT-EP will be discussed.[4pt] [1] Kurtz, R.J., et. al. 2009 J Nucl Mater 386-388[0pt] [2] Bergerson, W., et. al. 2008 Phys Rev Lett 101[0pt] [3] Kurita, G., et. al. 2003 Nucl Fus 43 949-954

  17. Transverse field-induced nucleation pad switching modes during domain wall injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-03-12

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) to image in-field magnetization configurations of patterned Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} domain wall 'injection pads' and attached planar nanowires. Comparison with micromagnetic simulations suggests that the evolution of magnetic domains in rectangular injection pads depends on the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent state. The magnetization reversal pathway is also altered by the inclusion of transverse magnetic fields. These different modes explain previous results of domain wall injection into nanowires. Even more striking was the observation of domain walls injecting halfway across the width of wider (>400 nm wide) wires but over wire lengths of several micrometers. These extended Neel walls can interact with adjacent nanowires and cause a switching in the side of the wire undergoing reversal as the domain wall continues to expand.

  18. Aegean wall lizards switch foraging modes, diet, and morphology in a human-built environment.

    PubMed

    Donihue, Colin M

    2016-10-01

    Foraging mode is a functional trait with cascading impacts on ecological communities. The foraging syndrome hypothesis posits a suite of concurrent traits that vary with foraging mode; however, comparative studies testing this hypothesis are typically interspecific. While foraging modes are often considered typological for a species when predicting foraging-related traits or mode-specific cascading impacts, intraspecific mode switching has been documented in some lizards. Mode-switching lizards provide an opportunity to test foraging syndromes and explore how intraspecific variability in foraging mode might affect local ecological communities.Because lizard natural history is intimately tied to habitat use and structure, I tested for mode switching between populations of the Aegean wall lizard, Podarcis erhardii, inhabiting undisturbed habitat and human-built rock walls on the Greek island of Naxos. I observed foraging behavior among 10 populations and tested lizard morphological and performance predictions at each site. Furthermore, I investigated the diet of lizards at each site relative to the available invertebrate community.I found that lizards living on rock walls were significantly more sedentary-sit and wait-than lizards at nonwall sites. I also found that head width increased in females and the ratio of hindlimbs to forelimbs in both sexes increased as predicted. Diet also changed, with nonwall lizards consuming a higher proportion of sedentary prey. Lizard bite force also varied significantly between sites; however, the pattern observed was opposite to that predicted, suggesting that bite force in these lizards may more closely relate to intraspecific competition than to diet.This study demonstrates microgeographic variability in lizard foraging mode as a result of human land use. In addition, these results demonstrate that foraging mode syndromes can shift intraspecifically with potential cascading effects on local ecological communities.

  19. Physical properties of resistance vessel wall in peripheral blood flow regulation--I. Mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Iida, N

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model is introduced to investigate the influence of the physical properties of the resistance vessel wall on the metabolic and myogenic mechanisms. The resistance vessel wall is assumed to have an elastic property and the elastic modulus to be a function of pressure (myogenic) and flow (metabolic). Blood is Poiseuille's flow. The resulting mathematical equations for pressure-flow, pressure-diameter, pressure-wall tension and pressure-wall elastic modulus relationships introduced obey Laplace's law. Poiseuille's law and Hooke's law. In comparison with the experimental data (pressure diameter), the mathematical model is confirmed to explain well the dynamic behavior of the resistance vessel wall in vivo.

  20. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  1. Drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes in quasihelical stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2010-02-15

    A linear stability theory of nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning modes is investigated using a two fluid model for electron-ion plasmas. Drift-resistive-inertial ballooning mode eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are calculated for a variety of equilibria including axisymmetric shifted circular geometry (s-alpha model) as well as for three dimensional configurations relevant for the Helically Symmetric Stellarator (HSX) [F. S. B. Anderson, A. F. Almagri, D. T. Anderson, et al., Fusion Technology 27, 273 (1995)]. For typical HSX parameters, characteristic ballooning mode growth rates exceed the electron collision frequency. In this regime, electron inertial effects dominate plasma resistivity and produce an instability whose growth rate scales with the electromagnetic skin depth. However, as plasma beta is increased, the resistive and inertial effects become unimportant. Under these conditions, the mode is completely stabilized by drift frequency effects, which dominate resistivity and inertia. Numerical results indicate that in the absence of drift effects, the resistive-inertial MHD modes are purely growing and persist in regimes where ideal MHD ballooning modes are stable. It is found that the magnitudes of the linear growth rates are not sensitive to the addition of a mirror term to the magnetic spectrum that spoils the quasihelical symmetry of the configuration. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors in the strong ballooning approximation are used together with a quasilinear mixing length estimate to determine particle flux and particle diffusivity. The particle diffusivity increases with rising density gradient and collisionality in a plasma with a low electron temperature. This increase in transport is consistent with the increase observed in the edge region of HSX plasmas. The magnitude of the particle diffusivity is computed to be in the range from 5 to 10 m{sup 2}/s, which is consistent with the experimental measured particle diffusivity at the edge of HSX

  2. Investigation of resistive wall instability in the 7 GeV APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Yong-Chul

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring is a 7-GeV light source with 40 straight sections. Intense x-ray beams will be delivered by 34 insertion devices installed in these straight sections. The vacuum chamber for the insertion devices has an elliptical cross section with the gap equal to 8 mm. With this narrow gap, we estimate that the transverse impedance of the ring at the revolution frequency could be as high as 36 M{Omega} from the resistive wall. By increasing the (unnormalized) chromaticity to 7, we cure the head-tail modes of order up to m=l for all 60 coupled bunch mode patterns around the ring. Tracking results show that the increased sextupole strength resulting from a higher chromaticity does not significantly reduce the dynamic aperture. Since increased chromaticity alone-cannot cure all the head-tail modes, the APS storage ring will have a feedback system to damp the rigid-bunch modes.

  3. A molecular dynamics study of the failure modes of a glassy polymer confined between rigid walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmi, Udit; Basu, Sumit

    2006-09-01

    Adhesion is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon which is controlled by various factors such as the loading rate, interface toughness, temperature and geometric and molecular properties. The mode of failure of adhesive joints (adhesive or cohesive) is decided through a complex interplay between these factors. In this work, we study the failure under tensile loading of a thin layer of a polymeric material confined between two rigid walls using molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the interface is controlled by the interaction potential between the polymer and wall atoms. The polymer modelled is a simple linear chain of 'united atoms' having a fixed bond length but contributions to the energy arise from bending and torsion of bonds as well as from non-bonded interactions between the 'united atoms'. The results indicate that even when the adhesion between the wall and the polymer is weak, a short chained polymer is more likely to fail by a mixed adhesive cohesive mode. A long chained polymer, with the same interface strength, fails in a pure adhesive manner. However, when the interface is sufficiently strengthened, the long chained polymer fails cohesively and it can bear a much higher load. The failure mode is somewhat modulated by the rate at which deformation occurs. Moreover, when the polymer is confined such that the spacing between the walls is comparable to the end-to-end distance of the polymer chain, strength of the joint increases significantly. In such a situation, even polymers with weak interfacial adhesion might fail cohesively.

  4. The removal of wall components in Doppler ultrasound signals by using the empirical mode decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Gao, Yali; Wang, Le; Chen, Jianhua; Shi, Xinling

    2007-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound systems, used for the noninvasive detection of the vascular diseases, normally employ a high-pass filter (HPF) to remove the large, low-frequency components from the vessel wall from the blood flow signal. Unfortunately, the filter also removes the low-frequency Doppler signals arising from slow-moving blood. In this paper, we propose to use a novel technique, called the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), to remove the wall components from the mixed signals. The EMD is firstly to decompose a signal into a finite and usually small number of individual components named intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Then a strategy based on the ratios between two adjacent values of the wall-to-blood signal ratio (WBSR) has been developed to automatically identify and remove the relevant IMFs that contribute to the wall components. This method is applied to process the simulated and clinical Doppler ultrasound signals. Compared with the results based on the traditional high-pass filter, the new approach obtains improved performance for wall components removal from the mixed signals effectively and objectively, and provides us with more accurate low blood flow.

  5. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.; the JT-60 Team

    2013-07-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  6. IRAC: Mode of action classification and insecticide resistance management.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Insecticide resistance is a long standing and expanding problem for pest arthropod control. Effective insecticide resistance management (IRM) is essential if the utility of current and future insecticides is to be preserved. Established in 1984, the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) is an international association of crop protection companies. IRAC serves as the Specialist Technical Group within CropLife International focused on ensuring the long term efficacy of insect, mite and tick control products through effective resistance management for sustainable agriculture and improved public health. A key function of IRAC is the continued development of the Mode of Action (MoA) classification scheme, which provides up-to-date information on the modes of action of new and established insecticides and acaricides and which serves as the basis for developing appropriate IRM strategies for crop protection and vector control. The IRAC MoA classification scheme covers more than 25 different modes of action and at least 55 different chemical classes. Diversity is the spice of resistance management by chemical means and thus it provides an approach to IRM providing a straightforward means to identify potential rotation/alternation options.

  7. Impact of the JET ITER-like wall on H-mode plasma fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Brezinsek, S.; Wischmeier, M.; De la Luna, E.; Groth, M.; Jaervinen, A. E.; de la Cal, E.; Losada, U.; de Aguilera, A. M.; Frassinetti, L.; Gao, Y.; Guillemaut, C.; Harting, D.; Meigs, A.; Schmid, K.; Sergienko, G.; contributors, JET

    2017-06-01

    JET ITER-like wall (ILW) experiments show that the edge density evolution is strongly linked with the poloidal distribution of the ionization source. The fueling profile in the JET-ILW is more delocalized as compared to JET-C (JET with carbon-based plasma-facing components PFCs). Compared to JET-C the H-mode pedestal fueling cycle is dynamically influenced by a combination of plasma-wall interaction features, in particular: (1) edge-localized modes (ELMs) induced energetic particles are kinetically reflected on W divertor PFCs leading to distributed refueling away from the divertor depending on the divertor plasma configuration, (2) delayed molecular re-emission and outgassing of particles being trapped in W PFCs (bulk-W at the high field side and W-coated CFCs at the low field side) with different fuel content and (3) outgassing from Be co-deposits located on top of the high-field side baffle region shortly after the ELM. In view of the results of a set of well diagnosed series of JET-ILW type-I ELMy H-mode discharges with good statistics, the aforementioned effects are discussed in view of H-mode pedestal fueling capacity. The ongoing modelling activities with the focus on coupled core-edge plasma simulations and plasma-wall interaction are described and discussed also in view of possible code improvements required.

  8. Polarised spectroscopy of individual single-wall nanotubes: Radial-breathing mode study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2001-02-01

    Polarised Raman spectroscopy is performed in a randomly distributed single-wall carbon tube (SWNT) sample at the scale of an individual single-wall nanotube. A detailed analysis in the radial-breathing mode (RBM) domain is presented. Selection of either a single tiny rope of SWNTs or of a single SWNT results from the conjugated high spatial selection of confocal microscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and sample dilution. The drastic modifications observed in the low-frequency Raman spectra as a function of the polarisation configuration confirm the theoretical results.

  9. The plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism-concepts for organization and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    One of the main differences between plant and animal cells are the walls surrounding plant cells providing structural support during development and protection like an adaptive armor against biotic and abiotic stress. During recent years it has become widely accepted that plant cells use a dedicated system to monitor and maintain the functional integrity of their walls. Maintenance of integrity is achieved by modifying the cell wall and cellular metabolism in order to permit tightly controlled changes in wall composition and structure. While a substantial amount of evidence supporting the existence of the mechanism has been reported, knowledge regarding its precise mode of action is still limited. The currently available evidence suggests similarities of the plant mechanism with respect to both design principles and molecular components involved to the very well characterized system active in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There the system has been implicated in cell morphogenesis as well as response to abiotic stresses such as osmotic challenges. Here the currently available knowledge on the yeast system will be reviewed initially to provide a framework for the subsequent discussion of the plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism. The review will then end with a discussion on possible design principles for the cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism and the function of the plant turgor pressure in this context. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Experiments on fracture toughness of thick-wall cylinder for modes I, II, III

    SciTech Connect

    Saegusa, T.; Urabe, N.; Ito, C.; Shirai, K.; Kosaki, A.

    1999-07-01

    There have been few data on fracture toughness for Mode 2 and 3 as compared with those for Mode 1. Experimental data on fracture toughness of plates made of ductile cast iron (ASTM A874-89) and forged steel (ASME SA350 LF5 C1.1) were obtained at a temperature range from 77K to 293K for Mode 1, 2 and 3. The results showed: J{sub IC} < J{sub IIC} < J{sub IIIC}, and K{sub IC} < K{sub IIC} K{sub IIIC}. Integrity of a thick-wall cylinder with artificial flaw was demonstrated against brittle fracture at 233K for Mode 1, 2 and 3, which is one of the design requirements of containers shipping radioactive materials.

  11. Lamb mode selection for accurate wall loss estimation via guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, P.; Ribichini, R.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Cawley, P.

    2014-02-18

    Guided wave tomography offers a method to accurately quantify wall thickness losses in pipes and vessels caused by corrosion. This is achieved using ultrasonic waves transmitted over distances of approximately 1–2m, which are measured by an array of transducers and then used to reconstruct a map of wall thickness throughout the inspected region. To achieve accurate estimations of remnant wall thickness, it is vital that a suitable Lamb mode is chosen. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of the fundamental modes, S{sub 0} and A{sub 0}, which are of primary interest in guided wave tomography thickness estimates since the higher order modes do not exist at all thicknesses, to compare their performance using both numerical and experimental data while considering a range of challenging phenomena. The sensitivity of A{sub 0} to thickness variations was shown to be superior to S{sub 0}, however, the attenuation from A{sub 0} when a liquid loading was present was much higher than S{sub 0}. A{sub 0} was less sensitive to the presence of coatings on the surface of than S{sub 0}.

  12. Positional stability of field-reversed-configurations in the presence of resistive walls

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, N. Onofri, M.; Barnes, D. C.

    2016-06-15

    We show that in a field-reversed-configuration, the plasma is unstable to either transverse or axial rigid displacement, but never to both. Driving forces are found to be parallel to the direction of displacement with no orthogonal components. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the properties of a resistive wall (geometry and resistivity) in the vicinity of the plasma do not affect whether the plasma is stable or unstable, but in the case of an unstable system determine the instability growth rate. Depending on the properties of the wall, the instability growth is dominated by plasma inertia (and not affected by wall resistivity) or dominated by ohmic dissipation of wall eddy currents (and thus proportional to the wall resistivity).

  13. Normal modes of magnetic domain wall motion in a confined stripe domain lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Spreen, J.H.; Argyle, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    We report the observation of standing wave modes in an array of stripe domains confined by a pair of parallel cracks in a Gd, Ga:YIG film. These modes appear in the response spectrum of the confined lattice as shallow minima or maxima at frequencies lower than that of the usual domain wall resonance peak. A simple model, analogous to the forced response of a membrane clamped at the edges, fits the spatial patterns of wall motion observed at the frequencies of the maxima and minima. Experimental frequency-wave vector values, interpreted with guidance from this analogy, provide the first experimental dispersion curve for a stripe domain lattice. We compare this result with recent theoretical calculations. The experimental value of the uniform mode frequency is 41.5 +- 0.2 MHz, with a long wavelength group velocity of 330 +- 50 m/sec. A surprising conclusion from the observed extrema of the spatial patterns is that the damping of the waves is an order of magnitude less than expected from the damping of the uniform mode. The estimated decay length for a propagating wave is 400 ..mu...

  14. Detecting Defects Within Soil-Bentonite Slurry Cutoff Walls Using Electrical Resistivity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aborn, L.; Jacob, R. W.; Mucelli, A.

    2016-12-01

    Installed in the subsurface, vertical cutoff walls may limit groundwater movement. The effectiveness of these walls can be undermined by defects, for example high permeability material, within the wall. An efficient way of detecting these defects in a soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall has yet to be established. We installed an approximately 200-meter long and 7-meter deep soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall for the purposes of research. The wall was constructed adjacent to a natural wetland, the Montandon Marsh near Lewisburg, PA. The wall is composed of soil-bentonite backfill and was designed to be a typical low permeability material. We evaluate the capability of non-invasive geophysical techniques, specifically electrical resistivity, to detect high permeability defects that are expected to have higher electrical resistivity values than the backfill material. The laboratory measured electrical resistivity of the backfill used for construction was 12.27-ohm meters. During construction, designed defects of saturated fine-grained sand bags were deployed at different positions and depths within the wall. To create larger defects multiple bags were tied together. Laboratory resistivity testing of the sand and the filled sand bags indicates values between 125-ohm meters at full saturation and 285-ohm meters at partial saturation. Post construction, we collected electrical resistivity data using a 28-channel system along the centerline of the cutoff wall, which indicated the backfill material to have a resistivity value of 15-ohm meters. The electrical resistivity profile was affected by the sidewalls of the trench, as expected, which may explain the difference between laboratory results and field measurements. To minimize the sidewalls obscuring the defects, we developed electrodes that are pushed into the backfill at different depths to collect subsurface resistivity. Different arrays and electrode spacings are being tested. Our presentation will report the most

  15. Theoretical axial wall angulation for rotational resistance form in an experimental-fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Bowley, John Francis; Kaye, Elizabeth Krall; Garcia, Raul Isidro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of long base lengths of a fixed partial denture (FPD) to rotational resistance with variation of vertical wall angulation. Trigonometric calculations were done to determine the maximum wall angle needed to resist rotational displacement of an experimental-FPD model in 2-dimensional plane. The maximum wall angle calculation determines the greatest taper that resists rotation. Two different axes of rotation were used to test this model with five vertical abutment heights of 3-, 3.5-, 4-, 4.5-, and 5-mm. The two rotational axes were located on the mesial-side of the anterior abutment and the distal-side of the posterior abutment. Rotation of the FPD around the anterior axis was counter-clockwise, Posterior-Anterior (P-A) and clockwise, Anterior-Posterior (A-P) around the distal axis in the sagittal plane. Low levels of vertical wall taper, ≤ 10-degrees, were needed to resist rotational displacement in all wall height categories; 2-to-6-degrees is generally considered ideal, with 7-to-10-degrees as favorable to the long axis of the abutment. Rotation around both axes demonstrated that two axial walls of the FPD resisted rotational displacement in each direction. In addition, uneven abutment height combinations required the lowest wall angulations to achieve resistance in this study. The vertical height and angulation of FPD abutments, two rotational axes, and the long base lengths all play a role in FPD resistance form.

  16. Acoustical modes in lined ducts with flexible walls - A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, R. J.

    A unified variational scheme is set forth for calculating axial wavenumbers, attenuations, and pressure distributions for acoustical modes propagating in flexible lined ducts. The technique accounts for the effects of bulk liners, flexible walls, and mean flow in the airway by describing a variational statement of the dispersion relationship for the propagation of fundamental modes. The variational statement can be applied as a Rayleigh-Ritz finite-element scheme to compute the eigenmodes for these ducts. The approach therefore unifies the computation of the fundamental dispersion relationships and the more complex modes described with high-resolution meshes. The approach is used to describe an experimental test duct without flow, and the Rayleigh-Ritz solution provides results that are similar to those of the full numerical solution. The present treatment is of practical interest to the design and fabrication of silencers and acoustically lined moving ductwork.

  17. A nonlocal shell model for mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shi, M X; Li, Q M; Huang, Y

    2009-11-11

    A second-order strain gradient nonlocal shell model is established to study the mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Nonlocal length is calibrated carefully for SWCNTs in reference to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through analysis of nonlocal length effects on the frequencies of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) and its effects on mode transformation. All analyses show that only a negative second-order nonlocal shell model is appropriate to SWCNTs. Nonlocal length is evidently related to vibration modes and the radius-to-thickness ratio. It is found that a nonlocal length is approximately 0.1 nm in an average sense when RBM frequency is concerned. A nonlocal length of 0.122-0.259 nm is indicated for the mode transformation in a selected group of armchair SWCNTs. 2:1 and 1:1 internal resonances are found for the same SWCNT based on different models, which implies that the internal resonance mechanism depends on the model employed. Furthermore, it is shown that an effective thickness of approximately 0.1 nm is more appropriate to SWCNTs than 0.066 nm.

  18. EFFICACY AND MODES OF ACTION OF RESISTANCE INDUCERS ON TWO WHEAT SPECIES AGAINST MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA.

    PubMed

    Somai-Jemmali, L; Randoux, B; Siah, A; Ors, M; Halama, P; Reignault, Ph; Hamada, W

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance inducers could be an alternative to conventional fungicides to control in a more durable and environmentally friendly manner fungal pathogens. Here, we tested the protection efficacy and the modes of action of four resistance inducers (R1, R2, R3 and R4) against the causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch, Mycosphaerella graminicola, the most frequently occurring pathogen on wheat crops worldwide. The four inducers were tested on two wheat cultivars, Premio (a French bread wheat cultivar) and Karim (a Tunisian durum wheat cultivar), each inoculated with a bread-wheat or a durum-wheat adapted isolate; respectively. All inducers exhibited in the greenhouse a significant protection level on both cultivars regarding disease symptoms (necrosis and chlorosis) and sporulation (pycnidium density). The most efficient inducer was R3 which showed 84% symptom reduction, while the less efficient one was R2 with only a 39% reduction. None of the studied inducers showed direct biocide effect against the fungus, except R4 which displayed a significant in planta inhibition of spore germination. Further investigations revealed that all inducers elicited the plant defence enzymes peroxidase and lipoxygenase, but the activity levels varied depending on the considered inducer. In addition, the effect of resistance inducers on the infection process and the fungal cell-wall degrading enzymes xylanases and glucanases was also investigated. Our study allowed us to find out four efficient resistance inducers on wheat against M. graminicola and to establish data about the modes of action of these inducers.

  19. Cell Wall Composition and Associated Properties of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Brian J.; Dorian, Kenneth J.; Sabath, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus strains have previously been reported to be deficient in surface negative charge; this has been correlated with methicillin resistance and ascribed to a deficiency of teichoic acid at the cell surface (A. W. Hill and A. M. James, Microbios 6:157-167, 1972). Teichoic acid was present in walls of MR organisms as revealed by appreciable phosphate levels and detection of ribitol residues. Phosphate levels in walls from five MR strains (0.54 to 0.77 μmol/mg of wall) were lower than in three unrelated methicillin-sensitive (MS) strains (0.86 to 1.0 μmol/mg of wall). However, two MS strains derived from two of the MR strains had wall phosphate levels very similar to those of the MR strains. No evidence for unusual wall polymers was found. Simple deficiency of wall teichoic acid does not result in methicillin resistance since an independently isolated teichoic acid-deficient strain (0.1 μmol of phosphate per mg of wall) was not methicillin resistant. In studies of biological properties possibly related to wall teichoic acid, it was discovered that walls isolated from MR organisms grown in the presence of methicillin autolyzed more rapidly than those isolated from organisms grown in the absence of the drug. Since methicillin resistance is enhanced by NaCl and suppressed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate, the effects of these compounds on autolysis of isolated walls were studied. NaCl (1.0 M) and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (1.0 mM) inhibited the autolysis of walls isolated from MR and MS strains. An MR strain bound phage 47, 52A, and 3A only slightly less well than their respective propagating strains. PMID:152758

  20. Vibrational modes and thermal transformation of purified single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong

    Vibrational modes of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) were studied using Raman scattering and/or Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopies, Variations in a three-step purification scheme to remove amorphous carbon and residual catalyst were studied: (step 1) Oxidation, (step 2) Acid Reflux, and (step 3) Thermal Annealing were found to remove most amorphous carbon (oxidation step) and residual metal catalyst (acid reflux step) which were the major impurity phases. By combining IR and Raman, we found considerable wall damage and functional groups (e.g.-COOH and-OH) could be introduced via H2O2 and HNO3 reflux. Surprisingly, vacuum annealing at ˜1100°C for a few hours was found to remove most wall damage and functional groups. Methods to break up large (purified) bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to individual tubes were also investigated. Amide solvents with ultrasound were found to be very effective in debundling; initial purification treatment strongly impacted the outcome. SWNT material decorated with functional groups (e.g., -COOH) tended to produce higher yields of single tubes. Length and diameter distributions of individual tubes were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. Aggressive chemical debundling processes were found to lead to more functionalization, higher degree of debundling and shorter tubes. The IR-active modes of SWNTs was observed for the first time by transmission method, some ten years after the discovery of the Raman-active modes. In concert with theoretical calculations, we were able to assign much of the sharp structure in the IR with anticipated one- and two-phonon lattice mode bands. Thermal evolution of bundled SWNT materials produced in the electric arc (ARC) and by CVD in CO gas (HiPCO) was also investigated. Although both ARC and HiPCO evolved thermally to multi-walled tubes (MWNTs), we found using electron microscopy that for T>2000°C ARC SWNTs (with significantly narrower

  1. Resistive and ferritic-wall plasma dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Kaplan, E. J.; Katz, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B.; Spence, E. J.

    2012-10-15

    We numerically study the effects of varying electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of the bounding wall on a kinematic dynamo in a sphere for parameters relevant to Madison plasma dynamo experiment. The dynamo is excited by a laminar, axisymmetric flow of von Karman type. The flow is obtained as a solution to the Navier-Stokes equation for an isothermal fluid with a velocity profile specified at the sphere's boundary. The properties of the wall are taken into account as thin-wall boundary conditions imposed on the magnetic field. It is found that an increase in the permeability of the wall reduces the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr}. An increase in the conductivity of the wall leaves Rm{sub cr} unaffected but reduces the dynamo growth rate.

  2. Carotid wall stress calculated with continuous intima-media thickness assessment using B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascaner, A. F.; Craiem, D.; Casciaro, M. E.; Danielo, R.; Graf, S.; Guevara, E.

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular risk is normally assessed using clinical risk factors but it can be refined using non-invasive infra-clinical markers. Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) is recognized as an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. Carotid Wall Stress (CWS) can be calculated using arterial pressure and carotid size (diameter and IMT). Generally, IMT is measured during diastole when it reaches its maximum value. However, it changes during the cardiac cycle and a time-dependant waveform can be obtained using B-mode ultrasound images. In this work we calculated CWS considering three different approaches for IMT assessment: (i) constant IMT (standard diastolic value), (ii) estimated IMT from diameter waveform (assuming a constant cross-sectional wall area) and (iii) continuously measured IMT. Our results showed that maximum wall stress depends on the IMT estimation method. Systolic CWS progressively increased using the three approaches (p<0.024). We conclude that maximum CWS is highly dependent on wall thickness and accurate IMT measures during systole should be encouraged.

  3. Antifungal agents: mode of action, mechanisms of resistance, and correlation of these mechanisms with bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, M A; Rice, L B

    1999-10-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of resistance. In this review, the mode of action of antifungals and their mechanisms of resistance are discussed. Additionally, an attempt is made to discuss the correlation between fungal and bacterial resistance. Antifungals can be grouped into three classes based on their site of action: azoles, which inhibit the synthesis of ergosterol (the main fungal sterol); polyenes, which interact with fungal membrane sterols physicochemically; and 5-fluorocytosine, which inhibits macromolecular synthesis. Many different types of mechanisms contribute to the development of resistance to antifungals. These mechanisms include alteration in drug target, alteration in sterol biosynthesis, reduction in the intercellular concentration of target enzyme, and overexpression of the antifungal drug target. Although the comparison between the mechanisms of resistance to antifungals and antibacterials is necessarily limited by several factors defined in the review, a correlation between the two exists. For example, modification of enzymes which serve as targets for antimicrobial action and the involvement of membrane pumps in the extrusion of drugs are well characterized in both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

  4. Cell wall alterations in the leaves of fusariosis-resistant and susceptible pineapple cultivars.

    PubMed

    de Farias Viégas Aquije, Glória Maria; Zorzal, Poliana Belisário; Buss, David Shaun; Ventura, José Aires; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno; Fernandes, Antonio Alberto Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Fusariosis, caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. ananas (Syn. F. guttiforme), is one of the main phytosanitary threats to pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus). Identification of plant cell responses to pathogens is important in understanding the plant-pathogen relationship and establishing strategies to improve and select resistant cultivars. Studies of the structural properties and phenolic content of cell walls in resistant (Vitoria) and susceptible (Perola) pineapple cultivars, related to resistance to the fungus, were performed. The non-chlorophyll base of physiologically mature leaves was inoculated with a conidia suspension. Analyses were performed post-inoculation by light, atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds. Non-inoculated leaves were used as controls to define the constitutive tissue characteristics. Analyses indicated that morphological differences, such as cell wall thickness, cicatrization process and lignification, were related to resistance to the pathogen. Atomic force microscopy indicated a considerable difference in the mechanical properties of the resistant and susceptible cultivars, with more structural integrity, associated with higher levels of cell wall-bound phenolics, found in the resistant cultivar. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids were shown to be the major phenolics bound to the cell walls and were found in higher amounts in the resistant cultivar. Leaves of the resistant cultivar had reduced fungal penetration and a faster and more effective cicatrization response compared to the susceptible cultivar.

  5. Resistive-Wall Instability in the Damping Rings of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; /SLAC

    2006-07-05

    In the damping rings of the International Linear Collider (ILC), the resistive-wall instability is one of the dominant transverse instabilities. This instability directly influences the choice of material and aperture of the vacuum pipe, and the parameters of the transverse feedback system. This paper investigates the resistive-wall instabilities in an ILC damping ring under various conditions of beam pipe material, aperture, and fill pattern.

  6. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  7. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode, with ΔW = 0.7 MJ mitigated edge localized modes (ELMs). Tungsten (W) is the material now decided for the divertor plasma-facing components from the start of plasma operations. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during ELMs are expected to be the dominant source under the partially detached divertor conditions required for safe ITER operation. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of plasma-wall interaction during ELMs is important and a primary input for this is the energy of incoming ions during an ELM event. In this paper, coupled Infrared thermography and Langmuir Probe (LP) measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall unseeded H-mode experiments with ITER relevant ELM energy drop have been used to estimate the impact energy of deuterium ions (D+) on the divertor target. This analysis gives an ion energy of several keV during ELMs, which makes D+ responsible for most of the W sputtering in unseeded H-mode discharges. These LP measurements were possible because of the low electron temperature (Te) during ELMs which allowed saturation of the ion current. Although at first sight surprising, the observation of low Te at the divertor target during ELMs is consistent with the ‘Free-Streaming’ kinetic model which predicts a near-complete transfer of parallel energy from electrons to ions in order to maintain quasi-neutrality of the ELM filaments while they are transported to the divertor targets.

  8. Mosquitocidal bacterial toxins: diversity, mode of action and resistance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Charles, J F; Nielsen-LeRoux, C

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria active against dipteran larvae (mosquitoes and black flies) include a wide variety of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus strains, as well as isolates of Brevibacillus laterosporus and Clostridium bifermentans. All display different spectra and levels of activity correlated with the nature of the toxins, mainly produced during the sporulation process. This paper describes the structure and mode of action of the main mosquitocidal toxins, in relationship with their potential use in mosquito and/or black fly larvae control. Investigations with laboratory and field colonies of mosquitoes that have become highly resistant to the B. sphaericus Bin toxin have shown that several mechanisms of resistance are involved, some affecting the toxin/receptor binding step, others unknown.

  9. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  10. Selective coherent phonon-mode generation in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-02-08

    The pulse-train technique within ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is theoretically investigated to excite a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period of the pulse train matches with the integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude can be maintained while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition period of a half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM can be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition period that matches with the integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses having a property of "magic ratio" of the G-band and RBM periods.

  11. Selective coherent phonon-mode generation in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-02-01

    The pulse-train technique within ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is theoretically investigated to excite a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period of the pulse train matches with the integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude can be maintained while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition period of a half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM can be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition period that matches with the integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses having a property of “magic ratio” of the G-band and RBM periods.

  12. SpoVG Regulates Cell Wall Metabolism and Oxacillin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain N315

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    Increasing cases of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in healthy individuals have raised concerns worldwide. MRSA strains are resistant to almost the entire family of β-lactam antibiotics due to the acquisition of an extra penicillin-binding protein, PBP2a. Studies have shown that spoVG is involved in oxacillin resistance, while the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we have found that SpoVG plays a positive role in oxacillin resistance through promoting cell wall synthesis and inhibiting cell wall degradation in MRSA strain N315. Deletion of spoVG in strain N315 led to a significant decrease in oxacillin resistance and a dramatic increase in Triton X-100-induced autolytic activity simultaneously. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that the expression of 8 genes related to cell wall metabolism or oxacillin resistance was altered in the spoVG mutant. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that SpoVG can directly bind to the putative promoter regions of lytN (murein hydrolase), femA, and lytSR (the two-component system). These findings suggest a molecular mechanism in which SpoVG modulates oxacillin resistance by regulating cell wall metabolism in MRSA. PMID:27001809

  13. Disentangling the physical contributions to the electrical resistance in magnetic domain walls: a multiscale study.

    PubMed

    Seemann, K M; Garcia-Sanchez, F; Kronast, F; Miguel, J; Kákay, A; Schneider, C M; Hertel, R; Freimuth, F; Mokrousov, Y; Blügel, S

    2012-02-17

    We analyze the origin of the electrical resistance arising in domain walls of perpendicularly magnetized materials by considering a superposition of anisotropic magnetoresistance and the resistance implied by the magnetization chirality. The domain wall profiles of L1(0)-FePd and L1(0)-FePt are determined by micromagnetic simulations based on which we perform first-principles calculations to quantify electron transport through the core and closure region of the walls. The wall resistance, being twice as high in L1(0)-FePd than in L1(0)-FePt, is found to be clearly dominated in both cases by a high gradient of magnetization rotation, which agrees well with experimental observations.

  14. Resistive edge mode instability in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M.; Weiland, J.

    2008-09-15

    Geometrical effects on linear stability of electrostatic resistive edge modes are investigated in the three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis, Nucl. Fusion 7, S1, S285 (2007)]-like equilibria. An advanced fluid model is used for the ions together with the reduced Braghinskii equations for the electrons. Using the ballooning mode representation, the drift wave problem is set as an eigenvalue equation along a field line and is solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. A significantly larger magnetic shear and a less unfavorable normal curvature in the tokamak equilibrium are found to give a stronger finite-Larmor radius stabilization and a more narrow mode spectrum than in the stellarator. The effect of negative global magnetic shear in the tokamak is found to be stabilizing. The growth rate on a tokamak magnetic flux surface is found to be comparable to that on a stellarator surface with the same global magnetic shear but the eigenfunction in the tokamak is broader than in the stellarator due to the presence of large negative local magnetic shear (LMS) on the tokamak surface. A large absolute value of the LMS in a region of unfavorable normal curvature is found to be stabilizing in the stellarator, while in the tokamak case, negative LMS is found to be stabilizing and positive LMS destabilizing.

  15. Resistive edge mode instability in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, M. Ansar; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M.; Weiland, J.

    2008-09-01

    Geometrical effects on linear stability of electrostatic resistive edge modes are investigated in the three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis, Nucl. Fusion 7, S1, S285 (2007)]-like equilibria. An advanced fluid model is used for the ions together with the reduced Braghinskii equations for the electrons. Using the ballooning mode representation, the drift wave problem is set as an eigenvalue equation along a field line and is solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. A significantly larger magnetic shear and a less unfavorable normal curvature in the tokamak equilibrium are found to give a stronger finite-Larmor radius stabilization and a more narrow mode spectrum than in the stellarator. The effect of negative global magnetic shear in the tokamak is found to be stabilizing. The growth rate on a tokamak magnetic flux surface is found to be comparable to that on a stellarator surface with the same global magnetic shear but the eigenfunction in the tokamak is broader than in the stellarator due to the presence of large negative local magnetic shear (LMS) on the tokamak surface. A large absolute value of the LMS in a region of unfavorable normal curvature is found to be stabilizing in the stellarator, while in the tokamak case, negative LMS is found to be stabilizing and positive LMS destabilizing.

  16. Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-03-15

    Velocity boundary conditions appropriate for magnetohydrodynamic simulations have been controversial recently. A comparison of numerical simulations of sideways wall force in disruptions is presented for Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, and DEBS boundary conditions. It is shown that all the boundary conditions give qualitatively similar results. It is shown that Dirichlet boundary conditions are valid in the small Larmor radius limit of electromagnetic sheath boundary conditions.

  17. Nanoenhanced polyurea as a blast resistant coating for concrete masonry walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Heather Kathryn Daniell

    Blast impact is a major concern in the world today. The leading cause of death due to blast impacts is rapidly moving debris. To prevent this many researchers are looking for methods of improved blast resistance for concrete masonry walls. However, many available protective coatings are not flame retardant. This thesis focuses on nanoenhanced polyurea for applications in improving blast resistance, while possessing improved flame retardancy, of concrete masonry walls. The polyurea that is being researched is enhanced with nanoadditives in an effort improve both blast and fire resistance. These materials are dynamically tested and those showing marked improvement are chosen for experimental and computational testing.

  18. Theoretical axial wall angulation for rotational resistance form in an experimental-fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the influence of long base lengths of a fixed partial denture (FPD) to rotational resistance with variation of vertical wall angulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Trigonometric calculations were done to determine the maximum wall angle needed to resist rotational displacement of an experimental-FPD model in 2-dimensional plane. The maximum wall angle calculation determines the greatest taper that resists rotation. Two different axes of rotation were used to test this model with five vertical abutment heights of 3-, 3.5-, 4-, 4.5-, and 5-mm. The two rotational axes were located on the mesial-side of the anterior abutment and the distal-side of the posterior abutment. Rotation of the FPD around the anterior axis was counter-clockwise, Posterior-Anterior (P-A) and clockwise, Anterior-Posterior (A-P) around the distal axis in the sagittal plane. RESULTS Low levels of vertical wall taper, ≤ 10-degrees, were needed to resist rotational displacement in all wall height categories; 2–to–6–degrees is generally considered ideal, with 7–to–10–degrees as favorable to the long axis of the abutment. Rotation around both axes demonstrated that two axial walls of the FPD resisted rotational displacement in each direction. In addition, uneven abutment height combinations required the lowest wall angulations to achieve resistance in this study. CONCLUSION The vertical height and angulation of FPD abutments, two rotational axes, and the long base lengths all play a role in FPD resistance form. PMID:28874995

  19. Putative role of pith cell wall phenylpropanoids in Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Butron, Ana; Arnason, John T; Reid, Lana M; Souto, Xose C; Malvar, Rosa A

    2006-03-22

    The stem borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefèbvre) is the most important insect pest that attacks maize, Zea mays L., in northwestern Spain. Host plant resistance to this borer was investigated in relation to the cell wall phenylpropanoids content in the pith. Eight inbred lines that differ in resistance were analyzed. Three major simple phenolic acids, p-coumaric, trans-ferulic, and cis-ferulic acids, and three isomers of diferulic acid, 8-5', 8-O-4', and 8-5'b (benzofuran form), were identified. The amount of all these compounds was correlated with the resistance level in the genotypes, with the resistant inbreds having the highest concentrations. The role of these compounds in cell wall fortification and lignification is well-documented, suggesting their possible intervention in S. nonagrioides resistance. Future studies that focus on these compounds could be useful to enhance S. nonagroides resistance.

  20. The relationships between edge localized modes suppression, pedestal profiles and lithium wall coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, D. P.; Maingi, R.; Snyder, P. B.; Manickam, J.; Osborne, T.H.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated with wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX.

  1. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process.

  2. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process. PMID:25161657

  3. Prediction of radial breathing-like modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes with arbitrary chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with arbitrary chirality are investigated by a simple analytical model. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through van der Waals (vdW) forces between two adjacent tubes. Lennard-Jones potential and a molecular mechanics model are used to calculate the vdW forces and to predict the mechanical properties, respectively. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experimental results. Finally, a new approach is proposed to determine the diameters and the chiral indices of the inner and outer tubes of the DWCNTs with high precision.

  4. Enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes with edge coherent modes achieved by RF heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Ding, S. Y.; Yan, N.; Wang, L.; Gong, X. Z.; Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2014-12-01

    Two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes, named low-enhanced-recycling (LER) and high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode regimes, with edge coherent modes, have been achieved by lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak. In the LER H-mode regime, the density and radiation increase during the ELM-free phase until the onset of edge-localized modes (ELMs), while in the HER H-mode regime, the density and radiation are well controlled without the presence of ELMs. Both LER and HER H-modes exhibit a low-frequency (frequency <100 kHz) edge quasi-coherent mode (ECM) with an initial frequency chirping down phase, following the L-H transition. In addition, an electromagnetic high-frequency coherent mode (HFM) with frequency >170 kHz appears shortly (<1 ms) after the transition during HER H-modes. Both ECM and HFM propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction in the lab frame with a low poloidal wavelength and may be responsible for enhanced recycling during the ELM-free phase. These two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes may have significant implications for long-pulse high-performance operations in future fusion experiments.

  5. Cell wall and membrane changes associated with ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, M; Khuller, G K

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical variations accompanying the acquisition of ethambutol (EMB) resistance in a single-step mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra were analyzed. Comparative analysis of phospholipids revealed a reduced content in the EMB-resistant strain, particularly in the cell membrane fraction. Significant alterations were observed in the individual phospholipid content and phospholipid fatty acyl group composition of whole cells and subcellular fractions. Quantitative changes were seen in the chemical constituents of the cell walls of resistant cultures in comparison with those of EMB-susceptible cultures of M. tuberculosis. Alterations in the binding of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate to whole cells of an EMB-resistant strain indicated structural changes on the cell surface. Structural changes in the cell wall may play an important role in the resistance of M. tuberculosis H37Ra to EMB. PMID:2126690

  6. The mode I crack growth resistance of metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Fleck, N. A.; Lu, T. J.

    2001-02-01

    A Dugdale-type cohesive zone model is used to predict the mode I crack growth resistance ( R-curve) of metallic foams, with the fracture process characterised by an idealised traction-separation law that relates the crack surface traction to crack opening displacement. A quadratic yield function, involving the von Mises effective stress and mean stress, is used to account for the plastic compressibility of metallic foams. Finite element calculations are performed for the crack growth resistance under small scale yielding and small scale bridging in plane strain, with K-field boundary conditions. The following effects upon the fracture process are quantified: material hardening, bridging strength, T-stress (the non-singular stress acting parallel to the crack plane), and the shape of yield surface. To study the failure behaviour and notch sensitivity of metallic foams in the presence of large scale yielding, a study is made for panels embedded with either a centre-crack or an open hole and subjected to tensile stressing. For the centre-cracked panel, a transition crack size is predicted for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to elastic-brittle fracture. Likewise, for a panel containing a centre-hole, a transition hole diameter exists for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to a local maximum stress criterion at the edge of the hole.

  7. Angular Dependence of Domain Wall Resistivity in Artificial Magnetic Domain Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A.; Bending, S. J.; Roberts, H. G.; Crampin, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marrows, C. H.

    2006-11-01

    We exploit the ability to precisely control the magnetic domain structure of perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Pt trilayers to fabricate artificial domain wall arrays and study their transport properties. The scaling behavior of this model system confirms the intrinsic domain wall origin of the magnetoresistance, and systematic studies using domains patterned at various angles to the current flow are excellently described by an angular-dependent resistivity tensor containing perpendicular and parallel domain wall resistivities. We find that the latter are fully consistent with Levy-Zhang theory, which allows us to estimate the ratio of minority to majority spin carrier resistivities, ρ↓/ρ↑˜5.5, in good agreement with thin film band structure calculations.

  8. Impact of cell wall composition on maize resistance to pests and diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A

    2013-03-27

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases.

  9. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  10. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotube passively mode-locked O-band Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, D.; Saito, L. A. M.; Rosa, H. G.; Thoroh de Souza, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a nanosecond-pulse single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) passively mode-locked O-band Raman fiber lasers. As gain medium, single mode fiber (SMF) and highly nonlinear Raman gain were used at three different experimental setups. By incorporating 1.0 nm mean diameter SWCNT as saturable absorbers (SA) at 2.3 km SMF long-length gain medium setup, soliton-like spectrum followed by nanosecond high chirped pulse was observed at cavity fundamental repetition rate. In order to shorter the chirped pulse, intracavity anomalous dispersion was introduced with normal dispersion shift fiber (DSF) lengths and pulse duration decreased from 4.20 to 2.30 ns. By using highly nonlinear Raman gain medium in the O-band Raman laser configuration, the laser generated clean and well-defined nanosecond high chirped pulses, achieving pulse duration as short as 2.30 ns with 230 m gain medium length. Also, we could estimate the picosecond pulse duration region as a function of gain medium length of this laser and compared with SMF pulse shortening curve. As results, the lasers presented similar tendencies, indicating a strong influence of nonlinearities and dispersion in the pulse duration shortening.

  12. Cell wall composition and biofilm formation of azoles-susceptible and -resistant Candida glabrata strains.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Alberto; Vavala, Elisabetta; Marzano, Valeria; Leone, Claudia; Castagnola, Massimo; Iavarone, Federica; Angiolella, Letizia

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, three strains of Candida glabrata have been investigated to shed light on the mechanisms involved in azole resistance during adherence and biofilm formation. In particular, a clinical isolate, susceptible to azole-based drugs, DSY562 and two different resistant mutagenic strains deriving from DSY562, SFY114 and SFY115, have been analysed with different approaches for their cell wall composition and properties. A proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of six cell wall-related proteins and biofilm formation varied between the strains. The SFY114 and SFY115 strains resulted to be less hydrophobic than the susceptible parental counterpart DSY562, on the other hand they showed a higher amount in total cell wall polysaccharides fraction in the total cell wall. Accordingly to the results obtained from the hydrophobicity and adherence assays, in the resistant strain SFY115 the biofilm formation decreased compared to the parental strain DSY562. Finally, the total glucose amount in resistant SFY115 was about halved in comparison to other strains. Taken together all these data suggest that azole drugs may affect the cell wall composition of C. glabrata, in relation to the different pathogenic behaviours.

  13. Experimental observation of exchange-mode spin-wave via domain wall annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Delaney, Tristan; Beach, Geoffrey

    2014-03-01

    Spin waves (SWs) in magnetic nanostructures have generated great interest recently, motivated by the possibility of high-speed, low-power magnonic devices applications. A number of micromagnetic researches, therefore, have been conducted, revealing the particular behaviors of SWs in nanostructured ferromagnets. However, SWs' short attenuation length prevents them from being observed and used experimentally. Generating large-amplitude exchange-mode SWs, which is thus indispensable for real device applications, are still challenging because their very short wavelengths cannot be directly excited. Here, we present the first experimental evidence of the exchange-mode SWs. Using micromagnetics, we firstly show that the annihilation of two DWs releases their exchange energy by a mean of localized SW burst, which has broad range band and intense amplitude. Another micromagnetic result also shows that the collision-induced SWs inside a nanowire can cause the depinning of a DW with an assisting magnetic field. By taking advantage of an anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) effect and relative electrical measurements, we observe the generation/annihilation of DWs and the contribution of generated SWs to the DW depinning process experimentally. The additional depinning field of ~ 8 Oe caused by SWs can be readily achieved, enough to propagate a standstill DW in a well-defined pinning-free nanostructure. This work shows the first experimental observation of exchange-mode SWs and highlights a new route towards SW-integrated spintronic devices. This is the corresponding author of this work.

  14. Impairment of Cellulose Synthases Required for Arabidopsis Secondary Cell Wall Formation Enhances Disease Resistance[W

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Feng, Dong Xin; Hu, Jian; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Deslandes, Laurent; Llorente, Francisco; Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Keller, Harald; Barlet, Xavier; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Anderson, Lisa K.; Somerville, Shauna; Marco, Yves; Molina, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Cellulose is synthesized by cellulose synthases (CESAs) contained in plasma membrane–localized complexes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three types of CESA subunits (CESA4/IRREGULAR XYLEM5 [IRX5], CESA7/IRX3, and CESA8/IRX1) are required for secondary cell wall formation. We report that mutations in these proteins conferred enhanced resistance to the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. By contrast, susceptibility to these pathogens was not altered in cell wall mutants of primary wall CESA subunits (CESA1, CESA3/ISOXABEN RESISTANT1 [IXR1], and CESA6/IXR2) or POWDERY MILDEW–RESISTANT5 (PMR5) and PMR6 genes. Double mutants indicated that irx-mediated resistance was independent of salicylic acid, ethylene, and jasmonate signaling. Comparative transcriptomic analyses identified a set of common irx upregulated genes, including a number of abscisic acid (ABA)–responsive, defense-related genes encoding antibiotic peptides and enzymes involved in the synthesis and activation of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. These data as well as the increased susceptibility of ABA mutants (abi1-1, abi2-1, and aba1-6) to R. solanacearum support a direct role of ABA in resistance to this pathogen. Our results also indicate that alteration of secondary cell wall integrity by inhibiting cellulose synthesis leads to specific activation of novel defense pathways that contribute to the generation of an antimicrobial-enriched environment hostile to pathogens. PMID:17351116

  15. Rigid fire-resistant foams for walls and floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous techniques for fabricating rigid fire-resistant polyimide foams by compressing already-foamed precursor have been supplanted by one-step constrained-rise process. Precursor mixed with reinforcing fillers is placed between rigid substrates that constrain expansion of foam as it is heated by microwave energy. Process works for both liquid and powder precursors and can also be adapted to attach woven fiberglass skins at same time prcursor is being foamed.

  16. Rigid fire-resistant foams for walls and floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous techniques for fabricating rigid fire-resistant polyimide foams by compressing already-foamed precursor have been supplanted by one-step constrained-rise process. Precursor mixed with reinforcing fillers is placed between rigid substrates that constrain expansion of foam as it is heated by microwave energy. Process works for both liquid and powder precursors and can also be adapted to attach woven fiberglass skins at same time prcursor is being foamed.

  17. Near-isogenic lines of Triticum aestivum with distinct modes of resistance exhibit dissimilar transcriptional regulation during Diuraphis noxia feeding.

    PubMed

    Botha, Anna-Maria; van Eck, Leon; Burger, N Francois V; Swanevelder, Zacharias H

    2014-10-31

    Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia, Kurdjumov) feeding on susceptible Triticum aestivum L. leads to leaf rolling, chlorosis and plant death - symptoms not present in resistant lines. Although the effects of several D. noxia (Dn) resistance genes are known, none have been isolated or characterized. Wheat varieties expressing different Dn genes exhibit distinct modes of D. noxia resistance, such as antibiosis (Dn1), tolerance (Dn2), and antixenosis (Dn5). However, the mechanism whereby feeding aphids are perceived, and how subsequent transcriptional responses are partitioned into resistance categories, remains unclear. Here we report on downstream events in near-isogenic wheat lines containing different Dn genes after D. noxia biotype SA1 feeding. Transcripts involved in stress, signal transduction, photosynthesis, metabolism and gene regulation were differentially regulated during D. noxia feeding. Expression analyses using RT-qPCR and RNA hybridization, as well as enzyme activity profiling, provide evidence that the timing and intensity of pathways induced are critical in the development of particular modes of resistance. Pathways involved include the generation of kinase signalling cascades that lead to a sustained oxidative burst, and a hypersensitive response that is active during antibiosis. Tolerance is a passive resistance mechanism that acts through repair or de novo synthesis of photosystem proteins. Results further suggest that ethylene-mediated pathways are possibly involved in generating volatile compounds and cell wall fortification during the antixenosic response. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Preservative agents in foods. Mode of action and microbial resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brul, S; Coote, P

    1999-09-15

    Preservative agents are required to ensure that manufactured foods remain safe and unspoiled. In this review, we will discuss the mode of action of both chemical and biological (nature-derived) preservatives and the stress response mechanisms induced by these compounds in microorganisms of concern to the food industry. We will discuss the challenges that food manufacturers face with respect to the assurance of food safety and the prevention of spoilage. Following this, chemical preservatives will be discussed, in particular, weak organic acids such as sorbic and benzoic acid which are widely used in preservation. Furthermore. the mechanisms of microbial inactivation with hydrogen peroxide mediated systems and chelators such as citric acid and EDTA and their potential use in preservation will be covered. We will then address the potential of naturally occurring "preservatives". Of the antimicrobial compounds present in nature, first to be discussed will be the nonproteinaceous compounds often present in herbs and spices and we will speculate on the stress response(s) that microorganisms may elicit to these natural compounds. Next to be addressed will be compounds that attack cell walls and membranes, for example, peptides, proteins and lytic enzymes. In discussing the resistance mechanisms against membrane and wall perturbation, the extensive knowledge of stress responses against osmotic stress and temperature stress will be refered to. Finally, in the concluding paragraphs, options for combination preservation systems are evaluated.

  19. Pleuromutilins: Potent Drugs for Resistant Bugs-Mode of Action and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Susanne; Riedl, Rosemarie

    2017-01-03

    use in veterinary medicine. This review focuses on the structural characteristics, mode of action, antibacterial activity, and resistance development of this potent and novel antibacterial class for systemic use in humans. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. The ideal tearing mode: theory and resistive MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.; Papini, E.; Pucci, F.; Velli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Classical MHD reconnection theories, both the stationary Sweet-Parker model and the tearing instability, are known to provide rates which are too slow to explain the observations. However, a recent analysis has shown that there exists a critical threshold on current sheet's thickness, namely a/L ∼ S -1/3, beyond which the tearing modes evolve on fast macroscopic Alfvénic timescales, provided the Lunquist number S is high enough, as invariably found in solar and astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, the classical Sweet-Parker scenario, for which the diffusive region scales as a/L ∼ S -1/2 and thus can be up to ∼ 100 times thinner than the critical value, is likely to be never realized in nature, as the current sheet itself disrupts in the elongation process. We present here two-dimensional, compressible, resistive MHD simulations, with S ranging from 105 to 107, that fully confirm the linear analysis. Moreover, we show that a secondary plasmoid instability always occurs when the same critical scaling is reached on the local, smaller scale, leading to a cascading explosive process, reminiscent of the flaring activity.

  1. The Effect of an Oxide Layer on Resistive-Wall Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    Shorter and shorter electron bunches are now used in the FEL designs. The fine structure of the wall of a beam vacuum pipe plays more noticeable role in the wake field generation. Additionally to the resistance and roughness, the wall may have an oxide layer, which is usually a dielectric. It is important for aluminium pipe, which have Al2O3 layer. The thickness of this layer may vary in a large range: 1-100 nm. We study this effect for the very short (20-1000 nm) ultra relativistic bunches in an infinite round pipe. We solved numerically the Maxwell equations for the fields in the metal and ceramics. Results showed that the oxide layer may considerably increase the wavelength and the decay time of the resistive-wall wake fields, however the loss factor of the very short bunches does not change much.

  2. Resistance of a single domain wall in (Co/Pt)7 multilayer nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hassel, C; Brands, M; Lo, F Y; Wieck, A D; Dumpich, G

    2006-12-01

    Single (Co/Pt)_{7} multilayer nanowires prepared by electron beam lithography with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are locally modified by means of Ga-ion implantation generating 180 degrees domain walls which are pinned at the edges of underlying thin Pt wires. Since we can exclude contributions from the anisotropic and the Lorentz magnetoresistance this allows us to determine the resistance of a single domain wall at room temperature. We find a positive relative resistance increase of DeltaR/R=1.8% inside the domain wall which agrees well with the model of Levy and Zhang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 5110 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevLett.79.5110].

  3. A 31 mW, 280 fs passively mode-locked fiber soliton laser using a high heat-resistant SWNT/P3HT saturable absorber coated with siloxane.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takato; Hori, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2012-10-08

    We report a substantial increase in the heat resistance in a connector-type single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) saturable absorber by sealing SWNT/P3HT composite with siloxane. By applying the saturable absorber to a passively mode-locked Er fiber laser, we successfully demonstrated 280 fs, 31 mW pulse generation with a fivefold improvement in heat resistance.

  4. Hydraulic resistance of plane channels and annulus with different roughness on opposite walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsun, A. S.; Kutsenko, K. V.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Balberkina, Y. N.

    2017-03-01

    A new method for prediction of hydraulic resistance for a turbulent flow in plane channels and annulus is proposed. In spite of the importance of this issue, only very few publications devoted to the investigation into hydrodynamics in these channels are available, and there are no methods for predicting hydraulic resistance of a flow in these channels at all. The flow in channels with different roughness on the walls is described using the Prandtl semiempirical theory of a turbulent boundary layer. The flow in a channel cross-section is divided into two noninteracting layers of different thickness flowing along the walls with different roughness. The basic balance correlations are derived for a plane channel. To match the velocity profiles of both layers at the interface point, a logarithmic velocity profile is used. This yields a closed system of equations for predicting hydraulic resistance in plane channels with a given different roughness on opposite walls. It is demonstrated that the obtained correlation may be used for predicting hydraulic resistance in annulus as well. Experiments were carried out with a water flow in an annulus. Each annuli consisted of a pipe having a smooth wall into which a rod with artificial roughness on the surface was inserted coaxially. Two types of roughness were investigated: trapezoid and threadlike ones. Comparison of the predictions with the experimental data confirmed the validity of the proposed method. It can be used in designing flowpaths of various power installations.

  5. Gravity resistance, another graviresponse in plants - role of microtubule-membrane-cell wall continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Saito, Y.; Usui, S.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.

    Resistance to the gravitational force has been a serious problem for plants to survive on land, after they first went ashore more than 400 million years ago. Thus, gravity resistance is the principal graviresponse in plants comparable to gravitropism. Nevertheless, only limited information has been obtained for this second gravity response. We have examined the mechanism of gravity resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. The results led a hypothesis on the mechanism of plant resistance to the gravitational force that the plant constructs a tough body by increasing the cell wall rigidity, which are brought about by modification of the cell wall metabolism and cell wall environment, especially pH. The hypothesis was further supported by space experiments during the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission. On the other hand, we have shown that gravity signal may be perceived by mechanoreceptors (mechanosensitive ion channels) on the plasma membrane and amyloplast sedimentation in statocytes is not involved in gravity resistance. Moreover, hypergravity treatment increased the expression levels of genes encoding alpha-tubulin, a component of microtubules and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor of terpenoids such as membrane sterols. The expression of HMGR and alpha- and beta-tubulin genes increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment, depending on the magnitude of gravity. The determination of levels of gene products as well as the analysis with knockout mutants of these genes by T-DNA insertions in Arabidopsis supports the involvement of both membrane sterols and microtubules in gravity resistance. These results suggest that structural or physiological continuum of microtubule-cell membrane-cell wall is responsible for plant resistance to the gravitational force.

  6. Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-02-01

    A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Extrinsic anisotropic magnetoresistance contribution to measured domain wall resistances of in-plane magnetized (Ga,Mn)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H. G.; Crampin, S.; Bending, S. J.

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate the presence of an important extrinsic anisotropic magnetoresistance contribution to the domain wall resistance recently measured in thin-film (Ga,Mn)As with in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Analytic results for simple domain wall orientations supplemented by numerical results for more general cases show that this previously omitted contribution can largely explain the observed negative resistance.

  8. Tracking Random Walk of Individual Domain Walls in Cylindrical Nanomagnets with Resistance Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrita; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik; Ghosh, Arindam

    2010-08-01

    The stochasticity of domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic nanowires has been probed by measuring slow fluctuations, or noise, in electrical resistance at small magnetic fields. By controlled injection of DWs into isolated cylindrical nanowires of nickel, we have been able to track the motion of the DWs between the electrical leads by discrete steps in the resistance. Closer inspection of the time dependence of noise reveals a diffusive random walk of the DWs with a universal kinetic exponent. Our experiments outline a method with which electrical resistance is able to detect the kinetic state of the DWs inside the nanowires, which can be useful in DW-based memory designs.

  9. Zero-line modes at stacking faulted domain walls in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhee; Kim, Gunn; Jung, Jeil; Min, Hongki

    2016-09-01

    Rhombohedral multilayer graphene is a physical realization of the chiral two-dimensional electron gas that can host zero-line modes (ZLMs), also known as kink states, when the local gap opened by inversion symmetry breaking potential changes sign in real space. Here we study how the variations in the local stacking coordination of multilayer graphene affects the formation of the ZLMs. Our analysis indicates that the valley Hall effect develops whenever an interlayer potential difference is able to open up a band gap in stacking faulted multilayer graphene, and that ZLMs can appear at the domain walls separating two distinct regions with imperfect rhombohedral stacking configurations. Based on a tight-binding formulation with distant hopping terms between carbon atoms, we first show that topologically distinct domains characterized by the valley Chern number are separated by a metallic region connecting AA and AA' stacking line in the layer translation vector space. We find that gapless states appear at the interface between the two stacking faulted domains with different layer translation or with opposite perpendicular electric field if their valley Chern numbers are different.

  10. Adsorption effects on radial breathing mode of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiashi, Shohei; Kono, Kaname; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shitaba, Junpei; Homma, Naoki; Beniya, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    For elucidation of the adsorption effects on the vibration properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), photoluminescence and Raman scattering spectra from SWNTs at different vapor pressure of water were simultaneously measured and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed. The water vapor pressure dependence and its tube diameter (dtube) dependence of the frequency of the radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks (ωRBM) and the optical transition energy (Ei i) indicate that the physical adsorption is quite important, and both ωRBM and Ei i clearly depend on the number density of adsorption molecules on the SWNT surface. A simple adsorption model, where the vibrational coupling between the surrounding adsorption layer and SWNTs via van der Waals interaction is considered for RBM, reproduces the experimental and MD simulation results of ωRBM in a wide dtube range for various SWNTs, such as isolated SWNTs in vacuum, SWNTs with adsorption water layer, and even bundled SWNTs. On the basis of the model, the variation of the relationship between ωRBM and Ei i in a Kataura plot for various SWNT samples can also be understood generally as the "environmental effects."

  11. Nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Circumferential flexural modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Matteo; Smirnov, Valeri V.; Manevitch, Leonid I.; Milani, Massimo; Pellicano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied. The Sanders-Koiter theory is applied to model the nonlinear dynamics of the system in the case of finite amplitude of vibration. The SWNT deformation is described in terms of longitudinal, circumferential and radial displacement fields. Simply supported, clamped and free boundary conditions are considered. The circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) are investigated. Two different approaches based on numerical and analytical models are compared. In the numerical model, an energy method based on the Lagrange equations is used to reduce the nonlinear partial differential equations of motion to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which is solved by using the implicit Runge-Kutta numerical method. In the analytical model, a reduced form of the Sanders-Koiter theory assuming small circumferential and tangential shear deformations is used to get the nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion, which are solved by using the multiple scales analytical method. The transition from energy beating to energy localization in the nonlinear field is studied. The effect of the aspect ratio on the analytical and numerical values of the nonlinear energy localization threshold for different boundary conditions is investigated. Time evolution of the total energy distribution along the axis of a simply supported SWNT

  12. Mode selection for electrostatic beam resonators based on motional resistance and quality factor.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Jeong Hoon; Gorman, Jason J

    2016-12-07

    An analytical comparison between the fundamental mode and higher modes of vibration for an electrostatic beam resonator is presented. Multiple mode numbers can be matched to a desired resonance frequency through appropriate scaling. Therefore, it is important to determine which mode yields the best performance. A dynamic model of the resonator is derived and then used to determine the motional resistance for each mode. The resulting equation provides the basis for comparing performance between modes using motional resistance and quality factor. As a demonstration of the approach, a quality factor model that has been previously validated experimentally is introduced. Numerical results for silicon resonators indicate that the fundamental mode can provide a lower motional resistance and higher quality factor when the resonators under comparison have the same aspect ratio or the same stiffness.

  13. Derivation of Path Independent Coupled Mix Mode Cohesive Laws from Fracture Resistance Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutianos, Stergios

    2017-08-01

    A generalised approach is presented to derive coupled mixed mode cohesive laws described with physical parameters such as peak traction, critical opening, fracture energy and cohesive shape. The approach is based on deriving mix mode fracture resistance curves from an effective mix mode cohesive law at different mode mixities. From the fracture resistance curves, the normal and shear stresses of the cohesive laws can be obtained by differentiation. Since, the mixed mode cohesive laws are obtained from a fracture resistance curve (potential function), path independence is automatically satisfied. The effective mix mode cohesive law can have different shape and cohesive law parameters at different mode mixities so that the approach can be applied to various material failure models.

  14. Influence of the thermal contact resistance in current-induced domain wall depinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Cristina; Ramos, Eduardo; Muñoz, Manuel; Kar-Narayan, S.; Mathur, N. D.; Prieto, José L.

    2017-08-01

    In this work we study the influence of the thermal contact resistance on the temperature of a typical nanostripe used in current induced magnetic domain wall movement or depinning. The thermal contact resistance arises from an imperfect heat transport across the interface between the metallic ferromagnetic nanostripe and the substrate. We show that this parameter, which is likely non-zero in any experimental device, increases the temperature in the nanostripe considerably. When the current is injected in the nanostripe in nanosecond long pulses, the larger temperature also implies a reduction of the effective current density delivered by the pulse generator. Both the thermal contact resistance and the dynamic response of the pulse generator are usually neglected in theoretical estimations of the influence of spin transfer torque on domain wall displacement and depinning. Here we show that only if the thermal contact resistance and the electric resistivity of the ferromagnetic nanostripe are optimized to the best values reported in the bibliography, the Joule heating may not be so crucial for current densities of the order of 108 A cm-2. Also, the use of physical constrictions (notch) to pin the magnetic domain wall may complicate the interpretation of the results as they always come together with relevant thermal gradients.

  15. Resistive effects on line-tied magnetohydrodynamic modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, John M.

    2007-09-15

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on the linear stability of line-tied magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is presented in cylindrical geometry, based on the method recently developed in the paper by Evstatiev et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072902 (2006)]. The method uses an expansion of the full solution of the problem in one-dimensional radial eigenfunctions. This method is applied to study sausage modes (m=0, m being the poloidal wavenumber), kink modes (m=1), and m=2 modes. All these modes can be resistively unstable. It is found that m{ne}0 modes can be unstable below the ideal MHD threshold due to resistive diffusion of the field lines, with growth rates proportional to resistivity. For these resistive modes, there is no indication of tearing, i.e., current sheets or boundary layers due to ideal MHD singularities. That is, resistivity acts globally on the whole plasma column and not in layers. Modes with m=0, on the other hand, can exist as tearing modes if the equilibrium axial magnetic field reverses sign within the plasma.

  16. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of the Ideal Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, S.; Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Pucci, F.; Velli, M.

    2015-06-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear evolution of the tearing instability on thin current sheets by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations, within the framework of compressible, resistive MHD. In particular we analyze the behavior of current sheets whose inverse aspect ratio scales with the Lundquist number S as {{S}-1/3}. This scaling has been recently recognized to yield the threshold separating fast, ideal reconnection, with an evolution and growth that are independent of S provided this is high enough, as it should be natural having the ideal case as a limit for S\\to ∞ . Our simulations confirm that the tearing instability growth rate can be as fast as γ ≈ 0.6 {{τ }A}-1, where {{τ }A} is the ideal Alfvénic time set by the macroscopic scales, for our least diffusive case with S={{10}7}. The expected instability dispersion relation and eigenmodes are also retrieved in the linear regime, for the values of S explored here. Moreover, in the nonlinear stage of the simulations we observe secondary events obeying the same critical scaling with S, here calculated on the local, much smaller lengths, leading to increasingly faster reconnection. These findings strongly support the idea that in a fully dynamic regime, as soon as current sheets develop, thin, and reach this critical threshold in their aspect ratio, the tearing mode is able to trigger plasmoid formation and reconnection on the local (ideal) Alfvénic timescales, as required to explain the explosive flaring activity often observed in solar and astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Host carbon sources modulate cell wall architecture, drug resistance and virulence in a fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V; Adya, Ashok K; Wehmeier, Silvia; Brand, Alexandra C; MacCallum, Donna M; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P

    2012-01-01

    The survival of all microbes depends upon their ability to respond to environmental challenges. To establish infection, pathogens such as Candida albicans must mount effective stress responses to counter host defences while adapting to dynamic changes in nutrient status within host niches. Studies of C. albicans stress adaptation have generally been performed on glucose-grown cells, leaving the effects of alternative carbon sources upon stress resistance largely unexplored. We have shown that growth on alternative carbon sources, such as lactate, strongly influence the resistance of C. albicans to antifungal drugs, osmotic and cell wall stresses. Similar trends were observed in clinical isolates and other pathogenic Candida species. The increased stress resistance of C. albicans was not dependent on key stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1) signalling pathways. Instead, increased stress resistance was promoted by major changes in the architecture and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Glucose- and lactate-grown cells displayed significant differences in cell wall mass, ultrastructure, elasticity and adhesion. Changes in carbon source also altered the virulence of C. albicans in models of systemic candidiasis and vaginitis, confirming the importance of alternative carbon sources within host niches during C. albicans infections. PMID:22587014

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  19. 177 fs erbium-doped fiber laser mode locked with a cellulose polymer film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, V. I.; Kryukov, P. G.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Dianov, E. M.

    2008-04-01

    A mode-locked soliton erbium-doped fiber laser generating 177fs pulses is demonstrated. The laser pumped by a 85mW, 980nm laser diode emits 7mW at 1.56μm at a pulse repetition rate of 50MHz. Passive mode locking is achieved with a saturable absorber made of a high-optical quality film based on cellulose derivative with dispersed carbon single-wall nanotubes. The film is prepared with the original technique by using carbon nanotubes synthesized by the arc-discharge method.

  20. Yb-doped passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a single wall carbon nanotubes wallpaper absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Wei; Hu, Xiaohong; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Cunxiao; Shen, Deyuan; Li, Cheng; Tsang, Yuen H.

    2013-04-01

    A passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser is demonstrated based on a band-pass filter together with a novel fabricated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) wallpaper absorber. Mode-locking can be achieved with a low threshold pump power of 32 mW. The proposed fiber laser operates at 1064 nm with the spectral width of about 0.57 nm and pulse repetition rate of about 19.45 MHz. The pulse duration is about 276 ps, which can be used directly as seed source for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system.

  1. Chest-wall thickness and percent thoracic fat estimation by B-mode ultrasound: system and procedure review

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Lane, B.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Accurate measurement of chest wall thickness is necessary for estimation of lung burden of transuranic elements in humans. To achieve tis capability, the ORNL Whole Body Counter has acquired a B-mode ultrasonic imaging system for defining the structure within the thorax of the body. This report contains a review of the ultrasound system in use at the ORNL Whole Body Counter, including its theory of operation, and te procedure for use of the system. Future developmental plans are also presented.

  2. Contribution of cell walls, nonprotein thiols, and organic acids to cadmium resistance in two cabbage varieties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyun; Cui, Jin; Luo, Chunling; Gao, Lu; Chen, Yahua; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-02-01

    To study possible cadmium (Cd) resistance mechanisms in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.), several parameters of metal uptake, distribution, and complexation were compared between two varieties Chunfeng [CF (Cd-tolerant)] and Lvfeng [LF (Cd-sensitive)]. Results showed that CF contained significantly lower Cd concentrations in leaves and higher Cd concentrations in roots than LF. Approximately 70 to 74 % and 66 to 68 % of Cd taken up by LF and CF, respectively, was transported to shoots. More Cd was bound to the cell walls of leaves, stems, and roots in CF than in LF. The higher capacity of CF to limit Cd uptake into shoots could be explained by immobilization of Cd in root cell walls. Compared with control groups, Cd treatment also significantly increased concentrations of nonprotein thiols, phytochelatins (PCs), and citric acid in the leaves and roots of the two varieties; the increases were more pronounced in CF than in LF. Taken together, the results suggest that the greater Cd resistance in CF than in LF may be attributable to the greater capacity of CF to limit Cd uptake into shoots and complex Cd in cell walls and metal binding ligands, such as PCs and citric acid. However, the contributions of PCs and citric acid to Cd detoxification might be smaller than those in cell walls.

  3. Measurement of contact resistance in CdSe-single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minkyung; Ahn, Juwon; Park, Taehee; Yi, Whikun

    2014-08-01

    The CdSe-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrids are synthesized for measuring contact resistance between CdSe quantum dots and SWNTs in two hybrid samples, i.e., spray-deposited CdSe on SWNTs, and pyrene-self assembled CdSe on SWNTs. Currents are measured through indium-tin oxide (ITO), CdSe-SWNT hybrids and the tip of conductive AFM (c-AFM) with and without light at 532 and 655 nm.

  4. Theoretical, Computational, and Experimental Studies of a Metamaterial-Enhanced Resistive Wall Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Raymond Tyler

    This project focuses on a specific vacuum electron device (VED), the resistive wall amplifier (RWA). The RWA passes a velocity-modulated electron beam near a resistive surface to amplify electromagnetic signals. It was originally introduced in 1950 and received limited further theoretical and experimental investigation. The original investigators demonstrated that if the admittance of the RWA's wall was resistive or resistive-inductive (as seen by the electron beam), the device would support a growing space charge wave and produce gain. However, when constructing a practical device a dielectric substrate is necessary to support the resistive medium. The addition of a dielectric introduces a capacitive component to the wall's admittance (less inductive), reducing the device's performance. This work investigates how metamaterials (MTMs) can improve the RWA performance. MTMs are composite structures engineered to have electromagnetic (EM) properties that are not readily available in nature (e.g., negative permittivity and/or permeability). The metamaterial enhanced resistive wall amplifier (MERWA) was theoretically, computationally, and experimentally investigated in this work. The analytic theory investigation revealed how the addition of an epsilon negative (ENG) medium liner could make the wall's admittance more inductive and enhance the gain-bandwidth product of a RWA. We then examined how a periodic, inductively-meandered, metal wire array could be used as an ENG MTM medium for the MERWA. Finally, we developed and analyzed a relativistic analytic theory MERWA model. The computational portion of the MERWA investigation included EM and particle-in-cell (PIC) studies of the ENG-medium-lined RWA and the inductively-meandered, metal-wire-array, MTM-lined MERWA realization. The computational simulation results agreed well with the analytic theory predictions. Finally, the experimental investigation of the MERWA included design, fabrication, assembly and measurements of

  5. Hyper-resistivity produced by tearing mode turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    Tearing mode turbulence produces a hyperresistivity or effective anomalous electron viscosity. The hyperresistivity is calculated for the mean magnetic field quasi-linearly, and for long-wavelength modes using the direct interaction approximation. The hyperresistivity accounts for current relaxation in reversed-field pinch experiments, and gives a magnetic fluctuation scaling of S to the -1/3. It causes enhanced tearing mode growth rates in the turbulent phase of tokamak disruptions. In astrophysics, it limits magnetic energy growth because of the dynamo effect, and may explain rapid reconnection phenomena such as solar flares.

  6. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  7. Resonant and resistive dual-mode uncooled infrared detectors toward expanded dynamic range and high linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Liang, Ji; Zhang, Hongxiang; Yang, Xing; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Menglun

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports an uncooled infrared (IR) detector based on a micromachined piezoelectric resonator operating in resonant and resistive dual-modes. The two sensing modes achieved IR responsivities of 2.5 Hz/nW and 900 μdB/nW, respectively. Compared with the single mode operation, the dual-mode measurement improves the limit of detection by two orders of magnitude and meanwhile maintains high linearity and responsivity in a higher IR intensity range. A combination of the two sensing modes compensates for its own shortcomings and provides a much larger dynamic range, and thus, a wider application field of the proposed detector is realized.

  8. A comparison of assisted, resisted, and common plyometric training modes to enhance sprint and agility performance.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Kazem; Mohammadi, Abbas; Badri, Neda

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of assisted, resisted and common plyometric training modes to enhance sprint and agility performance. Thirty active young males (age 20.67±1.12, height 174.83±4.69, weight 63.45±7.51) volunteered to participate in this study that 24 completed testing. The participants were randomly assigned into different groups: assisted, resisted and common plyometric exercises groups. Plyometric training involved three sessions per week for 4 weeks. The volume load of plyometric training modes was equated between the groups. The posttest was performed after 48 hours of the last training session. Between-group differences were analyzed with the ANCOVA and LSD post-hoc tests, and within-group differences were analyzed by a paired t-test. The findings of the present study indicated that 0-10-m, 20-30-m sprint time and the Illinois Agility Test time significantly decreased in the assisted and resisted plyometrics modes compared to the common plyometric training mode (P≤0.05). Also, the 0-10-m, 0-30-m sprint time and agility T-test time was significantly reduced with resisted plyometrics modes compared to the assisted and common plyometric modes (P≤0.05). There was no significant difference in the 10-20-m sprint time among the three plyometric training modes. The results of this study demonstrated that assisted and resisted plyometrics modes with elastic bands were effective methods to improve sprint and agility performance than common plyometric training in active males. Also, the resisted plyometrics mode was superior than the assisted plyometrics mode to improving sprint and agility tasks.

  9. Self-Resistance and Cell Wall Composition in the Glycopeptide Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina▿

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Hüttel, Stephan; Kulik, Andreas; Röttgen, Marlene; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Stegmann, Evi

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing resistance mechanism against glycopeptides in Gram-positive pathogens involves reprogramming the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan precursors, resulting in d-alanyl-d-lactate depsipeptide termini. Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-like glycopeptide balhimycin and therefore has to protect itself from the action of the glycopeptide. We studied the roles of the accessory resistance gene orthologs vanYb, vnlRb, and vnlSb, which are part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster (represented by the subscript “b”). The VanYb carboxypeptidase cleaved the terminal d-Ala from peptidoglycan precursors, and its heterologous expression enhanced glycopeptide resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor. The VanRS-like two component system VnlRSb was not involved in glycopeptide resistance or in the expression of the vanHAX glycopeptide resistance genes. Mature A. balhimycina peptidoglycan contained mainly tri- and tetrapeptides, with only traces of the d-Ala-d-Ala-ending pentapeptides that are binding sites for the antibiotic produced. The structure of the peptidoglycan precursor is consistent with the presence of vanHAX genes, which were identified outside the balhimycin synthesis cluster. Both wild-type and non-antibiotic-producing mutant strains synthesized peptidoglycan precursors ending mainly with d-Lac, indicating constitutive synthesis of a resistant cell wall. A. balhimycina could provide a model for an ancestral glycopeptide producer with constitutively expressed resistance genes. PMID:21690280

  10. Stabilizing effect of resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode discharge in lithium-conditioned NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    Linear stability analysis of the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) Li-conditioned ELM-free H-mode equilibria is carried out in the context of the extended magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model in NIMROD. The purpose is to investigate the physical cause behind edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in experiment after the Li-coating of the divertor and the first wall of the NSTX tokamak. Besides ideal MHD modeling, including finite-Larmor radius effect and two-fluid Hall and electron diamagnetic drift contributions, a non-ideal resistivity model is employed, taking into account the increase of Z eff after Li-conditioning in ELM-free H-mode. Unlike an earlier conclusion from an eigenvalue code analysis of these equilibria, NIMROD results find that after reduced recycling from divertor plates, profile modification is necessary but insufficient to explain the mechanism behind complete ELMs suppression in ideal two-fluid MHD. After considering the higher plasma resistivity due to higher Z eff, the complete stabilization could be explained. A thorough analysis of both pre-lithium ELMy and with-lithium ELM-free cases using ideal and non-ideal MHD models is presented, after accurately including a vacuum-like cold halo region in NIMROD to investigate ELMs.

  11. Stabilizing effect of resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode discharge in lithium-conditioned NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-05-12

    Linear stability analysis of the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) Li-conditioned ELM-free H-mode equilibria is carried out in the context of the extended magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model in NIMROD. Our purpose is to investigate the physical cause behind edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in experiment after the Li-coating of the divertor and the first wall of the NSTX tokamak. Besides ideal MHD modeling, including finite-Larmor radius effect and two-fluid Hall and electron diamagnetic drift contributions, a non-ideal resistivity model is employed, taking into account the increase of Z eff after Li-conditioning in ELM-free H-mode. And unlike an earlier conclusion from anmore » eigenvalue code analysis of these equilibria, NIMROD results find that after reduced recycling from divertor plates, profile modification is necessary but insufficient to explain the mechanism behind complete ELMs suppression in ideal two-fluid MHD. After considering the higher plasma resistivity due to higher Z eff, the complete stabilization could be explained. Furthermore, a thorough analysis of both pre-lithium ELMy and with-lithium ELM-free cases using ideal and non-ideal MHD models is presented, after accurately including a vacuum-like cold halo region in NIMROD to investigate ELMs.« less

  12. Modes and Modulations of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Depardieu, Florence; Podglajen, Isabelle; Leclercq, Roland; Collatz, Ekkehard; Courvalin, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    Since antibiotic resistance usually affords a gain of function, there is an associated biological cost resulting in a loss of fitness of the bacterial host. Considering that antibiotic resistance is most often only transiently advantageous to bacteria, an efficient and elegant way for them to escape the lethal action of drugs is the alteration of resistance gene expression. It appears that expression of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is frequently regulated, which indicates that modulation of gene expression probably reflects a good compromise between energy saving and adjustment to a rapidly evolving environment. Modulation of gene expression can occur at the transcriptional or translational level following mutations or the movement of mobile genetic elements and may involve induction by the antibiotic. In the latter case, the antibiotic can have a triple activity: as an antibacterial agent, as an inducer of resistance to itself, and as an inducer of the dissemination of resistance determinants. We will review certain mechanisms, all reversible, that bacteria have elaborated to achieve antibiotic resistance by the fine-tuning of the expression of genetic information. PMID:17223624

  13. Understanding the destabilization of a resistive drift mode in EAST core plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erzhong; Xu, L.; Guo, W.; Chen, K.; Lyu, B.; Shen, Y.; Hu, L.

    2017-02-01

    A low-frequency oscillation driven by heavy impurities is frequently observed in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) H-mode discharges accompanied by an Edge Localized Mode-free duration. This instability has been identified as a resistive drift mode according to a two-fluid simulation, showing that the mode stability is determined by the gradient of resistivity profile. Furthermore, the analytic theory also demonstrates that the mode is destabilized by the sharp impurity density gradient agreeing to the observation of intrinsic Mo (Molybdenum) concentration. The destabilization conditions have been derived like LN ,z<2/3 LT ,z ( LN ,z and LT ,z are the scale lengths of density and temperature of impurity, respectively). Calculations based on the analytical theory reproduce the characteristic of the mode, which is in agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Vancomycin tolerant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus reveals the effects of vancomycin on cell wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Ochoa, Sara A; Escalona, Gerardo; Arellano-Galindo, José; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes both healthcare- and community-acquired infections. An increase in the incidence of these infections may lead to a substantial change in the rate of vancomycin usage. Incidence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has been increasing worldwide for the last few years, conferring different levels of resistance to vancomycin as well as producing changes in the cell wall structure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vancomycin on cell wall thickening in clinical isolates of vancomycin-tolerant (VT) MRSA obtained from pediatric patients. From a collection of 100 MRSA clinical isolates from pediatric patients, 12% (12/100) were characterized as VT-MRSA, and from them, 41.66% (5/12) exhibited the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) phenotype. Multiplex-PCR assays revealed 66.66% (8/12), 25% (3/12), and 8.33% (1/12) of the VT-MRSA isolates were associated with agr group II, I, and III polymorphisms, respectively; the II-mec gene was amplified from 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates, and the mecIVa gene was amplified from 16.66% (2/12) of the isolates. Pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprint analysis showed 62% similarity among the VT-MRSA isolates. Thin transverse sections analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an average increase of 24 nm (105.55%) in the cell wall thickness of VT-MRSA compared with untreated VT-MRSA isolates. In summary, these data revealed that the thickened cell walls of VT-MRSA clinical isolates with agr type II and SCCmec group II polymorphisms are associated with an adaptive resistance to vancomycin.

  15. Vancomycin Tolerant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Reveals the Effects of Vancomycin on Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Ochoa, Sara A.; Escalona, Gerardo; Arellano-Galindo, José; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; López-Villegas, Edgar O.; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes both healthcare- and community-acquired infections. An increase in the incidence of these infections may lead to a substantial change in the rate of vancomycin usage. Incidence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has been increasing worldwide for the last few years, conferring different levels of resistance to vancomycin as well as producing changes in the cell wall structure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vancomycin on cell wall thickening in clinical isolates of vancomycin-tolerant (VT) MRSA obtained from pediatric patients. From a collection of 100 MRSA clinical isolates from pediatric patients, 12% (12/100) were characterized as VT-MRSA, and from them, 41.66% (5/12) exhibited the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) phenotype. Multiplex-PCR assays revealed 66.66% (8/12), 25% (3/12), and 8.33% (1/12) of the VT-MRSA isolates were associated with agr group II, I, and III polymorphisms, respectively; the II-mec gene was amplified from 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates, and the mecIVa gene was amplified from 16.66% (2/12) of the isolates. Pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprint analysis showed 62% similarity among the VT-MRSA isolates. Thin transverse sections analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an average increase of 24 nm (105.55%) in the cell wall thickness of VT-MRSA compared with untreated VT-MRSA isolates. In summary, these data revealed that the thickened cell walls of VT-MRSA clinical isolates with agr type II and SCCmec group II polymorphisms are associated with an adaptive resistance to vancomycin. PMID:25793280

  16. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein regulates cell wall defense and resistance to necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Escudero, Viviana; Miedes, Eva; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Jordá, Lucía; Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Bednarek, Pawel; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Somerville, Shauna; Estevez, José Manuel; Persson, Staffan; Molina, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein controls defense responses to necrotrophic and vascular fungi. The agb1 mutant impaired in the Gβ subunit displays enhanced susceptibility to these pathogens. Gβ/AGB1 forms an obligate dimer with either one of the Arabidopsis Gγ subunits (γ1/AGG1 and γ2/AGG2). Accordingly, we now demonstrate that the agg1 agg2 double mutant is as susceptible as agb1 plants to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. To elucidate the molecular basis of heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated resistance, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of agb1-1 mutant and wild-type plants upon inoculation with P. cucumerina. This analysis, together with metabolomic studies, demonstrated that G-protein-mediated resistance was independent of defensive pathways required for resistance to necrotrophic fungi, such as the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid, and tryptophan-derived metabolites signaling, as these pathways were not impaired in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants. Notably, many mis-regulated genes in agb1 plants were related with cell wall functions, which was also the case in agg1 agg2 mutant. Biochemical analyses and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy of cell walls from G-protein mutants revealed that the xylose content was lower in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants than in wild-type plants, and that mutant walls had similar FTIR spectratypes, which differed from that of wild-type plants. The data presented here suggest a canonical functionality of the Gβ and Gγ1/γ2 subunits in the control of Arabidopsis immune responses and the regulation of cell wall composition.

  17. Distortion of Magnetic Domain Wall Measured by Magneto-Resistance Changes in a Co Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-01-01

    The electrical anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) measurements were performed to see the formation of a 360 degree magnetic domain wall (360 DW) and distortion of the magnetic moments in a Co nanoring structure. Since the 360 DW is consisted of two 180 degree DWs, a decrease of the resistance was found in the switching process from the vortex to reverse onion state by the AMR effects, which is consistent with micromagnetic simulations. In addition, a decrease of the resistance in the switching process from the onion to vortex state was observed by the distortion of the local magnetic moments due to an applied magnetic field. The stochastic behavior in the switching process is caused by thermally induced magnetic moments changes.

  18. Wall mode instability driven transition to turbulence in a soft microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Sagar; v, Kumaran

    Transition to turbulence has been triggered due to structure fluid interaction at Reynolds number (Re) much lower than hard wall transition Re, in a soft walled micro channel of dimensions 40mm*1.5mm*0.16mm. Mixing index analysis indicates high degree of mixing accompanied by lower pressure drop as the channel deforms. Flow after transition velocity statistics has been extensively studied using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) along streamwise-wallnormal direction. The reduced plots of streamwise mean velocity are shown with the absence of viscous sublayer and presence of logarithmic layer with von Karman constants different from rigid wall channel. The one-point cross correlation between velocity fluctuations is non-zero at the soft surface which is in contrast to flow in hard walled channel. This indicates that the additional fluid stress exerted on the soft surface by the fluid velocity fluctuations result in net energy transfer due to shear work done at the interface. The structure fluid interface acts as a source of energy for the mean turbulent kinetic energy which is typically zero at the interface for hard walled channel. We also detect the onset of wall-oscillations primarily tangential to the surface at the transition Re. Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India.

  19. Alternative Pathway to a Glycopeptide-Resistant Cell Wall in the Balhimycin Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kalan, Lindsay; Kilian, Regina; Martin, Tobias; Wright, Gerard D; Stegmann, Evi

    2015-06-12

    Balhimycin, a vancomycin-type glycopeptide, is a lipid II targeting antibiotic produced by Amycolatopsis balhimycina. A. balhimycina has developed a self-resistance mechanism based on the synergistic action of different enzymes resulting in modified peptidoglycan. The canonical resistance mechanism against glycopeptides is the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending with acyl-d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) rather than acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala). This reprogramming is the result of the enzymes VanH, VanA, and VanX. VanH and VanA are required to produce d-Ala-d-Lac; VanX cleaves cytosolic pools of d-Ala-d-Ala, thereby ensuring that peptidoglycan is enriched in d-Ala-d-Lac. In A. balhimycina, the ΔvanHAXAb mutant showed a reduced glycopeptide resistance in comparison to the wild type. Nevertheless, ΔvanHAXAb was paradoxically still able to produce d-Ala-d-Lac containing resistant cell wall precursors suggesting the presence of a novel alternative glycopeptide resistance mechanism. In silico analysis, inactivation studies, and biochemical assays led to the characterization of an enzyme, Ddl1Ab, as a paraloguous chromosomal d-Ala-d-Lac ligase able to complement the function of VanAAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. Furthermore, A. balhimycina harbors a vanYAb gene encoding a d,d-carboxypeptidase. Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulated expression of vanYAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. VanYAb cleaves the endstanding d-Ala from the pentapeptide precursors, reducing the quantity of sensitive cell wall precursors in the absence of VanXAb. These findings represent an unprecedented coordinated layer of resistance mechanisms in a glycopeptide antibiotic producing bacterium.

  20. Cross-resistance, mode of inheritance and stability of resistance to emamectin in Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Sayyed, Ali H; Saleem, Mushtaq A

    2010-08-01

    Spodoptera litura (F.) is a cosmopolitan pest that has developed resistance to several insecticides. The aim of the present study was to establish whether an emamectin-selected (Ema-SEL) population could render cross-resistance to other insecticides, and to investigate the genetics of resistance. Bioassays at G(1) gave resistance ratios (RRs) of 80-, 2980-, 3050- and 2800-fold for emamectin, abamectin, indoxacarb and acetamiprid, respectively, compared with a laboratory susceptible population Lab-PK. After three rounds of selection, resistance to emamectin in Ema-SEL increased significantly, with RRs of 730-fold and 13-fold compared with the Lab-PK and unselected (UNSEL) population respectively. Further studies revealed that three generations were required for a tenfold increase in resistance to emamectin. Resistance to abamectin, indoxacarb, acetamiprid and emamectin in UNSEL declined significantly compared with the field population at G(1). Furthermore, selection with emamectin reduced resistance to abamectin, indoxacarb and acetamiprid on a par with UNSEL. Crosses between Ema-SEL and Lab-PK indicated autosomal and incomplete dominance of resistance. A direct test of a monogenic model and Land's method suggested that resistance to emamectin was controlled by more than one locus. Instability of resistance and lack of cross-resistance to other insecticides suggest that insecticides with different modes of action should be recommended to reduce emamectin selection pressure. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Multiple drug resistance in Mycobacterium avium: is the wall architecture responsible for exclusion of antimicrobial agents?

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Frehel, C; Ryter, A; Ohayon, H; Lesourd, M; David, H L

    1981-01-01

    Whole cells of Mycobacterium avium, characterized by their negative response in the nine biochemical tests used for mycobacterial identification in our laboratory, turned positive for nitrate reductase, Tween-80 hydrolysis, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, penicillinase, and trehalase after their wall portion was removed to yield spheroplasts. This suggested that the negative results in most of the biochemical procedures were caused by the exclusion mechanism at the wall level. Preliminary transmission and scanning electron microscopic studies showed differences at wall level between laboratory-maintained opaque, dome-shaped (SmD) and host-recycled smooth, transparent (SmT) colony type variants of M. avium and suggested the presence of an outer regularly structured layer in SmT variants. Comparative ultrastructural studies utilizing different polysaccharide coloration methods confirmed the presence of an outer polysaccharide layer in SmT variants which was probably related to their enhanced pathogenicity for experimental animals and drug resistance as compared to that of SmD variants. These findings are discussed with respect to multiple drug resistance, virulence, and gene expression of M. avium. Images PMID:6798925

  2. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  3. Cell wall structure and formation of maturing fibres of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) increase buckling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Ren, Haiqing; Zhang, Bo; Fei, Benhua; Burgert, Ingo

    2012-05-07

    The mechanical stability of the culms of monocotyledonous bamboos is highly attributed to the proper embedding of the stiff fibre caps of the vascular bundles into the soft parenchymatous matrix. Owing to lack of a vascular cambium, bamboos show no secondary thickening growth that impedes geometrical adaptations to mechanical loads and increases the necessity of structural optimization at the material level. Here, we investigate the fine structure and mechanical properties of fibres within a maturing vascular bundle of moso bamboo, Phyllostachys pubescens, with a high spatial resolution. The fibre cell walls were found to show almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils, and the stiffness and hardness of the central part of the cell wall remained basically consistent for the fibres at different regions across the fibre cap. A stiffness gradient across the fibre cap is developed by differential cell wall thickening which affects tissue density and thereby axial tissue stiffness in the different regions of the cap. The almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils in the fibre walls maximize the longitudinal elastic modulus of the fibres and their lignification increases the transverse rigidity. This is interpreted as a structural and mechanical optimization that contributes to the high buckling resistance of the slender bamboo culms.

  4. Cell wall structure and formation of maturing fibres of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) increase buckling resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Ren, Haiqing; Zhang, Bo; Fei, Benhua; Burgert, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical stability of the culms of monocotyledonous bamboos is highly attributed to the proper embedding of the stiff fibre caps of the vascular bundles into the soft parenchymatous matrix. Owing to lack of a vascular cambium, bamboos show no secondary thickening growth that impedes geometrical adaptations to mechanical loads and increases the necessity of structural optimization at the material level. Here, we investigate the fine structure and mechanical properties of fibres within a maturing vascular bundle of moso bamboo, Phyllostachys pubescens, with a high spatial resolution. The fibre cell walls were found to show almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils, and the stiffness and hardness of the central part of the cell wall remained basically consistent for the fibres at different regions across the fibre cap. A stiffness gradient across the fibre cap is developed by differential cell wall thickening which affects tissue density and thereby axial tissue stiffness in the different regions of the cap. The almost axially oriented cellulose fibrils in the fibre walls maximize the longitudinal elastic modulus of the fibres and their lignification increases the transverse rigidity. This is interpreted as a structural and mechanical optimization that contributes to the high buckling resistance of the slender bamboo culms. PMID:21920959

  5. A resistive magnetodynamics analysis of sawtooth driven tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenping; Wang, Jiaqi; Liu, Dongjian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is applied to study the effect of sawtooth driven on classical/neoclassical tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. In a model of forced reconnection, the sawtooth is considered as a boundary disturbance for m >1 modes and causes the islands growth of m/n = 2/1 and 3/2 modes through toroidal coupling. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the linear growth of the modes is driven by precursors of the sawtooth through the linear mode coupling, while differential rotation has great effect on both the linear and the nonlinear development of the modes. It is believed that the tearing mode can be suppressed by control of the sawtooth by radio frequency heating or current drive.

  6. Braking of tearing mode rotation by ferromagnetic conducting walls in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-09-15

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a “forbidden band” of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band, there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode “locks” to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). On the other hand, if the ferromagnetism becomes too large, then the forbidden band of mode rotation frequencies is suppressed, and the mode frequency consequently varies smoothly and reversibly with the mode amplitude.

  7. Braking of tearing mode rotation by ferromagnetic conducting walls in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-09-01

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a "forbidden band" of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band, there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode "locks" to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). On the other hand, if the ferromagnetism becomes too large, then the forbidden band of mode rotation frequencies is suppressed, and the mode frequency consequently varies smoothly and reversibly with the mode amplitude.

  8. [The role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Ufuk

    2007-04-01

    mechanisms and global activator proteins (MarA, SoxS, Rob) are significant in the induction of overexpression of these efflux pump systems. Outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria with its unique lipopolysaccharide rich structure also contributes to drug efflux and other antimicrobial resistance mechanisms by reducing the influx rate of toxic antimicrobial compunds. Multidrug efflux pump proteins found in Gram positive bacteria and mycobacteria are usually the members of protein super families other than RND family and their substrate profiles are more limited. However, some of these efflux proteins (NorA, MsrA, QacA in Staphylococcus aureus; PmrA and EmeA in Streptococcus pneumoniae) have clinical significance in the resistance to several antimicrobial agents (fluoroquinolones, macrolids) and toxic substances (quarternery ammonium compounds). In this review article, the role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria have been discussed.

  9. Appearance of radial breathing modes in Raman spectra of multi-walled carbon nanotubes upon laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Mohapatra, Dipti R.; Hazra, K. S.; Misra, D. S.; Ghatak, Jay; Satyam, P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Raman spectra of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes are studied with the laser power of 5-20 mW. We observe the Raman bands at ˜1352, 1581, 1607, and 2700 cm -1 with 5 mW laser power. As the laser power is increased to 10, 15 and 20 mW, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) appear in the range 200-610 cm -1. The diameter corresponding to the highest RBM is ˜0.37 nm, the lowest reported so far. The RBMs are attributed to the local synthesis of the SWNTs at the top surface of the samples at higher laser power.

  10. Effect of inter-particle rolling resistance on passive earth pressure against a translating rigid retaining wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; He, Jie; Liu, Fang; Wang, Huaning

    2013-06-01

    The presence of the inter-particle rolling resistance of soil grains results in higher bulk shear strength in the soil, which relates to the earth pressure calculation based on the classic theory. This paper focuses on the effect of the inter-particle rolling resistance on the earth pressure against a rigid retaining wall. A particle contact model considering the inter-particle rolling resistance was implemented into the distinct element code PFC2D, which was then used to simulate a rigid wall retaining a sandy backfill. The passive earth pressure against the wall subjected to a translational displacement was analyzed and compared with results without considering the inter-particle rolling resistance. The influence of the inter-particle rolling resistance was examined from the microscopic scale (e.g., averaged micro-pure rotation-rate) as well as the macroscopic scale (e.g., the magnitude and action point of resultant earth pressures). The results show that the inter-particle rolling resistance of the backfill strongly affects the value of passive thrust behind the wall, but it has no significant effect on the action position of the thrust. The distribution of micro-pure rotation-rate (APR) in the backfill provides an insight into the connection between inter-particle rolling resistance to the energy dissipation in the shear zone behind the wall.

  11. Resistive sensor and electromagnetic actuator for feedback stabilization of liquid metal walls in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, S. M. H.; Volpe, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors will be subject to instabilities, turbulence, induced currents, error fields and temperature gradients that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun to actively stabilize static or flowing free-surface liquid metal layers by locally applying forces in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present resistive sensors of liquid metal thickness and demonstrate \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} actuators, to locally control it.

  12. Relation of cell wall lipid content of Serratia marcescens to resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Winshell, E B; Neu, H C

    1974-07-01

    Serratia marcescens strains were divided into three groups on the basis of antimicrobial sensitivity and pigment production. Group I, nonpigmented, was resistant to most antibiotics. Group II, nonpigmented, was susceptible to many antimicrobial agents, as was group III which was pigmented. Representative organisms of each group were examined for all lipid content. There were no significant differences in total lipid, phospholipid, or fatty acid esters among the three groups. Differences in susceptibility to antibiotics in Serratia do not seem to be explained on the basis of wall lipid content.

  13. 90-fs diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser mode-locked using single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuangeng; Petrov, Valentin; Griebner, Uwe; Zhang, Xingyu; Choi, Sun Young; Gwak, Ji Yoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Mateos, Xavier; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2014-03-10

    A diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser is mode-locked with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) for the first time. Pulse durations as short as 90 fs are obtained at ~1049 nm with 0.4% output coupler, the shortest pulses to our knowledge for a diode-pumped 1-µm laser applying SWCNTs as saturable absorber. Using 3% output coupler, the maximum average output power reached 90 mW at a repetition frequency of 83 MHz.

  14. Observation of n=1 Resistive Interchange Mode in low-β Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Y.; Ramos, J. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Snipes, J.; Wolfe, S.; Taylor, G.

    1999-11-01

    A localized MHD perturbation, which is identified as a resistive interchange mode, has been observed during the current ramp of Alcator C-Mod, when βN is as low as 0.15. Using two grating polychromators which can cover more than half of the whole plasma profile, very localized (within 2cm) Te fluctuations were observed in the core region, which has a hollow equilibrium Te profile. Based on magnetic diagnostics, the toroidal mode number is n=1. The pressure gradients at the channels where the fluctuations were observed were positive (p^' >0) and they were located close to an inner rational surface of the reversed q-profile with q = 5. According to resistive interchange mode theory(GLASSER, A.H. et al., Phys. Fluids. 19) (1976) 567, such a hollow pressure profile with q > 1 in a low-β plasma can be unstable. A resistive MHD analysis of this equilibrium, using the MARS(BONDESON, A. et al, Phys. Fluids B4) (1992) 1889 code, predicts such an unstable mode with toroidal mode number, n=1. Unlike DIII-D observations(CHU, M.S. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 )(1996) 2710, this resistive interchange mode during low-β plasma is due to the inverted pressure gradient in the core, not to high β.

  15. Passively mode-locking erbium-doped fiber lasers with 0.3 nm single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xintong; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Ling; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Yongqin; Zhang, Min; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2014-10-24

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by using the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a diameter of 0.3 nm as the saturable absorber. These ultrasmall SWNTs are fabricated in the elliptical nanochannels of a ZnAPO₄-11 (AEL) single crystal. By placing an AEL crystal into an EDFL cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode, stable passive mode-locking is achieved for a threshold pump power of 280 mW, and 73 ps pulses at 1563.2 nm with a repetition rate of 26.79 MHz.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 Can Use Depsi-Lipid II Derived from Vancomycin-Resistant Strains for Cell Wall Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Jun; Yamashiro, Hidenori; Miya, Hiroto; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Maki, Hideki; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2013-09-02

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (VRSA) uses depsipeptide-containing modified cell-wall precursors for the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Transglycosylase is responsible for the polymerization of the peptidoglycan, and the penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) plays a major role in the polymerization among several transglycosylases of wild-type S. aureus. However, it is unclear whether VRSA processes the depsipeptide-containing peptidoglycan precursor by using PBP2. Here, we describe the total synthesis of depsi-lipid I, a cell-wall precursor of VRSA. By using this chemistry, we prepared a depsi-lipid II analogue as substrate for a cell-free transglycosylation system. The reconstituted system revealed that the PBP2 of S. aureus is able to process a depsi-lipid II intermediate as efficiently as its normal substrate. Moreover, the system was successfully used to demonstrate the difference in the mode of action of the two antibiotics moenomycin and vancomycin.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 Can Use Depsi-Lipid II Derived from Vancomycin-Resistant Strains for Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Yamashiro, Hidenori; Miya, Hiroto; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Maki, Hideki; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (VRSA) uses depsipeptide-containing modified cell-wall precursors for the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Transglycosylase is responsible for the polymerization of the peptidoglycan, and the penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) plays a major role in the polymerization among several transglycosylases of wild-type S. aureus. However, it is unclear whether VRSA processes the depsipeptide-containing peptidoglycan precursor by using PBP2. Here, we describe the total synthesis of depsi-lipid I, a cell-wall precursor of VRSA. By using this chemistry, we prepared a depsi-lipid II analogue as substrate for a cell-free transglycosylation system. The reconstituted system revealed that the PBP2 of S. aureus is able to process a depsi-lipid II intermediate as efficiently as its normal substrate. Moreover, the system was successfully used to demonstrate the difference in the mode of action of the two antibiotics moenomycin and vancomycin. PMID:23873669

  18. Mycolic Acid Cyclopropanation is Essential for Viability, Drug Resistance, and Cell Wall Integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Daniel; Liu, Zhen; Sacchettini, James C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains a major global health problem complicated by escalating rates of antibiotic resistance. Despite the established role of mycolic acid cyclopropane modification in pathogenesis, the feasibility of targeting this enzyme family for antibiotic development is unknown. We show through genetics and chemical biology that mycolic acid methyltransferases are essential for M. tuberculosis viability, cell wall structure, and intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. The tool compound dioctylamine, which we show acts as a substrate mimic, directly inhibits the function of multiple mycolic acid methyltransferases, resulting in loss of cyclopropanation, cell death, loss of acid fastness, and synergistic killing with isoniazid and ciprofloxacin. These results demonstrate that mycolic acid methyltransferases are a promising antibiotic target and that a family of virulence factors can be chemically inhibited with effects not anticipated from studies of each individual enzyme.

  19. The Changing Paradigm of Outflow Resistance Generation: Towards Synergistic Models of the JCT and Inner Wall Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Darryl R.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous humor outflow resistance is the primary determinant of intraocular pressure (IOP), and increased outflow resistance is the basis for elevated IOP associated with glaucoma. Experimental evidence suggests that the bulk of outflow resistance is generated in the vicinity of the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal, its basement membrane and the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT). However, attempts to sort out the contribution of each of these tissues to total outflow resistance have not been successful. Conventional understanding of outflow resistance assumes that the resistance of each tissue strata (i.e., the inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and JCT) in the outflow pathway adds in series to contribute to total outflow resistance generation. However, this perspective leads to a paradox where the apparent resistances of all tissues in the outflow pathway are much lower than the measured total resistance. To resolve this paradox, we explore synergistic models of outflow resistance generation where hydrodynamic interactions between different tissue strata lead to a total resistance that is greater than the sum of the individual tissue resistances. We closely examine the “funneling” hypothesis that has emerged as a leading synergistic model, and we review the basis of funneling, mechanical and biological requirements for funneling and evidence in support of this hypothesis. We also propose refinements to the funneling model and describe how funneling may relate to segmental variability of aqueous humor outflow patterns observed within the trabecular meshwork. Pressure gradients across the JCT and inner wall endothelium will generate mechanical loads that influence the morphology of these tissues. Because tissue morphology may in turn affect outflow resistance, there exists the potential for a two-way coupling or a “fluid-solid interaction” between outflow hydrodynamics and the mechanical behavior of the inner wall and JCT

  20. Fast magnetic reconnection driven by intermittent resistive tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Becchaku, M.; Kusano, K.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key process of various bursty phenomena in space plasmas. In general, a magnetic Reynolds number of the space plasma is extremely high. Therefore, since magnetic reconnection rate becomes low as magnetic Reynolds number increases within the framework of the stationary resistive MHD model, kinetic effects have been considered to realize realistic fast magnetic reconnection in modern reconnection models. However, it is thought that the MHD description is valid within a very wide scale range since a scale gap between macro and micro is so large, e.g., in the solar corona, the ratio of macro to micro will be more than 107. In this situation, how an ion-scale thin current sheet can be realized from a macro scale magnetic structure? Conversely, how the microscopic processes can affect macroscopic MHD dynamics? From the analogy of hydrodynamics, we expect that the strong MHD turbulence will be developed in the wide range. Thus, in this case, fast magnetic reconnection might be driven by the turbulence other than the kinetic effects. In this study, a very high-resolution resistive MHD simulation is performed to clarify multi-scale dynamics of the resistive tearing instability at high magnetic Reynolds number. Results show that small scale plasmoids, which seem to have an internal structure by itself, are intermittently created and ejected by the secondary tearing instability. Moreover, it seems that fast magnetic reconnection is achieved by intermittent dynamics of the plasmoids. This might support that the MHD turbulence is essential for fast magnetic reconnection at very high magnetic Reynolds number.

  1. Shear reinforcement effect of reinforced concrete tie-columns on the lateral resistance of confined masonry walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhedja, Samir; Bourzam, Abdelkrim; Boukhaled, Ahmed; Nechnech, Ammar

    2016-06-01

    Tie-columns improve significantly the lateral resistance of masonry bearing walls against persistent, transient and accidental loads. The research work described herein has been carried out to assess the lateral resistance of confined masonry walls, where contribution of the masonry panel is evaluated according to material mechanics and tie-columns effect is estimated by a proposed analytical formulation based on a model reported on previously. This approach takes into account the effect of dowel support on the reaction of its adjacent shear reinforcement: the conditions for the various contributions of transverse reinforcements are better defined following a clear evaluation of the participation ratio of these reinforcements. Lateral resistances of confined masonry walls measured in full-scale tests and gleaned from the literature are compared and checked with resistances calculated using the present approach.

  2. Magnetic domain configurations and huge wall resistivity in half-metallic chromium dioxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaojing

    We have fabricated, studied and compared the electrical and magnetic behavior of several sub-micron-sized polycrystalline and epitaxial chromium dioxide (CrO2) nanostructures, grown using selective-area growth technique. Magnetic domain structures were studied by magnetic force microscopy, and in-plane, lamellar domain structure with fragmented walls aligned along the magnetic easy axis direction have been observed, indicating the existence of a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy in epitaxial CrO2 nanostructures. Low-temperature transport measurements on nanowires have shown that the dc resistivity of polycrystalline CrO2 wires is strongly dependent on the linewidth. Below a critical temperature, a transition from a positive to a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity have been observed, which we attribute to a competition between the scattering of the conduction electrons inside the grains and scattering across the grain boundaries. Using a model based on grain boundary scattering, we estimate a mean transmission probability through the grain boundaries to be on the order of 10-1 . Furthermore, magnetoresistance (MR) measurement indicates that the MR behavior of polycrystalline CrO2 wires is dominated by the shape anisotropy; however, for epitaxial CrO2 wires, both the shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy play important roles, and the resulting MR properties are found to be closely related to the orientation of the wire axis. By studying the MR curves, we inferred the internal magnetic domain structures in various single crystal CrO2 wires and found that the spin-dependent transport is much stronger across a grain boundary than a magnetic domain wall. We have also studied the magnetotransport properties of CrO2 nanoscale continuous contacts. Manipulating the domain walls using a large dc current in the contact area yields a magnetoresistance of up to 25%, which is the largest ever seen in a single ferromagnetic film. The single domain-wall-resistance

  3. Mode of Action of the Polyene Antibiotic Candicidin: Binding Factors in the Wall of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. M.; Kliger, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    The polyene antibiotic candicidin produces a rapid efflux of K+ ions from a suspension of Candida albicans. Onset of K+ leakage depends on the culture age, stationary-phase yeasts leaking K+ more slowly than exponential-phase yeasts. The time taken for potassium leakage to begin represents the time taken by the antibiotic to cross the cell wall and produce membrane damage. It was shown that there were factors in the cell wall of C. albicans that increased their total binding capacity and their affinity for candicidin during growth. An attempt was made to relate changes in the lipid content of the yeast cell with the increased time taken to produce membrane damage. PMID:773298

  4. Braking of Tearing Mode Rotation by Ferromagnetic Conducting Walls in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the braking of tearing mode rotation in tokamak plasmas via eddy currents induced in external ferromagnetic conducting structures is performed. In general, there is a ``forbidden band'' of tearing mode rotation frequencies that separates a branch of high-frequency solutions from a branch of low-frequency solutions. When a high-frequency solution crosses the upper boundary of the forbidden band there is a bifurcation to a low-frequency solution, and vice versa. The bifurcation thresholds predicted by simple torque-balance theory (which takes into account the electromagnetic braking torque acting on the plasma, as well as the plasma viscous restoring torque, but neglects plasma inertia) are found to be essentially the same as those predicted by more complicated time-dependent mode braking theory (which takes inertia into account). Significant ferromagnetism causes otherwise electromagnetically thin conducting structures to become electromagnetically thick, and also markedly decreases the critical tearing mode amplitude above which the mode ``locks'' to the conducting structures (i.e., the high-frequency to low-frequency bifurcation is triggered). This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  5. Interaction between static magnetic islands and interchange modes in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kinya; Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    2010-06-15

    Fundamental mechanism of the nonlinear interaction between static magnetic islands generated by an external field and a resistive interchange mode is investigated in a straight heliotron plasma with high resistivity by using a numerical method based on the reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations. The behavior of the magnetic islands is examined at the steady state after the nonlinear saturation of the interchange mode. The width and the phase of the magnetic islands are changed by the mode evolution. These changes are almost determined by the linear combination of the two perturbed poloidal magnetic fluxes, the flux imposed externally and the flux attributed to the interchange mode, in spite of the fact that the changes result from the nonlinear process. It is also obtained that the amount of the local change of the pressure at the resonant surface in the saturation state depends on the phase of the static magnetic islands.

  6. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-12-10

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  7. Empirical Mode Decomposition and k-Nearest Embedding Vectors for Timely Analyses of Antibiotic Resistance Trends

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. Objective To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. Methods We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. Results The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. Conclusion The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends. PMID:23637796

  8. Empirical mode decomposition and k-nearest embedding vectors for timely analyses of antibiotic resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends.

  9. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-07

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  10. Using surface and cross-hole resistivity tomography in an urban environment: An example of imaging the foundations of the ancient wall in Thessaloniki, North Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokas, G. N.; Tsourlos, P. I.; Vargemezis, G. N.; Pazaras, N. Th.

    This work describes the application of the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technique, in both surface and cross-hole modes, for subsurface exploration in an urban environment. The objective was to image the foundations of the Thessaloniki city walls (Region of Macedonia, North Greece) at locations that will be affected by the construction of a new underground Metro line. The surface ERT survey was performed along lines crossing directly over the wall on areas where it had partly collapsed. ERT surveys were also applied at places where the main over ground structure of the walls had been completely destroyed and what is left now is primarily only the ancient subsurface foundations. In addition, the present day ground surface is partially covered by concrete pavement slabs. In both cases, nonconventional electrodes were partially used to carry out a number of ERTs on the ground surface. This was necessary in order not to destroy the pavement slabs and most importantly not to damage in any way the monuments. An example of cross-hole ERT is also presented. Cross-hole ERTs were conducted because detailed measurements employing surface ERT were not possible due to limitations imposed by the urban environment. The way that the boreholes were instrumented is also presented. The combined surface and borehole tomographies produced images of the buried structures allowing the assessment of their geometrical shape and of the dimensions of the foundations of the ancient wall.

  11. Vasodilatation with pinacidil. Mode of action in rat resistance vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Videbaek, L.M.; Aalkjaer, C.; Mulvany, M.J. )

    1988-01-01

    Pinacidil is a newly developed antihypertensive vasodilator, proposed to belong to the new group of smooth muscle relaxants, the K+ channel openers. The in vitro effects of pinacidil on induced tone, smooth muscle membrane potential and {sup 86}Rb and {sup 42}K efflux from rat resistance vessels (internal diameter about 200 microns) were studied. Tone induced with noradrenaline was concentration-dependently inhibited by pinacidil. Responses to electrical field stimulation were also inhibited. However, tone induced with high K+ depolarization, noradrenaline in the presence of high K+, caffeine-induced contractions and noradrenaline contractions in the presence of felodipine were little affected by pinacidil. Pinacidil caused concentration-dependent hyperpolarisation of the resting smooth muscle. Pinacidil caused only a small and transient increase of the {sup 86}Rb efflux rate constant, while the same concentrations of pinacidil produced a significant increase in the {sup 42}K efflux rate constant. Our results seem to indicate that the relaxant effect of pinacidil is the result of an increase in K+ permeability, thus causing hyperpolarisation and relaxation. The opened K+ channels appear to be selective for K+ over Rb+.

  12. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  13. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  14. Nonlinear evolution of the first mode supersonic oblique waves in compressible boundary layers. Part 1: Heated/cooled walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of an oblique mode propagating in a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer is considered under the long wave-length approximation. The growth rate of the wave is assumed to be small so that the concept of unsteady nonlinear critical layers can be used. It is shown that the spatial/temporal evolution of the mode is governed by a pair of coupled unsteady nonlinear equations for the disturbance vorticity and density. Expressions for the linear growth rate show clearly the effects of wall heating and cooling and in particular how heating destabilizes the boundary layer for these long wavelength inviscid modes at O(1) Mach numbers. A generalized expression for the linear growth rate is obtained and is shown to compare very well for a range of frequencies and wave-angles at moderate Mach numbers with full numerical solutions of the linear stability problem. The numerical solution of the nonlinear unsteady critical layer problem using a novel method based on Fourier decomposition and Chebychev collocation is discussed and some results are presented.

  15. Use of an experimental model to evaluate infection resistance of meshes in abdominal wall surgery.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Lévano-Linares, C; Celdrán-Uriarte, Á; Isea-Peña, M C; De Molina, M Sánchez; García-Vasquez, C; Esteban-Moreno, J

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcal species are the most common organisms causing prosthetic mesh infections, however, infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria are increasing. This study evaluates the resistance of biomaterial for abdominal wall prostheses against the development of postoperative infection in a rat model. In 75 rats, we intramuscularly implanted three different types of prostheses: (1) low-density polypropylene monofilament mesh (PMM), (2) high-density PMM, and (3) a composite prosthesis composed of low-density PMM and a nonporous hydrophilic film. Meshes were inoculated with a suspension containing 10(8) colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, or Mycobacterium abscessus before wound closure. Animals were sacrificed on the eighth day postoperatively for clinical evaluation, and the implants were removed for bacteriologic analyses. Prostheses infected with S aureus showed a higher bacterial viability, worse integration, and clinical outcome compared with infection by other bacteria. Composite prostheses showed a higher number of viable colonies of both M fortuitum and Staphylococcus spp., with poorer integration in host tissue. However, when the composite prosthesis was infected with M abscessus, a lower number of viable bacteria were isolated and a better integration was observed compared with infection by other bacteria. Considering M abscessus, a smaller collagen-free contact surface shows better resistance to infection, however, depending on the type of bacteria, prostheses with a large surface, and covered with collagen shows reduced resistance to infection, worse integration, and worse clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dual-mode self-validating resistance/Johnson noise thermometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, Robert L.; Blalock, Theron V.; Roberts, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    A dual-mode Johnson noise and DC resistance thermometer capable of use in control systems where prompt indications of temperature changes and long term accuracy are needed. A resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) tuned circuit produces a continuous voltage signal for Johnson noise temperature measurement. The RLC circuit provides a mean-squared noise voltage that depends only on the capacitance used and the temperature of the sensor. The sensor has four leads for simultaneous coupling to a noise signal processor and to a DC resistance signal processor.

  17. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  18. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  19. Influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes, dubbed ''fishbones'' in the literature, explored. A general dispersion relation, which recovers the ideal theory in its appropriate limit, is derived and analyzed. Implications of the theory for present generation fusion devices such as the Joint European Torus are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Impact of divertor geometry on H-mode confinement in the JET metallic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffrin, E.; Tamain, P.; Belonohy, E.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Challis, C. D.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Dodt, D.; Frassinetti, L.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Hobirk, J.; Jarvinen, A. E.; Kim, H.-T.; Koechl, F.; Kruezi, U.; Lipschutz, B.; Lomas, P. J.; de la Luna, E.; Loarer, T.; Maget, P.; Maggi, C.; Matthews, G.; Maviglia, F.; Meigs, A.; Nunes, I.; Pucella, G.; Rimini, F.; Saarelma, S.; Solano, E.; Sips, A. C. C.; Tsalas, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Weisen, H.; JET Contributors, the

    2017-08-01

    Recent experiments with the ITER-like wall have demonstrated that changes in divertor strike point position are correlated with strong modification of the global energy confinement. The impact on energy confinement is observable both on the pedestal confinement and core normalised gradients. The corner configuration shows an increased core density gradient length and ion pressure indicating a better ion confinement. The study of neutral re-circulation indicates the neutral pressure in the main chamber varies inversely with the energy confinement and a correlation between the pedestal total pressure and the neutral pressure in the main chamber can be established. It does not appear that charge exchange losses nor momentum losses could explain this effect, but it may be that changes in edge electric potential are playing a role at the plasma edge. This study emphasizes the importance of the scrape-off layer (SOL) conditions on the pedestal and core confinement.

  1. Cell wall elongation mode in Gram-negative bacteria is determined by peptidoglycan architecture.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert D; Hurd, Alexander F; Cadby, Ashley; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Cellular integrity and morphology of most bacteria is maintained by cell wall peptidoglycan, the target of antibiotics essential in modern healthcare. It consists of glycan strands, cross-linked by peptides, whose arrangement determines cell shape, prevents lysis due to turgor pressure and yet remains dynamic to allow insertion of new material, and hence growth. The cellular architecture and insertion pattern of peptidoglycan have remained elusive. Here we determine the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics during growth in rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Peptidoglycan is made up of circumferentially oriented bands of material interspersed with a more porous network. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals an unexpected discontinuous, patchy synthesis pattern. We present a consolidated model of growth via architecture-regulated insertion, where we propose only the more porous regions of the peptidoglycan network that are permissive for synthesis.

  2. Cell wall elongation mode in Gram-negative bacteria is determined by peptidoglycan architecture

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Robert D.; Hurd, Alexander F.; Cadby, Ashley; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Foster, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular integrity and morphology of most bacteria is maintained by cell wall peptidoglycan, the target of antibiotics essential in modern healthcare. It consists of glycan strands, cross-linked by peptides, whose arrangement determines cell shape, prevents lysis due to turgor pressure and yet remains dynamic to allow insertion of new material, and hence growth. The cellular architecture and insertion pattern of peptidoglycan have remained elusive. Here we determine the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics during growth in rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Peptidoglycan is made up of circumferentially oriented bands of material interspersed with a more porous network. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals an unexpected discontinuous, patchy synthesis pattern. We present a consolidated model of growth via architecture-regulated insertion, where we propose only the more porous regions of the peptidoglycan network that are permissive for synthesis. PMID:23422664

  3. Screening of the resistive-wall impedance by a cylindrical electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khateeb, A.; Hasse, R. W.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hofmann, I.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of an electron cloud on the longitudinal coupling impedance is studied by idealizing it as a cold and uniformly distributed non-neutral plasma of electrons. The beam pipe is assumed to be of circular cross section with a thick resistive wall and the beam charge is idealized as a uniform disk. The electron contribution to the charge and current densities is obtained from the collective electron response to the beam passage through the pipe. In the presence of the electron background, a general closed formula for the longitudinal coupling impedance is obtained. The screening of the coupling impedance with the density of the electron plasma is studied and discussed for typical parameters in an accelerator beam pipe for the under-dense and the over-dense plasma regions.

  4. Resistive-wall impedance effects for the new KEK Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.

    2017-07-01

    Effects of resistive-wall (RW) impedance on a 3-GeV storage ring of the KEK Light Source (KEK-LS) are presented. Cu sheets used for in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) are regarded as the main source of the RW impedance. Although the calculated heating power per unit length due to the longitudinal impedance is more than 20 W, it is not serious for the water-cooled IVUs. The maximum growth rate of the coupled-bunch instability caused by the transverse impedance is calculated and as a result, a transverse feedback system with the damping rate of more than 104 s-1 is required for the instability suppression. NEG coating of about 1 μm can be used for the KEK-LS vacuum pipe because increase of the heating power due to the NEG coating impedance is small and the effect on the transverse coupled-bunch instability is negligible.

  5. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Cell wall polysaccharide synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains in oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Briolay, Anne; Bouzenzana, Jamel; Guichardant, Michel; Deshayes, Christian; Sindt, Nicolas; Bessueille, Laurence; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The pathways responsible for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis are vital in eukaryotic microorganisms. The corresponding synthases are potential targets of inhibitors such as fungicides. Despite their fundamental and economical importance, most polysaccharide synthases are not well characterized, and their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. With the example of Saprolegnia monoica as a model organism, we show that chitin and (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) in oomycetes, a phylum that comprises some of the most devastating microorganisms in the agriculture and aquaculture industries. Interestingly, no cellulose synthase activity was detected in the DRMs. The purified DRMs exhibited similar biochemical features as lipid rafts from animal, plant, and yeast cells, although they contained some species-specific lipids. This report sheds light on the lipid environment of the (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan and chitin synthases, as well as on the sterol biosynthetic pathways in oomycetes. The results presented here are consistent with a function of lipid rafts in cell polarization and as platforms for sorting specific sets of proteins targeted to the plasma membrane, such as carbohydrate synthases. The involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of major cell wall polysaccharides in eukaryotic microorganisms suggests a function of lipid rafts in hyphal morphogenesis and tip growth.

  7. The role of resistivity on line-tied kink modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, G. L.; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, J. M.

    2007-07-15

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on linear line-tied kink modes is presented in cylindrical geometry. A region near marginal stability, where the line-tied system is stable in ideal magnetohydrodynamics but unstable with resistivity, is shown. In this region, the growth rate is found to be proportional to resistivity. There is no signature of the tearing-like scaling, which occurs in the corresponding system with periodic boundary conditions, or of the formation of boundary layers near the end plates. Instead, the resistive scaling is due to global resistivity, leading to imperfect line-tying. This feature is common to equilibrium pitch profiles that increase or decrease monotonically with radius and is not influenced by viscosity.

  8. Modes and balance of energy in the piezoelectric cochlear outer hair cell wall.

    PubMed

    Spector, Alexander A; Jean, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    Here, we analyze energy transformations in the outer hair cell and its effectiveness as a piezoelectric-type actuator in the cochlea. The major modes of energy are introduced, and a method to estimate the coefficients of their tension-dependence is proposed. Next, we derive balance of the mechanical and electrical parts of energy, and show two forms of the active energy associated with the motors driving electromotility. The two forms of the active energy, stored mechanical energy, and external electrical work are then introduced as functions of voltage and applied force. We use the energy balance to introduce and estimate the effectiveness of the cell's electromotile response.

  9. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  10. Correlation of Neutral Beam Injection Parameters and Core B with Anomalous First-Wall Heating During QH-Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Rhodes, T; VanZeeland, M; Watkins, J

    2006-05-15

    Anomalous first-wall heating has been observed far from the divertor strike point during QH-mode in DIII-D, with measured heat flux comparable to that at the outer strike point. The data are consistent with deuterium ions of approximately the pedestal energy carrying the anomalous heat flux. Although an instability has not been identified that is correlated with the anomalous heat flux, two classes of behavior have been observed: one in which the anomalous heat flux depends linearly on core {beta}, and another class with no {beta}-dependence. The anomalous heat flux depends strongly on the injected beam energy of the non-tangentially-injected neutral beams but not that of the tangential beams.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  12. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  13. Nonpolar resistive memory switching with all four possible resistive switching modes in amorphous LaHoO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Fachini, Esteban; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the resistive memory switching in pulsed laser deposited amorphous LaHoO3 (a-LHO) thin films for non-volatile resistive random access memory applications. Nonpolar resistive switching (RS) was achieved in Pt/a-LHO/Pt memory cells with all four possible RS modes (i.e., positive unipolar, positive bipolar, negative unipolar, and negative bipolar) having high RON/ROFF ratios (in the range of ˜104-105) and non-overlapping switching voltages (set voltage, VON ˜ ±3.6-4.2 V and reset voltage, VOFF ˜ ±1.3-1.6 V) with a small variation of about ±5-8%. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics indicated the metallic conduction in low resistance states (LRS). We believe that the formation (set) and rupture (reset) of mixed conducting filaments formed out of oxygen vacancies and metallic Ho atoms could be responsible for the change in the resistance states of the memory cell. Detailed analysis of I-V characteristics further corroborated the formation of conductive nanofilaments based on metal-like (Ohmic) conduction in LRS. Simmons-Schottky emission was found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism in the high resistance state.

  14. Investigation of oxidation resistance of carbon based first-wall liner materials of fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H. K.; Krüssenberg, A.-K.; Stauch, B.; Wu, C. H.

    1994-09-01

    One important aspect in selection of carbon based first-wall liner materials in fusion reactors is a sufficient oxidation resistance against steam and oxygen; this is because during accidents like loss of coolant into vacuum or loss of vacuum these oxidizing media can enter the vacuum vessel and may cause some corrosion of carbon followed by release of adsorbed tritium; in addition other consequences of oxidation like formation of burnable gases and their explosions have to be examined. Based on extensive experience on nuclear graphite oxidation in HTRs KFA has started in cooperation with NET some experimental investigations on oxidation of fusion reactor carbons. Results of first experiments on CFCs, Ti- and Si-doped carbons and graphites in steam (1273-1423 K) and oxygen (973 K) are reported. It was found that most materials have a similar reactivity as HTR nuclear graphites (which is much smaller than those of usual technical carbons); Si-doped CFCs however have a remarkably better oxidation resistance than those, which is probably due to the formation of a protecting layer of SiO 2. The measured kinetic data will be used in safety analyses for above mentioned accidents.

  15. Contact resistance of multi-walled carbon nanotube/natural rubber nanocomposites with metallic ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Tomoyoshi; Fujishige, Masatsugu; Noguchi, Toru; Ueki, Hiroyuki; Niihara, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on the contact resistance (Rc) between carbon filler/natural rubber (NR) nanocomposite and gold ball: three varieties of nanocomposites were prepared from carbon black (CB) and two kinds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different diameter. Rc of MWCNT/NR nanocomposite was remarkably less than that of CB/NR nanocomposites. The relationship between Rc of MWCNT/NR nanocomposites and applied load was expressed in the formula, Rc=C·P-n (P: load, C and n: constant): for the MWCNTs (diameters of 13 nm)/NR and MWCNTs (diameters of 67 nm)/ NR nanocomposites, they were expressed as Rc=1724·P-0.6 and Rc=344·P-0.37, respectively. The former (MWCNT, ϕ13 nm) showed higher Rc than the latter (MWCNT, ϕ67 nm) over whole region of applied load. The mechanical hardness of the former was higher (90 HsA) than that of the latter (82 HsA). Therefore, the smaller contact area between the nanocomposite and gold ball of the former resulted in higher Rc. The apparent specific contact resistivity was calculated from the observed values of Rc and contact area: 130 Ω mm2 and 127 Ω mm2 for the former (MWCNT, ϕ13 nm) and the latter (MWCNT, ϕ67 nm), respectively.

  16. Contact-damage-resistant ceramic/single-wall carbon nanotubes and ceramic/graphite composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotong; Padture, Nitin P; Tanaka, Hidehiko

    2004-08-01

    There has been growing interest in incorporating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as toughening agents in brittle ceramics. Here we have prepared dense Al(2)O(3)/SWNT composites using the spark-plasma sintering (SPS) method. Vickers (sharp) and Hertzian (blunt) indentation tests reveal that these composites are highly contact-damage resistant, as shown by the lack of crack formation. However, direct toughness measurements, using the single-edge V-notch beam method, show that these composites are as brittle as dense Al(2)O(3) (having a toughness of 3.22 MPa m(0.5)). This type of unusual mechanical behaviour was also observed in SPS-processed, dense Al(2)O(3)/graphite composites. We argue that the highly shear-deformable SWNTs or graphite heterogeneities in the composites help redistribute the stress field under indentation, imparting the composites with contact-damage resistance. These composites may find use in engineering and biomedical applications where contact loading is important.

  17. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  18. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  19. Comparison of shear flow formation between resonant and non-resonant resistive interchange modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unemura, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-11-01

    It is known that the poloidal shear flow is produced from the nonlinear resistive interchange modes(A. Hasegawa and M. Wakatani, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59) 1581 (1987)(B.A. Carreras and V. E. Lynch, Phys. Fluids B 5) 1795 (1993). Since the non-resonant resistive modes also become unstable(K. Ichiguchi, Y. Nakamura and M. Wakatani, Nucl. Fusion 31) 2073 (1991), the nonlinear behavior is compared between the resonant and non-resonant modes from the point of view of poloidal flow formation. For understanding the difference, we studied single helicity (m,n)=(3,2) mode in a cylindrical geometry.Rotational transform profile, ι(r), was changed. First, we assumed ι(r)=0.51+0.39r^2, and increased ι(0). This change represents a finite beta effect in currentless stellarators. When the resonant surface exists with ι(r_s)=2/3, the poloidal flow are created near the resonant surface. And, in the case when no resonant surface exists but ι_min ~ 2/3, the non-resonant (3,2) mode grows and poloidal shear flow is also generated; however, the magnitude decreases sharply with the increase of ι_min.

  20. The effects of differential flow between rational surfaces on toroidal resistive MHD modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Dylan; Halfmoon, Michael; Rhodes, Dov; Cole, Andrew; Okabayashi, Michio; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Finn, John

    2016-10-01

    Differential flow between resonant surfaces can strongly affect the coupling and penetration of resonant components of resistive modes, and yet this mechanism is not yet fully understood. This study focuses on the evolution of tearing instabilities and the penetration of imposed resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamak configurations relevant to DIII-D and ITER, including equilibrium flow shear. It has been observed on DIII-D that the onset of tearing instabilities leading to disruption is often coincident with a loss of differential rotation between a higher m/n tearing surface (normally the 4/3 or 3/2) and a lower m/n tearing surface (normally the 2/1). Imposing RMPs can strongly affect this coupling and the torques between the modes. We apply the nonlinear 3-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD to study the mechanisms by which these couplings occur. Reduced MHD analyses are applied to study the effects of differential flow between resonant surfaces in the simulations. Interaction between resonant modes can cause significant energy transfer between them, effectively stabilizing one mode while the other grows. The flow mitigates this transfer, but also affects the individual modes. The combination of these effects determines the nonlinear outcome. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-SC0014005 and DE-SC0014119.

  1. Influence of helical external driven current on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2017-06-01

    The influences of helical driven currents on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation are studied by using a three-dimensional toroidal resistive magnetohydrodynamic code (CLT). We carried out three types of helical driven currents: stationary, time-dependent amplitude, and thickness. It is found that the helical driven current is much more efficient than the Gaussian driven current used in our previous study [S. Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 23(5), 052503 (2016)]. The stationary helical driven current cannot persistently control tearing mode instabilities. For the time-dependent helical driven current with f c d = 0.01 and δ c d < 0.04 , the island size can be reduced to its saturated level that is about one third of the initial island size. However, if the total driven current increases to about 7% of the total plasma current, tearing mode instabilities will rebound again due to the excitation of the triple tearing mode. For the helical driven current with time dependent strength and thickness, the reduction speed of the radial perturbation component of the magnetic field increases with an increase in the driven current and then saturates at a quite low level. The tearing mode is always controlled even for a large driven current.

  2. Resistive stability of 2/1 modes near 1/1 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L. L.; Osborne, T. H.; Galkin, S. A.

    2007-05-15

    The stability of resistive modes is examined using reconstructions of experimental equilibria in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], revealing the important physics in mode onset as discharges evolve to instability. Experimental attempts to access the highest {beta} in tokamak discharges, including 'hybrid' discharges, are typically terminated by the growth of a large 2/1 tearing mode. Model equilibria, based on experimental reconstructions from one of these discharges with steady state axial q{sub 0}{approx_equal}1, are generated varying q{sub 0} and pressure. For each equilibrium, the PEST-III code [A. Pletzer, A. Bondeson, and R. L. Dewar, J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] is used to determine the ideal magnetohydrodynamic solution including both tearing and interchange parities. This outer region solution must be matched to the resistive inner layer solutions at the rational surface to determine resistive mode stability. From this analysis it is found that the approach to q=1 simultaneously causes the 2/1 mode to become unstable and the nonresonant 1/1 displacement to become large, as the ideal {beta} limit rapidly decreases toward the experimental value. However, the 2/2 harmonic on axis, which is also large and is coupled to the saturated steady state 3/2 mode, is thought to contribute to the current drive sustaining q{sub 0} above 1 in these hybrid discharges. Thus, the approach to the q=1 resonance is self-limiting in this context. This work suggests that sustaining q{sub 0} slightly above 1 will avoid the 2/1 instability and will allow access to significantly higher {beta} values in these discharges.

  3. Passive mode locking in a Ti:sapphire laser using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber at a wavelength of 810 nm.

    PubMed

    Khudyakov, Dmitry V; Lobach, Anatoly S; Nadtochenko, Viktor A

    2010-08-15

    We report mode locking in a Ti:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser at the wavelength of 810 nm using a polymer film with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) applied as a saturable absorber. Pulses with 600 fs duration and 0.4 nJ energy were generated from the Ti:Sa laser with polymer-SWNT composite film for cw passive mode locking.

  4. Cell Wall Biomolecular Composition Plays a Potential Role in the Host Type II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Lahlali, Rachid; Kumar, Saroj; Wang, Lipu; Forseille, Li; Sylvain, Nicole; Korbas, Malgorzata; Muir, David; Swerhone, George; Lawrence, John R.; Fobert, Pierre R.; Peng, Gary; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease of wheat worldwide. Cultivar resistance to FHB depends on biochemical factors that confine the pathogen spread in spikes. Breeding for cultivar resistance is considered the most practical way to manage this disease. In this study, different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques were applied to discriminate resistance in wheat genotypes against FHB. Synchrotron-based spectroscopy and imaging techniques, including focal plane array infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were used to understand changes in biochemical and nutrients in rachis following FHB infection. Sumai3 and Muchmore were used to represent resistant and susceptible cultivars to FHB, respectively, in this study. The histological comparison of rachis showed substantial differences in the cell wall thickness between the cultivars after infection. Synchrotron-based infrared imaging emphasized substantial difference in biochemical composition of rachis samples between the two cultivars prior to visible symptoms; in the resistant Sumai3, infrared bands representing lignin and hemicellulose were stronger and more persistent compared to the susceptible cultivar. These bands may be the candidates of biochemical markers for FHB resistance. Focal plane array infrared imaging (FPA) spectra from the rachis epidermis and vascular bundles revealed a new band (1710 cm−1) related to the oxidative stress on the susceptible cultivar only. XRF spectroscopy data revealed differences in nutrients composition between cultivars, and between controls and inoculated samples, with substantial increases observed for Ca, K, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si in the resistant cultivar. These nutrients are related to cell wall stability, metabolic process, and plant defense mechanisms such as lignification pathway and callose deposition. The combination of cell wall composition and lignification plays a role in the mechanism of type II host resistance to FHB. Biochemical profiling

  5. Effects of Failure Modes on Strength of Aluminum Resistance Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Davies, Richard W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Spinella, Donald J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of failure modes on the static strength and total energy absorption of aluminum spot-welded samples using experimental, statistical, and analytical approaches. The main failure modes for aluminum spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Two populations of aluminum spot welds were studied. Within each population, coupon configurations of lap shear, cross tension and coach peel were considered. Thirty replicate static strength tests were performed for each coupon configuration. The resulted peak load and energy absorption level associated with each failure mode was studied using statistical models. Next, an analytical model was developed to determine the failure mode of an aluminum resistance spot weld based on stress analysis. It is found that weld size, sheet thickness, and level of weld porosity and defects are the main factors determining the cross tension failure mode for an aluminum spot weld. The peak load and energy absorption levels for the cross tension and coach peel samples tested are found not to be very sensitive to the failure modes under static loading.

  6. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  7. The evolution of resistive ballooning modes in the banana-plateau collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, A.K.; Callen, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The theory of resistive ballooning modes relevant to the banana-plateau collisionality regime is studied using the recently developed neoclassical MHD equations. Employing the ballooning mode formulation and a multiple length scale analysis, a generalized set of poloidal flux surface averaged equations coupling the parallel ion flow velocity V{sub {parallel}i}, the vector potential A{sub {parallel}}, and the electrostatic potential {phi} are derived. A particularly simple case in which the parallel sound wave coupling reduces the order of the differential equation in the frequency range {vert bar}{omega}{vert bar} {much gt} {omega}{sub s}, where {omega}{sub s} = sc{sub s}/qR{sub 0}, s is the shear parameter, c{sub s} the sound speed and qR{sub 0} the connection length, is dealt with. The calculations show that a new class of localized pressure-gradient-driven ballooning modes with growth rates varying as ({upsilon}{sub e} + {mu}{sub e}){sup 1/2} is possible, where {upsilon}{sub e} is the electron collision frequency and {mu}{sub e} is the electron neoclassical poloidal flow viscous damping frequency. It is shown that the resistive ballooning modes are sensitive to variations of a parameter {eta} (= {vert bar} dlnP{sub 0}/dlnq {vert bar}) within the tokamak plasma. The enhanced ion polarization and pinch type currents are found to cause stabilization of resistive modes. Further, our model highlights a smooth transition from the Pfirsch-Schlueter to the (neoclassical) banana-plateau collisionality regimes. The relevance of these results to ISX-B experiments is briefly pointed out. 17 refs.

  8. Explosive Magnetic Reconnection in Double-current Sheet Systems: Ideal versus Resistive Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Hubert

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic reconnection associated with the tearing instability occurring in double-current sheet systems is investigated within the framework of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. A special emphasis on the existence of fast and explosive phases is taken. First, we extend the recent theory on the ideal tearing mode of a single-current sheet to a double-current layer configuration. A linear stability analysis shows that, in long and thin systems with (length to shear layer thickness) aspect ratios scaling as {S}L9/29 (S L being the Lundquist number based on the length scale L), tearing modes can develop on a fast Alfvénic timescale in the asymptotic limit {S}L\\to ∞ . The linear results are confirmed by means of compressible resistive MHD simulations at relatively high S L values (up to 3× {10}6) for different current sheet separations. Moreover, the nonlinear evolution of the ideal double tearing mode (IDTM) exhibits a richer dynamical behavior than its single-tearing counterpart, as a nonlinear explosive growth violently ends up with a disruption when the two current layers interact trough the merging of plasmoids. The final outcome of the system is a relaxation toward a new state, free of magnetic field reversal. The IDTM dynamics is also compared to the resistive double tearing mode dynamics, which develops in similar systems with smaller aspect ratios, ≳ 2π , and exhibits an explosive secondary reconnection, following an initial slow resistive growth phase. Finally, our results are used to discuss the flaring activity in astrophysical magnetically dominated plasmas, with a particular emphasis on pulsar systems.

  9. Influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-06-01

    The influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes, dubbed ''fishbones'' in the literature, is explored. A general dispersion relation, which recovers the ideal theory in its appropriate limit, is derived and analyzed. An important implication of the theory for present generation fusion devices such as the Joint European Torus (Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, London, 1984), Vol I, p.11) is that they will be stable to fishbone activity.

  10. Transform-limited pulse generation in normal cavity dispersion erbium doped single-walled carbon nanotubes mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, M A; Krylov, A A; Ogleznev, A A; Arutyunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D; Dianov, E M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate an erbium doped fiber ring laser mode-locked with a carboxymetylcellulose high-optical quality film with dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The laser with large normal net cavity dispersion generates near bandwidth-limited picosecond inverse modified soliton pulses at 1.56 µm.

  11. Mutations in mmpL and in the cell wall stress stimulon contribute to resistance to oxadiazole antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiaobin; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections, which exhibit broad resistance to various antibiotics. We recently disclosed the discovery of the oxadiazole class of antibiotics, which has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We report herein that MmpL, a putative member of the resistance, nodulation, and cell division (RND) family of proteins, contributes to oxadiazole resistance in the S. aureus strain COL. Through serial passages, we generated two S. aureus COL variants that showed diminished susceptibilities to an oxadiazole antibiotic. The MICs for the oxadiazole against one strain (designated S. aureus COL(I)) increased reproducibly 2-fold (to 4 μg/ml), while against the other strain (S. aureus COL(R)), they increased >4-fold (to >8 μg/ml, the limit of solubility). The COL(R) strain was derived from the COL(I) strain. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 31 mutations in S. aureus COL(R), of which 29 were shared with COL(I). Consistent with our previous finding that oxadiazole antibiotics inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, we found 13 mutations that occurred either in structural genes or in promoters of the genes of the cell wall stress stimulon. Two unique mutations in S. aureus COL(R) were substitutions in two genes that encode the putative thioredoxin (SACOL1794) and MmpL (SACOL2566). A role for mmpL in resistance to oxadiazoles was discerned from gene deletion and complementation experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a cell wall-acting antibiotic selects for mutations in the cell wall stress stimulon and the first to implicate MmpL in resistance to antibiotics in S. aureus.

  12. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  13. Anisotropic electrical resistance in mesoscopic LaAlO3/SrTiO3 devices with individual domain walls.

    PubMed

    Goble, Nicholas J; Akrobetu, Richard; Zaid, Hicham; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Gao, Xuan P A

    2017-03-15

    The crystal structure of bulk SrTiO3(STO) transitions from cubic to tetragonal at around 105 K. Recent local scanning probe measurements of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interfaces indicated the existence of spatially inhomogeneous electrical current paths and electrostatic potential associated with the structural domain formation in the tetragonal phase of STO. Here we report a study of temperature dependent electronic transport in combination with the polarized light microscopy of structural domains in mesoscopic LAO/STO devices. By reducing the size of the conductive interface to be comparable to that of a single tetragonal domain of STO, the anisotropy of interfacial electron conduction in relationship to the domain wall and its direction was characterized between T = 10-300 K. It was found that the four-point resistance measured with current parallel to the domain wall is larger than the resistance measured perpendicular to the domain wall. This observation is qualitatively consistent with the current diverting effect from a more conductive domain wall within the sample. Among all the samples studied, the maximum resistance ratio found is at least 10 and could be as large as 10(5) at T = 10 K. This electronic anisotropy may have implications on other oxide hetero-interfaces and the further understanding of electronic/magnetic phenomena found in LAO/STO.

  14. Anisotropic electrical resistance in mesoscopic LaAlO3/SrTiO3 devices with individual domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Goble, Nicholas J.; Akrobetu, Richard; Zaid, Hicham; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Gao, Xuan P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of bulk SrTiO3(STO) transitions from cubic to tetragonal at around 105 K. Recent local scanning probe measurements of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interfaces indicated the existence of spatially inhomogeneous electrical current paths and electrostatic potential associated with the structural domain formation in the tetragonal phase of STO. Here we report a study of temperature dependent electronic transport in combination with the polarized light microscopy of structural domains in mesoscopic LAO/STO devices. By reducing the size of the conductive interface to be comparable to that of a single tetragonal domain of STO, the anisotropy of interfacial electron conduction in relationship to the domain wall and its direction was characterized between T = 10–300 K. It was found that the four-point resistance measured with current parallel to the domain wall is larger than the resistance measured perpendicular to the domain wall. This observation is qualitatively consistent with the current diverting effect from a more conductive domain wall within the sample. Among all the samples studied, the maximum resistance ratio found is at least 10 and could be as large as 105 at T = 10 K. This electronic anisotropy may have implications on other oxide hetero-interfaces and the further understanding of electronic/magnetic phenomena found in LAO/STO. PMID:28295058

  15. From multidrug-resistant to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Lisbon, Portugal: the stepwise mode of resistance acquisition.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, João; Macedo, Rita; Silva, Carla; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Jordao, Luisa; Portugal, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The development and transmission of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) constitutes a serious threat to the effective control of TB in several countries. Here, in an attempt to further elucidate the dynamics of the acquisition of resistance to second-line drugs and investigate an eventual role for eis promoter mutations in aminoglycoside resistance, we have studied a set of multidrug-resistant (MDR)/XDR-TB isolates circulating in Lisbon, Portugal. Forty-four MDR-TB or XDR-TB isolates were genotyped and screened for mutations in genes associated with second-line drug resistance, namely tlyA, gyrA, rrs and eis. The most prevalent mutations found in each gene were Ins755GT in tlyA, A1401G in rrs, G-10A in eis and S91P in gyrA. Additionally, two genetic clusters were found in this study: Lisboa3 and Q1. The characteristic mutational profile found among recent XDR-TB circulating in Lisbon was also found in MDR-TB strains isolated in the 1990s. Also investigated was the resistance level conferred by eis G-10A mutations, revealing that eis G-10A mutations may result in amikacin resistance undetectable by widely used phenotypic assays. The analysis of the distribution of the mutations found by genetic clustering showed that in the Q1 cluster, two mutations, gyrA D94A and rrs A1401G, were enough to ensure development of XDR-TB from an MDR strain. Moreover, in the Lisboa3 cluster it was possible to elaborate a model in which the development of low-level kanamycin resistance was at the origin of the emergence of XDR-TB strains that can be discriminated by tlyA mutations.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber for a diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Jie; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    A reflective single-walled carbon nanotube as saturable absorber has been firstly adopted to a passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 crystal. Without any dispersion compensation, the stably mode-locked laser delivers pulses with pulse width as short as 1.7 ps, repetition rate of 107.8 MHz and center wavelength of 1056 nm. The oscillator produces maximum average output power of 319 mW corresponding with a high slope efficiency of 20.2%. The single pulse energy and the peak power are 2.96 nJ and 1.74 kW, respectively. The experimental results show that single-walled carbon nanotube is an excellent saturable absorber for mode-locked lasers.

  17. Resistive ballooning modes in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with long mean-free path

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Chen, L.

    1984-08-01

    Tokamak devices normally operate at such high temperatures that the resistive fluid description is inappropriate. In particular, the collision frequency may be low enough for trapped particles to exist. However, on account of the high conductivity of such plasmas, one can identify two separate scale lengths when discussing resistive ballooning modes. By describing plasma motion on one of these, the connection length, in terms of kinetic theory the dynamics of trapped particles can be incorporated. On the resistive scale length, this leads to a description in terms of modified fluid equations in which trapped particle effects appear. The resulting equations are analyzed and the presence of trapped particles is found to modify the stability properties qualitatively.

  18. Dual mode of action of Bt proteins: protoxin efficacy against resistant insects

    PubMed Central

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Zhang, Min; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Yidong; Gao, Meijing; Huang, Fangneng; Wei, Jizhen; Zhang, Jie; Yelich, Alexander; Unnithan, Gopalan C.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario; Carrière, Yves; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins for pest control are grown extensively, but insect adaptation can reduce their effectiveness. Established mode of action models assert that Bt proteins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac are produced as inactive protoxins that require conversion to a smaller activated form to exert toxicity. However, contrary to this widely accepted paradigm, we report evidence from seven resistant strains of three major crop pests showing that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac protoxins were generally more potent than the corresponding activated toxins. Moreover, resistance was higher to activated toxins than protoxins in eight of nine cases evaluated in this study. These data and previously reported results support a new model in which protoxins and activated toxins kill insects via different pathways. Recognizing that protoxins can be more potent than activated toxins against resistant insects may help to enhance and sustain the efficacy of transgenic Bt crops. PMID:26455902

  19. A computational modeling of Raman radial breathing-like mode frequencies of fullerene encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2017-02-01

    Raman radial breathing-like mode (RBLM) frequencies of an infinite nanopeapods are calculated within the framework of a continuum-molecular based model. The nanotube-fullerene interaction is modeled via the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential. An analytical formulation is developed and is justified due to its good agreement with the experimental and atomistic-based results. Furthermore, we propose new relationships for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction coefficients between the atoms of this hybrid nanostructure. Numerical results are also obtained for various nanopeapods on the basis of the present formulation. The RBLM frequency upshifts are predicted for small single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The frequency shifts can be adequately explained by the vdW intermolecular interactions acting between the fullerene and the SWCNTs atoms. To the best of our knowledge, a simple theoretical method which can predict the Raman RBLM frequencies of the nanopeapods with high precision has not been provided hitherto. We believe that the present study is likely to fill the gap.

  20. Micrococcus luteus mediated dual mode synthesis of gold nanoparticles: involvement of extracellular α-amylase and cell wall teichuronic acid.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Pichaimani; Thanalakshmi, Muthukrishnan; Kumar, Priyadarsini; Premkumar, Kumpati

    2013-03-01

    In the present study we have utilized the bioreductive potential of Micrococcus luteus for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Biochemical and physiological analysis indicate that the biosynthesized GNPs were achieved by dual mode, involving extracellular α-amylase and cell wall teichuronic acid (TUA) of M. luteus. The biosynthetic potential of both α-amylase and TUA, after isolation from bacterium, was examined. Under optimum conditions, these biomolecules reduces Au(3+) into Au(0) and the resulting GNPs were found to be stable for 1 month. The synthesized GNPs were characterized by UV-VIS spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results demonstrated that the synthesized GNPs were found to be monodispersive and spherical in shape with an average size of ∼6 nm and ∼50 nm for α-amylase and teichuronic acid, respectively. These findings suggest that M. luteus can be exploited as a potential biosource for the eco-friendly synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wall force produced during disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  2. The rotating wall machine: A device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hannum, D. A.; Kendrick, R.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-12-15

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high {beta} ({<=}p>2{mu}{sub 0}/B{sub z}{sup 2}), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  3. The rotating wall machine: A device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hannum, D. A.; Kendrick, R.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-12-01

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high β ( {le} p> {2μ _0}/{B_z^2}), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  4. The rotating wall machine: a device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldan, C; Bergerson, W F; Brookhart, M I; Hannum, D A; Kendrick, R; Fiksel, G; Forest, C B

    2010-12-01

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high β (≤p>2μ(0)/B(z)(2)), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  5. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Hoon-Sang; CHO, Kyu-Jeong; PARK, Su-Jung; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; HWANG, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Material and Methods Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. Results The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. Conclusion In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity. PMID:24037066

  6. On the magnetic reconnection of resistive tearing mode with the dynamic flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection usually occurs in turbulent environments, which may not only provide anomalous resistivity to enhance reconnection rates but also significantly modify the reconnection process through direct nonlinear interaction with magnetic islands. This study presents numerical simulations investigating the effects of an imposed dynamic flow on magnetic reconnection, based on a two-dimensional reduced resistive MHD model. Results show that while the linear stability properties of the resistive tearing mode are moderately affected by the dynamic flow, nonlinear evolution is significantly modified by radial parity, amplitude, and frequency of the dynamic flow. After the slowly evolving nonlinear Rutherford stage, the reconnection process is found to progress in two phases by including the dynamic flow. A Sweet-Parker like current sheet is formed in the first phase. Afterwards, plasmoid instability is triggered in the second phase, where multiple plasmoids are continuously generated and ejected along the current sheet, leading to an impulsive bursty reconnection. The reconnection rate is considerably enhanced in the range of low resistivity as compared to without flow. We found that plasmoid instability onset and evolution are strongly influenced by the frequency and radial parity of the dynamic flows. The scaling of effective reconnection rates with the flow is found to be independent of resistivity.

  7. On the magnetic reconnection of resistive tearing mode with the dynamic flow effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan Kishimoto, Y.

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic reconnection usually occurs in turbulent environments, which may not only provide anomalous resistivity to enhance reconnection rates but also significantly modify the reconnection process through direct nonlinear interaction with magnetic islands. This study presents numerical simulations investigating the effects of an imposed dynamic flow on magnetic reconnection, based on a two-dimensional reduced resistive MHD model. Results show that while the linear stability properties of the resistive tearing mode are moderately affected by the dynamic flow, nonlinear evolution is significantly modified by radial parity, amplitude, and frequency of the dynamic flow. After the slowly evolving nonlinear Rutherford stage, the reconnection process is found to progress in two phases by including the dynamic flow. A Sweet-Parker like current sheet is formed in the first phase. Afterwards, plasmoid instability is triggered in the second phase, where multiple plasmoids are continuously generated and ejected along the current sheet, leading to an impulsive bursty reconnection. The reconnection rate is considerably enhanced in the range of low resistivity as compared to without flow. We found that plasmoid instability onset and evolution are strongly influenced by the frequency and radial parity of the dynamic flows. The scaling of effective reconnection rates with the flow is found to be independent of resistivity.

  8. Fracture resistance of welded thick-walled high-pressure vessels in power plants. Report No. 1. Statistical analysis of defects and fracture resistance of vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gorynin, I.V.; Filatov, V.M.; Ignatov, V.A.; Timofeev, B.T.; Zvezdin, Yu. I.

    1986-07-01

    Data from plant radiographic inspection of reactor vessels and boilers in power plants of 440- and 1000-MW capacity were subjected to statistical analysis. It was found that, given the current technology for making and constructing 440- and 1000-MW power plants, the limiting defect size in the vessels of the plants is no more than 10% of the wall thickness according to the results of statistical analysis. This finding makes it possible to increase the tolerable stresses by a factor of 1.6 compared to the current estimate of resistance to brittle fracture, which presumes the presence of a semielliptical surface crack of a depth corresponding to 25% of the wall thickness. The fracture resistance of steel increase with a decrease in defect size and as a result of the damping capacity of the anticorrosive hardfacing applied.

  9. Antibiotic resistance modulation and modes of action of (-)-α-pinene in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jasna; Šimunović, Katarina; Wu, Zuowei; Klančnik, Anja; Bucar, Franz; Zhang, Qijing; Možina, Sonja Smole

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mode of action of (-)-α-pinene in terms of its modulation of antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter jejuni. Broth microdilution and ethidium bromide accumulation assays were used to evaluate the (-)-α-pinene antimicrobial activity, modulation of antimicrobial resistance, and inhibition of antimicrobial efflux. The target antimicrobial efflux systems were identified using an insertion mutagenesis approach, and C. jejuni adaptation to (-)-α-pinene was evaluated using DNA microarrays. Knock-out mutants of the key up-regulated transcriptional regulators hspR and hrcA were constructed to investigate their roles in C. jejuni adaptation to several stress factors, including osmolytes, and pH, using Biolog phenotypical microarrays. Our data demonstrate that (-)-α-pinene efficiently modulates antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni by decreasing the minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and triclosan by up to 512-fold. Furthermore, (-)-α-pinene promotes increased expression of cmeABC and another putative antimicrobial efflux gene, Cj1687. The ethidium bromide accumulation was greater in the wild-type strain than in the antimicrobial efflux mutant strains, which indicates that these antimicrobial efflux systems are a target of action of (-)-α-pinene. Additionally, (-)-α-pinene decreases membrane integrity, which suggests that enhanced microbial influx is a secondary mode of action of (-)-α-pinene. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that (-)-α-pinene disrupts multiple metabolic pathways, and particularly those involved in heat-shock responses. Thus, (-)-α-pinene has significant activity in the modulation of antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni, which appears to be mediated by multiple mechanisms that include inhibition of microbial efflux, decreased membrane integrity, and metabolic disruption. These data warrant further studies on (-)-α-pinene to develop its use in the control of antibiotic resistance

  10. Improvement on wear resistance property of polyurethane film by compositing plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are composited into a polyurethane (PU) film. In this journal article, we especially focused on one of mechanical properties of PU film, the wear resistance, to find how the plasma-treated CNTs give contributions to improve the resistance. Our experimental results showed that plasma-treated CNTs enhanced the wear resistance, in particular, when the CNTs treated with the plasma that was made of nitrogen-oxygen mixture gas. Then, we made measurements with infrared absorption spectroscopy to find the possible causes of the improvement. The measurement showed that the surface of the CNTs treated with nitrogen-oxygen plasma had an indication of isocyanate group, which generally hardens PU film. The plasma likely attached the functional group on CNTs, and then the CNTs added extra wear resistance of a polyurethane film.

  11. A temperature correlation for the radiation resistance of a thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Cline, J. G.; Jones, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    It is often useful to know the radiation impedance of an unflanged but thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas into relatively cold surroundings. The reactive component is shown to be insensitive to temperature, but the resistive component is shown to be temperature dependent. A temperature correlation is developed permitting prediction of the radiation resistance from a knowledge of the temperature difference between the ambient air and the gas flowing from the duct, and a physical basis for this correlation is presented.

  12. Effect of wall edge suction on the performance of a short annular dump diffuser with exit passage flow resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of wall edge suction on the performance of a short annular dump diffuser having a perforated plate flow resistance device in the exit passage was evaluated. Testing was conducted with air at near ambient pressure and temperature at inlet Mach numbers of 0.18 and 0.27 with suction rates up to 13.5 percent. Results show that pressure recovery downstream of the perforated plate was improved significantly by suction. Optimum performance was obtained with the flow resistance plate located at one inlet passage height downstream of the dump plane.

  13. L-Rhamnosylation of Listeria monocytogenes Wall Teichoic Acids Promotes Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides by Delaying Interaction with the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filipe; Atilano, Magda L.; Pombinho, Rita; Covas, Gonçalo; Gallo, Richard L.; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic Gram-positive bacterial pathogen responsible for listeriosis, a human foodborne disease. Its cell wall is densely decorated with wall teichoic acids (WTAs), a class of anionic glycopolymers that play key roles in bacterial physiology, including protection against the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In other Gram-positive pathogens, WTA modification by amine-containing groups such as D-alanine was largely correlated with resistance to AMPs. However, in L. monocytogenes, where WTA modification is achieved solely via glycosylation, WTA-associated mechanisms of AMP resistance were unknown. Here, we show that the L-rhamnosylation of L. monocytogenes WTAs relies not only on the rmlACBD locus, which encodes the biosynthetic pathway for L-rhamnose, but also on rmlT encoding a putative rhamnosyltransferase. We demonstrate that this WTA tailoring mechanism promotes resistance to AMPs, unveiling a novel link between WTA glycosylation and bacterial resistance to host defense peptides. Using in vitro binding assays, fluorescence-based techniques and electron microscopy, we show that the presence of L-rhamnosylated WTAs at the surface of L. monocytogenes delays the crossing of the cell wall by AMPs and postpones their contact with the listerial membrane. We propose that WTA L-rhamnosylation promotes L. monocytogenes survival by decreasing the cell wall permeability to AMPs, thus hindering their access and detrimental interaction with the plasma membrane. Strikingly, we reveal a key contribution of WTA L-rhamnosylation for L. monocytogenes virulence in a mouse model of infection. PMID:26001194

  14. Observation and Analysis of Resistive Instabilities in Negative Central Shear in DIII-D Discharges with L-Mode Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Austin, M.E.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Luce, T.C.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.

    2002-07-01

    In DIII-D plasmas with L-mode edge and negative central shear (q{sub axis}-q{sub min} {approx}0.3 to 0.5), an interchange-like instability has been observed [1]. The instability and a subsequent tearing mode cause reduction of the core electron temperature and plasma rotation, and therefore the instability affects discharge evolution and the desired high performance is not achieved. Stability analyses indicate robust ideal stability, while the Resistive Interchange Mode criterion is marginal and the instability appears to be localized initially. Based on this, we believe that the mode is, most likely, a Resistive Interchange Mode. The amplitude of the instability is correlated with the location of the q{sub min} surface and inversely with the fast-ion pressure. There is indication that the interchange-like instability may be ''seeding'' the tearing mode that sometimes follows the interchange-like instability.

  15. Resistance of Membrane Retrofit Concrete Masonry Walls to Lateral Pressure (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    equation is derived for the wall curvature as crack grows: (15) 2R crAlso: O’cr =-- (16) t And: (17) Setting: (18) Then: LlerG = fJ Ller (19...Defense Finite Element gram kiloPascal kilometer per hour meter millimeter Newton Simply Supported University of Alabama at Birmingham Wall

  16. Performance of a Resistive Plate Chamber operated in avalanche mode under 137Cs irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Gianini, G.; Ratti, S. P.; Vitulo, P.

    1997-02-01

    A 2 mm gas gap Resistive Plate Chamber with bakelite plates has been operated in avalanche mode with a 137Cs source. We report measurements of the efficiency for a cosmic ray detection and the charge developed in the gap, performed for two different gas mixtures: the first containing a high percentage of environmental friendly "freon" C 2H 2F 4; the second one having a high percentage of argon. We show that the freon-based mixture exhibits a wide full-efficiency plateau with low streamer probability, while the argon-based mixture allows a reduction in the detector power consumption.

  17. Influence of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-04-01

    Unresolved controversy exists concerning the optimum restorative material to reinforce the thin-walled roots of endodontically treated teeth to improve their fracture resistance under occlusal load. This study evaluated the effectiveness of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on the fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth. The root canals of 140 maxillary central incisors were enlarged and equally divided into seven groups according to the canal irrigant: no irrigant (control), 5% hydrogen peroxide, 5% sodium hypochlorite, a combination of 5% hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite, 15% ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid (EDTA), 10% lactic acid, or 20% lactic acid. Within each group, root canals were lined with composite resin (PermaFlo) or glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). A light-transmitting plastic dowel (Luminex) was used to create space for a quartz fiber-reinforced dowel (Aestheti Post) or a titanium alloy dowel (ParaPost XH) and to cure the restorative materials. Following dowel cementation and restoration of the roots with composite core, the teeth were submitted to fracture resistance testing, and data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test (α= 0.05). Fracture resistance values were significantly different among irrigants, restorative materials, and their interaction (p < 0.001); however, the dowel type was not significantly different (p= 0.51). Thin-walled roots that had the smear layer removed with lactic acid and that were then lined with composite resin had a higher fracture resistance. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Mode Coupling Studies in an RFP with Rotating Helical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamune, Sadao; Iida, Motomi

    2001-10-01

    Nonlinear coupling of m=1 modes play essential roles in RFP dynamics such as field reversal, RFP dynamo and mode locking. In the RFP with a resistve wall, the mode coupling is enhanced because of larger saturation amplitudes of the core resonant tearing modes. The mode coupling usually brings about unfavorable effect on RFP plasmas, and therefore, studies on detailed coupling process is quite important. In this paper, we describe the mode coupling studies from STE-2 RFP (R/a=0.4m/0.1m) with rotating helical field (RHF). This machine is operated with a resistive wall and the effect of external RHF is studied on the dynamics of core resonant tearing modes. In standard RFP plasmas, the magnetic fluctuations are dominated by core resonant m=1/n=7,8,9 tearing modes which grow with the time scale of resistive wall. These modes, usually locked to the wall, start to rotate with application of the RHF when the RHF amplitude is higher than that of the intrinsic mode at the edge. In ULQ plasmas in which there is no m=0 resonant surface and the m=1 modes usually rotate, only a single mode is locked to the wall with application of the static resonant helical field. These results suggest the importance of nonlinear coupling of the m=1 and m=0 modes, and detailed measurements of the dynamics of m=1 and m=0 modes are in progress.

  19. Nitrogen fertilizer application affects lodging resistance by altering secondary cell wall synthesis in japonica rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wujun; Wu, Longmei; Ding, Yanfeng; Yao, Xiong; Wu, Xiaoran; Weng, Fei; Li, Ganghua; Liu, Zhenghui; Tang, She; Ding, Chengqiang; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-09-01

    Stem mechanical strength is an important agricultural quantitative trait that is closely related to lodging resistance in rice, which is known to be reduced by fertilizer with higher levels of nitrogen. To understand the mechanism that regulates stem mechanical strength in response to nitrogen, we analysed stem morphology, anatomy, mechanical properties, cell wall components, and expression of cell wall-related genes, in two varieties of japonica rice, namely, Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistant variety) and W3668 (lodging-susceptible variety). The results showed that higher nitrogen fertilizer increased the lodging index in both varieties due to a reduction in breaking strength and bending stress, and these changes were larger in W3668. Cellulose content decreased slightly under higher nitrogen fertilizer, whereas lignin content reduced remarkably. Histochemical staining revealed that high nitrogen application decreased lignin deposition in the secondary cell wall of the sclerenchyma cells and vascular bundle cells compared with the low nitrogen treatments, while it did not alter the pattern of cellulose deposition in these cells in both Wuyunjing23 and W3668. In addition, the expression of the genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, OsPAL, OsCoMT, Os4CL3, OsCCR, OsCAD2, OsCAD7, OsCesA4, and OsCesA7, were also down-regulated under higher nitrogen conditions at the early stage of culm growth. These results suggest that the genes involved in lignin biosynthesis are down-regulated by higher nitrogen fertilizer, which causes lignin deficiency in the secondary cell walls and the weakening of mechanical tissue structure. Subsequently, this results in these internodes with reduced mechanical strength and poor lodging resistance.

  20. Heat transfer characteristics of walls with similar thermal resistance values. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.C.; Van Geem, M.G.

    1986-06-01

    Heat transfer characteristics of building elements must be known to evaluate energy losses through a building envelope. Laboratory tests of walls for dynamic outdoor temperture conditions provide data that can be used to determine thermal properties. Dynamic testing is particularly important for massive envelope components that store as well as transmit heat. A normal weight concrete wall with board insulation on the outdoor surface was tested in the calibrated hot box facility at the Construction Technology Laboratories, a division of the Portland Cement Association. The wall consisted of 8 in. (200 mm) of normal weight concrete with 5/8-in. (16-mm) polyisocyanurate board insulation bonded to the outdoor surface.

  1. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    PubMed

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested.IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  2. Nonlinear coupling of tearing modes with self-consistent resistivity evolution in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Waddell, B.V.

    1980-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of tearing modes of different helicity is studied for realistic values of the tokamak parameters of resistivity and parallel heat conduction. The self-consistent evolution of the resistivity is taken into account through the electron heat conduction equation. For equilibrium q profiles inferred from electron temperature profile measured before a tokamak disruption, the essential result is that the (m = 2; n = 1) model nonlinearly destabilizes other modes on a rapid time scale. Because of the development of magnetic islands of different helicity, the toroidal current density is severely deformed. These islands overlap and field lines become stochastic in a sizable plasma volume, flattening the temperature profile in this region through parallel heat transport. The deformation of the toroidal current produces a rapid decrease in the self-inductance of the plasma, and the voltage at the limiter decreases, becoming increasingly negative. An extensive survey of equilibria and initial conditions has been conducted, and a simple prescription for their nonlinear stability properties is given.

  3. Spontaneous bacteriocin resistance in Listeria monocytogenes as a susceptibility screen for identifying different mechanisms of resistance and modes of action by bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macwana, Sunita; Muriana, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    A practical system was devised for grouping bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based on mode of action as determined by changes in inhibitory activity to spontaneously-acquired bacteriocin resistance (Bac(R)). Wild type Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 was sensitive to five bacteriocins produced by 3 genera of LAB: pediocin PA-1 and pediocin Bac3 (Pediococcus), lacticin FS97 and lacticin FS56 (Lactococcus), and curvaticin FS47 (Lactobacillus). A spontaneous Bac(R) derivative of L. monocytogenes 39-2 obtained by selective recovery against lacticin FS56 provided complete resistance to the bacteriocin made by Lactococcus lactis FS56. The lacticin FS56-resistant strain of L. monocyotgenes 39-2 was also cross-resistant to curvaticin FS47 and pediocin PA-1, but not to lacticin FS97 or pediocin Bac3. The same pattern of cross-resistance was also observed with Bac(R) isolates obtained with L. monocytogenes Scott A-2. A spontaneous mutation that renders a strain cross-resistant to different bacteriocins indicates that they share a common mechanism of resistance due to similar modes of action of the bacteriocins. Spontaneous resistance was acquired to other bacteriocins (in aggregate) by following the same procedure against which the Bac(R) strain was still sensitive. In subsequent challenge assays, mixtures of bacteriocins of different modes of action provided greater inhibition than mixtures of bacteriocins of the same mode of action (as determined by our screening method). This study identifies a methodical approach to classify bacteriocins into functional groups based on mechanism of resistance (i.e., mode of action) that could be used for identifying the best mixture of bacteriocins for use as biopreservatives.

  4. Cell wall composition and penetration resistance against the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum are affected by impaired starch turnover in Arabidopsis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Will, Cornelia; Hofmann, Jörg; Schmitt, Christine; Merritt, Brian B.; Rieger, Leonie; Frenger, Marc S.; Marschall, André; Franke, Rochus B.; Pattathil, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Penetration resistance represents the first level of plant defense against phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report that the starch-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana phosphoglucomutase (pgm) mutant has impaired penetration resistance against the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum. We could not determine any changes in leaf cutin and epicuticular wax composition or indolic glucosinolate levels, but detected complex alterations in the cell wall monosaccharide composition of pgm. Notably, other mutants deficient in starch biosynthesis (adg1) or mobilization (sex1) had similarly affected cell wall composition and penetration resistance. Glycome profiling analysis showed that both overall cell wall polysaccharide extractability and relative extractability of specific pectin and xylan epitopes were affected in pgm, suggesting extensive structural changes in pgm cell walls. Screening of mutants with alterations in content or modification of specific cell wall monosaccharides indicated an important function of pectic polymers for penetration resistance and hyphal growth of C. higginsianum during the biotrophic interaction phase. While mutants with affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (mur8) were hypersusceptible, penetration frequency and morphology of fungal hyphae were impaired on pmr5 pmr6 mutants with increased pectin levels. Our results reveal a strong impact of starch metabolism on cell wall composition and suggest a link between carbohydrate availability, cell wall pectin and penetration resistance. PMID:28204541

  5. Listeria monocytogenes is resistant to lysozyme through the regulation, not the acquisition, of cell wall-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas P; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas P.; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward genetic screen for lysozyme-sensitive mutants led to the identification of 174 transposon insertion mutations that mapped to 13 individual genes. Four mutants were killed exclusively by lysozyme and not other cell wall-targeting molecules, including the peptidoglycan deacetylase encoded by pgdA, the putative carboxypeptidase encoded by pbpX, the orphan response regulator encoded by degU, and the highly abundant noncoding RNA encoded by rli31. Both degU and rli31 mutants had reduced expression of pbpX and pgdA, yet DegU and Rli31 did not regulate each other. Since pbpX and pgdA are also present in lysozyme-sensitive bacteria, this suggested that the acquisition of novel enzymes was not responsible for lysozyme resistance, but rather, the regulation of conserved enzymes by DegU and Rli31 conferred high lysozyme resistance. Each lysozyme-sensitive mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in mice, and a time course of infection revealed that the most lysozyme-sensitive strain was killed within 30 min of intravenous infection, a phenotype that was recapitulated in purified blood. Collectively, these data indicate that the genes required for lysozyme resistance are highly upregulated determinants of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis that are required for avoiding the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in the blood. PMID:25157076

  7. Bacillus subtilis as a platform for molecular characterisation of regulatory mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chong; Stiegeler, Emanuel; Cook, Gregory M; Mascher, Thorsten; Gebhard, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To combat antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms, particularly of antibiotic detection, signal transduction and gene regulation is needed. Because molecular studies in this bacterium can be challenging, we aimed at exploiting the genetically highly tractable Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis as a heterologous host. Two fundamentally different regulators of E. faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics, the bacitracin sensor BcrR and the vancomycin-sensing two-component system VanSB-VanRB, were produced in B. subtilis and their functions were monitored using target promoters fused to reporter genes (lacZ and luxABCDE). The bacitracin resistance system BcrR-BcrAB of E. faecalis was fully functional in B. subtilis, both regarding regulation of bcrAB expression and resistance mediated by the transporter BcrAB. Removal of intrinsic bacitracin resistance of B. subtilis increased the sensitivity of the system. The lacZ and luxABCDE reporters were found to both offer sensitive detection of promoter induction on solid media, which is useful for screening of large mutant libraries. The VanSB-VanRB system displayed a gradual dose-response behaviour to vancomycin, but only when produced at low levels in the cell. Taken together, our data show that B. subtilis is a well-suited host for the molecular characterization of regulatory systems controlling resistance against cell wall active compounds in E. faecalis. Importantly, B. subtilis facilitates the careful adjustment of expression levels and genetic background required for full functionality of the introduced regulators.

  8. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in WHD and 3.4 ± 0.8% (P < 0.01) in PLA, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.01). Proximal patellar tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.1 ± 3.2% (P = 0.054) for WHD and PLA, respectively, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.05), with no effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P < 0.001) and 12-63% (P < 0.05), respectively, with no group or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as an efficient drug carrier for overcoming multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Jinping; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Sun Yaping; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2011-01-15

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance poses a serious problem in chemotherapy, and new types of transporters have been actively sought to overcome it. In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared and explored as drug carrier to overcome multidrug resistance. The prepared PEGylated MWCNTs penetrated into mammalian cells without damage plasma membrane, and its accumulation did not affect cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. More importantly, PEGylated MWCNTs accumulated in the multidrug-resistant cancer cells as efficient as in the sensitive cancer cells. Intracellular translocation of PEGylated MWCNTs was visualized in both multidrug-resistant HepG2-DR cells and sensitive HepG2 cells, as judged by both fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. PEGylated MWCNTs targeted cancer cells efficiently and multidrug-resistant cells failed to remove the intracellular MWCNTs. However, if used in combination with drugs without conjugation, PEGylated MWCNTs prompted drug efflux in MDR cells by stimulating the ATPase activity of P-glycoprotein. This study suggests that PEGylated MWCNTs can be developed as an efficient drug carrier to conjugate drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Resistance of Concrete Masonry Walls With Membrane Catcher Systems Subjected to Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    fiber reinforcement) sprayed-on polymers. The early versions of this approach were a polyurea -based coating similar to that used for truck bed liners...displacement. Figure 5 illustrates a resistance function using a polyurea membrane retrofit, and Figure 6 shows the complete resistance function. The...resistance function is truncated for these conditions: Figure 5. Resistance function — 3 mm thick polyurea retrofit DIsplacement (mm) P re s s u re

  11. Combining Organophosphate Treated Wall Linings and Long-lasting Insecticidal Nets for Improved Control of Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Ngufor, Corine; Tchicaya, Emile; Koudou, Benjamin; N'Fale, Sagnon; Dabire, Roch; Johnson, Paul; Ranson, Hilary; Rowland, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background New approaches to delivering insecticides need to be developed to improve malaria vector control. Insecticidal durable wall lining (DL) and net wall hangings (NWH) are novel alternatives to indoor residual spraying which can be produced in a long-lasting format. Non-pyrethroid versions could be used in combination with long-lasting insecticidal nets for improved control and management of insecticide resistant vector populations. Methods Experimental hut trials were carried out in Valley du Kou, Burkina Faso to evaluate the efficacy of pirimiphos methyl treated DL and NWH either alone or in combination with LLINs against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae ss. Comparison was made with pyrethroid DL. Mosquitoes were genotyped for kdr and ace-1R resistant genes to investigate the insecticide resistance management potential of the combination. Results The overall kdr and ace-1R allele frequencies were 0.95 and 0.01 respectively. Mortality with p-methyl DL and NWH alone was higher than with pyrethroid DL alone (>95% vs 40%; P<0.001). Combining pyrethroid DL with LLINs did not show improvement in mortality (48%) compared to the LLIN alone (44%) (P>0.1). Combining p-methyl DL or NWH with LLINs reduced biting rates significantly (8–9%) compared to p-methyl DL and NWH alone (>40%) and killed all An gambiae that entered the huts. Mosquitoes bearing the ace-1R gene were more likely to survive in huts with p-methyl DL alone (p<0.03) whereas all resistant and susceptible genotypes were killed by the combination. Conclusion P-methyl DL and NWH outperformed pyrethroid DL. Combining p-methyl DL and NWH with LLINs could provide significant epidemiological benefits against a vector population which is resistant to pyrethroids but susceptible to organophosphates. There was evidence that the single intervention would select kdr and ace-1R resistance genes and the combination intervention might select less strongly. Technology to bind organophosphates to plastic wall

  12. Overlap valence on 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion configurations with deflation and low-mode substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.; Alexandru, A.; Lee, F. X.; Chen, Y.; Doi, T.; Dong, S. J.; Draper, T.; Gong, M.; Horvath, I.; Liu, K. F.; Hasenfratz, A.; Mathur, N.; Streuer, T.; Zhang, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    The overlap fermion propagator is calculated on 2+1 flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations on 16{sup 3}x32, 24{sup 3}x64 and 32{sup 3}x64 lattices. With hyper-cubic (HYP) smearing and low eigenmode deflation, it is shown that the inversion of the overlap operator can be expedited by {approx}20 times for the 16{sup 3}x32 lattice and {approx}80 times for the 32{sup 3}x64 lattice. The overhead cost for calculating eigenmodes ranges from 4.5 to 7.9 propagators for the above lattices. Through the study of hyperfine splitting, we found that the O(m{sup 2}a{sup 2}) error is small and these dynamical fermion lattices can adequately accommodate quark mass up to the charm quark. A preliminary calculation of the low-energy constant {Delta}{sub mix} which characterizes the discretization error of the pion made up of a pair of sea and valence quarks in this mixed-action approach is carried out via the scalar correlator with periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. It is found to be small which shifts a 300 MeV pion mass by {approx}10 to 19 MeV on these sets of lattices. We have studied the signal-to-noise issue of the noise source for the meson and baryon. We introduce a new algorithm with Z{sub 3} grid source and low eigenmode substitution to study the many-to-all meson and baryon correlators. It is found to be efficient in reducing errors for the correlators of both mesons and baryons. With 64-point Z{sub 3} grid source and low-mode substitution, it can reduce the statistical errors of the light quark (m{sub {pi}{approx}2}00-300 MeV) meson and nucleon correlators by a factor of {approx}3-4 as compared to the point source. The Z{sub 3} grid source itself can reduce the errors of the charmonium correlators by a factor of {approx}3.

  13. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-01-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers. PMID:27126900

  14. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-29

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  15. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  16. Overexpression of Rice Wall-Associated Kinase 25 (OsWAK25) Alters Resistance to Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Harkenrider, Mitch; Sharma, Rita; De Vleesschauwer, David; Tsao, Li; Zhang, Xuting; Chern, Mawsheng; Canlas, Patrick; Zuo, Shimin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall-associated kinases comprise a sub-family of receptor-like kinases that function in plant growth and stress responses. Previous studies have shown that the rice wall-associated kinase, OsWAK25, interacts with a diverse set of proteins associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here, we show that wounding and BTH treatments induce OsWAK25 transcript expression in rice. We generated OsWAK25 overexpression lines and show that these lines exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype and enhanced expression of rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1), OsPAL2, PBZ1 and PR10. Furthermore, these lines show resistance to the hemibiotrophic pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Magnaporthe oryzae, yet display increased susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Cochliobolus miyabeanus. PMID:26795719

  17. Experimental analysis and WallDYN simulations of the global nitrogen migration in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisl, G.; Schmid, K.; Oberkofler, M.; Krieger, K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Reimold, F.; Lunt, T.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-03-01

    This work presents ASDEX Upgrade experiments, where the nitrogen deposition and re-erosion on divertor manipulator samples and the effect of its transport through the plasma were studied. These results are compared to WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations based on SOLPS plasma backgrounds and employing an improved WallDYN model, which includes the effusion of nitrogen from saturated surfaces. On one hand, this allows the WallDYN code and the new saturation model with a comprehensive data set to be benchmarked, on the other hand the simulations help in the interpretation of the experimental results. Both, experimental results and simulations, show that the N content in the region of the outer strike line reaches its steady-state value within one discharge. The simulations also reproduce the experimentally observed nitrogen content in samples exposed to N2-seeded discharges. With respect to the boron deposition, the nitrogen deposition in a non-seeded discharge and the re-erosion of nitrogen discrepancies to the WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations are observed. Based on SDTrimSP simulations, these are attributed to the missing depth resolution of the WallDYN surface model. A detailed comparison of spectroscopic measurements to WallDYN simulations, based on a novel synthetic spectroscopy diagnostic for WallDYN, shows that the nitrogen fluxes in the plasma are well described by the simulations. From a comparison of several WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations employing customized onion-skin model plasma backgrounds the physical processes controlling the nitrogen concentration in the core plasma and the applicability of onion-skin model plasma backgrounds are discussed. From these simulations the private flux zone with the gas valve, the outer baffle and the high field side main wall are identified as the main sources for the nitrogen content of the core plasma.

  18. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Thompson, L.; Li, G.

    2016-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equilibrium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent variables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium configuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  19. Covalent cross-linking of cell-wall polysaccharides through esterified diferulates as a maize resistance mechanism against corn borers.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Santiago, Rogelio; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Malvar, Rosa A

    2015-03-04

    There is strong evidence to suggest that cross-linking of cell-wall polymers through ester-linked diferulates has a key role in plant resistance to pests; however, direct experimentation to provide conclusive proof is lacking. This study presents an evaluation of the damage caused by two corn borer species on six maize populations particularly selected for divergent diferulate concentrations in pith stem tissues. Maize populations selected for high total diferulate concentration had 31% higher diferulates than those selected for low diferulates. Stem tunneling by corn borer species was 29% greater in the population with the lowest diferulates than in the population with the highest diferulates (31.7 versus 22.6 cm), whereas total diferulate concentration was negatively correlated with stem tunneling by corn borers. Moreover, orthogonal contrasts between groups of populations evaluated showed that larvae fed in laboratory bioassays on pith stem tissues from maize populations with higher diferulates had 30-40% lower weight than larvae fed on the same tissues from maize populations with lower diferulates. This is the first report that shows a direct relationship between diferulate deposition in maize cell walls and corn borer resistance. Current findings will help to develop adapted maize varieties with an acceptable level of resistance against borers and be useful in special kinds of agriculture, such as organic farming.

  20. Wall slipping behavior of foam with nanoparticle-armored bubbles and its flow resistance factor in cracks.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qichao; Li, Zhaomin; Li, Binfei; Husein, Maen; Shi, Dashan; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Tongke

    2017-07-11

    In this work, wall slipping behavior of foam with nanoparticle-armored bubbles was first studied in a capillary tube and the novel multiphase foam was characterized by a slipping law. A crack model with a cuboid geometry was then used to compare with the foam slipping results from the capillary tube and also to evaluate the flow resistance factor of the foam. The results showed that the slipping friction force F FR in the capillary tube significantly increased by addition of modified SiO2 nanoparticles, and an appropriate power law exponents by fitting F FR vs. Capillary number, Ca, was 1/2. The modified nanoparticles at the surface were bridged together and formed a dense particle "armor" surrounding the bubble, and the interconnected structures of the "armor" with strong steric integrity made the surface solid-like, which was in agreement with the slip regime associated with rigid surface. Moreover, as confirmed by 3D microscopy, the roughness of the bubble surface increased with nanoparticle concentration, which in turn increased the slipping friction force. Compared with pure SDBS foam, SDBS/SiO2 foam shows excellent stability and high flow resistance in visual crack. The resistance factor of SiO2/SDBS foam increased as the wall surface roughness increased in core cracks.

  1. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:26870060

  2. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum).

  3. Modes of action, resistance and toxicity of insecticides targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-02-06

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels (cys-loop LGICs) and mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the nervous system of insects. The completion of many insect genome projects has greatly enhanced our understanding of the individual subunits that make up nAChR gene families from an insect genetic model organism (Drosophila melanogaster), crop pests, disease vectors and beneficial (pollinator) species. In addition to considerable insect nAChR subunit diversity, individual subunits can be subject to alternative splicing and RNA editing and these post-transcriptional modifications can add significantly to the diversity of nAChR receptor subtypes. The actions of insecticides targeting nAChRs, notably cartap, neonicotinoids, sulfoximines, flupyradifurone, spinosyns and triflumezopyrim are reviewed. Structural studies obtained using an acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) co-crystallised with neonicotinoids have yielded important new insights into the requirements for neonicotinoid insecticide - nAChR interactions. The persistent application of insecticides to crop pests leads to the onset of resistance and several examples of resistance to insecticides targeting nAChRs have been documented. Understanding the molecular basis of resistance can inform our understanding of the mechanism of insecticide action. It also provides an important driver for the development of new chemistry, diagnostic tests for resistance and the adoption of application strategies designed to attenuate such problems. Finally, we consider toxicity issues relating to nAChR-active insecticides, with particular reference to beneficial insect species (pollinators) as well as mammalian and avian toxicity. This review is part of the special issue "Insecticide Mode of Action: From Insect to Mammalian Toxicity.".

  4. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  5. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Novikov, Serguei

    2016-05-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40–60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  6. Effects of Velocity Spread and Wall Resistivity on the Gain and Bandwidth of the Gyrotron Travelling-Wave Amplifier.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-12

    this Report) Appo7 fo bi e~s.dsn on unlimited, OITI7. UTOt hi Roer’) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY MOTES oScience Applications, Inc., McLean, VA **B-K Dynamics ...Resistive Wall on the Dynamics of the Electron Beam..................................................................18 I Ac~cession For NTIS DDC TAB Jui...part by NAVELEX, Task XF54581007. REFERENCES " Science Applications, Inc. 00 B.-K. Dynamics 1. J.L. Seftor, V.L. Granatstein, K.R. Chu, P. Sprangle

  7. Stabilizing effects of enhanced resistivity due to lithium-conditioning on low-n edge localized modes in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-05-01

    The stabilizing effects of enhanced edge resistivity on edge-localized instabilities in high confinement discharges due to lithium-conditioning in the National Spherical Torus Experiment are identified for the first time. Linear stability analysis of the experimentally constrained equilibrium suggests that the change in the equilibrium plasma density and pressure profiles alone due to lithium-conditioning may be insufficient for a complete suppression of low toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes. The enhanced resistivity due to the increased effective electric charge number Zeff after lithium-conditioning provides additional stabilization of the edge localized modes. Notably, this stabilizing effect by enhanced edge resistivity becomes evident only in two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Unified switching mechanism for reversible change between unipolar and bipolar switching modes of oxide resistive switching memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hong; Yang, Woo-Young; Kim, Sohyeon; Oh, Semi; Kim, Kyoung-Kook; Kim, Yunkyung; Hong, Minki; Nam, Kiyoung; Cho, Soohaeng

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the coexistence of the unipolar and bipolar switching behaviors in a single oxide resistive device composed of Pt-CuO0.8-W structure and we reveal the switching mechanism by the comprehensive analyses of both unipolar and bipolar switching behaviors. The observations suggest that the RESET (turning OFF) mechanism of unipolar and bipolar switching modes can be explained by a unified scheme. The results also elucidate that the SET (turning ON) process in bipolar mode is originated from by the drift of ions though charged vacancies, while the SET process in unipolar mode is explained by electron tunneling through vacancies. The proposed model successfully explains the observations of resistive switching of our device regardless of input voltage polarity and, more importantly, we propose a way to selectively choose one specific operation mode.

  9. Sheet resistance characterization of locally anisotropic transparent conductive films made of aligned metal-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hosung; Kim, Duckjong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-09-21

    One-dimensional conductive fillers such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be aggregated and aligned during transparent conductive film (TCF) formation by the vacuum filtration method. The potential error of analysing the average sheet resistance of these anisotropic films, using the four-point probe in-line method and the conversion formula developed assuming uniform isotropic material properties, was systematically investigated by finite element analysis and experiments. The finite element analysis of anisotropic stripe-patterned TCFs with alternating low (ρ1) and high (ρ2) resistivities revealed that the estimated average sheet resistance approached ρ1/t when the probes were parallel to the aligned nanotubes. The thickness of the film is t. It was more close to ρ2/t when the probes were perpendicular to the aligned tubes. Indeed, TCFs fabricated by the vacuum filtration method using metal-enriched SWNTs exhibited highly anisotropic local regions where tubes were aggregated and aligned. The local sheet resistances of randomly oriented, aligned, and perpendicular tube regions of the TCF at a transmittance of 89.9% were 5000, 2.4, and 12 300 Ω □(-1), respectively. Resistivities of the aggregated and aligned tube region (ρ1 = 1.2 × 10(-5) Ω cm) and the region between tubes (ρ2 = 6.2 × 10(-2) Ω cm) could be approximated with the aid of finite element analysis. This work demonstrates the potential error of characterizing the average sheet resistance of anisotropic TCFs using the four-point probe in-line method since surprisingly high or low values could be obtained depending on the measurement angle. On the other hand, a better control of aggregation and alignment of nanotubes would realize TCFs with a very small anisotropic resistivity and a high transparency.

  10. Linear growth rates of resistive tearing modes with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. N.; Ma, Z. W.

    2014-07-15

    The tearing instability with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow along the external magnetic field is investigated using resistive MHD simulation. It is found that the growth rate of the tearing mode instability is larger than that without the streaming flow. With the streaming flow, there exist two Alfvén resonance layers near the central current sheet. The larger perturbation of the magnetic field in two closer Alfvén resonance layers could lead to formation of the observed cone structure and can largely enhance the development of the tearing mode for a narrower streaming flow. For a broader streaming flow, a larger separation of Alfvén resonance layers reduces the magnetic reconnection. The linear growth rate decreases with increase of the streaming flow thickness. The growth rate of the tearing instability also depends on the plasma beta (β). When the streaming flow is embedded in the current sheet, the growth rate increases with β if β < β{sub s}, but decreases if β > β{sub s}. The existence of the specific value β{sub s} can be attributed to competition between the suppressing effect of β and the enhancing effect of the streaming flow on the magnetic reconnection. The critical value β{sub s} increases with increase of the streaming flow strength.

  11. Computational modeling of neoclassical and resistive MHD tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Gianakon, Thomas A.

    1996-02-01

    Numerical studies of the linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic tearing type modes in three-dimensional toroidal geometry are presented. In addition to traditional resistive MHD effects, where the parameter Δ' determines the stability properties, neoclassical effects have been included for the first time in such models. The inclusion of neoclassical physics introduces and additional free-energy source for the nonlinear formation of magnetic islands through the effects of a bootstrap current in Ohm`s law. The neoclassical tearing mode is demonstrated to be destabilized in plasmas which are otherwise Δ' stable, albeit once an island width threshold is exceeded. The simulations are based on a set of neoclassical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three-dimensional toroidal geometry derived from the two-fluid equations in the limit of small inverse aspect ratio ε and low plasma pressure β with neoclassical closures for the viscous force ∇• $\\vec{π}$. The poloidal magnetic flux Ψ, the toroidal vorticity ωζ, and the plasma pressure p are time advanced using the parallel projection of Ohm`s law, the toroidal projection of the curl of the momentum equation, and a pressure evolution equation with anisotropic pressure transport parallel to and across magnetic field lines. The equations are implemented in an initial value code which Fourier decomposes equilibrium and perturbation quantities in the poloidal and toroidal directions, and finite differences them radially based on a equilibrium straight magnetic field line representation. An implicit algorithm is used to advance the linear terms; the nonlinear terms are advanced explicitly. The simulations are benchmarked linearly and nonlinearly against single and multiple helicity Δ' tearing modes in toroidal geometry in the absence of neo-classical effects.

  12. Study of collective radial breathing-like modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes: combination of continuous two-dimensional membrane theory and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, Dmitry I.; Avramenko, Marina V.; Than, Xuan-Tinh; Michel, Thierry; Arenal, Raul; Paillet, Matthieu; Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Rochal, Sergei B.; Yuzyuk, Yuri I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Radial breathing modes (RBMs) are widely used for the atomic structure characterization and index assignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from resonant Raman spectroscopy. However, for double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), the use of conventional ωRBM(d) formulas is complicated due to the van der Waals interaction between the layers, which strongly affects the frequencies of radial modes and leads to new collective vibrations. This paper presents an alternative way to theoretically study the collective radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of DWNTs and to account for interlayer interaction, namely the continuous two-dimensional membrane theory. We obtain an analytical ωRBLM(do,di) relation, being the equivalent of the conventional ωRBM(d) expressions, established for SWNTs. We compare our theoretical predictions with Raman data, measured on individual index-identified suspended DWNTs, and find a good agreement between experiment and theory. Moreover, we show that the interlayer coupling in individual DWNTs strongly depends on the interlayer distance, which is manifested in the frequency shifts of the RBLMs with respect to the RBMs of the individual inner and outer tubes. In terms of characterization, this means that the combination of Raman spectroscopy data and predictions of continuous membrane theory may give additional criteria for the index identification of DWNTs, namely the interlayer distance.

  13. Uniformity of glycyl bridge lengths in the mature cell walls of fem mutants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Kim, Sung Joon; Labischinski, Harald; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) composition in intact cells of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its isogenic Fem mutants has been characterized by measuring the glycine content of PG bridge structures by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The glycine content estimated from integrated intensities (rather than peak heights) in the cell walls of whole cells was increased by approximately 30% for the FemA mutant and was reduced by 25% for the FemB mutant relative to expected values for homogeneous structures. In contrast, the expected compositions were observed in isolated cell walls of the same mutants. For FemA mutant whole cells, the increase was due to the presence of triglycyl bridge PG units (confirmed directly by mass spectrometric analysis), which constituted 10% of the total PG. These species were coalesced in some sort of a lattice or aggregate with spatial proximity to other PG bridges. This result suggests that the triglycyl-bridged PG units form a PG-like structure that is not incorporated into the mature cell wall.

  14. On the abrupt growth dynamics of nonlinear resistive tearing mode and the viscosity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-05-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the resistive tearing mode exhibits an abrupt growth after an X-point collapse once the magnetic island exceeds a certain critical width Δ′w{sub c} for large instability parameter Δ′, leading to a current sheet formation [N. F. Loureiro et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235003 (2005)]. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of the X-point collapse as well as the current sheet formation including the viscosity effects, based on a secondary instability analysis. The secondary instability is excited due to the quasilinear current modification by the zonal current. In particular, it is identified that the current peaking effect is plausibly responsible for the onset of the X-point collapse and the current sheet formation, leading to the explosive growth of reconnected flux. In the presence of finite viscosity, the Δ′w{sub c} scaling with the resistivity gets modified. A transition behavior is revealed at P{sub r}≈1 for the viscosity dependence of Δ′w{sub c} and the linear tearing instability. However, the explosive growth seems to be independent of the viscosity in the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub r}<1 regime, while large viscosity plays a strong dissipation role.

  15. Biotic resistance, disturbance, and mode of colonization impact the invasion of a widespread, introduced wetland grass.

    PubMed

    Kettenring, Karin M; Whigham, Dennis F; Hazelton, Eric L G; Gallagher, Sally K; Weiner, Heather M

    2015-03-01

    Disturbance and biotic resistance are important factors driving plant invasions, but how these factors interact for plants with different modes of colonization (i.e., sexual and asexual) is unclear. We evaluated factors influencing the invasion of nonnative Phragmites australis, which has been rapidly expanding in brackish tidal wetlands in Chesapeake Bay. We conducted a survey of naturally occurring small-scale disturbances (removal of vegetation and/or sediment deposition) across four plant communities; determined the effects of small-scale disturbance and biotic resistance on P. australis seedling and rhizome emergence; and tested the effects of size and frequency of small-scale disturbances on seedling emergence and survival of transplanted seedlings. The results of our study demonstrate that the invasion window for seeds is in disturbed areas in high-marsh plant communities that flood less frequently; seedling emergence in undisturbed areas was negligible. Establishment of shoots from rhizome segments was low in all plant communities. Disturbance size and frequency had no significant impact on seed germination and seedling survival. Our findings provide evidence that small-scale within-wetland disturbances are important for the invasion of the nonnative lineage of P. australis by seeds in brackish tidal wetlands in Chesapeake Bay. Efforts to reduce disturbances, large and small, in wetlands can be used to limit P. australis invasion by seed, but invasion by rhizome is still likely to occur across many plant communities irrespective of the presence of disturbance.

  16. Reduced fluid simulation of runaway electron generation in the presence of resistive kink modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, A.; Aiba, N.; Yagi, M.

    2017-06-01

    A reduced fluid simulation is developed to study the formation of runaway current profiles in the framework of a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. In our simulation,three-dimensional dynamics of runaway electrons in real space is treated in terms of the equation for fluid electron density with source terms representing Dreicer and secondary generation mechanisms. The excitation of MHD instabilities, non-diffusive transport due to magnetic field fluctuation and dynamical changes of the runaway generation rate due to MHD activity are incorporated. The results of an m/n  =  1/1 single-helicity simulation for resistive kink instability are illustrated, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively. It is found that: (1) profile relaxation due to resistive kink instability affects net runaway generation through modification of the internal inductance; and (2) inductive voltage spike can be a direct channel to enhance Dreicer seed electrons with background electric fields exceeding the critical threshold of runaway generation.

  17. Structure and Mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarS, the Wall Teichoic Acid β-glycosyltransferase Involved in Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    King, Dustin T.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Baumann, Lars; Gale, Robert T.; Brown, Eric D.; Withers, Stephen G.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in teichoic acids as targets for antibiotic drug design against major clinical pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, reflecting the disquieting increase in antibiotic resistance and the historical success of bacterial cell wall components as drug targets. It is now becoming clear that β-O-GlcNAcylation of S. aureus wall teichoic acids plays a major role in both pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. Here we present the first structure of S. aureus TarS, the enzyme responsible for polyribitol phosphate β-O-GlcNAcylation. Using a divide and conquer strategy, we obtained crystal structures of various TarS constructs, mapping high resolution overlapping N-terminal and C-terminal structures onto a lower resolution full-length structure that resulted in a high resolution view of the entire enzyme. Using the N-terminal structure that encapsulates the catalytic domain, we furthermore captured several snapshots of TarS, including the native structure, the UDP-GlcNAc donor complex, and the UDP product complex. These structures along with structure-guided mutants allowed us to elucidate various catalytic features and identify key active site residues and catalytic loop rearrangements that provide a valuable platform for anti-MRSA drug design. We furthermore observed for the first time the presence of a trimerization domain composed of stacked carbohydrate binding modules, commonly observed in starch active enzymes, but adapted here for a poly sugar-phosphate glycosyltransferase. PMID:27973583

  18. Disturbed Laminar Blood Flow Vastly Augments Lipoprotein Retention in the Artery Wall: A Key Mechanism Distinguishing Susceptible From Resistant Sites.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Lasse Bach; Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Kjolby, Mads; Hagensen, Mette Kallestrup; Oxvig, Claus; Bentzon, Jacob Fog

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis develops initially at branch points and in areas of high vessel curvature. Moreover, experiments in hypercholesterolemic mice have shown that the introduction of disturbed flow in straight, atherosclerosis-resistant arterial segments turns them highly atherosclerosis susceptible. Several biomechanical mechanisms have been proposed, but none has been demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether a causal link exists between disturbed laminar flow and the ability of the arterial wall to retain lipoproteins. Lipoprotein retention was detected at natural predilection sites of the murine thoracic aorta 18 hours after infusion of fluorescently labeled low-density lipoprotein. To test for causality between blood flow and the ability of these areas to retain lipoproteins, we manipulated blood flow in the straight segment of the common carotid artery using a constrictive collar. Disturbed laminar flow did not affect low-density lipoprotein influx, but increased the ability of the artery wall to bind low-density lipoprotein. Concordantly, disturbed laminar flow led to differential expression of genes associated with phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells, increased expression of proteoglycan core proteins associated with lipoprotein retention, and of enzymes responsible for chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan synthesis and sulfation. Blood flow regulates genes associated with vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation, as well as the expression and post-translational modification of lipoprotein-binding proteoglycan core proteins, and the introduction of disturbed laminar flow vastly augments the ability of a previously resistant, straight arterial segment to retain lipoproteins. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Managing insecticide resistance in malaria vectors by combining carbamate-treated plastic wall sheeting and pyrethroid-treated bed nets

    PubMed Central

    Djènontin, Armel; Chabi, Joseph; Baldet, Thierry; Irish, Seth; Pennetier, Cédric; Hougard, Jean-Marc; Corbel, Vincent; Akogbéto, Martin; Chandre, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Pyrethroid resistance is now widespread in Anopheles gambiae, the major vector for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. This resistance may compromise malaria vector control strategies that are currently in use in endemic areas. In this context, a new tool for management of resistant mosquitoes based on the combination of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and carbamate-treated plastic sheeting was developed. Methods In the laboratory, the insecticidal activity and wash resistance of four carbamate-treated materials: a cotton/polyester blend, a polyvinyl chloride tarpaulin, a cotton/polyester blend covered on one side with polyurethane, and a mesh of polypropylene fibres was tested. These materials were treated with bendiocarb at 100 mg/m2 and 200 mg/m2 with and without a binding resin to find the best combination for field studies. Secondly, experimental hut trials were performed in southern Benin to test the efficacy of the combined use of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and the carbamate-treated material that was the most wash-resistant against wild populations of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Results Material made of polypropylene mesh (PPW) provided the best wash resistance (up to 10 washes), regardless of the insecticide dose, the type of washing, or the presence or absence of the binding resin. The experimental hut trial showed that the combination of carbamate-treated PPW and a pyrethroid-treated bed net was extremely effective in terms of mortality and inhibition of blood feeding of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae. This efficacy was found to be proportional to the total surface of the walls. This combination showed a moderate effect against wild populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, which were strongly resistant to pyrethroid. Conclusion These preliminary results should be confirmed, including evaluation of entomological, parasitological, and clinical parameters. Selective pressure on resistance mechanisms within the vector

  20. New triazoles and echinocandins: mode of action, in vitro activity and mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Fera, Maria Teresa; La Camera, Erminia; De Sarro, Angelina

    2009-10-01

    against important basidiomycetes, including Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. This review attempts to deliver the most up-to-date knowledge on the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to triazoles and echinocandins in fungal pathogens. In addition, the in vitro activity data available on triazoles and echinocandins are reported.

  1. Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes and type-II quantum dots in photovoltaics and passive mode-locking saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Wang, Yong-Gang; Cheng, Shin-Min; Yu, Pyng; Huang, Kuo-Yen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu

    2012-10-01

    Using single-molecule confocal imaging techniques combined with time-correlated single-photon counting we investigated the electron transfer (ET) rates to the single-walled carbon nanotubes from various types of semiconductor hetero-nanocrystals of type-I or type-II band alignment. We observed significantly larger ET rate for type-II ZnSe/CdS dot-in-rod nanostructures as compared to type-I spherical CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum-dots, and to CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod structures. We demonstrated that such rapid ET dynamics can compete with both Auger and radiative recombination processes, leading to potentially more effective photovoltaic operation. In another work, we used aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes as saturable absorbers for ps laser pulse generation. Using the vertical evaporation technique we fabricated saturable absorbers by transferring the water-soluble single wall carbon nanotubes onto a hydrophilic quartz substrate. The fast recovery times of the absorber were measured to be 136 fs and 790 fs. The modulation depth of the absorber was about 1.5%. Passive mode-locked Nd: GdVO4 laser using such an absorber was demonstrated. The continuous wave mode-locked pulses with the pulse duration of 12.4 ps and the repetition of 120 MHz were achieved. The maximum average output power of the mode-locked laser is 2.4 W at the pump power of 13 W. Such a kind of absorbers has potential to be put into practical use.

  2. Thioridazine Induces Major Changes in Global Gene Expression and Cell Wall Composition in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300

    PubMed Central

    Thorsing, Mette; Klitgaard, Janne K.; Atilano, Magda L.; Skov, Marianne N.; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2013-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of the neuroleptic drug thioridazine (TDZ) are well-known to enhance the killing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by β-lactam antibiotics, however, the mechanism underlying the synergy between TDZ and β-lactams is not fully understood. In the present study, we have examined the effect of a subinhibitory concentration of TDZ on antimicrobial resistance, the global transcriptome, and the cell wall composition of MRSA USA300. We show that TDZ is able to sensitize the bacteria to several classes of antimicrobials targeting the late stages of peptidoglycan (PGN) synthesis. Furthermore, our microarray analysis demonstrates that TDZ modulates the expression of genes encoding membrane and surface proteins, transporters, and enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Interestingly, resemblance between the transcriptional profile of TDZ treatment and the transcriptomic response of S. aureus to known inhibitors of cell wall synthesis suggests that TDZ disturbs PGN biosynthesis at a stage that precedes transpeptidation by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). In support of this notion, dramatic changes in the muropeptide profile of USA300 were observed following growth in the presence of TDZ, indicating that TDZ can interfere with the formation of the pentaglycine branches. Strikingly, the addition of glycine to the growth medium relieved the effect of TDZ on the muropeptide profile. Furthermore, exogenous glycine offered a modest protective effect against TDZ-induced β-lactam sensitivity. We propose that TDZ exposure leads to a shortage of intracellular amino acids, including glycine, which is required for the production of normal PGN precursors with pentaglycine branches, the correct substrate of S. aureus PBPs. Collectively, this work demonstrates that TDZ has a major impact on the cell wall biosynthesis pathway in S. aureus and provides new insights into how MRSA may be sensitized towards β-lactam antibiotics. PMID

  3. ENHANCED RESISTANCE TO STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION INDUCED IN MICE BY CELL WALL MUCOPEPTIDE

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Jiri; Prendergast, Thomas J.; Karakawa, Walter W.; Harmon, Charles K.; Krause, Richard M.

    1965-01-01

    The streptococcal cell wall mucopeptide when injected into mice either intraperitoneally or intravenously enhances the resitance to subsequent challenge with virulent Group A streptococci. Rabbits which are injected intravenously with solubilized mucopeptide develop a fever response which has a resemblance to that achieved with endotoxin. Mice which survive 6 to 7 weeks after challenge with virulent Group A streptococci yield at autopsy search Group A streptococci serologically identical to the challenge organisms. A preparative dose of cell walls injected into mice prior to challenge diminished this late recovery of streptococci. Group A-variant streptococci were recovered from mice which survived challenge and carried the organisms for several weeks. Filterable bacterial forms, which grew on L form media, were recovered from infected mice. The serologic type of the L forms was identical to that of the challenge organisms. PMID:5853074

  4. High-level (beta)-lactam resistance and cell wall synthesis catalyzed by the mecA homologue of Staphylococcus sciuri introduced into Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Severin, Anatoly; Wu, Shang Wei; Tabei, Keiko; Tomasz, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    A close homologue of mecA, the determinant of broad-spectrum beta-lactam resistance in Staphylococcus aureus was recently identified as a native gene in the animal commensal species Staphylococcus sciuri. Introduction of the mecA homologue from a methicillin-resistant strain of S. sciuri into a susceptible strain of S. aureus caused an increase in drug resistance and allowed continued growth and cell wall synthesis of the bacteria in the presence of high concentrations of antibiotic. We determined the muropeptide composition of the S. sciuri cell wall by using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometric analysis, and Edman degradation. Several major differences between the cell walls of S. aureus and S. sciuri were noted. The pentapeptide branches in S. sciuri were composed of one alanine and four glycine residues in contrast to the pentaglycine units in S. aureus. The S. sciuri wall but not the wall of S. aureus contained tri- and tetrapeptide units, suggesting the presence of dd- and ld-carboxypeptidase activity. Most interestingly, S. aureus carrying the S. sciuri mecA and growing in methicillin-containing medium produced a cell wall typical of S. aureus and not S. sciuri, in spite of the fact that wall synthesis under these conditions had an absolute dependence on the heterologous S. sciuri gene product. The protein product of the S. sciuri mecA can efficiently participate in cell wall biosynthesis and build a cell wall using the cell wall precursors characteristic of the S. aureus host.

  5. Passively mode-locking erbium-doped fiber lasers with 0.3 nm Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xintong; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Ling; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Yongqin; Zhang, Min; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by using the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a diameter of 0.3 nm as the saturable absorber. These ultrasmall SWNTs are fabricated in the elliptical nanochannels of a ZnAPO4-11 (AEL) single crystal. By placing an AEL crystal into an EDFL cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode, stable passive mode-locking is achieved for a threshold pump power of 280 mW, and 73 ps pulses at 1563.2 nm with a repetition rate of 26.79 MHz. PMID:25342292

  6. Correlation of Daptomycin Resistance in a Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Strain with Increased Cell Wall Teichoic Acid Production and d-Alanylation▿

    PubMed Central

    Bertsche, Ute; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Kuehner, Daniel; Yang, Soo-Jin; Baur, Stefanie; Wanner, Stefanie; Francois, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Yeaman, Michael R.; Bayer, Arnold S.

    2011-01-01

    Cell wall thickening is a common feature among daptomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. However, the mechanism(s) leading to this phenotype is unknown. We examined a number of cell wall synthesis pathway parameters in an isogenic strain set of S. aureus bloodstream isolates obtained from a patient with recalcitrant endocarditis who failed daptomycin therapy, including the initial daptomycin-susceptible parental strain (strain 616) and two daptomycin-resistant strains (strains 701 and 703) isolated during daptomycin therapy. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated significantly thicker cell walls in the daptomycin-resistant strains than in the daptomycin-susceptible strain, a finding which was compatible with significant differences in dry cell weight of strain 616 versus strains 701 to 703 (P < 0.05). Results of detailed analysis of cell wall muropeptide composition, the degree of peptide side chain cross-linkage, and the amount of the peptidoglycan precursor, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide, were similar in the daptomycin-susceptible and daptomycin-resistant isolates. In contrast, the daptomycin-resistant strains contained less O-acetylated peptidoglycan. Importantly, both daptomycin-resistant strains synthesized significantly more wall teichoic acid (WTA) than the parental strain (P < 0.001). Moreover, the proportion of d-alanylated WTA species was substantially higher in the daptomycin-resistant strains than in the daptomycin-susceptible parental strain (P < 0.05 in comparing strain 616 versus strain 701). The latter phenotypic findings correlated with (i) enhanced tagA and dltA gene expression, respectively, and (ii) an increase in surface positive charge observed in the daptomycin-resistant versus daptomycin-susceptible isolates. Collectively, these data suggest that increases in WTA synthesis and the degree of its d-alanylation may play a major role in the daptomycin-resistant phenotype in some S. aureus strains. PMID:21606222

  7. Anomalous resistivity at the field null of the FRC: a quasi-linear expression based upon flute-type modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwin, R.

    1983-10-01

    In the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRC) experiment, the poloidal flux is observed to be lost at a rate several times greater than classical resistivity would allow. Thus, there must be anomalous resistivity at the field null. Assuming that an electromagnetic microinstability of the flute mode type is responsible for this, we derived a general expression for the anomalous resistivity at the field null based upon a quasi-linear model of the microturbulence. This general expression does not depend upon the details of the ion-species model, for example, whether the ions are fluid or kinetic.

  8. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and “weakest” microstructural resistance. PMID:20409579

  9. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  10. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Launey, Maximilien E; Ritchie, Robert O

    2010-07-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I+II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and "weakest" microstructural resistance.

  11. Stabilizing Effect of Resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode Discharge in Lithium-conditioned NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    The stabilizing effect of edge resistivity on the edge localized modes (ELMs) has been recently recovered through analyzing NSTX experimental profiles of Lithium-conditioned ELM-free H-mode discharge. Comparative studies of ELM-free and a reference NSTX ELMy-H mode equilibriums have been performed using both resistive and 2-fluid MHD models implemented in the initial value extended MHD code NIMROD. Our results indicate that in addition to the pedestal profile refinement in electron pressure, the inclusion of enhanced resistivity due to the increase in the effective electric charge number Zeff, which is observed after Lithium-conditioning in experiment, is further required to account for the full stabilization of the low- n edge localized modes. Such a stabilization from the enhanced edge resistivity only becomes effective when the two-fluid diamagnetic and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects are considered in the MHD model. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Protection of vascular wall function in insulin-resistant rats from copper oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Sheila F; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Yunlong; Russell, James C

    2001-01-01

    The effects of oxidative stress on vascular function in the insulin-resistant state were assessed in mesenteric resistance arteries of obese, insulin-resistant (cp/cp) and lean, normal (+/?) JCR : LA-cp rats.Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of noradrenaline-contracted arteries in response to acetylcholine was impaired after 2 h of incubation with Cu2+ in both genotypes, with or without the continuing presence of Cu2+. Relaxation was enhanced on initial exposure to Cu2+, and post-incubation removal of the Cu2+ resulted in a greater impairment of relaxation. Arteries from cp/cp rats were less impaired in function by Cu2+ incubation than were those of +/? controls.Sodium nitroprusside-mediated relaxation was impaired by exposure to Cu2+, with an accompanying increase in EC50.The impairment in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in the arteries from both cp/cp and +/? rats was completely inhibited by co-incubation with copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and catalase, confirming that the impairment associated with Cu2+ incubation was due to oxidative stress.The impairment appears to involve both smooth muscle and the endothelium.The cp/cp rats showed greater resistance to the effects of oxidative stress on arterial function, possibly due to an adaptation to oxidative stress on arterial function associated with the insulin-resistant state. PMID:11399664

  13. Investigations of the Mode of Action and Resistance Development of Cadazolid, a New Antibiotic for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Patrick; Bruyère, Thierry; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Knezevic, Andreja; Keck, Wolfgang; Ritz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic currently in clinical development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Here, we report investigations on the mode of action and the propensity for spontaneous resistance development in C. difficile strains. Macromolecular labeling experiments indicated that cadazolid acts as a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis, while inhibition of DNA synthesis was also observed, albeit only at substantially higher concentrations of the drug. Strong inhibition of protein synthesis was also obtained in strains resistant to linezolid, in agreement with low MICs against such strains. Inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in coupled transcription/translation assays using extracts from different C. difficile strains, including strains resistant to linezolid, while inhibitory effects in DNA topoisomerase assays were weak or not detectable under the assay conditions. Spontaneous resistance frequencies of cadazolid were low in all strains tested (generally <10−10 at 2× to 4× the MIC), and in multiple-passage experiments (up to 13 passages) MICs did not significantly increase. Furthermore, no cross-resistance was observed, as cadazolid retained potent activity against strains resistant or nonsusceptible to linezolid, fluoroquinolones, and the new antibiotic fidaxomicin. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that cadazolid acts primarily by inhibition of protein synthesis, with weak inhibition of DNA synthesis as a potential second mode of action, and suggest a low potential for spontaneous resistance development. PMID:24277035

  14. Transparency, gas barrier, and moisture resistance of large-aspect-ratio vermiculite nanobrick wall thin films.

    PubMed

    Priolo, Morgan A; Holder, Kevin M; Greenlee, Stephen M; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2012-10-24

    The ability to incorporate large-aspect-ratio vermiculite (VMT) clay into thin films fabricated using the layer-by-layer assembly techinique is reported for the first time. Thin films of branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and VMT were analyzed for their growth rate, clay composition, transparency, and gas barrier behavior. These films consist of >96 wt% clay, are >95% transparent, and, because of their nanobrick wall structure, exhibit super gas barrier behavior at thicknesses of <165 nm. When coupled with flexibility, the optical clarity and super barrier that these coatings can impart make them superb candidates for a variety of packaging applications.

  15. Estimation of adsorption energy for water molecules on a multi-walled carbon nanotube thin film by measuring electric resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokabu, Takuya; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2016-11-01

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotube (CNT) films have attracted attention owing to their low power consumption. For further development of these sensors, we need to understand the surface interaction of the films with gas molecules. In our previous research, we investigated the influence of water molecules on the electrical conductance of multi-walled CNT films and explained this phenomenon using a two-layer adsorption model. This work motivated us to measure the adsorption energy of CNT-H2O. In this study, we focused on the first-layer adsorption and investigated the sheet resistance to water vapor pressure at various temperatures using the transmission line method (TLM). The results were fitted to Langmuir adsorption model and the adsorption equilibrium constant was determined. The temperature dependence of the sheet resistance followed a model of fluctuation induced tunneling (FIT), in which the energy barrier at the CNT junction is regarded as the main factor influencing the electrical conductance of the CNT film. The sheet resistance and equilibrium constant decreased as temperature increased. This result was consistent with the adsorption phenomenon. Finally, the adsorption energy was determined to be 0.22-0.31 eV, which is larger than the previously calculated value. It was also reported that the adsorption energy of the gas molecules in the interstitial site between two carbon nanotubes was larger than that on the CNT surface. These results indicate that the CNT junction plays a key role in the detection of gas molecules.

  16. Phenylthiazole Antibacterial Agents Targeting Cell Wall Synthesis Exhibit Potent Activity in Vitro and in Vivo against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Haroon; Younis, Waleed; Chen, Lu; Peters, Christine E; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit; Cooper, Bruce; Zhang, Jianan; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman; Oldfield, Eric; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-03-23

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial species, such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. Here, we investigate the spectrum of antibacterial activity of three phenylthiazole-substituted aminoguanidines. These compounds possess potent activity against VRE, inhibiting growth of clinical isolates at concentrations as low as 0.5 μg/mL. The compounds exerted a rapid bactericidal effect, targeting cell wall synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis suggested three possible targets: YubA, YubB (undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP)), and YubD. Both UPPP as well as undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase were inhibited by compound 1. YubA and YubD are annotated as transporters and may also be targets because 1 collapsed the proton motive force in membrane vesicles. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that two compounds (1, 3, at 20 μg/mL) retain potent activity in vivo, significantly reducing the burden of VRE in infected worms. Taken altogether, the results indicate that compounds 1 and 3 warrant further investigation as novel antibacterial agents against drug-resistant enterococci.

  17. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P < 0.001), while pSRF protein levels increased similarly by 48% with both CONC and ECC exercise (P < 0.001). Prolonged ECC and CONC training equally stimulated muscle hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). No changes occurred for total SRF protein. There was no effect of whey protein supplementation. These results show that resistance exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations.

  18. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P < 0.001), while pSRF protein levels increased similarly by 48% with both CONC and ECC exercise (P < 0.001). Prolonged ECC and CONC training equally stimulated muscle hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). No changes occurred for total SRF protein. There was no effect of whey protein supplementation. These results show that resistance exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations. PMID:23753523

  19. Influence of restorative technique on the biomechanical behavior of endodontically treated maxillary premolars. Part I: fracture resistance and fracture mode.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo Vinicius; Santos-Filho, Paulo Cesar Freitas; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Soares, Carlos Jose

    2008-01-01

    Unresolved controversy exists concerning the preferred cavity design and restorative technique used to restore endodontically treated maxillary premolars to improve their resistance to fracture under occlusal load. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance, stress distribution, and cusp deformation of endodontically treated human maxillary premolars restored with different materials. The study is divided into 2 parts. In Part I, fracture resistance and fracture mode were determined. Seventy noncarious human maxillary premolars were selected and divided into 7 groups (n=10). The control group, ST, consisted of sound unprepared teeth. Teeth in the other 6 groups were endodontically treated and each received 1 of 2 cavity preparation designs: MODd, direct mesio-occlusal-distal preparation; MODi, indirect mesio-occlusal-distal preparation. Teeth were restored with 4 types of material: AM, MODd restored with amalgam; CR, MODd restored with composite resin; LPR, MODi restored with laboratory-processed composite resin; and LGC, MODi restored with leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The fracture resistance (N) was assessed under compressive load in a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (alpha =.05). Fracture modes were recorded based on the degree of tooth structure involvement and restoration damage. Statistical analysis showed that the ST group presented the highest fracture resistance values. The restored groups showed significantly higher fracture resistance values compared to the nonrestored groups. The groups restored with adhesive techniques (LPR, CR, and LGC) presented significantly higher fracture resistance values than the group restored with the nonadhesive technique (AM) (P<.001). The catastrophic fractures were prevalent in MODd, MODi, AM, and LPR groups, and less severe fractures were found in ST and LGC groups. For the CR group, there was no prevalent fracture mode. Teeth with the

  20. Measurement of the 3D arterial wall strain tensor using intravascular B-mode ultrasound images: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Zhu, Hui; Friedman, Morton H.

    2010-11-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography is a promising tool for studying atherosclerotic plaque composition and assessing plaque vulnerability. Current IVUS elastography techniques can measure the 1D or 2D strain of the vessel wall using various motion tracking algorithms. Since biological soft tissue tends to deform non-uniformly in 3D, measurement of the complete 3D strain tensor is desirable for more rigorous analysis of arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we extend our previously developed method of 2D arterial wall strain measurement based on non-rigid image registration into 3D strain measurement. The new technique registers two image volumes acquired from the same vessel segment under different levels of luminal pressure and longitudinal stress. The 3D displacement field obtained from the image registration is used to calculate the local 3D strain tensor. From the 3D strain tensor, radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain distributions can be obtained and displayed. This strain tensor measurement method is validated and evaluated using IVUS images of healthy porcine carotid arteries subjected to a luminal pressure increase and longitudinal stretch. The ability of the algorithm to overcome systematic noise was tested, as well as the consistency of the results under different longitudinal frame resolutions.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes L-forms respond to cell wall deficiency by modifying gene expression and the mode of division.

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Simone; Buchrieser, Carmen; Couvé, Elisabeth; Schnell, Barbara; Briers, Yves; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J

    2009-07-01

    Cell wall-deficient bacteria referred to as L-forms have lost the ability to maintain or build a rigid peptidoglycan envelope. We have generated stable, non-reverting L-form variants of the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, and studied the cellular and molecular changes associated with this transition. Stable L-form cells can occur as small protoplast-like vesicles and as multinucleated, large bodies. They have lost the thick, multilayered murein sacculus and are surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane only, although peptidoglycan precursors are still produced. While they lack murein-associated molecules including Internalin A, membrane-anchored proteins such as Internalin B are retained. Surprisingly, L-forms were found to be able to divide and propagate indefinitely without a wall. Time-lapse microscopy of fluorescently labelled L-forms indicated a switch to a novel form of cell division, where genome-containing membrane vesicles are first formed within enlarged L-forms, and subsequently released by collapse of the mother cell. Array-based transcriptomics of parent and L-form cells revealed manifold differences in expression of genes associated with morphological and physiological functions. The L-forms feature downregulated metabolic functions correlating with the dramatic shift in surface to volume ratio, whereas upregulation of stress genes reflects the difficulties in adapting to this unusual, cell wall-deficient lifestyle.

  2. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Steven D.; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; Shrader, Carl D.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; Chantler, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7–8, 12–13, and 16–17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7–8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  3. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS.

  4. rf resistance and inductance of massively parallel single walled carbon nanotubes: Direct, broadband measurements and near perfect 50 Ω impedance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherglen, Chris; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter

    2008-08-01

    We report using dielectrophoresis to accumulate hundred to thousands of solubilized single walled carbon nanotubes in parallel to achieve impedance values very close to 50Ω. This allows us to clearly measure the real (resistive) and imaginary (inductive) impedance over a broad frequency range. We find a negligible to mild frequency dependent resistance for the devices and an imaginary impedance that is significantly smaller then the resistance over the range of dc to 20GHz. This clearly and unambiguously demonstrates that kinetic inductance is not the major issue facing nanotube array interconnects, when compared to the real impedance (the resistance).

  5. Destabilization of low-n peeling modes by trapped energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Mou, Z. Z.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.

    2013-06-15

    The kinetic effect of trapped energetic particles (EPs), arising from perpendicular neutral beam injection, on the stable low-n peeling modes in tokamak plasmas is investigated, through numerical solution of the mode's dispersion relation derived from an energy principle. A resistive-wall peeling mode with m/n=6/1, with m and n being the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively, is destabilized by trapped EPs as the EPs' pressure exceeds a critical value β{sub c}{sup *}, which is sensitive to the pitch angle of trapped EPs. The dependence of β{sub c}{sup *} on the particle pitch angle is eventually determined by the bounce average of the mode eigenfunction. Peeling modes with higher m and n numbers can also be destabilized by trapped EPs. Depending on the wall distance, either a resistive-wall peeling mode or an ideal-kink peeling mode can be destabilized by EPs.

  6. The Putative Lactococcal Extracytoplasmic Function Anti-Sigma Factor Llmg2447 Determines Resistance to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Pérez, Verónica; Campelo, Ana B.; Blanco, Diego; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a cell wall-active bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis. In this work, the transcriptomes of the Lcn972-resistant (Lcnr) mutant L. lactis D1 and its parent strain were compared to identify factors involved in Lcn972 resistance. Upregulated genes included members of the cell envelope stress (CesSR) regulon, the penicillin-binding protein pbpX gene and gene llmg2447, which may encode a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) anti-sigma factor. The gene llmg2447 is located downstream of the nonfunctional ECF gene sigXpseudo. Nisin-controlled expression of llmg2447 led to high Lcn972 resistance in L. lactis, with no cross-resistance to other cell wall-active antimicrobials. Upregulation of llmg2447 in L. lactis D1 (Lcnr) was linked to the integration of insertion element IS981 into the llmg2447 promoter region, replacing the native −35 box and activating the otherwise silent promoter P2447. This is the first example of an orphan ECF anti-sigma factor involved in bacteriocin resistance. This new role in neutralizing cell wall-active compounds (e.g., Lcn972) could have evolved from a putative primary function of Llmg2447 in sensing cell envelope stress. PMID:22890757

  7. Vascular wall dysfunction in JCR:LA-cp rats: effects of age and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    O'brien, S F; Russell, J C; Davidge, S T

    1999-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging and insulin resistance interact to increase vascular dysfunction by comparing the function of isolated mesenteric resistance arteries in obese, insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats and lean, insulin-sensitive rats of the same strain at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo of age. The peak constrictor responses to norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and high potassium were elevated in arteries from obese rats. Responses to these agents increased with age in both obese and lean rats. An eicosanoid constrictor contributed substantially to vasoconstriction in the arteries from both lean and obese animals. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increased the vasoconstrictor response to norepinephrine in both obese and lean rats. This effect increased with age in lean rats only. Vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was impaired in the obese rats and did not alter with age. The results suggest that obese JCR:LA-cp rats have enhanced maximal constriction, which originates in the arterial smooth muscle and increases with age. There is evidence that the ability of the arteries to compensate for the enhanced contractility is impaired in obese rats, particularly with advanced age.

  8. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    PubMed

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p < .05). The highest fracture loads were associated with metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments (p = .000). IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchiola, Aymeric; Chrétien, Pascal; Schneegans, Olivier; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric; Delprat, Sophie; Bouzehouane, Karim; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Tatay, Sergio; Geffroy, Bernard; and others

    2016-06-13

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  10. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric; Chrétien, Pascal; Delprat, Sophie; Bouzehouane, Karim; Schneegans, Olivier; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Tatay, Sergio; Geffroy, Bernard; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  11. Polymorphism and reproductive mode in the rotifer, Asplanchna sieboldi: relationship between meiotic oogenesis and shape of body-wall outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Kabay, M E; Gilbert, J J

    1977-07-01

    Sexuality and polymorphism are closely coupled in the rotifer Asplanchna sieboldi. In a graded response to dietary tocopherol, embryos develop body-wall outgrowths of various sizes and shapes. Also in a graded response to this compound, some of the affected females produce eggs undergoing meiotic instead of mitotic oogenesis. The haploid eggs of such mictic females develop parthenogenetically into males instead of females. The incidence of mictic females among animals with different shapes was studied among cohorts from mothers subjected to different inducing conditions. The hypothesis that external tocopherol concentrations absolutely fix the probability of meiotic oogenesis was rejected. The other extreme hypothesis, that the probability of meiotic oogenesis is fixed by morphotype, was rejected for animals at the low end of the morphotypic scale but accepted for the more strongly-affected individuals. The probability of meiotic oogenesis is thus constant for the higher morphotypes. The ascertainment of morphotype frequencies in natural or laboratory populations may suffice for estimating the incidence of sexual forms; furthermore studies of factors affecting the body-wall-outgrowth response may also bear directly upon regulation of sexual reproduction in this species.

  12. Effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2002-11-01

    The effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are studied. Most RFP machines are equipped with one or more metal shells outside of the vacuum vessel. These shells have finite resistivities. The eddy currents induced in each of the shells contribute to the braking electromagnetic (EM) torque which slows down the plasma rotation. In this work we study the electromagnetic torque acting on the plasma (tearing) modes produced by a system of resistive shells. These shells may consist of several nested thin shells or several thin shells enclosed within a thick shell. The dynamics of the plasma mode is investigated by balancing the EM torque from the resistive shells with the plasma viscous torque. Both the steady state theory and the time-dependent theory are developed. The steady state theory is shown to provide an accurate account of the resultant EM torque if (dω/dt)ω-2≪1 and the time scale of interest is much longer than the response (L/R) time of the shell. Otherwise, the transient theory should be adopted. As applications, the steady state theory is used to evaluate the changes of the EM torque response from the resistive shells in two variants of two RFP machines: (1) modification from Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) [Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)] to the modified RFX: both of them are equipped with one thin shell plus one thick shell; (2) modification from Extrap T2 to Extrap T2R [Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]: both of them are equipped with two thin shells. The transient theory has been applied numerically to study the time evolution of the EM torque during the unlocking of a locked tearing mode in the modified RFX.

  13. Effects of Passive Porous Walls on the First Mode of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Over a Sharp Cone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    velocities are non -dimensionalised with respect to U−, where U− is the magnitude of the fluid velocity just behind the shock. Additionally, the time... Non -axisymmetric viscous lower-branch modes in axisymmet- ric supersonic flows, J. Fluid Mech. 213 (1990) 191–201. 13. S. O. Seddougui, Stability of...265. 21. J. T. Stuart, On the non -linear mechanics of wave disturbances in stable and unstable parallel flows, J. Fluid Mech. 9 (1960) 353–370. 22. D

  14. Suppression of Trapped Energetic Ions Driven Resistive Interchange Modes with Electron Cyclotron Heating in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. D.; Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Seki, R.; Nicolas, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Ogawa, K.; Tanaka, K.; Isobe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kubo, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Bando, T.; Ido, T.; Ozaki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Takemura, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The resistive interchange mode destabilized by the resonant interaction with the trapped energetic ions is fully suppressed when the injected power of electron cyclotron heating exceeds a certain threshold. It is shown for the first time that the complete stabilization of the energetic-particle-driven mode without relaxing the energetic particle (EP) pressure gradient is possible by reducing the radial width of the eigenmodes δw , especially when δw narrows to a small enough value relative to the finite orbit width of EP.

  15. Preparation of the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Nickel Composite Coating with Superior Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Gu, Yang; Shi, Tian; Peng, Dai; Tang, Mingkai; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-12-01

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nickel (MWCNTs/Ni) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Cu substrate by electro-deposition method in the electrolyte with well-dispersed MWCNTs. Surface morphologies of the composite coatings with protrusion structures were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer were used to characterize the phase structures, functional groups, and elements distribution of the coatings as well as the incorporated MWCNTs. In addition, the effect of MWCNTs percentage on thickness, hardness, wear, and corrosion resistance of the coatings was also investigated. Results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNTs positively affected the hardness of coatings for their strengthening skeletons effect. Meanwhile, the coating with the MWCNTs concentration of 0.2 g/L could achieve the lowest friction coefficient, wear rate as well as the mass loss in the tribological test by a ball-on-disk tribometer. And also, the optimal corrosion resistance with the highest corrosion potential ( E corr) and the lowest corrosion current density ( I corr) of the composite coating was finally proved after the potentiodynamic polarization evaluation, which could promote the potential applications in preparing the functional nanocomposite materials.

  16. Vascular wall function in insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats: role of male and female sex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S F; Russell, J C; Dolphin, P J; Davidge, S T

    2000-08-01

    Vascular wall function was assessed in obese insulin-resistant (cp/cp) and lean normal (+/?), male and female, JCR:LA-cp rats. Both male and female cp/cp rats showed enhanced maximum contractility in response to norepinephrine; impaired smooth muscle in response to sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide (NO) donor; and impaired relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh), compared with their lean counterparts. The abnormalities were similar in male and female cp/cp rats. The NO synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inhibited ACh-mediated relaxation significantly in male rats, both cp/cp and +/?. The inhibition of ACh-mediated relaxation by L-NAME in +/? females was less, with no reduction in maximal relaxation, and was absent in cp/cp females. These effects suggest that the relative importance of NO in the endothelial modulation of smooth muscle contractility is greater in male rats. The results are consistent with a decreased role for endothelial NO in the cp/cp rats of both sexes and a reduction in NO-independent cholinergic relaxation in the male cp/cp rat. This NO-independent mechanism is not affected in the female cp/cp rats. The relatively small differences between males and females in smooth muscle cell and vascular function may contribute to sex-related differences in the atherogenesis, vasospasm, and ischemic damage associated with the obese insulin-resistant state.

  17. Phonon contribution to electrical resistance of acceptor-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes assembled into transparent films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsebro, V. I.; Tonkikh, A. A.; Rybkovskiy, D. V.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Obraztsova, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    The electrical resistance of pristine and acceptor-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes assembled into transparent films was measured in the temperature range of 5 to 300 K. The doping was accomplished by filling the nanotubes with iodine or CuCl from the gas phase. After doping the films resistance appeared to drop down by one order of magnitude, to change the nonmonotonic temperature behavior, and to reduce the crossover temperature. The experimental data have been perfectly fitted in frames of the known heterogeneous model with two contributions: from the nanotube bundles (with quasi-one-dimensional conductivity) and from the interbundle electron tunneling. The doping was observed to decrease the magnitudes of both contributions. In this paper we have revealed the main reason of changes in the nanotube part. It is considered to be connected with the involvement of low-energy phonons, which start to participate in the intravalley scattering due to the shift of the Fermi level after doping. The values of the Fermi level shift into the valence band are estimated to be equal to -0.6 eV in the case of iodine doping and -0.9 eV in the case of CuCl doping. These values are in qualitative agreement with the optical absorption data.

  18. Resistive sensing of gaseous nitrogen dioxide using a dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Prabhash; Pavelyev, V.S.; Patel, Rajan; Islam, S.S.

    2016-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Ionic liquid ([C6-mim]PF6) used as dispersant agent for SWCNTs: An investigations were carried out to find the structural quality and surface modification for sensor application. - Highlights: • An effective technique based on Ionic liquids (IL) and their use as a dispersant. • Electron microscopy and spectroscopy for structure characterization. • Covalent linkage of ILs with SWNTs and dispersion of SWCNTs. • The IL-wrapped sensing film, capable for detecting trace levels of gas. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) and investigated in terms of structural quality, surface functionalization and inter-CNT force. Analysis by field emission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy shows the IL layer to coat the SWNTs, and FTIR and Raman spectroscopy confirm strong binding of the ILs to the SWNTs. Two kinds of resistive sensors were fabricated, one by drop casting of IL-wrapped SWCNTs, the other by conventional dispersion of SWCNTs. Good response and recovery to NO{sub 2} is achieved with the IL-wrapped SWCNTs material upon UV-light exposure, which is needed because decrease the desorption energy barrier to increase the gas molecule desorption. NO{sub 2} can be detected in the 1–20 ppm concentration range. The sensor is not interfered by humidity due to the hydrophobic tail of PF6 (ionic liquid) that makes our sensor highly resistant to moisture.

  19. D-Alanylation of Lipoteichoic Acids Confers Resistance to Cationic Peptides in Group B Streptococcus by Increasing the Cell Wall Density

    PubMed Central

    Saar-Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkadi; Nezer, Ravit; Shmuel-Galia, Liraz; Firon, Arnaud; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) serve as the first line of defense of the innate immune system against invading microbial pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria can resist CAMPs by modifying their anionic teichoic acids (TAs) with D-alanine, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not fully understood. Here, we utilized various functional and biophysical approaches to investigate the interactions of the human pathogen Group B Streptococcus (GBS) with a series of CAMPs having different properties. The data reveal that: (i) D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) enhance GBS resistance only to a subset of CAMPs and there is a direct correlation between resistance and CAMPs length and charge density; (ii) resistance due to reduced anionic charge of LTAs is not attributed to decreased amounts of bound peptides to the bacteria; and (iii) D-alanylation most probably alters the conformation of LTAs which results in increasing the cell wall density, as seen by Transmission Electron Microscopy, and reduces the penetration of CAMPs through the cell wall. Furthermore, Atomic Force Microscopy reveals increased surface rigidity of the cell wall of the wild-type GBS strain to more than 20-fold that of the dltA mutant. We propose that D-alanylation of LTAs confers protection against linear CAMPs mainly by decreasing the flexibility and permeability of the cell wall, rather than by reducing the electrostatic interactions of the peptide with the cell surface. Overall, our findings uncover an important protective role of the cell wall against CAMPs and extend our understanding of mechanisms of bacterial resistance. PMID:22969424

  20. Liquid Metal Walls and the Belt Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, Michael; Dorland, W.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J.; Miller, R.

    2000-10-01

    High flux reactor designs have placed the MHD stabilizing shell well away from the first wall due to breeding and reliability issues. Liquid metal shells containing Li may allow close shells, with much higher elongation (kappa), beta and power density. MHD stability of equilibria with kappa = 2 - 6 and high bootstrap fraction are examined using JSOLVER plus PEST and TOQ plus BALOO. Compared to kappa = 2, stable beta increases by 2.5 for kappa = 3 and 5 for kappa = 6 (with little change in normalized beta). External mode stability (n = 1-10 ) with a wall is similar for kappa = 2-6; a wall at b/a 1.2-1.3 give stability. Resistive wall mode evolution is examined using the new code WALLMODE; feedback power is evaluated using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations (similar to ARIES studies). N = 0 vertical modes are acceptable with a 2-4 cm Li shell at b/a 1.05 -1.1. Resistive wall kink modes for model current profiles are stabilizable by feedback and/or liquid flow as low as 20 m/s; interfacing with PEST is in progress to examinine realistic equilibria. Modest indendation gives bootstrap island stability. Comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 find a strong improvement with kappa for 1) ExB shearing compared to ITG/drift mode growth rates and 2) transport in nonlinear ETG simulations. Also, low edge recycling (density) boundary conditions substantially improve H mode pedestal stabilty, for additional global confinement improvement. Even with H mode scaling law confinement, kappa =6 gives ignition in a .8 m major radius device with Cu coils (12T at the coil).

  1. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    PubMed

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  2. The role of carbon and nitrogen on the H-mode confinement in ASDEX Upgrade with a metal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Dunne, M. G.; Frassinetti, L.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Fischer, R.; Järvinen, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Laggner, F. M.; McDermott, R. M.; Potzel, S.; Schweinzer, J.; Tardini, G.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    Carbon (CD4) and nitrogen (N2) have been seeded in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) with a tungsten wall and have both led to a 20-30% confinement improvement. The reference plasma is a standard target plasma with I p /B T  =  1 MA/2.5 T, total input power P tot ~ 12 MW and normalized pressure of β N ~ 1.8. Carbon and nitrogen are almost perfectly exchangeable for the core, pedestal and divertor plasma in this experiment where impurity concentrations of C and N of 2% are achieved and Z eff only mildly increases from ~1.3 to ~1.7. As the radiation potentials of C and N are similar and peak well below 100 eV, both impurities act as divertor radiators and radiate well outside the pedestal region. The outer divertor is purposely kept in an attached state when C and N are seeded to avoid confinement degradation by detachment. As reported in earlier publications for nitrogen, carbon is also seen to reduce the high field side high density (the so-called HFSHD) in the scrape off layer above the inner divertor strike point by about 50%. This is accompanied by a confinement improvement for both low (δ ~ 0.25) and high (δ ~ 0.4) triangularity configurations for both seeding gases, due to an increase of pedestal temperature and stiff core temperature profiles. The electron density profiles show no apparent change due to the seeding. As an orthogonal effect, increasing the triangularity leads to an additionally increased pedestal density, independent of the impurity seeding. This experiment further closes the gap in understanding the confinement differences observed in carbon and metal wall devices; the absence of carbon can be substituted by nitrogen which leads to a similar confinement benefit. So far, no definite physics explanation for the confinement enhancement has been obtained, but the experimental observations in this paper provide input for further model development.

  3. Structure-driven nonlinear instability as the origin of the explosive reconnection dynamics in resistive double tearing modes.

    PubMed

    Janvier, M; Kishimoto, Y; Li, J Q

    2011-11-04

    The onset of abrupt magnetic reconnection events, observed in the nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes (DTM), is investigated via reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We have identified the critical threshold for the parameters characterizing the linear DTM stability leading to the bifurcation to the explosive dynamics. A new type of secondary instability is discovered that is excited once the magnetic islands on each rational surface reach a critical structure characterized here by the width and the angle rating their triangularization. This new instability is an island structure-driven nonlinear instability, identified as the trigger of the subsequent nonlinear dynamics which couples flow and flux perturbations. This instability only weakly depends on resistivity.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against antibiotic-resistant strains of the cell wall-free bacteria Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Hillitt, K L; Jenkins, R E; Spiller, O B; Beeton, M L

    2017-03-01

    The susceptibility of the cell wall-free bacterial pathogens Ureaplasma spp. to Manuka honey was examined. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Manuka honey for four Ureaplasma urealyticum and four Ureaplasma parvum isolates was determined. Sensitivity to honey was also compared to clinical isolates with resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Finally step-wise resistance training was utilized in an attempt to induce increased tolerance to honey. The MIC was dependent on the initial bacterial load with 7·5 and 18·0% w/v honey required to inhibit U. urealyticum at 1 and 10(6) colour changing units (CCU), respectively, and 4·8 and 15·3% w/v required to inhibit U. parvum at 1 and 10(6)  CCU respectively. MIC values were consistently lower for U. parvum compared with U. urealyticum. Antimicrobial activity was seen against tetracycline-resistant, erythromycin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates at 10(5)  CCU. No resistance to honey was observed with 50 consecutive challenges at increasing concentrations of honey. This is the first report of the antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against a cell wall-free bacterial pathogen. The antimicrobial activity was retained against antibiotic-resistant strains and it was not possible to generate resistant mutants.

  5. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  6. Nanosecond soliton pulse generation by mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using single-walled carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohd Afiq; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Zulkepely, Nurul Rozullyah; Nor, Roslan Md; Ahmad, Fauzan; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-12-20

    We demonstrate a simple and low cost mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) operating in the nanosecond region using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based saturable absorber (SA). A droplet of SWCNT solution is applied on the end of a fiber ferrule, which is then mated to another clean connector ferrule to construct an SA. Then the SA is integrated into a ring EDFL cavity for nanosecond pulse generation. The EDFL operates at around 1570.4 nm, with a soliton-like spectrum with small Kelly sidebands, which confirms the attainment of the anomalous dispersion. It produces a soliton pulse train with a 332 ns width, repetition rate of 909.1 kHz, an average output power of 0.31 mW, and energy of 0.34 nJ at the maximum pump power of 130.8 mW.

  7. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, Annika Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  8. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, Annika; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at IP = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  9. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement. PMID:28287159

  10. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  11. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C T; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-13

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  12. Value of baseline left lateral wall postsystolic displacement assessed by M-mode to predict reverse remodeling by cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Sassone, Biagio; Capecchi, Alessandro; Boggian, Giulio; Gabrieli, Luca; Saccà, Saverio; Vandelli, Roberto; Petracci, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato

    2007-08-01

    Although left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony assessed by ultrasound is emerging as superior to QRS duration in predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the role of conventional echocardiographic parameters of dyssynchrony is still debated. Forty-eight patients with heart failure in New York Heart Association classes III to IV, LV ejection fraction < or =35%, and QRS duration > or =120 ms were studied. LV dyssynchrony was evaluated by M-mode as septal-to-posterior wall motion delay and left lateral wall postsystolic displacement (LWPSD). Interventricular dyssynchrony was defined as the difference between the LV and right ventricular preejection periods measured by standard Doppler. Reverse remodeling was defined as an LV end-systolic volume decrease > or =15% after 6 months of CRT. Thirty-one patients (65%) were considered responders to CRT. At baseline responders differed from nonresponders by having less severe New York Heart Association class (p = 0.006), lower percentage of ischemic cause (p = 0.006), longer PR interval (p = 0.013), shorter LV diastolic filling time corrected for heart rate (p = 0.005), and presence of LWPSD (p = 0.003). At multivariate analysis, predictors of CRT response were LWPSD (odds ratio [OR] 1.045, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.001 to 1.091; p = 0.043), LV diastolic filling time corrected for heart rate (OR 0.855, 95% CI 0.744 to 0.981, p = 0.026), and nonischemic cause (OR 0.109, 95% CI 0.018 to 0.657, p = 0.016). In conclusion, preimplantation assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony based on M-mode LWPSD may predict LV reverse remodeling after CRT, especially in patients with nonischemic cause and shorter diastolic filling time. This suggests the potential role of baseline postsystolic mechanical phenomena in determining response to CRT independently of QRS duration.

  13. Nonpolar resistive memory switching with all four possible resistive switching modes in amorphous LaHoO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Fachini, Esteban; Scott, James F.

    2015-09-07

    We studied the resistive memory switching in pulsed laser deposited amorphous LaHoO{sub 3} (a-LHO) thin films for non-volatile resistive random access memory applications. Nonpolar resistive switching (RS) was achieved in Pt/a-LHO/Pt memory cells with all four possible RS modes (i.e., positive unipolar, positive bipolar, negative unipolar, and negative bipolar) having high R{sub ON}/R{sub OFF} ratios (in the range of ∼10{sup 4}–10{sup 5}) and non-overlapping switching voltages (set voltage, V{sub ON} ∼ ±3.6–4.2 V and reset voltage, V{sub OFF} ∼ ±1.3–1.6 V) with a small variation of about ±5–8%. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I–V) characteristics indicated the metallic conduction in low resistance states (LRS). We believe that the formation (set) and rupture (reset) of mixed conducting filaments formed out of oxygen vacancies and metallic Ho atoms could be responsible for the change in the resistance states of the memory cell. Detailed analysis of I–V characteristics further corroborated the formation of conductive nanofilaments based on metal-like (Ohmic) conduction in LRS. Simmons-Schottky emission was found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism in the high resistance state.

  14. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2 NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium.

    PubMed

    Anas, A; Jiya, J; Rameez, M J; Anand, P B; Anantharaman, M R; Nair, S

    2013-01-01

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO(2) NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium. Bacterial sensitivity towards antibiotics and Ag-SiO(2) NC was studied using standard disc diffusion and death rate assay, respectively. The effect of Ag-SiO(2) NC on cell wall integrity was monitored using SDS assay and fatty acid profile analysis, while the effect on metabolism and genetic stability was assayed microscopically, using CTC viability staining and comet assay, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to be resistant to β-lactamase, glycopeptidase, sulfonamide, quinolones, nitrofurantoin and macrolides classes of antibiotics. Complete mortality of the bacterium was achieved with 80 μg ml(-1) concentration of Ag-SiO(2) NC. The cell wall integrity reduced with increasing time and reached a plateau of 70% in 110 min. Changes were also noticed in the proportion of fatty acids after the treatment. Inside the cytoplasm, a complete inhibition of electron transport system was achieved with 100 μg ml(-1) Ag-SiO(2) NC, followed by DNA breakage. The study thus demonstrates that Ag-SiO(2) NC invades the cytoplasm of the multiple drug-resistant P. aeruginosa by impinging upon the cell wall integrity and kills the cells by interfering with electron transport chain and the genetic stability. Although the synthesis, structural characteristics and biofunction of silver nanoparticles are well understood, their application in antimicrobial therapy is still at its infancy as only a small number of microorganisms are tested to be sensitive to nanoparticles. A thorough knowledge of the mode of interaction of nanoparticles with bacteria at subcellular level is mandatory for any clinical application. The present study deals with the interactions of Ag-SiO2NC with the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  15. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G; Pla, Jesus; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    We have morphologically characterizedCandida tropicalisisolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization ofGalleria mellonellalarvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host.

  16. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C.; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C.; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G.; Pla, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    We have morphologically characterized Candida tropicalis isolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization of Galleria mellonella larvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host. PMID:26833156

  17. Fracture resistance and failure mode of posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two zirconia CAD/CAM systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Suárez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Peláez, Jesús; Rodríguez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an improvement of zirconia ceramic materials to replace posterior missing teeth. To date little in vitro studies has been carried out on the fracture resistance of zirconia veneered posterior fixed dental prostheses. This study investigated the fracture resistance and the failure mode of 3-unit zirconia-based posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two CAD/CAM systems. Material and Methods Twenty posterior fixed dental prostheses were studied. Samples were randomly divided into two groups (n=10 each) according to the zirconia ceramic analyzed: Lava and Procera. Specimens were loaded until fracture under static load. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon´s rank sum test and Wilcoxon´s signed-rank test (P<0.05). Results Partial fracture of the veneering porcelain occurred in 100% of the samples. Within each group, significant differences were shown between the veneering and the framework fracture resistance (P=0.002). The failure occurred in the connector cervical area in 80% of the cases. Conclusions All fracture load values of the zirconia frameworks could be considered clinically acceptable. The connector area is the weak point of the restorations. Key words:Fixed dental prostheses, zirconium-dioxide, zirconia, fracture resistance, failure mode. PMID:26155341

  18. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  19. Ultra-high oxidation resistance of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube bundles grown by an "all-laser" process.

    PubMed

    Yi, J H; Aïssa, B; El, Khakani M A

    2007-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were laterally grown on SiO2/Si substrates by means of an "all-laser" growth process. Our "all-laser" process stands out by its exclusive use of the same pulsed UV laser, first, to deposit the CoNi nanocatalyst and, second, to grow SWCNTs through the laser ablation of a pure graphite target. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs generally self-assemble into bundles (5-15 nm-diam.) sprouting from the CoNi nanocatalyst and laterally bridging the 2 microm gap separating adjacent catalysed electrodes (in either "suspended" or "on-substrate" geometries). A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of both suspended and on-substrate SWCNTs was achieved. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs were subjected to annealing under flowing oxygen at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1100 degrees C. Systematic scanning electron microscopy observations combined with micro-Raman analyses revealed that more than 20% of suspended nanotubes were still stable at temperatures as high as 900 degrees C under flowing O2 while the on-substrate counterpart were completely burnt out at this temperature. Accordingly, the activation energy, as deduced from the Arrhenius plot, of the suspended SWCNTs is found to be as high as approximately 180 kJ mol(-1) (approximately 9 times higher than that of the on-substrate ones). The high quality (almost defect-free) of the nanotubes synthesized by the "all-laser" approach, their protected tips into the embedded CoNi catalyst nanolayer together with their suspended geometry are thought to be responsible for their unprecedented ultra-high oxidation resistance. This opens up new prospects for the use of these suspended nanotubes into nanodevices that have to operate under highly oxidizing environments.

  20. Loss-of-Function Mutation of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 in Arabidopsis Leads to Reduced Cell Wall Acetylation and Increased Resistance to Botrytis cinerea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Nafisi, Majse; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Orfila, Caroline; Gille, Sascha; Rautengarten, Carsten; Cherk, Candice; Marcus, Susan E.; Somerville, Shauna; Pauly, Markus; Knox, J. Paul; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all polysaccharides in plant cell walls are O-acetylated, including the various pectic polysaccharides and the hemicelluloses xylan, mannan, and xyloglucan. However, the enzymes involved in the polysaccharide acetylation have not been identified. While the role of polysaccharide acetylation in vivo is unclear, it is known to reduce biofuel yield from lignocellulosic biomass by the inhibition of microorganisms used for fermentation. We have analyzed four Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homologs of the protein Cas1p known to be involved in polysaccharide O-acetylation in Cryptococcus neoformans. Loss-of-function mutants in one of the genes, designated REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 (RWA2), had decreased levels of acetylated cell wall polymers. Cell wall material isolated from mutant leaves and treated with alkali released about 20% lower amounts of acetic acid when compared with the wild type. The same level of acetate deficiency was found in several pectic polymers and in xyloglucan. Thus, the rwa2 mutations affect different polymers to the same extent. There were no obvious morphological or growth differences observed between the wild type and rwa2 mutants. However, both alleles of rwa2 displayed increased tolerance toward the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. PMID:21212300

  1. Ectopic expression of a novel OsExtensin-like gene consistently enhances plant lodging resistance by regulating cell elongation and cell wall thickening in rice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunfen; Li, Ying; Hu, Zhen; Hu, Huizhen; Wang, Guangya; Li, Ao; Wang, Youmei; Tu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Tao; Peng, Liangcai; Feng, Shengqiu

    2017-06-02

    Plant lodging resistance is an important integrative agronomic trait of grain yield and quality in crops. Although extensin proteins are tightly associated with plant cell growth and cell wall construction, little has yet been reported about their impacts on plant lodging resistance. In this study, we isolated a novel extensin-like (OsEXTL) gene in rice, and selected transgenic rice plants that expressed OsEXTL under driven with two distinct promoters. Despite different OsEXTL expression levels, two-promoter-driven OsEXTL-transgenic plants, compared to a rice cultivar and an empty vector, exhibited significantly reduced cell elongation in stem internodes, leading to relatively shorter plant heights by 7%-10%. Meanwhile, the OsEXTL-transgenic plants showed remarkably thickened secondary cell walls with higher cellulose levels in the mature plants, resulting in significantly increased detectable mechanical strength (extension and pushing forces) in the mature transgenic plants. Due to reduced plant height and increased plant mechanical strength, the OsEXTL-transgenic plants were detected with largely enhanced lodging resistances in 3 years field experiments, compared to those of the rice cultivar ZH11. In addition, despite relatively short plant heights, the OsEXTL-transgenic plants maintain normal grain yields and biomass production, owing to their increased cellulose levels and thickened cell walls. Hence, this study demonstrates a largely improved lodging resistance in the OsEXTL-transgenic rice plants, and provides insights into novel extensin functions in plant cell growth and development, cell wall network construction and wall structural remodelling. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Tempo and mode of plant RNA virus escape from RNA interference-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Lafforgue, Guillaume; Martínez, Fernando; Sardanyés, Josep; de la Iglesia, Francisca; Niu, Qi-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Solé, Ricard V; Chua, Nam-Hai; Daròs, José-Antonio; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-10-01

    A biotechnological application of artificial microRNAs (amiRs) is the generation of plants that are resistant to virus infection. This resistance has proven to be highly effective and sequence specific. However, before these transgenic plants can be deployed in the field, it is important to evaluate the likelihood of the emergence of resistance-breaking mutants. Two issues are of particular interest: (i) whether such mutants can arise in nontransgenic plants that may act as reservoirs and (ii) whether a suboptimal expression level of the transgene, resulting in subinhibitory concentrations of the amiR, would favor the emergence of escape mutants. To address the first issue, we experimentally evolved independent lineages of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) (family Potyviridae) in fully susceptible wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and then simulated the spillover of the evolving virus to fully resistant A. thaliana transgenic plants. To address the second issue, the evolution phase took place with transgenic plants that expressed the amiR at subinhibitory concentrations. Our results show that TuMV populations replicating in susceptible hosts accumulated resistance-breaking alleles that resulted in the overcoming of the resistance of fully resistant plants. The rate at which resistance was broken was 7 times higher for TuMV populations that experienced subinhibitory concentrations of the antiviral amiR. A molecular characterization of escape alleles showed that they all contained at least one nucleotide substitution in the target sequence, generally a transition of the G-to-A and C-to-U types, with many instances of convergent molecular evolution. To better understand the viral population dynamics taking place within each host, as well as to evaluate relevant population genetic parameters, we performed in silico simulations of the experiments. Together, our results contribute to the rational management of amiR-based antiviral resistance in plants.

  3. Tempo and Mode of Plant RNA Virus Escape from RNA Interference-Mediated Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lafforgue, Guillaume; Martínez, Fernando; Sardanyés, Josep; de la Iglesia, Francisca; Niu, Qi-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Solé, Ricard V.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Daròs, José-Antonio; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    A biotechnological application of artificial microRNAs (amiRs) is the generation of plants that are resistant to virus infection. This resistance has proven to be highly effective and sequence specific. However, before these transgenic plants can be deployed in the field, it is important to evaluate the likelihood of the emergence of resistance-breaking mutants. Two issues are of particular interest: (i) whether such mutants can arise in nontransgenic plants that may act as reservoirs and (ii) whether a suboptimal expression level of the transgene, resulting in subinhibitory concentrations of the amiR, would favor the emergence of escape mutants. To address the first issue, we experimentally evolved independent lineages of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) (family Potyviridae) in fully susceptible wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and then simulated the spillover of the evolving virus to fully resistant A. thaliana transgenic plants. To address the second issue, the evolution phase took place with transgenic plants that expressed the amiR at subinhibitory concentrations. Our results show that TuMV populations replicating in susceptible hosts accumulated resistance-breaking alleles that resulted in the overcoming of the resistance of fully resistant plants. The rate at which resistance was broken was 7 times higher for TuMV populations that experienced subinhibitory concentrations of the antiviral amiR. A molecular characterization of escape alleles showed that they all contained at least one nucleotide substitution in the target sequence, generally a transition of the G-to-A and C-to-U types, with many instances of convergent molecular evolution. To better understand the viral population dynamics taking place within each host, as well as to evaluate relevant population genetic parameters, we performed in silico simulations of the experiments. Together, our results contribute to the rational management of amiR-based antiviral resistance in plants. PMID:21775453

  4. The maize disease resistance gene Htn1 against northern corn leaf blight encodes a wall-associated receptor-like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hurni, Severine; Scheuermann, Daniela; Krattinger, Simon G.; Kessel, Bettina; Wicker, Thomas; Herren, Gerhard; Fitze, Mirjam N.; Breen, James; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Keller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Exserohilum turcicum is an important foliar disease of maize that is mainly controlled by growing resistant maize cultivars. The Htn1 locus confers quantitative and partial NCLB resistance by delaying the onset of lesion formation. Htn1 represents an important source of genetic resistance that was originally introduced from a Mexican landrace into modern maize breeding lines in the 1970s. Using a high-resolution map-based cloning approach, we delimited Htn1 to a 131.7-kb physical interval on chromosome 8 that contained three candidate genes encoding two wall-associated receptor-like kinases (ZmWAK-RLK1 and ZmWAK-RLK2) and one wall-associated receptor-like protein (ZmWAK-RLP1). TILLING (targeting induced local lesions in genomes) mutants in ZmWAK-RLK1 were more susceptible to NCLB than wild-type plants, both in greenhouse experiments and in the field. ZmWAK-RLK1 contains a nonarginine-aspartate (non-RD) kinase domain, typically found in plant innate immune receptors. Sequence comparison showed that the extracellular domain of ZmWAK-RLK1 is highly diverse between different maize genotypes. Furthermore, an alternative splice variant resulting in a truncated protein was present at higher frequency in the susceptible parents of the mapping populations compared with in the resistant parents. Hence, the quantitative Htn1 disease resistance in maize is encoded by an unusual innate immune receptor with an extracellular wall-associated kinase domain. These results further highlight the importance of this protein family in resistance to adapted pathogens. PMID:26124097

  5. Effects of divergent resistance exercise contraction mode and dietary supplementation type on anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis and muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Farup, Jean; Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Holm, Lars; Jessen, Niels; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-01

    Greater force produced with eccentric (ECC) compared to concentric (CONC) contractions, may comprise a stronger driver of muscle growth, which may be further augmented by protein supplementation. We investigated the effect of differentiated contraction mode with either whey protein hydrolysate and carbohydrate (WPH + CHO) or isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation on regulation of anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Twenty-four human participants performed unilateral isolated maximal ECC versus CONC contractions during exercise habituation, single-bout exercise and 12 weeks of training combined with WPH + CHO or CHO supplements. In the exercise-habituated state, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, p-rpS6 increased by approximately 42, 206 and 213 %, respectively, at 1 h post-exercise, with resistance exercise per se; whereas, the phosphorylation was exclusively maintained with ECC at 3 and 5 h post-exercise. This acute anabolic signalling response did not differ between the isocaloric supplement types, neither did protein fractional synthesis rate differ between interventions. Twelve weeks of ECC as well as CONC resistance training augmented hypertrophy with WPH + CHO group compared to the CHO group (7.3 ± 1.0 versus 3.4 ± 0.8 %), independently of exercise contraction type. Training did not produce major changes in basal levels of Akt-mTOR pathway components. In conclusion, maximal ECC contraction mode may constitute a superior driver of acute anabolic signalling that may not be mirrored in the muscle protein synthesis rate. Furthermore, with prolonged high-volume resistance training, contraction mode seems less influential on the magnitude of muscle hypertrophy, whereas protein and carbohydrate supplementation augments muscle hypertrophy as compared to isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation .

  6. Asparaginase Therapy in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on the Mode of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    Asparaginase is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. The therapeutic efficacy (e.g., chemoresistance) and adverse effects of asparaginase (e.g., hypersensivity and pancreatitis) have been investigated over the past four decades. It was suggested early on that leukemic cells are resistant to asparaginase because of their increased asparagine synthetase activity. Afterward, other mechanisms associated with asparaginase resistance were reported. Not only leukemic cells but also patients themselves may play a role in causing asparaginase resistance, which has been associated with unfavorable outcome in children with ALL. This article will briefly review asparaginase therapy in children with ALL and comprehensively analyze recent reports on the potential mechanisms of asparaginase resistance.

  7. B-mode sonography wall thickness assessment of the temporal and axillary arteries for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Schröttle, Angelika; Baustel, Kerstin; Lottspeich, Christian; Dechant, Claudia; Treitl, Karla-Maria; Treitl, Marcus; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Hoffmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of B-mode compression sonography of the temporal arteries (tempCS) and B-mode sonographic measurement of the axillary artery intima media thickness (axIMT) for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA). After having established measurement of tempCS and axIMT in our routine diagnostic workup, 92 consecutive patients with a suspected diagnosis of GCA were investigated. Clinical characteristics were recorded and wall thickening of the temporal arteries (tempCS) and axillary arteries (axIMT) was measured (mm). Using the final clinical diagnosis as the reference standard, receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed. In a subgroup of 26 patients interobserver agreement was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation. Cranial GCA, extracranial GCA, and combined cranial/extracranial GCA were diagnosed in 18, 7, and 9 individuals, respectively. For the diagnosis of cranial GCA, tempCS had an excellent area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95, with a cut-off of ≥0.7 mm offering a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 95%. The AUC of axIMT for the diagnosis of extracranial GCA was 0.91 (cut-off ≥1.2 mm: sensitivity and specificity 81.3 and 96.1%). Applying a combined tempCS/axIMT cut-off of ≥0.7mm/1.2 mm, we calculated an overall sensitivity and specificity for the final clinical diagnosis of cranial and/or extracranial GCA of 85.3% and 91.4%. Interobserver agreement was strong for both parameters assessed (Spearman's rho 0.72 and 0.77, respectively). The combination of tempCS/axIMT allows objective sonographic assessment in suspected GCA with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  8. Regulation of the expression of cell wall stress stimulon member gene msrA1 in methicillin-susceptible or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pechous, Roger; Ledala, Nagender; Wilkinson, Brian J; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K

    2004-08-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling studies of the response of Staphylococcus aureus to cell wall-active antibiotics have led to the discovery of a cell wall stress stimulon of genes induced by these agents. msrA1, encoding methionine sulfoxide reductase, is a highly induced member gene of this stimulon. In the present study we show that msrA1 induction by oxacillin is common to all methicillin-susceptible strains studied but did not occur in two homogeneous and two heterogeneous methicillin-resistant strains. However, msrA1 was induced by vancomycin and/or D-cycloserine in methicillin-resistant strains. Lysozyme and lysostaphin treatment did not induce msrA1 expression. Oxacillin-induced msrA1 expression was enhanced by ca. 30% in a SigB+ derivative (SH1000) of the SigB-defective RN450 (NCTC 8325-4) strain. msrA1 expression was not affected in mutants in the global regulatory systems agr and sar. Glycerol monolaurate, an inhibitor of signal transduction, inhibited the oxacillin-induced transcription of msrA1 and other cell wall stress stimulon member genes, vraS and dnaK. These observations suggest that the cell wall stress stimulon is induced by inhibition of the process of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and the inhibitory effects of glycerol monolaurate indicate that gene expression is dependent on a signal transduction pathway.

  9. Electromigration failure mode concerning negative resistance shift of Cu interconnects buried in porous low-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Yin, Binfeng; Yu, Hewei; Chen, Leigang; Gao, Lin; Zhou, Ke; Kuo, Chinte

    2017-02-01

    Electromigration failure mode concerning a negative resistance shift of 4%-11% and cathode burnout was reported for Cu interconnects buried in porous low-k in this paper. Evidence for oxidation and debonding of Ta/TaN liner at high temperature was revealed, which was demonstrated to have been enabled by the unsealed porous low-k due to moisture uptake. The cathode burnout was thus attributed to severe Joule heating induced in the insulated liner after oxidation. The resistance decay of Cu also exhibited to be mainly consistent with the calculation from specularity recovery of electron scattering at the Cu/Ta interface after oxidation and debonding of the liner, although other factors like strain relaxation may also have some contribution.

  10. Antifungal agents commonly used in the superficial and mucosal candidiasis treatment: mode of action and resistance development

    PubMed Central

    Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Kurzątkowski, Wiesław

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in medical sciences and therapy resulted in an increased number of immunocompromised individuals. Candida albicans is the leading opportunistic fungal pathogen causing infections in humans, ranging from superficial mucosal lesions to disseminated or bloodstream candidiasis. Superficial candidiasis not always presents a risk to the life of the infected host, however it significantly lowers the quality of life. Superficial Candida infections are difficult to treat and their frequency of occurrence is currently rising. To implement successful treatment doctors should be up to date with better understanding of C. albicans resistance mechanisms. Despite high frequency of Candida infections there is a limited number of antimycotics available for therapy. This review focuses on current understanding of the mode of action and resistance mechanisms to conventional and emerging antifungal agents for treatment of superficial and mucosal candidiasis. PMID:24353489

  11. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Methods Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. stephensi was assessed using adult bioassay tests. In the laboratory, determination of diagnostic dose, assessment of residual activity on different substrates, cross-resistance pattern with different insecticides and potentiation studies using piperonyl butoxide were undertaken by following standard procedures. Potential cross-resistance patterns were assessed on field populations of An. culicifacies. Results A dose of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as the diagnostic concentration for assessing susceptibility applying the WHO tube test method in anopheline mosquitoes with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period. The DDT-resistant/malathion-deltamethrin-susceptible strain of An. culicifacies species C showed higher LD50 and LD99 (0.67 and 2.39% respectively) values than the DDT-malathion-deltamethrin susceptible An. culicifacies species A (0.41 and 2.0% respectively) and An. stephensi strains (0.43 and 2.13% respectively) and there was no statistically significant difference in mortalities among the three mosquito species tested (p > 0.05). Residual activity of chlorfenapyr a.i. of 400 mg/m2 on five fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement + distemper was found to be effective up to 24 weeks against An. culicifacies and up to 34 weeks against An. stephensi. No cross-resistance to DDT, malathion, bendiocarb and deltamethrin was observed with chlorfenapyr in laboratory-reared strains of An. stephensi and field-caught An. culicifacies. Potentiation studies

  12. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Barik, Tapan K; Sharma, Poonam; Bhatt, Rajendra M; Srivastava, Harish C; Sreehari, Uragayala; Dash, Aditya P

    2011-01-25

    Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. stephensi was assessed using adult bioassay tests. In the laboratory, determination of diagnostic dose, assessment of residual activity on different substrates, cross-resistance pattern with different insecticides and potentiation studies using piperonyl butoxide were undertaken by following standard procedures. Potential cross-resistance patterns were assessed on field populations of An. culicifacies. A dose of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as the diagnostic concentration for assessing susceptibility applying the WHO tube test method in anopheline mosquitoes with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period. The DDT-resistant/malathion-deltamethrin-susceptible strain of An. culicifacies species C showed higher LD50 and LD99 (0.67 and 2.39% respectively) values than the DDT-malathion-deltamethrin susceptible An. culicifacies species A (0.41 and 2.0% respectively) and An. stephensi strains (0.43 and 2.13% respectively) and there was no statistically significant difference in mortalities among the three mosquito species tested (p > 0.05). Residual activity of chlorfenapyr a.i. of 400 mg/m2 on five fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement + distemper was found to be effective up to 24 weeks against An. culicifacies and up to 34 weeks against An. stephensi. No cross-resistance to DDT, malathion, bendiocarb and deltamethrin was observed with chlorfenapyr in laboratory-reared strains of An. stephensi and field-caught An. culicifacies. Potentiation studies demonstrated the antagonistic

  13. Segmentation of plate coupling, fate of subduction fluids, and modes of arc magmatism in Cascadia, inferred from magnetotelluric resistivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Evans, Rob L.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Maris, Virginie; McGary, R. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Five magnetotelluric (MT) profiles have been acquired across the Cascadia subduction system and transformed using 2-D and 3-D nonlinear inversion to yield electrical resistivity cross sections to depths of ∼200 km. Distinct changes in plate coupling, subduction fluid evolution, and modes of arc magmatism along the length of Cascadia are clearly expressed in the resistivity structure. Relatively high resistivities under the coasts of northern and southern Cascadia correlate with elevated degrees of inferred plate locking, and suggest fluid- and sediment-deficient conditions. In contrast, the north-central Oregon coastal structure is quite conductive from the plate interface to shallow depths offshore, correlating with poor plate locking and the possible presence of subducted sediments. Low-resistivity fluidized zones develop at slab depths of 35–40 km starting ∼100 km west of the arc on all profiles, and are interpreted to represent prograde metamorphic fluid release from the subducting slab. The fluids rise to forearc Moho levels, and sometimes shallower, as the arc is approached. The zones begin close to clusters of low-frequency earthquakes, suggesting fluid controls on the transition to steady sliding. Under the northern and southern Cascadia arc segments, low upper mantle resistivities are consistent with flux melting above the slab plus possible deep convective backarc upwelling toward the arc. In central Cascadia, extensional deformation is interpreted to segregate upper mantle melts leading to underplating and low resistivities at Moho to lower crustal levels below the arc and nearby backarc. The low- to high-temperature mantle wedge transition lies slightly trenchward of the arc.

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins: mode of action, insect resistance and consequences for crop protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are insect pathogens that produce different Cry and Cyt toxins to kill their hosts. Here we review the group of three-domain Cry (3d-Cry) toxins. Expression of these 3d-Cry toxins in transgenic crops has contributed to efficient control of insect pests and a reduction in the use of chemical insecticides. The mode of action of 3d-Cry toxins involves sequential interactions with several insect midgut proteins that facilitate the formation of an oligomeric structure and induce its insertion into the membrane, forming a pore that kills midgut cells. We review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these Cry toxins and focus our attention on the different mechanisms of resistance that insects have evolved to counter their action, such as mutations in cadherin, APN and ABC transporter genes. Activity of Cry1AMod toxins, which are able to form toxin oligomers in the absence of receptors, against different resistant populations, including those affected in the ABC transporter and the role of dominant negative mutants as antitoxins, supports the hypothesis that toxin oligomerization is a limiting step in the Cry insecticidal activity. Knowledge of the action of 3d-Cry toxin and the resistance mechanisms to these toxins will set the basis for a rational design of novel toxins to overcome insect resistance, extending the useful lifespan of Cry toxins in insect control programs. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-mode-locking in erbium-doped fibre lasers with saturable polymer film absorbers containing single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, Anton V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the ring and linear schemes of erbium-doped fibre lasers in which passive mode locking was achieved with the help of saturable absorbers made of high-optical quality films based on cellulose derivatives with dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes. The films were prepared by the original method with the use of nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method. The films exhibit nonlinear absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. Pulses in the form of optical solitons of duration 1.17 ps at a avelength of 1.56 μm were generated in the ring scheme of the erbium laser. The average output power was 1.1 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz upon p