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Sample records for resolution carotid black-blood

  1. [Improved visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries using phase sensitive inversion recovery combined with 3D IR-T₁TFE].

    PubMed

    Horie, Tomohiko; Kawakata, Mami; Kajihara, Nao; Takano, Hayato; Honda, Masatoshi; Muro, Isao; Ogino, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries. We experimented on phantom and in-vivo study of 3 dimension (3D) inversion recovery T(1) turbo field echo combined with phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE) at 3.0 Tesla. As a result, the contrast has been improved by calculated images of PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE set to inversion time (TI) 350 ms that is shorter than null point of blood. This displays that the contrast between blood and tissues can be improved when the longitudinal magnetization of blood is a negative. Therefore, the visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries has been improved by the calculated images of PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE set to TI that is shorter than null point of blood.

  2. [Carotid plaque assessment using inversion recovery T1 weighted-3 dimensions variable refocus flip angle turbo spin echo sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different angle evolutions black blood imaging].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuji; Yoneyama, Masami; Nakamura, Masanobu; Ozaki, Satoshi; Ito, Kenjiro; Hiura, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerable plaque can be attributed to induction of ischemic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging of carotid artery is valuable to detect the plaque. Magnetization prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MPRAGE) method could detect hemorrhagic vulnerable plaque as high intensity signal; however, blood flow is not sufficiently masked by this method. The contrast for plaque in T1 weighted image (T1WI) could not be obtained sufficiently with black blood image (BBI) by sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different angle evolutions (SPACE) method as turbo spin echo (TSE). In addition, an appearance of artifact by slow flow is a problem. Considering these controversial situations in plaque imaging, we examined the modified BBI inversion recovery (IR)-SPACE in which IR was added for SPACE method so that the contrast for plaque in T1WI was optimized. We investigated the application of this method in plaque imaging. As a result of phantom imaging, the contrast for plaque in T1WI was definitely obtained by choosing an appropriate inversion time (TI) for the corresponding repetition time. In clinical cases, blood flow was sufficiently masked by IR-SPACE method and the plaque imaging was clearly obtained in clinical cases to the same extent as MPRAGE method. Since BBI with IR-SPACE method was derived from both IR pulse and flow void effect, this method could obtain the blood flow masking effect definitely. The present study suggested that SPACE method might be applicable to estimate properties of carotid artery plaque.

  3. Feasibility of endovascular optical coherence tomography for high-resolution carotid vessel wall imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kyle H. Y.; Sun, Cuiru; Cruz, Juan P.; Marotta, Thomas R.; Spears, Julian; Montanera, Walter J.; Herman, Peter R.; Thind, Aman; Courtney, Brian; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS) is a procedure that treats carotid atherosclerosis which should be monitored by in vivo high resolution imaging for the quality of the procedure and potential complications. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography to construct high resolution two and three dimensional images of stenting in porcine carotid artery for high accuracy diagnostic purposes. Four Yorkshire pigs were anaesthetized and catheterized. A state-of-the-art optical coherence tomography (OCT) system (Lightlab Imaging, St. Jude Medical Inc.) and an automated injector were used to obtain both healthy and stented porcine carotid artery images. Data obtained were then processed for visualization. The state-of-the-art OCT system was able to capture high resolution images of both healthy and stented carotid arteries. High quality three dimensional images of stented carotid arteries were constructed, clearly depicting stent apposition and thrombus formation over different stents. The results demonstrated that current state-of-the-art OCT system can be used to generate high quality three dimensional images of carotid arterial stents for accurate diagnosis of stent apposition and complications under appropriate imaging conditions.

  4. Comprehensive data visualization for high resolution endovascular carotid arterial wall imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kyle H. Y.; Sun, Cuiru; Cruz, Juan P.; Marotta, Thomas R.; Spears, Julian; Montanera, Walter J.; Thind, Aman; Courtney, Brian; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-05-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a minimally invasive endovascular procedure that may benefit from in vivo high resolution imaging for monitoring the physical placement of the stent and potential complications. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography to construct high resolution 2D and 3D images of stenting in porcine carotid artery. Four Yorkshire pigs were anaesthetized and catheterized. A state-of-the-art optical coherence tomography (OCT) system and an automated injector were used to obtain both healthy and stented porcine carotid artery images. Data obtained were then processed for visualization. The state-of-the-art OCT system was able to capture high resolution images of both healthy and stented carotid arteries. High quality 3D images of healthy and stented carotid arteries were constructed, clearly depicting vessel wall morphological features, stent apposition and thrombus formation over the inserted stent. The results demonstrate that OCT can be used to generate high quality 3D images of carotid arterial stents for accurate diagnosis of stent apposition and complications under appropriate imaging conditions.

  5. Mineral Volume and Morphology in Carotid Plaque Specimens Using High-Resolution MRI and CT

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Popescu, Andra M.; Woo, John H.; Song, Hee Kwon; Wright, Alexander C.; Mohler, Emile R.; Harding, John D.; Zager, Eric L.; Fairman, Ronald M.; Golden, Michael A.; Velazquez, Omaida C.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective High-resolution MRI methods have been used to evaluate carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque content. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of high-resolution MRI in evaluation of the quantity and pattern of mineral deposition in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens, with quantitative micro-CT as the gold standard. Methods and Results High-resolution MRI and CT were compared in 20 CEA specimens. Linear regression comparing mineral volumes generated from CT (VCT) and MRI (VMRI) data demonstrated good correlation using simple thresholding (VMRI=-0.01+0.98VCT; R2=0.90; threshold=4×noise) and k-means clustering methods (VMRI=-0.005+1.38VCT; R2=0.93). Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC [mineral mass]) were calculated for CT data and BMC verified with ash weight. Patterns of mineralization like particles, granules, and sheets were more clearly depicted on CT. Conclusions Mineral volumes generated from MRI or CT data were highly correlated. CT provided a more detailed depiction of mineralization patterns and provided BMD and BMC in addition to mineral volume. The extent of mineralization as well as the morphology may ultimately be useful in assessing plaque stability. PMID:15947239

  6. Reappraisal of velocity criteria for carotid bulb/internal carotid artery stenosis utilizing high-resolution B-mode ultrasound validated with computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Shaalan, Wael E.; Wahlgren, Carl M.; Desai, Tina; Piano, Giancarlo; Skelly, Christopher; Bassiouny, Hisham S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reliability of the most commonly used duplex ultrasound (DUS) velocity thresholds for internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis has been questioned since these thresholds were developed using less precise methods to grade stenosis severity based on angiography. In this study, maximum percent diameter carotid bulb ICA stenosis (European Carotid Surgery Trial [ECST] method) was objectively measured using high resolution B-mode DUS validated with computed tomography angiography (CTA) and used to determine optimum velocity thresholds for ≥50% and ≥80% bulb internal carotid artery stenosis (ICA). Methods B-mode DUS and CTA images of 74 bulb ICA stenoses were compared to validate accuracy of the DUS measurements. In 337 mild, moderate, and severe bulb ICA stenoses (n = 232 patients), the minimal residual lumen and the maximum outer bulb/proximal ICA diameter were determined on longitudinal and transverse images. This in contrast to the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) method using normal distal ICA lumen diameter as the denominator. Severe calcified carotid segments and patients with contralateral occlusion were excluded. In each study, the highest peak systolic (PSV) and end-diastolic (EDV) velocities as well as ICA/common carotid artery (CCA) ratio were recorded. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the optimum threshold for each hemodynamic parameter was determined to predict ≥50% (n = 281) and ≥80% (n = 62) bulb ICA stenosis. Results Patients mean age was 74 ± 8 years; 49% females. Clinical risk factors for atherosclerosis included coronary artery disease (40%), diabetes mellitus (32%), hypertension (70%), smoking (34%), and hypercholesterolemia (49%). Thirty-three percent of carotid lesions (n = 110) presented with ischemic cerebrovascular symptoms and 67% (n = 227) were asymptomatic. There was an excellent agreement between B-mode DUS and CTA (r = 0.9, P = .002). The inter/intraobserver agreement

  7. Increasing the Spatial Resolution of 3T Carotid MRI Has No Beneficial Effect for Plaque Component Measurement Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Diederik F.; Strang, Aart C.; Duivenvoorden, Raphael; Enklaar, Dirk-Jan F.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Kastelein, John J. P.; de Groot, Eric; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Different in-plane resolutions have been used for carotid 3T MRI. We compared the reproducibility, as well as the within- and between reader variability of high and routinely used spatial resolution in scans of patients with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease. Since no consensus exists about the optimal segmentation method, we analysed all imaging data using two different segmentation methods. Materials and Methods In 31 patient with carotid atherosclerosis a high (0.25 × 0.25 mm2; HR) and routinely used (0.50 × 0.50 mm2; LR) spatial resolution carotid MRI scan were performed within one month. A fully blinded closed and a simultaneously open segmentation were used to quantify the lipid rich necrotic core (LRNC), calcified and loose matrix (LM) plaque area and the fibrous cap (FC) thickness. Results No significant differences were observed between scan-rescan reproducibility for HR versus LR measurements, nor did we find any significant difference between the within-reader and between-reader reproducibility. The same applies for differences between the open and closed reads. All intraclass correlation coefficients between scans and rescans for the LRNC, calcified and LM plaque area, as well as the FC thickness measurements with the open segmentation method were excellent (all above 0.75). Conclusions Increasing the spatial resolution at the expense of the contrast-to-noise ratio does not improve carotid plaque component scan-rescan reproducibility in patients with atherosclerotic carotid disease, nor does using a different segmentation method. PMID:26161783

  8. Unprotected parasphenoidal carotid artery studied by high-resolution computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.M.; Hopkins, R.J.; Hanafee, W.N.; Fisk, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    A retrospective review was made of 500 consecutive thin-section axial CT scans of the adult sphenoid sinus using contrast enhancement and the bone algorithm to determine whether there was exposure of the cavernous sinus and the carotid arteries along their parasphenoidal course. At least one cavernous-carotid complex that could be considered at risk during sphenoid sinus surgery was seen in 31.4% of the patients. Of this group, 14.4% of the patients had no bony covering on one or both sides of some point along the parasphenoidal course. In 17% the bony covering was so thin it would give minimal, if any, protection from surgical trauma. A patient who had laceration of an unprotected carotid artery with development of post-traumatic aneurysm is discussed.

  9. High-resolution computational fluid dynamics detects flow instabilities in the carotid siphon: implications for aneurysm initiation and rupture?

    PubMed

    Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Piccinelli, Marina; Steinman, David A

    2014-09-22

    The carotid siphon is by nature a tortuous vessel segment with sharp bends and large area variations, and of relevance to the study of intracranial aneurysm initiation and rupture. The aim of this paper was to determine whether the siphon might harbor flow instabilities, if care is taken to resolve them. This study focused on five consecutive internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm cases from the open-source Aneurisk dataset. The aneurysm, always downstream of the siphon, was digitally removed using previously developed and verified tools. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models included long cervical segments upstream, and middle and anterior cerebral arteries downstream. High-resolution pulsatile simulations were performed using the equivalent of ~24 million linear tetrahedra on average (range 16-32 M) and 30,000 time-steps/cycle. Two of the five cases were laminar with mild flow instabilities right after peak systole. One of the cases experienced strong periodic vortex shedding at a frequency of around 100 Hz. The remaining two cases harbored higher frequency flow instabilities and complex 3D vortical structures, extending to the cerebral arteries downstream. Our findings suggest that the carotid siphon, a conduit to the majority of anterior intracranial aneurysms, may experience flow instabilities, consistent with in vitro reports, but seemingly at odds with the majority of CFD studies, which have been done at lower resolutions. This has obvious implications for elucidating the forces involved in aneurysm initiation; and propagation of flow instabilities into ICA or downstream aneurysms could also impact understanding of the forces involved in aneurysm rupture.

  10. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  11. Carotid Endarterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the carotid arteries. This limits or blocks the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your brain, which can lead to a stroke. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows ... normal carotid artery that has normal blood flow. Figure C show the inside of a carotid ...

  12. Evaluation of the early stage of carotid atherosclerosis using the vascular response to nitroglycerin and high-resolution ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Lai, C P; Koyanagi, S; Shaw, C K; Takeshita, A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the early stages of arterial atherosclerosis could be evaluated by the vascular response to nitroglycerin (NTG). The vascular elasticity of the common carotid artery (CCA) was evaluated at sites without atheromatous plaque using high-resolution ultrasonography before and after sublingular NTG administration. The vascular elasticity was expressed by vascular strain (VS) and pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep). The study was performed in 9 normal young males (group N) and 52 patients who were suspected to have coronary artery disease (CAD). In group N, VS of the CCA increased from 9+/-2 to 13+/-4%, Ep decreased from 80+/-18 to 42+/-14 kPa (p<0.01) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased from 116+/-8 to 109+/-8 mmHg (p<0.05) after NTG administration. Two different responses were observed in the patients. One group of patients (group A, n=27) showed similar responses to NTG as those of group N; that is, VS increased from 8+/-4 to 14+/-8%, Ep decreased from 115+/-64 to 57+/-31 kPa (p<0.01) and SBP decreased from 121+/-15 to 110+/-16 mmHg (p<0.05). In the other group (group B, n=25), in spite of SBP decreasing from 124+/-21 to 111+/-21 mmHg (p<0.05), VS decreased from 11+/-4 to 7+/-3% and Ep increased from 76+/-29 to 113+/-53 kPa (p<0.01). The prevalence and severity of CAD were lower in group A than in group B (33 vs 80%, 11 vs 60%, p<0.01, respectively). The prevalence of atheromatous plaque of the CCA was also lower in group A than in group B (4 vs 22%, p<0.01). These results revealed that the prevalence of carotid atheromatous plaque was highly correlated with that of CAD (p=0.001) and suggested that the vascular elasticity response of the CCA to NTG is highly associated with atherosclerotic changes of the artery and may be a useful method for detecting the early stages of atherosclerosis.

  13. Automatic segmentation and plaque characterization in atherosclerotic carotid artery MR images.

    PubMed

    Adame, I M; van der Geest, R J; Wasserman, B A; Mohamed, M A; Reiber, J H C; Lelieveldt, B P F

    2004-04-01

    In vivo MRI provides a means to non-invasively image and assess the morphological features of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. To assess quantitatively the degree of vulnerability and the type of plaque, the contours of the lumen, outer boundary of the vessel wall and plaque components, need to be traced. Currently this is done manually, which is time-consuming and sensitive to inter- and intra-observer variability. The goal of this work was to develop an automated contour detection technique for tracing the lumen, outer boundary and plaque contours in carotid MR short-axis black-blood images. Seventeen patients with carotid atherosclerosis were imaged using high-resolution in vivo MRI, generating a total of 50 PD- and T1-weighted MR images. These images were automatically segmented using the algorithm presented in this work, which combines model-based segmentation and fuzzy clustering to detect the vessel wall, lumen and lipid core boundaries. The results demonstrate excellent correspondence between automatic and manual area measurements for lumen (r = 0.92) and outer (r = 0.91), and acceptable correspondence for fibrous cap thickness (r = 0.71). Though further optimization is required, our algorithm is a powerful tool for automatic detection of lumen and outer boundaries, and characterization of plaque in atherosclerotic vessels. PMID:15029508

  14. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  15. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque narrows the carotid arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the brain. If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a carotid artery, which can cause a ...

  16. Imaging of carotid artery vessel wall edema using T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherothrombosis remains a major health problem in the western world, and carotid atherosclerosis is an important contributor to embolic ischemic strokes. It remains a clinical challenge to identify rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques before clinical events occur. Inflammation, endothelial injury and angiogenesis are features of vulnerable plaques and may all be associated with plaque edema. Therefore, vessel wall edema, which can be detected by 2D T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), may be used as a dynamic marker of disease activity in the atherosclerotic plaque. However, 2D imaging is limited by low spatial resolution in the slice-select direction compared to 3D imaging techniques. We sought to investigate the ability of novel 3D techniques to detect edema induced in porcine carotid arteries by acute balloon injury compared to conventional 2D T2-weighted black-blood CMR. Methods Edema was induced unilaterally by balloon overstretch injury in the carotid artery of nine pigs. Between one to seven hours (average four hours) post injury, CMR was performed using 2D T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), 3D volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) and 3D T2 prepared gradient-echo (T2prep-GE). The CMR images were compared in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio. Furthermore, the presence of vessel wall injury was validated macroscopically by means of Evans Blue dye that only enters the injured vessel wall. Results All three imaging sequences classified the carotid arteries correctly compared to Evans Blue and all sequences demonstrated a significant increase in SNR of the injured compared to the non-injured carotid vessel wall (T2-STIR, p = 0.002; VISTA, p = 0.004; and T2prep-GE, p = 0.003). There was no significant difference between sequences regarding SNR and CNR. Conclusion The novel 3D imaging sequences VISTA and T2prep-GE perform comparably to conventional 2D

  17. A case of delayed carotid cavernous fistula after facial gunshot injury presented as loss of vision with symptom resolution after endovascular closure procedure.

    PubMed

    Alagöz, Fatih; Yılmaz, Fevzi; Sönmez, Bedriye Müge; Yıldırım, Ali Erdem; Karakılıç, Muhammed Evvah

    2016-03-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are abnormal connections between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus (CS), and can occur as a result of blunt and penetrating head injuries. While occurrence is rare, diagnosis can be made in the emergency department. Described in the present report is the case of a 26-year-old man who presented with complaints of pain, redness, blurred and loss of vision in the right eye, and swelling of the upper face due to a gunshot injury he had sustained 35 days prior. PMID:27193990

  18. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  19. Complications of cerebral angiography for patients with mild carotid territory ischaemia being considered for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, G J; Warlow, C P; Molyneux, A J

    1990-01-01

    It is essential to image the carotid bifurcation adequately in patients with symptomatic carotid territory ischaemia if they are being considered for carotid endarterectomy. Optimal resolution is achieved by selective intraarterial contrast angiography which is an invasive procedure carrying some risk. The overall risk-benefit of carotid endarterectomy is currently being investigated in several large randomised trials in Europe and North America. Because cerebral angiography is a prerequisite for carotid endarterectomy, the risks of cerebral angiography will need to be added to those of surgery when considering whether carotid endarterectomy is effective in the management of these patients. This study evaluated prospectively 382 patients with symptomatically mild carotid ischaemia who had cerebral angiography to visualise a potentially resectable lesion at the carotid bifurcation. Complications followed 14 cerebral angiograms in 13 patients (3.4%); two complications were local (0.5%), two systemic (0.5%) and 10 were neurological (2.6%). The neurological complications were transient (TIA 1, generalised seizure 1) in two patients (0.5%), reversible (stroke) in three (0.8%) and permanent (stroke) in five patients (1.3%). There were no deaths. The significant risk factors for post angiographic stroke were (1) stroke before angiography compared with transient ischaemic attacks of the eye or brain and (2) the presence of greater than or equal to 50% diameter stenosis of the symptomatic internal carotid artery; unfortunately it may be the latter patients who are most at risk of stroke as part of the natural history of their disease and therefore most in need of prophylactic carotid endarterectomy (which requires cerebral angiography). The absolute risk of post-angiographic stroke of patients for cerebral angiography using clinical evaluation and Duplex carotid ultrasound screening. PMID:2118171

  20. Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Khimenko, L P; Esham, H R; Ahmed, W

    2000-10-01

    Once considered uncommon, spontaneous dissection of the carotid artery is an increasingly recognized cause of stroke, headache, cranial nerve palsy, or ophthalmologic events, especially in young adults. Even in the presence of existing signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be missed by experienced physicians of all specialties. We report a case of spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection in a 38-year-old woman with a cortical stroke and visual disturbances as initial symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography and by angiography. Prompt anticoagulation was instituted, and the patient had complete resolution of symptoms. Cervicocephalic arterial dissection should be included in the differential diagnosis of the causes of cerebrovascular events.

  1. Carotid labyrinth of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Tatsumi

    2002-11-01

    The amphibian carotid labyrinth is a characteristic maze-like vascular expansion at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery into the internal and external carotid arteries. The carotid labyrinths of anurans are spherical and those of urodeles are oblong. In the intervascular stroma of both anuran and urodelan carotid labyrinths, the glomus cells (type I cells, chief cells) are distributed singly or in clusters between connective tissue cells and smooth muscle cells. In fluorescence histochemistry, the glomus cells emit intense fluorescence for biogenic monoamines. In fine structure, the glomus cells are characterized by a number of dense-cored vesicles in their cytoplasm. The glomus cells have long, thin cytoplasmic processes, some of which are closely associated with smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and pericytes. Afferent, efferent, and reciprocal synapses are found on the glomus cells. The morphogenesis of the carotid labyrinth starts in the larvae at the point where the carotid arch descends to the internal gills. Through the early stages of larval development, the slightly expanded region of the external carotid artery becomes closely connected with the carotid arch. By the end of the foot stage, the expanded region becomes globular, and at the final stage of metamorphosis the carotid labyrinth is close to its adult form. In fine structure, the glomus cells appear as early as the initial stage of larval development. At the middle stages of development, the number of dense-cored vesicles increases remarkably. Distinct afferent synapses are found in juveniles, although efferent synapses can be seen during metamorphosis. The carotid labyrinth is innervated by nerve fibers containing several kinds of regulatory neuropeptides. Double-immunolabeling in combination with a multiple dye filter system demonstrates the coexistence of two different neuropeptides. The amphibian carotid labyrinth has been electrophysiologically confirmed to have arterial chemo

  2. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  3. Durability of carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Baker, W H; Hayes, A C; Mahler, D; Littooy, F N

    1983-07-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is the preferred treatment for patients with transient ischemic attacks and carotid stenosis. Although clinically these patients do well, the long-term fate of the operated carotid artery has not been well documented. To address this question, repeated noninvasive testing has been employed to follow our carotid endarterectomy patients since 1976. Supraorbital Doppler examination, oculoplethysmography-Kartchner, carotid phonoangiography and, later in this series, spectral analysis of the carotid Doppler velocities were performed after 193 endarterectomies. One hundred fifty-eight patients were initially tested within 3 months of operation, and 35 were initially tested 3 or more months after operation. Twenty-four arteries, four of which were symptomatic, had an initial abnormal test and are excluded from this study of carotid artery durability. Of the 169 patients with normal carotid tests, 36 had no further evaluation. Among the 133 patients who returned for serial testing from 1 to 60 months (mean 20 months), 115 carotid arteries continued to test normal at late follow-up but 18 subsequently developed test abnormalities. Ten had more than 75% stenosis, eight had 50% to 75% stenosis. Eight of these patients had contrast studies: three had normal findings; the five that had abnormal findings underwent reoperation. Interestingly, only two patients presented with symptoms appropriate to the abnormal test. The findings suggest that carotid endarterectomy is a reasonably durable operation. Recurrent stenosis was presumed or proven in 10% of 133 serially tested carotid arteries. This threat of restenosis makes long-term follow-up of these patients mandatory.

  4. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS.

  5. Association of Circulating Matrix Metalloproteinases with Carotid Artery Characteristics: The ARIC Carotid MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, John W.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; He, Max; Chambless, Lloyd E.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) with carotid artery characteristics measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cross-sectional investigation among Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI Study participants. Methods and Results A stratified random sample was recruited based on intima-media thickness (IMT) from a previous ultrasound examination. A high-resolution gadolinium-enhanced MRI exam of the carotid artery was performed in 2004–2005 on 1,901 ARIC cohort participants. Multiple carotid wall characteristics including wall thickness, lumen area, calcium area, lipid core and fibrous cap measures were evaluated for associations with plasma MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9 and TIMP-1. Plasma MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-7 were significantly higher among participants in the high IMT group compared to those in the low IMT group. Normalized wall index was independently associated with MMP-3, MMP-7, and TIMP-1. MMP-7 was positively associated with carotid calcification. Mean fibrous cap thickness was significantly higher in individuals with elevated TIMP-1 levels. In addition, TIMP-1 was positively associated with measures of lipid core. Conclusions Circulating levels of specific MMPs and TIMP-1 were associated with carotid wall remodeling and structural changes related to plaque burden in the elderly. PMID:20167662

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut ...

  7. [Evaluation of carotid stenosis by using carotid ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Seike, Nahoko; Ito, Michiko; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2010-12-01

    Carotid stenosis is observed in several diseases such as atherosclerosis, moyamoya disease, and aortitis. Carotid stenosis can be assessed using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), ultrasonography, or cerebral angiography. Carotid ultrasonography is superior to other modalities because it is a noninvasive, repeatable, and easy method that does not involve much cost. The intima-media complex thickness (IMT) can be easily measured using carotid ultrasonography. The incidence of cerebral and cardiovascular events increases with increase in the thickness of the IMT. The percentage of stenosis was expressed using the NASCET, ECST, or area methods. The NASCET criterion of 70% stenosis for performing carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis corresponded to 85% ECST stenosis, 90% area stenosis, and 200 cm/sec of peak systolic velocity. Carotid ultrasonography provides information on not only carotid stenosis but also unstable plaques such as ulcer, hypoechoic plaque, thin fibrous cap, and mobile plaque. In patients with moyamoya disease, carotid ultrasonography often reveals that the diameter of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is greatly reduced at the proximal portion above the bulbus (resembling a champagne bottle neck) and is less than 50% that of the common carotid artery (champagne bottle neck sign); the diameter of the ICA is smaller than that of the external carotid artery (diameter reversal sign). In patients with aortitis, IMT thickness is frequently observed at the common carotid artery (Macaroni sign) but not at the ICA. PMID:21139180

  8. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  9. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  11. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a different location to better see an area of concern. Doppler sonography and Carotid IMT US are performed using the ...

  12. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  13. Carotid body paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Tahir; Ahmed, Bashir; Najam, Atif; Ayub, Zeeshan

    2009-08-01

    Carotid body tumours are benign neoplasms. This case report describes two patients with this rare tumour with diagnostic workup and treatment options. The first case was a 36-year-old gentleman who presented with 6 months history of painless swelling on the left side of neck. The second patient was 60-years-old man who presented with slowly growing swelling on the right side of neck for the last 20 years. Both patients had transmitted pulsations over the swelling. On suspicion of a vascular lesion, a contrast enhanced CT scan and Doppler's ultrasound of neck was advised which suggested the diagnosis of a carotid body tumour. Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) confirmed the diagnosis. Excision in collaboration with vascular surgeon was planned for the first case. The second case was subjected to radiation therapy due to the large size of tumour and the patient's age.

  14. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates. PMID:27672529

  15. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates.

  16. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ahmad S; Hussain, Namath S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates. PMID:27672529

  17. Carotid and Aortic Stiffness in Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Meshkov, Alexey N.; Rozhkova, Tatyana A.; Kalinina, Maria V.; Deev, Alexander D.; Rogoza, Anatoliy N.; Balakhonova, Tatyana V.; Boytsov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of plasma cholesterol in impairing arterial function and elasticity remains unclear. We evaluated arterial stiffness, measured locally in the common carotid artery by high-resolution echo-tracking, and aortic stiffness, using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) (the “gold-standard” measurement of arterial stiffness), in treatment-naive patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Methods The study included 66 patients with FH (10–66 years old) and 57 first-degree relatives without FH (11–61 years old). Carotid-femoral PWV was determined by SphygmoCor (AtCor, Australia). The parameters of carotid stiffness β-index, Peterson elastic modulus and local PWV were assessed with regard to the common carotid artery at a distance of 1cm from the bifurcation (AlokaProsound Alpha7, Japan). Results FH patients showed significantly higher β-index (6.3(4.8–8.2) vs. 5.2(4.2–6.4), p = 0.005), Ep (78(53–111) kPa vs. 62(48–79) kPa, p = 0.006), local PWV (5.4(4.5–6.4) m/c vs. 4.7(4.2–5.4) m/c, p = 0.005), but comparable values of carotid-femoral PWV (6.76(7.0–7.92) m/c vs. 6.48(6.16–7.12) m/c, p = 0.138). Carotid arteries and the aorta stiffened with age in patients with FH, but after 30 years, carotid arteries stiffened more significantly than the aorta. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that treatment-naive patients with FH had stiffer carotid arteries than their relatives, but showed no difference in aortic stiffness. We also found out that the rate of reduction of elasticity of the aorta and carotid arteries in FH patients varies: it is observed earlier in carotid arteries than in the aorta. PMID:27434535

  18. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  19. Carotid barochemoreceptor pathological findings regarding carotid plaque status and aging

    PubMed Central

    Milei, José; Lavezzi, Anna M; Bruni, Barbara; Grana, Daniel R; Azzato, Francisco; Matturri, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid barochemoreceptor pathological lesions have been studied in animals, but few human necropsies have been performed. Therefore, data rely on case patients following surgery, radiotherapy and carotid endarterectomy. Almost no data are available regarding whether the effect of aging prevails over pathological conditions, despite the classic description that glomic fibrosis increases with age. OBJECTIVE: To morphometrically characterize the alterations of the carotid barochemoreceptors and their supplying arteries. METHODS: Patients (n=23) who had suffered and died from stroke, with and without complicated internal carotid atheromatosis, were divided by age (group 1: older than 80 years; group 2: 65 to 80 years; and group 3: younger than 65 years). Carotid segments were obtained at autopsy. The specimens were stained for light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Carotid glomus presented from moderate-to-severe atrophy and fibrosis. A focal decrease in vascularization (CD34-positive) of the glomus (greater than 50%) was observed in areas of atrophy and fibrosis. Damaged nerve endings (S100 protein-positive) were observed at the media of the carotid sinus. Morphometric data showed no differences between groups for glomus area, number of type 1 and 2 cells, and the wall to lumen arteriole ratio. No statistical differences were demonstrated in the pathological findings of the carotid glomus when comparing complicated with noncomplicated plaques or age groups. CONCLUSION: Severe carotid chemoreceptor damage exists in patients who have died from stroke and suffered from carotid atheromatosis. These findings were independent from aging and plaque type. However, damage was correlated with a marked narrowing of the supplying arterioles as a consequence of hemodynamic and/or metabolic alterations (dyslipidemia, diabetes). PMID:19148350

  20. Visualization of Periventricular Collaterals in Moyamoya Disease with Flow-sensitive Black-blood Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    FUNAKI, Takeshi; FUSHIMI, Yasutaka; TAKAHASHI, Jun C.; TAKAGI, Yasushi; ARAKI, Yoshio; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Fragile abnormal collaterals in moyamoya disease, known as “moyamoya vessels,” have rarely been defined. While flow-sensitive black-blood magnetic resonance angiography (FSBB-MRA) is a promising technique for visualizing perforating arteries, as of this writing no other reports exist regarding its application to moyamoya disease. Six adults with moyamoya disease underwent FSBB-MRA. It depicted abnormal collaterals as extended lenticulostriate, thalamic perforating, or choroidal arteries, which were all connected to the medullary or insular artery in the periventricular area and supplied the cortex. This preliminary case series illustrates the potential for FSBB-MRA to reveal abnormal moyamoya vessels, which could be reasonably defined as periventricular collaterals. PMID:25739429

  1. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  2. Carotid chemoreceptor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, Machiko; Kostuk, Eric W; Pichard, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Mice are the most suitable species for understanding genetic aspects of postnatal developments of the carotid body due to the availability of many inbred strains and knockout mice. Our study has shown that the carotid body grows differentially in different mouse strains, indicating the involvement of genes. However, the small size hampers investigating functional development of the carotid body. Hypoxic and/or hyperoxic ventilatory responses have been investigated in newborn mice, but these responses are indirect assessment of the carotid body function. Therefore, we need to develop techniques of measuring carotid chemoreceptor neural activity from young mice. Many studies have taken advantage of the knockout mice to understand chemoreceptor function of the carotid body, but they are not always suitable for addressing postnatal development of the carotid body due to lethality during perinatal periods. Various inbred strains with well-designed experiments will provide useful information regarding genetic mechanisms of the postnatal carotid chemoreceptor development. Also, targeted gene deletion is a critical approach.

  3. Carotid revascularization: risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Marlene; Chandra, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Despite a decline during the recent decades in stroke-related death, the incidence of stroke has remained unchanged or slightly increased, and extracranial carotid artery stenosis is implicated in 20%–30% of all strokes. Medical therapy and risk factor modification are first-line therapies for all patients with carotid occlusive disease. Evidence for the treatment of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis greater than 70% with either carotid artery stenting (CAS) or carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is compelling, and several trials have demonstrated a benefit to carotid revascularization in the symptomatic patient population. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is more controversial, with the largest trials only demonstrating a 1% per year risk stroke reduction with CEA. Although there are sufficient data to advocate for aggressive medical therapy as the primary mode of treatment for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, there are also data to suggest that certain patient populations will benefit from a stroke risk reduction with carotid revascularization. In the United States, consensus and practice guidelines dictate that CEA is reasonable in patients with high-grade asymptomatic stenosis, a reasonable life expectancy, and perioperative risk of less than 3%. Regarding CAS versus CEA, the best-available evidence demonstrates no difference between the two procedures in early perioperative stroke, myocardial infarction, or death, and no difference in 4-year ipsilateral stroke risk. However, because of the higher perioperative risks of stroke in patients undergoing CAS, particularly in symptomatic, female, or elderly patients, it is difficult to recommend CAS over CEA except in populations with prohibitive cardiac risk, previous carotid surgery, or prior neck radiation. Current treatment paradigms are based on identifying the magnitude of perioperative risk in patient subsets and on using predictive factors to stratify patients with high-risk asymptomatic stenosis. PMID

  4. Carotid chemoreceptor "resetting" revisited.

    PubMed

    Carroll, John L; Kim, Insook

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors transduce low arterial O(2) tension into increased action potential activity on the carotid sinus nerves, which contributes to resting ventilatory drive, increased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia, arousal responses to hypoxia during sleep, upper airway muscle activity, blood pressure control and sympathetic tone. Their sensitivity to O(2) is low in the newborn and increases during the days or weeks after birth to reach adult levels. This postnatal functional maturation of the CB O(2) response has been termed "resetting" and it occurs in every mammalian species studied to date. The O(2) environment appears to play a key role; the fetus develops in a low O(2) environment throughout gestation and initiation of CB "resetting" after birth is modulated by the large increase in arterial oxygen tension occurring at birth. Although numerous studies have reported age-related changes in various components of the O(2) transduction cascade, how the O(2) environment shapes normal CB prenatal development and postnatal "resetting" remains unknown. Viewing CB "resetting" as environment-driven (developmental) phenotypic plasticity raises important mechanistic questions that have received little attention. This review examines what is known (and not known) about mechanisms of CB functional maturation, with a focus on the role of the O(2) environment.

  5. Contemporary carotid imaging: from degree of stenosis to plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Lerman, Amir; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, contributing to up to 10%-20% of strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Many clinical trials over the last 20 years have used measurements of carotid artery stenosis as a means to risk stratify patients. However, with improvements in vascular imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MR angiography, ultrasonography, and PET/CT, it is now possible to risk stratify patients, not just on the degree of carotid artery stenosis but also on how vulnerable the plaque is to rupture, resulting in ischemic stroke. These imaging techniques are ushering in an emerging paradigm shift that allows for risk stratifications based on the presence of imaging features such as intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), plaque ulceration, plaque neovascularity, fibrous cap thickness, and presence of a lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC). It is important for the neurosurgeon to be aware of these new imaging techniques that allow for improved patient risk stratification and outcomes. For example, a patient with a low-grade stenosis but an ulcerated plaque may benefit more from a revascularization procedure than a patient with a stable 70% asymptomatic stenosis with a thick fibrous cap. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art advances in carotid plaque imaging. Currently, MRI is the gold standard in carotid plaque imaging, with its high resolution and high sensitivity for identifying IPH, ulceration, LRNC, and inflammation. However, MRI is limited due to time constraints. CT also allows for high-resolution imaging and can accurately detect ulceration and calcification, but cannot reliably differentiate LRNC from IPH. PET/CT is an effective technique to identify active inflammation within the plaque, but it does not allow for assessment of anatomy, ulceration, IPH, or LRNC. Ultrasonography, with the aid of contrast enhancement, is a cost-effective technique to assess plaque morphology and characteristics, but it is

  6. Carotid Disease Management: Surgery, Stenting, or Medication.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Chaturvedi, Seemant

    2015-09-01

    Internal carotid artery stenosis accounts for about 7-10 % of ischemic strokes. Conventional risk factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking increase the risk for carotid atherosclerosis. All patients with carotid stenosis should receive aggressive medical therapy. Carotid revascularization with either endarterectomy or stenting can benefit select patients with severe stenosis. New clinical trials will examine the contemporary role of carotid revascularization relative to optimal medical therapy.

  7. Indium-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy in carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Dudczak, R.; Schoefl, R.J.; Jung, M.; Koppensteiner, R.; Ahmadi, R.; Kretschmer, G.

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated platelet accumulation in carotid arteries by means of a dual-radiotracer method, using indium-111-labeled platelets and technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin, in 123 patients (92 men, 31 women; median age 60 years). Sixty patients had symptoms of transient ischemic carotid artery disease, and 63 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease served as controls. Antiplatelet treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was taken by 53 of the 123 patients. In 36 of the 60 symptomatic patients, platelet scintigraphy was repeated 3-4 days after carotid endarterectomy. Comparison of different scintigraphic parameters (platelet accumulation index and percent of the injected dose of labeled platelets at the carotid bifurcation) showed no significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, and the severity of stenosis and the presence of plaque ulceration also had no influence on the parameters. There was no difference between patients with a short (less than 4 weeks) or long (greater than 4 weeks) interval from the last transient ischemic attack to scintigraphy and no difference between patients with or without antiplatelet treatment. Classifying the patients according to plaque morphology judged by high-resolution real-time ultrasonography also demonstrated no differences. No significant correlation was found between any scintigraphic parameter and other platelet function parameters such as platelet survival time, platelet turnover rate, and concentration of platelet-specific proteins. Quantification of platelet deposition after carotid endarterectomy in 36 patients demonstrated a significant increase of the median platelet accumulation index and the percent injected dose index.

  8. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  9. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  10. Multimodality Imaging of Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Adla, Theodor; Adlova, Radka

    2015-01-01

    Four diagnostic modalities are used to image the following internal carotid artery: digital subtraction angiography (DSA), duplex ultrasound (DUS), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The aim of this article is to describe the potentials of these techniques and to discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Invasive DSA is still considered the gold standard and is an indivisible part of the carotid stenting procedure. DUS is an inexpensive but operator-dependent tool with limited visibility of the carotid artery course. Conversely, CTA and MRA allow assessment of the carotid artery from the aortic arch to intracranial parts. The disadvantages of CTA are radiation and iodine contrast medium administration. MRA is without radiation but contrast-enhanced MRA is more accurate than noncontrast MRA. The choice of methods depends on the clinical indications and the availability of methods in individual centers. However, the general approach to patient with suspected carotid artery stenosis is to first perform DUS and then other noninvasive methods such as CTA, MRA, or transcranial Doppler US. PMID:26417185

  11. Carotid bruits as predictor for carotid stenoses detected by ultrasonography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elias P; Wester, Per

    2008-01-01

    Background Carotid surgery in asymptomatic subjects with carotid stenosis is effective to prevent ischemic stroke. There is, however, uncertainty how to find such persons at risk, because mass screening with carotid artery ultrasonography (US) is not cost-effective. Signs of carotid bruits corresponding to the carotid arteries may serve as a tool to select subjects for further investigation. This study is thus aimed at determining the usefulness of carotid bruits in the screening of carotid stenoses. Methods 1555 consecutive carotid ultrasonography investigations from 1486 cases done between January 2004 and March 2006 at Norrlands University Hospital, Sweden, were examined. 356 subjects, medium age 69 (27–88) years, had a significant (≥ 50%) US-verified carotid stenosis uni- or bilaterally, 291 had been examined for signs of carotid bruits. The likelihood ratios for carotid bruits to predict US-verified carotid stenoses were calculated and expressed as likelihood percentages. Results Thirty-one out of 100 persons (31%) with carotid bruit as an indication to perform carotid US had a significant (≥ 50%) carotid stenosis. 281 of the 356 (79%) cases with significant carotid stenoses were found among patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). 145 of 226 (64%) CVD patients with a significant carotid stenosis had a carotid bruit. In patients with 50–99% carotid stenoses carotid bruits had an accuracy of 75% (436/582), a sensitivity of 71% (236/334), a specificity of 81% (200/248), a positive likelihood ratio at 3.65 and a negative likelihood at 0.36. Patients with 70–99% stenoses had the highest sensitivity at 77% (183/238). In patients with 100% carotid stenoses, carotid bruits had a sensitivity of 26% (15/57) and a specificity of 49% (256/525). Conclusion Although carotid bruits are not accurate to confirm or to exclude significant carotid stenoses, these signs are appropriate for directed screening for further investigation with carotid US if the patient

  12. [Radiological study of the internal carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Meder, J F; Brugières, P; Leguen, O

    1993-12-01

    Three radiologic methods are used to investigate the internal carotid artery. The main indication of CT scan is the assessment of brain ischaemic complications of carotid disease. Magnetic resonance imaging allows in addition to detect dissecting hematomas and carotid flow abnormalities. Cerebral angiography, which owes much to the advent of digital techniques, remains the standard examination of internal carotid artery. Complications of angiography although rare and usually benign explain the recent development of less invasive explorations such as dynamic CT scan and magnetic resonance angiography. This latter method is still under evaluation for diagnosis of carotid stenosis and small size aneurysms.

  13. Blood flow changes after unilateral carotid artery ligation monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yushu; Liang, Chengbo; Suo, Yanyan; Zhao, Yuqian; Wang, Yi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral carotid artery ligation which could induce adaptive improvement is a classic model that has been widely used to study pathology of ischemic disease. In those studies, blood flow is an important parameter to characterize the ischemia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality which can provide depth resolved images in biological tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. SPF rats was anesthetized with isoflurane and divided into two groups. In first group, bilateral carotid artery was surgically exposed, and then left carotid artery was ligated. Blood flow changes of the contralateral carotid artery was monitored using high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography, including the absolute flow velocity and the flow volume. In the other group, skull window was opened at the ipsilateral cerebral cortex of ligation and blood supply of small artery was measured before and after the ligation. The measured results demonstrate the blood supply compensation process after unilateral carotid artery ligation. With the superiority of high resolution, OCT is an effective technology in monitoring results of carotid artery after ligation.

  14. Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Chinese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Ying; Guan, Ke; Su, Yi-Xiang; Chen, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Limited studies have examined the association between sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels and the risk of atherosclerosis. This study examined whether higher Na and Na/K levels and low K levels were independent risk factors for atherosclerosis. This community-based cross-sectional study included 3290 subjects (1067 men and 2223 women) 40 to 75 years of age in Guangzhou, China, between 2011 and 2013. Urinary excretion of Na and K were measured from the first morning void, and creatinine-adjusted values were used. The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid common artery and the carotid bifurcation was measured with high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Dietary K and Na intake and other covariates were obtained by face-to-face interviews. A significant positive association was seen between urinary Na excretion and carotid atherosclerosis after adjustment for age, sex, and other lifestyle covariates. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the highest (vs. lowest) quartile of urinary Na were 1.32 (1.04–1.66) for carotid plaques, 1.48 (1.18–1.87) for increased common carotid artery IMT, and 1.55 (1.23–1.96) for increased carotid bifurcation IMT (all p-trend < 0.01). A similar positive association was observed between urinary Na/K levels and carotid plaque and increased IMT, and between dietary Na intake and increased bifurcation IMT. Regarding potassium data, we only found a significantly lower presence of carotid plaque (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57–0.91) for quartile 2 (vs. 1) of urinary K. Our findings suggest that higher levels of urinary excretion Na and Na/K are significantly associated with greater presence of carotid atherosclerosis in Chinese adults. PMID:27706075

  15. Assessing carotid atherosclerosis by fiber-optic multispectral photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Phillips, Evan; Bruning, Rebecca; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Sturek, Michael; Goergen, Craig J.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque at the carotid bifurcation is the underlying cause of the majority of ischemic strokes. Noninvasive imaging and quantification of the compositional changes preceding gross anatomic changes within the arterial wall is essential for diagnosis of disease. Current imaging modalities such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography are limited by the lack of compositional contrast and the detection of flow-limiting lesions. Although high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has been developed to characterize atherosclerotic plaque composition, its accessibility for wide clinical use is limited. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based multispectral photoacoustic tomography system for excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. Using sequential ultrasound imaging of ex vivo preparations we achieved ~2 cm imaging depth and chemical selectivity for assessment of human arterial plaques. A multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares analysis method was applied to resolve the major chemical components, including intravascular lipid, intramuscular fat, and blood. These results show the promise of detecting carotid plaque in vivo through esophageal fiber-optic excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. This imaging system has great potential for serving as a point-ofcare device for early diagnosis of carotid artery disease in the clinic.

  16. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2016-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a carotid plaque, but new developments in MRI enable more functional assessment of carotid plaques. In this review, MRI based biomechanical parameters are evaluated on their current status, clinical applicability, and future developments. Blood flow related biomechanical parameters, including endothelial wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index, have been shown to be related to plaque formation. Deriving these parameters directly from MRI flow measurements is feasible and has great potential for future carotid plaque development prediction. Blood pressure induced stresses in a plaque may exceed the tissue strength, potentially leading to plaque rupture. Multi-contrast MRI based stress calculations in combination with tissue strength assessment based on MRI inflammation imaging may provide a plaque stress-strength balance that can be used to assess the plaque rupture risk potential. Direct plaque strain analysis based on dynamic MRI is already able to identify local plaque displacement during the cardiac cycle. However, clinical evidence linking MRI strain to plaque vulnerability is still lacking. MRI based biomechanical parameters may lead to improved assessment of carotid plaque development and rupture risk. However, better MRI systems and faster sequences are required to improve the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as increase the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26791734

  17. Accelerated 3D MERGE Carotid Imaging using Compressed Sensing with a Hidden Markov Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, Mahender K.; Balu, Niranjan; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Yuan, Chun; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the potential for accelerated 3D carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using wavelet based compressed sensing (CS) with a hidden Markov tree (HMT) model. Materials and Methods We retrospectively applied HMT model-based CS and conventional CS to 3D carotid MRI data with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution, from six subjects with known carotid stenosis (12 carotids). We applied a wavelet-tree model learnt from a training database of carotid images to improve CS reconstruction. Quantitative endpoints such as lumen area, wall area, mean and maximum wall thickness, plaque calicification, and necrotic core area, were measured and compared using Bland-Altman analysis along with image quality. Results Rate-4.5 acceleration with HMT model-based CS provided image quality comparable to that of rate-3 acceleration with conventional CS and fully sampled reference reconstructions. Morphological measurements made on rate-4.5 HMT model-based CS reconstructions were in good agreement with measurements made on fully sampled reference images. There was no significant bias or correlation between mean and difference of measurements when comparing rate 4.5 HMT model-based CS with fully sampled reference images. Conclusion HMT model-based CS can potentially be used to accelerate clinical carotid MRI by a factor of 4.5 without impacting diagnostic quality or quantitative endpoints. PMID:22826159

  18. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  19. Carotid endarterectomy: current consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hermus, Linda; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-10-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of mortality, and carotid artery stenosis causes 8% to 29% of all ischemic strokes. Best medical treatment forms the basis of carotid stenosis treatment, and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has an additional beneficial effect in high-grade stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has challenged CEA as a primary carotid intervention. At present, CEA remains the gold standard, but in the future, CAS techniques will evolve and might become beneficial for subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. This chapter briefly describes the history of carotid interventions and current consensus and controversies in CEA. In the last two years, several meta-analyses were published on a variety of aspects of best medical treatment, CEA, and CAS. It is still a matter of debate as to whether asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis should undergo a carotid intervention. Especially because medical treatment has dramatically evolved since the early carotid trials. On the other hand, it is clear that carotid interventions in symptomatic patients with a high-grade stenosis should be performed as early as possible after the initial neurological event in order to achieve optimal stroke risk reduction. In CEA, the use of patching is advocated above primary closure, while the role of selective patching is still unclear. No differences in stroke and mortality rates are observed for routine versus selective shunting, for conventional versus eversion CEA, or for local versus general anesthesia. It is anticipated that in the future, there will be several interesting developments in carotid interventions such as plaque morphology analysis, acute interventions during stroke in progress, and further evolvement of CAS techniques. PMID:21082576

  20. Carotid endarterectomy: current consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hermus, Linda; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-10-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of mortality, and carotid artery stenosis causes 8% to 29% of all ischemic strokes. Best medical treatment forms the basis of carotid stenosis treatment, and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has an additional beneficial effect in high-grade stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has challenged CEA as a primary carotid intervention. At present, CEA remains the gold standard, but in the future, CAS techniques will evolve and might become beneficial for subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. This chapter briefly describes the history of carotid interventions and current consensus and controversies in CEA. In the last two years, several meta-analyses were published on a variety of aspects of best medical treatment, CEA, and CAS. It is still a matter of debate as to whether asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis should undergo a carotid intervention. Especially because medical treatment has dramatically evolved since the early carotid trials. On the other hand, it is clear that carotid interventions in symptomatic patients with a high-grade stenosis should be performed as early as possible after the initial neurological event in order to achieve optimal stroke risk reduction. In CEA, the use of patching is advocated above primary closure, while the role of selective patching is still unclear. No differences in stroke and mortality rates are observed for routine versus selective shunting, for conventional versus eversion CEA, or for local versus general anesthesia. It is anticipated that in the future, there will be several interesting developments in carotid interventions such as plaque morphology analysis, acute interventions during stroke in progress, and further evolvement of CAS techniques.

  1. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  2. Quantification of carotid vessel atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. D.; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of plaques in the arterial wall, which ultimately leads to heart attacks and stroke. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to screen patients' carotid arteries. Plaque measurements obtained from these images may aid in the management and monitoring of patients, and in evaluating the effect of new treatment options. Different types of measures for ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been proposed. Here, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3D US images obtained at two different time points. We evaluated our technique using manual segmentations of the wall and lumen of the carotid artery from images acquired in two US scanning sessions. To incorporate the effect of intraobserver variability in our evaluation, manual segmentation was performed five times each for the arterial wall and lumen. From this set of five segmentations, the mean wall and lumen surfaces were reconstructed, with the standard deviation at each point mapped onto the surfaces. A correspondence map between the mean wall and lumen surfaces was then established, and the thickness of the atherosclerotic plaque at each point in the vessel was estimated to be the distance between each correspondence pairs. The two-sample Student's t-test was used to judge whether the difference between the thickness values at each pair corresponding points of the arteries in the two 3D US images was statistically significant.

  3. Cognitive Performance following Carotid Endarterectomy or Stenting in Asymptomatic Patients with Severe ICA Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Picchetto, Livio; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Casolla, Barbara; Cacciari, Claudia; Cavallari, Michele; Fantozzi, Cristiano; Ciuffoli, Alessandro; Rasura, Maurizia; Imperiale, Francesca; Sette, Giuliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Taurino, Maurizio; Orzi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background. Endarterectomy (CEA) or stenting (CAS) of a stenotic carotid artery is currently undertaken to reduce stroke risk. In addition removal of the arterial narrowing has been hypothesized to improve cerebral hemodynamics and provide benefits in cognitive functions, by supposedly resolving a "hypoperfusion" condition. Methods. In this study we sought to test whether resolution of a carotid stenosis is followed by measurable changes in cognitive functions in 22 subjects with "asymptomatic" stenosis. Results. A main finding of the study was the statistically significant pre-post difference observed in the performance of phonological verbal fluency and Rey's 15-word immediate recall. Remarkably, there was a significant interaction between phonological verbal fluency performance and side of the carotid intervention, as the improvement in the verbal performance, a typical "lateralized" skill, was associated with resolution of the left carotid stenosis. Conclusion. The results reflect a substantial equivalence of the overall performance at the before- and after- CEA or CAS tests. In two domains, however, the postintervention performance resulted improved. The findings support the hypothesis that recanalization of a stenotic carotid could improve brain functions by resolving hypothetical "hypoperfusion" states, associated with the narrowing of the vessels.

  4. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  5. Rapid three-dimensional segmentation of the carotid bifurcation from serial MR images.

    PubMed

    Ladak, H M; Milner, J S; Steinman, D A

    2000-02-01

    The current trend in computational hemodynamics is to employ realistic models derived from ex vivo or in vivo imaging. Such studies typically produce a series of images from which the lumen boundaries must first be individually extracted (i.e., two-dimensional segmentation), and then serially reconstructed to produce the three-dimensional lumen surface geometry. In this paper, we present a rapid three-dimensional segmentation technique that combines these two steps, based on the idea of an expanding virtual balloon. This three-dimensional technique is demonstrated in application to finite element meshing and CFD modeling of flow in the carotid bifurcation of a normal volunteer imaged with black blood MRI. Wall shear stress patterns computed using a mesh generated with the three-dimensional technique agree well with those computed using a mesh generated from conventional two-dimensional segmentation and serial reconstruction. In addition to reducing the time required to extract the lumen surface from hours to minutes, our approach is easy to learn and use and requires minimal user intervention, which can potentially increase the accuracy and precision of quantitative and longitudinal studies of hemodynamics and vascular disease. PMID:10790835

  6. Feasibility of carotid artery PET/MRI in psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Hojjati, Mojgan; Lu, Ziang; Kosaraju, Vijaya; Partovi, Sasan; O’Donnell, James K; Longenecker, Christopher; McComsey, Grace A; Golden, Jackelyn B; Muakkassa, Fuad; Santilli, Scott; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Korman, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    We report our initial experience of performing integrated PET/MR imaging of the carotid arteries in psoriatic patients. Eleven patients with psoriasis and ten controls underwent carotid PET/MRI. Following injection of the FDG tracer, 3d T1w gradient echo sequence (atMR) was obtained for attenuation correction of PET data. High resolution images of carotid artery were then obtained, including pre-and post-contrast T1-w, T2-w and proton-density images as well as TOF images followed by PET imaging of the torso. From the fused axial PET/MRI, the arterial wall SUVmax and TBRmax was quantified in each slice. MRI images were also evaluated for vessel wall volume, plaque and internal composition. SUVmax and TBRmax were respectively, 1.72 ± 0.38 & 1.17 ± 0.27 in L- CCA, 1.75 ± 0.39 & 1.24 ± 0.19 in R-CCA, 1.59 ± 0.24 & 1.08 ± 0.14 in L-ICA and 1.62 ± 0.27 & 1.15 ± 0.17 in R-ICA in psoriatic patients and 1.74 ± 0.22 & 1.28 ± 0.44 in L- CCA, 1.74 ± 0.33 & 1.07 ± 0.28 in R-CCA, 1.78 ± 0.32 & 1.29 ± 0.39 in L-ICA and 1.60 ± 0.29 & 0.98 ± 0.25 in R-ICA in the controls. No discrete plaques were identified in any of the vessel segments in MRI. PET/MRI is feasible in evaluation of carotid arteries in psoriatic patients. PMID:27648374

  7. Feasibility of carotid artery PET/MRI in psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Hojjati, Mojgan; Lu, Ziang; Kosaraju, Vijaya; Partovi, Sasan; O’Donnell, James K; Longenecker, Christopher; McComsey, Grace A; Golden, Jackelyn B; Muakkassa, Fuad; Santilli, Scott; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Korman, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    We report our initial experience of performing integrated PET/MR imaging of the carotid arteries in psoriatic patients. Eleven patients with psoriasis and ten controls underwent carotid PET/MRI. Following injection of the FDG tracer, 3d T1w gradient echo sequence (atMR) was obtained for attenuation correction of PET data. High resolution images of carotid artery were then obtained, including pre-and post-contrast T1-w, T2-w and proton-density images as well as TOF images followed by PET imaging of the torso. From the fused axial PET/MRI, the arterial wall SUVmax and TBRmax was quantified in each slice. MRI images were also evaluated for vessel wall volume, plaque and internal composition. SUVmax and TBRmax were respectively, 1.72 ± 0.38 & 1.17 ± 0.27 in L- CCA, 1.75 ± 0.39 & 1.24 ± 0.19 in R-CCA, 1.59 ± 0.24 & 1.08 ± 0.14 in L-ICA and 1.62 ± 0.27 & 1.15 ± 0.17 in R-ICA in psoriatic patients and 1.74 ± 0.22 & 1.28 ± 0.44 in L- CCA, 1.74 ± 0.33 & 1.07 ± 0.28 in R-CCA, 1.78 ± 0.32 & 1.29 ± 0.39 in L-ICA and 1.60 ± 0.29 & 0.98 ± 0.25 in R-ICA in the controls. No discrete plaques were identified in any of the vessel segments in MRI. PET/MRI is feasible in evaluation of carotid arteries in psoriatic patients.

  8. Feasibility of carotid artery PET/MRI in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Hojjati, Mojgan; Lu, Ziang; Kosaraju, Vijaya; Partovi, Sasan; O'Donnell, James K; Longenecker, Christopher; McComsey, Grace A; Golden, Jackelyn B; Muakkassa, Fuad; Santilli, Scott; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Korman, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    We report our initial experience of performing integrated PET/MR imaging of the carotid arteries in psoriatic patients. Eleven patients with psoriasis and ten controls underwent carotid PET/MRI. Following injection of the FDG tracer, 3d T1w gradient echo sequence (atMR) was obtained for attenuation correction of PET data. High resolution images of carotid artery were then obtained, including pre-and post-contrast T1-w, T2-w and proton-density images as well as TOF images followed by PET imaging of the torso. From the fused axial PET/MRI, the arterial wall SUVmax and TBRmax was quantified in each slice. MRI images were also evaluated for vessel wall volume, plaque and internal composition. SUVmax and TBRmax were respectively, 1.72 ± 0.38 & 1.17 ± 0.27 in L- CCA, 1.75 ± 0.39 & 1.24 ± 0.19 in R-CCA, 1.59 ± 0.24 & 1.08 ± 0.14 in L-ICA and 1.62 ± 0.27 & 1.15 ± 0.17 in R-ICA in psoriatic patients and 1.74 ± 0.22 & 1.28 ± 0.44 in L- CCA, 1.74 ± 0.33 & 1.07 ± 0.28 in R-CCA, 1.78 ± 0.32 & 1.29 ± 0.39 in L-ICA and 1.60 ± 0.29 & 0.98 ± 0.25 in R-ICA in the controls. No discrete plaques were identified in any of the vessel segments in MRI. PET/MRI is feasible in evaluation of carotid arteries in psoriatic patients. PMID:27648374

  9. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  14. Distal protection for treatment of complete cervical internal carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, John P; Chaudry, Imran; Turner, Raymond; Turk, Aquilla S

    2012-01-01

    Distal protection devices (DPD) have been advocated for carotid artery stenting to reduce the risk of distal embolization. These devices were designed for deployment in the straight cervical segment of the internal carotid artery. We present a case of total cervical carotid occlusion recanalized with the aid of a distal protection device deployed 'distally' in the intracranial internal carotid artery.

  15. Coronary wall MR imaging in patients with rapid heart rates: a feasibility study of black-blood steady-state free precession (SSFP).

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Bi, Xiaoming; Taimen, Kirsi; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Lu, Biao; Carr, James; Li, Debiao

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the hypothesis that black-blood steady-state free precession (SSFP) would provide coronary wall images comparable to images from TSE and have better performance than TSE under conditions of fast heart rate. With IRB approval, thirty participants without a history of coronary artery disease (19 men, 11 women, 26-83 y/o) were scanned with a 1.5 T MR scanner. Cross-sectional black-blood images of the proximal portions of coronary arteries were acquired with a two-dimensional (2D), double inversion recovery (DIR) prepared TSE sequence and a 2D DIR SSFP sequence on the same planes. Image quality (ranked with a 4-point system, scored from 0 to 3), vessel wall area and thickness, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the wall and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, wall to lumen) were compared between SSFP and TSE with SPSS software (v 13.0). Totally 28 scans were completed. For SSFP and TSE, there was no difference in image quality. SSFP had a higher SNR (23.7 ± 10.1 vs. 14.4 ± 5.2, P < 0.001) and wall-lumen CNR (8.8 ± 4.5 vs. 6.7 ± 3.2, P = 0.001). Good agreements between measured wall area (r = 0.701, P < 0.001) and thickness (r = 0.560, P < 0.001) were found. For 10 participants with heart rate more than 80 beats/min, the image quality of SSFP was higher than TSE (P = 0.016). SSFP provided image quality and measurement accuracy that was comparable to TSE. With its higher performance under fast heart rate conditions, SSFP may break through the existing thresholds for heart rate and extend clinical applicability of coronary wall MR imaging to a larger population.

  16. Black blood T1rho MR imaging may diagnose early stage liver fibrosis: a proof-of-principle study with rat biliary duct ligation model

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Chi-Man; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Weitian; Chu, Eagle Siu Hong; San Lau, Clara Bik

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore black blood T1rho (T1ρ) liver imaging and investigate the earliest stage when biliary duct ligation (BDL) induced liver fibrosis can be diagnosed. Methods MR was performed at 3 Tesla. A T1ρ prepared 2D fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with acquisition of four spin lock times (TSLs: 1, 10, 30, and 50 msec) and spin-lock frequency of 500 Hz was applied. Inherent black blood effect of FSE and double inversion recovery (DIR) achieved blood signal suppression, and 3 axial sections per liver were obtained. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were scanned at baseline (n=32), and on day-3 (n=13), day-5 (n=11), day-7 (n=10), day-10 (n=4) respectively after BDL. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and picrosirius red staining liver histology was obtained at these time points. Results The physiological liver parenchyma T1ρ was 38.38±1.53 msec (range, 36.05–41.53 msec). Liver T1ρ value elevated progressively after BDL. On day-10 after BDL all experimental animals can be separated from normal liver based on T1ρ measurement with lowest value being 42.82 msec. Day-7 and day-10 liver resembled METAVIR stage-F1/F2 fibrosis, and fibrous area counted for 0.22%±0.13% and 0.38%±0.44% of liver parenchyma area, respectively. Conclusions This study provides the first proof-of-principle that T1ρ might diagnose early stage liver fibrosis. PMID:27709071

  17. High-resolution black-blood contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for the diagnosis and follow-up of intracranial arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Saam, T; Habs, M; Pollatos, O; Cyran, C; Pfefferkorn, T; Dichgans, M; Dietrich, O; Glaser, C; Reiser, M F; Nikolauo, K

    2010-01-01

    Primary arteritis of the central nervous system (CNS) comprises a heterogeneous group of CNS disorders, which is characterised by non-atheromatous inflammation and necrosis of the arterial wall. The clinical presentation is highly variable, with stroke being the most common manifestation. Conventional angiography is considered to be the best imaging tool for diagnosing the disease. However, angiographic findings, which usually show lumen irregularities and stenosis, are often unspecific and can occur with a variety of other vascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis and arterial dissection. Therefore, brain biopsies are often needed to confirm the diagnosis. Recent reports have shown that MRI is able to visualise contrast enhancement in subjects with known primary CNS arteritis. PMID:20739338

  18. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  19. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images.

  20. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness may be associated with stroke in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medina, G; Casaos, D; Jara, L; Vera-Lastra, O; Fuentes, M; Barile, L; Salas, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods: 28 patients with primary APS with at least a five year follow up, and 28 healthy subjects, matched by age and sex, were included in the study. Colour Doppler with high resolution B mode carotid ultrasonography and spectral analysis were performed in patients and controls. Information on cardiovascular risk factors and the clinical course were collected. Results: The mean (SD) age of patients and controls (12 male, 16 female in each group) was 40 (8.5) years; the mean (SD) disease duration 7.7 (3) years. Carotid artery IMT was found in 23/28 patients (2.6 (1.14) mm) and 7/28 controls (1.2 (0.44)) (p=0.0001). A decrease in the lumen diameter was also found in 11/28 patients with primary APS without carotid atherosclerotic plaque, and 2/28 controls (p=0.004). Hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, obesity, and hypertension were not associated with carotid artery IMT. Patients with carotid artery IMT had arterial vascular disease more often than patients without: 9/23 v 0/5 (p<0.009). These patients had stroke (seven patients), myocardial infarction (one), and mesenteric thrombosis (one). Subjects with IMT had a threefold higher risk for stroke than those without IMT (95% CI 0.78 to 14.3). Conclusions: Patients with primary APS have a high prevalence of carotid artery IMT and a decreased lumen diameter. IMT in primary APS may be associated with stroke. Patients with primary APS with IMT must be considered as carriers of atherosclerosis. PMID:12810420

  1. The Relationship between Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Carotid Plaque in the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Rundek, Tatjana; Gardener, Hannah; Della-Morte, David; Dong, Chuanhui; Cabral, Digna; Tiozzo, Eduardo; Roberts, Eugene; Crisby, Milita; Chueng, Kuen; Demmer, Ryan; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Desvarieux, Moise

    2015-01-01

    Objective Carotid intima–media thickness (cIMT) and carotid plaque (CP) are proposed biomarkers of subclinical atherosclerosis associated with stroke risk. Whether cIMT and CP are distinct phenotypes or single traits at different stages of atherosclerotic development is unclear. We explored the relationship between these markers in the population-based Northern Manhattan Study. Methods We used high-resolution ultrasound and validated imaging protocols to study the cross-sectional (N=1,788 stroke-free participants) and prospective relationship (N=768 with follow-up scan; mean years between examinations=3.5) between CP and cIMT measured in plaque-free areas. Results The mean age was 66±9 (40% male, 19% black, 17% white, 61% Hispanic). The mean baseline cIMT was 0.92±0.09mm, 0.94±0.09mm among the 58% with prevalent plaque, 0.90±0.08mm among the 42% without prevalent plaque (p<0.0001). Each 0.1mm increase in baseline cIMT was associated with a 1.72-fold increased odds of plaque presence (95%CI=1.50-1.97), increased plaque thickness (effect on the median=0.46mm, p<0.0001), and increased plaque area (effect on the median=3.45mm2, p<0.0001), adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors. Elevated baseline cIMT was associated with an increased risk of new plaque in any location at follow-up, but after adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors this association was no longer present. No association was observed in carotid segment-specific analyses. Conclusion Increased cIMT was associated with baseline prevalent plaque but did not predict incident plaque independent of other vascular risk factors. This finding suggests that increased cIMT is not an independent predictor of plaque development although these atherosclerotic phenotypes often coexist and share some common vascular determinants. PMID:26071659

  2. Management of Bilateral Carotid Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Ashutosh P.; Ducruet, Andrew F.; Jankowitz, Brian T.; Jovin, Tudor G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic bilateral internal carotid occlusive disease is a rare but potentially devastating entity. Medical therapy alone is associated with high rates of mortality and recurrent stroke. The optimal management of this disease remains poorly understood. Methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was conducted for patients who presented with an acute stroke in the setting of bilateral carotid occlusive disease between May and October 2013. Results We identified 3 patients. The admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ranged from 4 to 7. All patients had small- to moderate-sized infarcts in the anterior circulation on presentation. Angiography confirmed bilateral internal carotid occlusions with collateral filling via the posterior communicating artery and retrograde filling via external carotid artery supply to the ophthalmic artery. All patients were initially managed with permissive hypertension and anticoagulation followed by carotid angioplasty and stenting. At 1-year follow-up, all patients demonstrated a modified Rankin scale score of 0-1. Conclusions Carotid stenting may be a safe and effective therapy for patients presenting with symptomatic bilateral carotid occlusions. PMID:27051405

  3. Signal processing at mammalian carotid body chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Nurse, Colin A; Piskuric, Nikol A

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian carotid bodies are richly vascularized chemosensory organs that sense blood levels of O(2), CO(2)/H(+), and glucose and maintain homeostatic regulation of these levels via the reflex control of ventilation. Carotid bodies consist of innervated clusters of type I (or glomus) cells in intimate association with glial-like type II cells. Carotid bodies make afferent connections with fibers from sensory neurons in the petrosal ganglia and receive efferent inhibitory innervation from parasympathetic neurons located in the carotid sinus and glossopharyngeal nerves. There are synapses between type I (chemosensory) cells and petrosal afferent terminals, as well as between neighboring type I cells. There is a broad array of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and their ionotropic and metabotropic receptors in the carotid body. This allows for complex processing of sensory stimuli (e.g., hypoxia and acid hypercapnia) involving both autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. This review summarizes and evaluates current knowledge of these pathways and presents an integrated working model on information processing in carotid bodies. Included in this model is a novel hypothesis for a potential role of type II cells as an amplifier for the release of a key excitatory carotid body neurotransmitter, ATP, via P2Y purinoceptors and pannexin-1 channels.

  4. [A Case of Carotid Free-Floating Thrombus Treated by Carotid Ultrasonography-Guided Endovascular Approach].

    PubMed

    Otawa, Masato; Kinkori, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Ando, Ryo; Tambara, Masao; Arima, Toru

    2016-06-01

    We experienced a case of carotid free-floating thrombus treated by carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach. A 63-year-old man was brought to our hospital with the chief complaint of sudden onset left hemiplegia. MRI revealed acute infarction of the right MCA territory due to the right M1 occlusion. Carotid ultrasonography showed a pedunculated, polypoid mobile plaque floating with the cardiac beat. We attempted ultrasonography-guided endovascular treatment. Under proximal balloon protection, the floating plaque was successfully aspirated into the Penumbra aspiration catheter. Carotid stent was also placed to stabilize the residual pedicle of the plaque. Aspirated plaque was identified as fresh thrombus by pathological examination. Carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach was effective for getting the picture of real-time dynamics of the carotid FFT. PMID:27270147

  5. Hemodynamic changes and baroreflex sensitivity associated with carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qinqin; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Gelin

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic carotid lesion is a major cause of stroke which accounts for up to 20% of ischemic stroke. Aggressive treatment of carotid stenosis may prevent stroke. Currently, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS) are the first-line treatments for severe carotid stenosis. CEA is superior to medical therapy in preventing stroke and cardiovascular death. CAS has emerged as an alternative to CEA in recent years due to its less invasive nature. However, both CEA and CAS may be associated with adverse hemodynamic changes as well as a variation of carotid baroreflex sensitivity. There is no consensus on which of these two methods is more advantageous concerning the procedure-related hemodynamic changes. This article reviews the hemodynamic changes and baroreflex sensitivity after CEA and CAS. PMID:25999987

  6. Can a closed carotid artery be reopened?

    PubMed

    Issawi, Ahmad; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Carotid occlusion is a disease that presents a difficult decision for the treating provider. Traditionally, many providers would opt for expectant management with risk factor reduction and supportive therapy. There is a growing body of literature however pointing to possible improved outcomes of more aggressive treatments, including reopening of the occluded carotid. In this review, we discuss the difficulties involved in diagnosing a patient presenting with symptomatic carotid occlusion, the natural history of the disease, and the emerging treatment options and paradigms of different institutions based on recent literature. PMID:26277365

  7. Evaluation of Carotid Plaque Using Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traditional risk factors for predicting of cardiovascular disease are not always effective predictors for development of cardiovascular events. This review summarizes several newly developed noninvasive imaging techniques for evaluating carotid plaques and their role in cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:27358696

  8. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion

    PubMed Central

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G.; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. Presentation of case A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Conclusion Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. PMID:26255001

  9. Carotid endarterectomy and prevention of cerebral ischemia in symptomatic carotid stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberg, M.R.; Eskridge, J.; Winn, H.R.; Eskridge, J. ); Wilson, S.E. ); Yatsu, F. ); Weiss, D.G. ); Messina, L. ); Hershey, L.A. ); Colling, C. ); Deykin, D. )

    1991-12-18

    The objective of this study was to determine whether carotid endarterectomy provides protection against subsequent cerebral ischemia in men with ischemic symptoms in the distribution of significant ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis. The study group was comprised of men who presented within 120 days of onset of symptoms that were consistent with transient ischemic attacks, transient monocular blindness, or recent small completed strokes between July 1988 and February 1991. Among 5,000 patients screened, 189 individuals were randomized with angiographic internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 50% ipsilateral to the presenting symptoms. Forty-eight eligible patients who refused entry were followed up outside of the trial. For a selected cohort of men with symptoms of cerebral or retinal ischemia in the distribution of a high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis, carotid endarterectomy can effectively reduce the risk of subsequent ipsilateral cerebral ischemia. The risk of cerebral ischemia in this subgroup of patients is considerably higher than previously estimated.

  10. Oculoplethysmography and carotid phonoangiography for the noninvasive detection of extracranial carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    McRae, L P; Cadwallader, J A; Kartchner, M M

    1979-01-01

    Clinical applications of imaging techniques and noninvasive physiological vascular evaluations provide useful assistance in the detection and management of stroke-prone patients by minimizing unnecessary carotid arteriography and surgery. Two such evaluation techniques are oculoplethysmography (OPG) and carotid phonoangiography (CPA). Developed, used, and proved highly reliable at the Tucson (Arizona) Medical Center, the techniques have been documented in 12,000 tests on approximately 8500 patients. OPG simultaneously records the bilateral ocular pulses concomitantly with external carotid pulses. Delays in timing of these pulses reflect reduction of flow in the internal and/or external carotid arteries, respectively. CPA consists of electronic stethoscopic auscultation, direct visualization, and photographic recording of carotid bruits or blood flow sounds.

  11. Carotid plaque is a new risk factor for peripheral vestibular disorder: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kajii, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many chronic diseases are associated with dizziness or vertigo, as is peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD). Although carotid plaque development is linked to atherosclerosis, it is unclear whether such plaques can lead to the development of PVD. We therefore conducted this study to investigate the presence of an association between carotid plaque and new PVD events. In this retrospective study, we consecutively enrolled 393 patients ≥20 years old who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for ≥6 months at a primary care clinic (Oki Clinic, Japan) between November 2011 and March 2013. Carotid plaque presence was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography for all patients. During a 1-year follow-up period, an otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported any new PVD events (the main end point). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for new PVD occurrence were estimated using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. The mean age of the participants was 65.5 years; 33.8% were men, and 12.7%, 82.4%, and 93.1% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. There were 76 new PVD events; patients with carotid plaque had a greater risk of such events (crude HR: 3.25; 95% CI: 1.62–6.52) compared to those without carotid plaque. This risk was even higher after adjusting for traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis (adjusted HR: 4.41; 95% CI: 1.75–11.14). Carotid plaques are associated with an increased risk of new PVD events. PMID:27495105

  12. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  13. Who Is at Risk for Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a ... who don’t have diabetes. Family history of atherosclerosis . People who have a family history of atherosclerosis ...

  14. MIGRAINE, CAROTID STIFFNESS AND GENETIC POLYMORPHISM.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Basić; Jurasić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Corić, Lejla; Rotim, Kresimir

    2015-12-01

    Recently migraine has been associated with increased arterial stiffness, procoagulant state, increased incidence of cerebral white matter lesions (WML) and stroke. Our aim was to compare the characteristics of migraineurs to headache free controls regarding their functional carotid ultrasound parameters. Sixty patients (45 women) with migraine (mean age 40.42 ± 10.61 years) were compared with 45 controls (30 women) with no prior history of repeating headache (mean age 38.94 ± 5.46 years) using E-tracking software on Alpha 10 ultrasound platform. Student's t-test was used on statistical analysis with alpha < 0.05. All tested carotid vascular parameters were worse in patients with migraine including increased intima-media thickness, greater carotid diameter and carotid diameter change, as well as several arterial stiffness indices. Additionally, patients with migraine had greater incidence of homozygous mutations for procoagulant genes (MTHFR (C677T), PAI-1 and ACE I/D) than expected. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed WML in 11 patients, four of them migraine with aura patients. Since we established increased carotid stiffness and higher frequency of procoagulant gene mutations in migraineurs, we propose prospective ultrasound monitoring in such patients, especially those with detected WML, in order to timely commence more active and specific preventive stroke management strategies.

  15. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Elerding, S C; Fernandez, R N; Grotta, J C; Lindberg, R D; Causay, L C; McMurtrey, M J

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p = 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult. PMID:7294930

  16. Carotid body tumors: a 40-year study.

    PubMed

    Farr, H W

    1980-01-01

    A total of 44 carotid body tumors were observed for over 40 years at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. The true nature of th paraganglioma can remain obscure in those patients without prior tissue biopsy or sophisticated diagnostic studies. Eighteen patients came to surgery without a primary working diagnosis of the conditions, 43 percent of the seris. Significant advances in the preoperative workup of a cervical mass attached to the carotid sheath are now recommended: ultrasonography, radioisotope perfusion scanning, and selective carotid arteriography. Catecholamine determination should be considered for any paraganglioma exhibiting vasomotor instability or hypertension. Prior to 1945 the carotid bifurcation was sacrificed eight times with a 50 percent mortality occurring in relatively youthful subjects. In the 35 years since then, a more sophisticated surgical technique preserving the carotid circulation has resulted in over 30 resections with but one fatality. Multicentricity, both in the sporadic and the familial form, is characteristic of this rare tumor, also called "APUDoma." (APUD is an acronym derived from three of the most important characteristics of these cells: a high amine content, amine precursor uptake, and decarboxylation. Its malignant potential is beyond debate.

  17. Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS).

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; van Burken, Gerard; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Schinkel, Arend F L; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Bosch, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) is an important biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. As IPN can be detected by contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), imaging-biomarkers derived from CEUS may allow early prediction of plaque vulnerability. To select the best quantitative imaging-biomarkers for prediction of plaque vulnerability, a systematic analysis of IPN with existing and new analysis algorithms is necessary. Currently available commercial contrast quantification tools are not applicable for quantitative analysis of carotid IPN due to substantial motion of the carotid artery, artifacts, and intermittent perfusion of plaques. We therefore developed a specialized software package called Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS). It was designed for effective and systematic comparison of sets of quantitative imaging biomarkers. CINQS includes several analysis algorithms for carotid IPN quantification and overcomes the limitations of current contrast quantification tools and existing carotid IPN quantification approaches. CINQS has a modular design which allows integrating new analysis tools. Wizard-like analysis tools and its graphical-user-interface facilitate its usage. In this paper, we describe the concept, analysis tools, and performance of CINQS and present analysis results of 45 plaques of 23 patients. The results in 45 plaques showed excellent agreement with visual IPN scores for two quantitative imaging-biomarkers (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 and 0.93). PMID:25561454

  18. Complications of cerebral angiography in patients with symptomatic carotid territory ischaemia screened by carotid ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K N; Humphrey, P R

    1993-01-01

    After nearly 40 years, carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be of benefit to patients with symptomatic carotid territory ischaemia and greater than 70% stenosis of the relevant internal carotid artery. Cerebral angiography is performed before surgery and is not without risk. These risks must be added to those of surgery before recommending the procedure to patients. The study evaluated the local, systemic and neurological complications following digital subtraction angiography with selective catheterisation of the carotid arteries in 200 patients presenting to a cerebrovascular clinic for assessment of cerebral ischaemia. All patients had carotid ultrasound screening before angiography to screen out those with normal arteries or mild disease (less than 30% stenosis of symptomatic internal carotid artery). Complications occurred in 28 patients. There were six (3%) local, two (1%) systemic and 20 (10%) neurological complications. Seventeen neurological complications occurred within 24 hours and there were three late complications (24-72 hours). Neurological complications occurred more frequently when angiography was performed by a trainee rather than a consultant neuroradiologist (p < 0.01). The neurological complications were transient (resolved within 24 hours) in 10/200 (5%), reversible (resolved within seven days) in two (1%) and permanent in 8/200 (4%). Two patients died after a stroke and two other patients suffered a disabling stroke. At 24 hours post angiography the permanent (persisting beyond seven days) neurological complication rate was 2.5%. The incidence of total neurological complications and post angiographic strokes was higher in patients with greater than 90% stenosis of the symptomatic internal carotid artery (p < 0.001). The increased use of non-invasive Doppler duplex screening will reduced the absolute number of patients put at risk of angiography, yet the rate of post angiographic complications is likely to increase as patients with severe

  19. Safety Outcomes Using a Proximal Protection Device in Carotid Stenting of Long Carotid Stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Atchaneeyasakul, Kunakorn; Khandelwal, Priyank; Ambekar, Sudheer; Ramdas, Kevin; Guada, Luis; Yavagal, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Background Embolic protection devices can prevent atherosclerotic emboli during carotid stenting. Newer proximal protection devices reverse flow in the internal carotid artery (ICA), leading to reduction in perioperative microemboli. The risk of stroke is high for carotid stenting of ICA lesions with a length >10 mm and/or angiographic string sign. Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety outcomes of proximal embolic protection device usage in this high-risk group. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent carotid stenting procedures with proximal embolic protection devices at a tertiary care center. High-risk features for adverse events with carotid stenting were identified. Peri- and postprocedural outcomes were recorded. We further compared outcomes in patients with a carotid stenosis length >10 mm to those with shorter stenosis. Results From January 2011 to December 2014, we included 27 patients; 96.3% were symptomatic and 3.7% were asymptomatic. There was a stent placement technical success rate of 100%. No major stroke or coronary events were recorded. One minor stroke event developed in one patient. A carotid lesion length >10 mm and/or angiographic string sign was noted in 21/27 patients, with an average lesion length of 14.4 mm. One patient (4.8%) in this group developed a minor stroke event. Neither a coronary nor a major stroke event was recorded in this group. There was no significant difference in the complication rate between the long lesion and the control group. Conclusion In our patient cohort, it was found that a proximal embolic protection device is safe for patients with carotid stenosis, including those with a carotid lesion length >10 mm and/or angiographic string sign.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  1. Current status of carotid ultrasound in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily caused by atherosclerosis is a major cause of death and disability in developed countries. Sonographic carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is widely studied as a surrogate marker for detecting subclinical atherosclerosis for risk prediction and disease progress to guide medical intervention. However, there is no standardized CIMT measurement methodology in clinical studies resulting in inconsistent findings, thereby undermining the clinical value of CIMT. Increasing evidences show that CIMT alone has weak predictive value for CVD while CIMT including plaque presence consistently improves the predictive power. Quantification of plaque burden further enhances the predictive power beyond plaque presence. Sonographic carotid plaque characteristics have been found to be predictive of cerebral ischaemic events. With advances in ultrasound technology, enhanced assessment of carotid plaques is feasible to detect high-risk/vulnerable plaques, and provide risk assessment for ischemic stroke beyond measurement of luminal stenosis. PMID:27429912

  2. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE CAROTID BODY

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, T. J.; Stehbens, W. E.

    1966-01-01

    An electron microscope investigation was made of the carotid body in the cat and the rabbit. In thin-walled blood vessels the endothelium was fenestrated. Larger vessels were surrounded by a layer of smooth muscle fibers. Among the numerous blood vessels lay groups of cells of two types covered by basement membranes. Aggregates of Type I cells were invested by Type II cells, though occasionally cytoplasmic extensions were covered by basement membrane only. Type I cells contained many electron-opaque cored vesicles (350 to 1900 A in diameter) resembling those in endocrine secretory cells. Type II cells covered nerve endings terminating on Type I cells and enclosed nerve fibers in much the same manner as Schwann cells. The nerve endings contained numerous microvesicles (∼500 A in diameter), mitochondria, glycogen granules, and a few electron-opaque cored vesicles. Junctions between nerve endings and Type I cells were associated with regions of increased density in both intercellular spaces and the adjoining cytoplasm. Cilia of the 9 + 0 fibril pattern were observed in Type I and Type II cells and pericytes. Nonmyelinated nerve fibers, often containing microvesicles, mitochondria, and a few electron-opaque cored vesicles (650 to 1000 A in diameter) were present in Schwann cells, many of which were situated close to blood vessels Ganglion cells near the periphery of the gland, fibrocytes, and segments of unidentified cells were also seen. It was concluded that, according to present concepts of the structure of nerve endings, those endings related to Type I cells could be efferent or afferent. PMID:5971007

  3. Serum soluble RAGE levels and carotid atherosclerosis: the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Barry I; Gardener, Hannah; Liu-Mares, Wen; Dong, Chuanhui; Cheung, Ken; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Rundek, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent cohort studies suggested that serum levels of soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (sRAGE) are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that sRAGE levels are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in a racially and ethnically diverse population. Methods and results 828 stroke-free participants from the Northern Manhattan Study (mean age 71.1±8.7yrs; 64% Hispanic, 19% black, and 17% white) underwent high-resolution carotid B-mode ultrasound to measure carotid plaque (present in 62% of subjects) and intima-media thickness (IMT) (mean Total= 0.96±0.10 mm). Serum sRAGE was measured by ELISA and associations tested between sRAGE with IMT and plaque presence. Soluble RAGE levels were not associated with plaque presence or IMT after adjusting for sociodemographic, vascular risk factors and medication use. Stratification by race-ethnicity did not reveal any associations with carotid IMT or plaque. Conclusion In the present study, sRAGE levels were not associated with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:25744702

  4. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice.

  5. Otorrhagia as the initial presentation of an internal carotid artery aneurysm in the middle ear. Case presentation

    PubMed Central

    PETRI, MARIA; DINESCU, VERONICA; NECULA, VIOLETA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2016-01-01

    Middle ear aneurysms are rare and difficult to treat. The case of a 50-year-old female who presented with left otorrhagia caused by an internal carotid aneurysm is reported. She had no medical history of tinnitus, vertigo, otalgia or otorrhea. Middle ear surgery was effective in resolving bleeding and did not cause any permanent neurological deficit. High resolution computed tomography angiography is the technique of choice and, in some cases, can be complemented with a magnetic resonance angiography. Misdiagnosis of the internal carotid artery aneurysm may lead to serious morbidity because of bleeding or vascular occlusion. The use of modern imaging techniques explain the current relative increase in frequency. PMID:27152084

  6. Carotid Body Tumor as a Cause of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Budincevic, Hrvoje; Piršic, Ana; Bohm, Tihana; Trajbar, Tomislav; Ivkošic, Ante; Pavlovic, Tomislav; Bielen, Ivan; Soldo-Butkovic, Silva

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of a 78-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital due to a stroke with left-sided hemiparesis. Ultrasound of the carotid arteries showed a carotid body tumor on the bifurcation of the right common carotid artery, which was subsequently confirmed by a further neuroradiological investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head confirmed an acute ischemic lesion located in the right periventricular region. The carotid body tumor (CBT) was surgically removed and confirmed on histopathology. Our case reveals the role of carotid ultrasound in the diagnosis of a CBT, which may be a potential cause of stroke. PMID:26831027

  7. Occipital infarction with hemianopsia from carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Pessin, M S; Kwan, E S; Scott, R M; Hedges, T R

    1989-03-01

    Extracranial internal carotid artery occlusive disease usually produces stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory or the border zone between the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. It is unusual for occipital infarction in the posterior cerebral artery territory to be caused by internal carotid artery disease despite the fact that the posterior cerebral artery may arise directly from the internal carotid artery as an anatomic variation. We describe a patient with a fetal posterior cerebral artery originating from the internal carotid artery, and the initial manifestation of his extracranial internal carotid artery occlusive disease was hemianopsia from occipital infarction.

  8. Tasting arterial blood: what do the carotid chemoreceptors sense?

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakhar, Nanduri R.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose, and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO)-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K+ channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca2+ influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signaling is an area of ongoing study. PMID:25642193

  9. Tasting arterial blood: what do the carotid chemoreceptors sense?

    PubMed

    Prabhakhar, Nanduri R; Joyner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose, and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO)-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K(+) channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signaling is an area of ongoing study. PMID:25642193

  10. Evidence-based surgical treatment of carotid stenosis. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Andaluz, N; Zuccarello, M

    2004-03-01

    Carotid stenosis is an important cause of transient ischemic attacks and stroke. The cause of carotid stenosis is most often atherosclerosis, which accounts for 10% to 20% of brain infarction cases. Despite the introduction of tissue-plasminogen activator and other promising experimental therapies for select patients with acute ischemic stroke prevention remains the best approach to reduce its impact. Stroke-prone patients can be identified and targeted for specific interventions. At this juncture, treatment of carotid stenosis is a well-established therapeutic target and a pillar of stroke prevention. Two main strategies exist for the treatment of carotid stenosis. The 1st is stabilization or halting the progression of the carotid plaque formation with medications and modifications of risk factors (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, smoking, obesity, high cholesterol). The 2nd approach is the elimination or reduction of carotid stenosis by carotid endarterectomy or angioplasty and stenting. Carotid endarterectomy is the mainstay of therapy for symptomatic, severe carotid stenosis. Although its role for asymptomatic patients appears more limited, it is distinct for severe stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting are techniques in maturation with the attractiveness of being less invasive that face the challenge of at least replicating the results of surgery. In this article, we will discuss the surgical management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis based on the evidence provided by the literature. PMID:15257259

  11. Best evidence for medical therapy for carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Jason; Jayia, Parveen; Hamilton, George

    2013-10-01

    Carotid atheromatous disease is an important cause of stroke and represents a key target in stroke prevention. Randomized trials have shown the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy in secondary stroke prevention. Carotid stenting presents a less invasive alternative to surgical intervention. Advances in medical management, if compliance can be ensured, are leading to improvement in outcomes when implemented as sole therapy in the treatment of atherosclerotic carotid stenosis. This includes lifestyle modification, blood pressure control, and antiplatelet and statin therapy. Over the last 20 years, the annual rate of ipsilateral stroke associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis has decreased from 2% to 4% to less than 1%. This is largely due to improvements in medical therapy. However, despite numerous trials and years of clinical research, the optimal management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease remains controversial. This article presents and summarizes the evidence supporting best medical treatment for carotid artery stenosis.

  12. Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness, Carotid Plaque and Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Su, Ta-Chen; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Hu, Frank B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Our aim was to prospectively investigate the association between carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) as well as carotid plaque and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in Chinese, among whom data are limited. Methods and Findings We conducted a community-based cohort study composed of 2190 participants free of cardiovascular disease at baseline in one community. During a median 10.5-year follow up, we documented 68 new cases of coronary heart disease and 94 cases of stroke. The multivariate relative risks (RRs) associated with a change of 1 standard deviation of maximal common carotid IMT were 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.70) for CHD and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.28–1.69) for stroke. The corresponding RRs with internal carotid IMT were 1.47 (95% CI, 1.21–1.79) for CHD and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.31–1.76) for stroke. Carotid plaque measured by the degree of diameter stenosis was also significantly associated with increased risk of CHD (p for trend<0.0001) and stroke (p for trend<0.0001). However, these associations were largely attenuated when adjusting for IMT measurements. Conclusions This prospective study indicates a significant association between carotid IMT and incidence of CHD and stroke in Chinese adults. These measurements may be useful for cardiovascular risk assessment and stratification in Chinese. PMID:18927612

  13. Common Carotid Artery Stump Syndrome Due to Mobile Thrombus Detected by Carotid Duplex Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Yuki; Sakai, Kenichiro; Matsuno, Hiromasa; Arai, Ayumi; Terasawa, Yuka; Mitsumura, Hidetaka; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Carotid stump syndrome is a cause of recurrent embolic stroke following occlusion of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The present report describes a case of recurrent cerebral embolism ipsilateral to a chronically occluded left common carotid artery (CCA), i.e., "CCA stump syndrome." Doppler color flow imaging showed anterograde flow in the left internal and external carotid arteries, which were supplied by collateral flow from the superior thyroid artery inflowing just proximal to the left carotid bifurcation. According to carotid duplex ultrasonography (CDU), a low-echoic mobile thrombus was noted at the distal stump of the occluded CCA, which presumably caused distal embolism. The low-echoic mobile thrombus dramatically changed to a homogenously high-echoic thrombus, and there was no recurrence of stroke after antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy. This is the first report to demonstrate a CDU-verified temporal change in the thrombus at the stump in CCA stump syndrome. CDU is a noninvasive and useful technique to characterize hemodynamics, thrombus morphology, and the response to therapy. PMID:27567297

  14. Carotid Doppler evaluation in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alton, J. G.; Norris, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Doppler technique has proven to be a useful noninvasive technique for evaluating the patency of the carotid artery in patients at risk of stroke. The data obtained from 246 carotid Doppler examinations were compared with the angiographic findings in the same patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were high when the degree of stenosis was greater than 50%, but occlusions were less reliably detected, with 8 (33%) of the 24 being misdiagnosed as high-grade stenoses. Carotid Doppler evaluation guides and accelerates decisions regarding further investigations, such as cerebral angiography. It helps one decide whether a neck bruit is of arterial origin and aids assessment following cerebrovascular surgery. It is not a substitute for cerebral angiography because it poorly visualizes both the posterior and the intracranial circulations and cannot accurately detect low-grade (less than 50%) stenoses or ulcerated arterial plaques. Detection of stenosis in a carotid artery in an otherwise uncertain case is an indication for cerebral angiography, so the Doppler technique will probably increase the number of angiograms performed. However, this technique is also useful in follow-up, being without hazard, and should, therefore, reduce the likelihood of unnecessary angiographic examinations. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3A FIG. 3B FIG. 5 PMID:6640454

  15. Depressive symptoms and carotid intima-media thickness in South American Hispanics: results from the PREVENCION study.

    PubMed

    Chirinos, Diana A; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Salinas-Najarro, Belissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria M; Schneiderman, Neil; Paz-Manrique, Roberto; Bolanos, Juan F; Khan, Zubair; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to: (1) examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT); and, (2) Determine the moderating effect of gender in this relationship among South American Hispanics. We studied 496 adults enrolled in the population-based PREVENCION study. Carotid IMT was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Mean carotid IMT was 0.66 mm. (SD = 0.17) and mean depression score was 5.6 (SD = 3.5). Depressive symptoms were not associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.04, p = 0.222) in multivariate analyses. A significant moderating effect of gender was found (β for interaction = 0.10, p = 0.030), resulting from a significant association between depressive symptoms and carotid IMT in men but not women. Depressive symptoms were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in South American Hispanic men but not women after controlling for demographic characteristics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

  16. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Kun, Emily W; Cheng, Isaac T; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K; Zhu, Tracy Y; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients' group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (-2.918, [-6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  17. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  18. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Chatzimarkos, Markos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Safioleas, Michail

    2016-01-01

    Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones. PMID:27047690

  19. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  20. Micro-CT of Carotid Arteries: A Tool for Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Andreas; Wenke, Ruediger; Roemer, Frank W.; Lynch, John A.; Gatzka, Christian; Priebe, Markus; Guermazi, Ali; Grigorian, Mikayel; Heller, Martin; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2004-11-15

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive tool for two- and three-dimensional imaging and quantification. The ability of this technique to assess atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was evaluated in three human cadaver samples based on the original axial acquisitions, multiplanar reconstructions and volume rendering techniques. Quantitative analysis included the calculation of: (1) the original lumen perimeter, original lumen area, plaque area, residual lumen area, calcified area and gross sectional area reduction of the vascular lumen from two-dimensional slices; (2) the total tissue volume, soft tissue volume and calcified tissue volume from the three-dimensional data set. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of micro-CT as a supplementary method for the two- and three-dimensional ex vivo evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

  1. Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

  2. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Extracranial Internal Carotid Aneurysms Using Endografts

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Rostagno, Roman D.; Zander, Tobias; Llorens, Rafael; Schonholz, Claudio; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery (EICA) are infrequent. They are difficult to treat with conventional surgery because of their distal extension into the skull base. We report three cases of EICA aneurysms in two symptomatic patients successfully treated with polytetrafluoroethylene self-expanding endografts using an endovascular approach. The aneurysms were located distal to the carotid bifurcation and extended to the subpetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  4. Comparative Review of the Treatment Methodologies of Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Coney; Szuchmacher, Mauricio; Chang, John B.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of carotid stenosis entails three methodologies, namely, medical management, carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS), as well as carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) have shown that symptomatic carotid stenosis greater than 70% is best treated with CEA. In asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis greater than 60%, CEA was more beneficial than treatment with aspirin alone according to the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis (ACAS) and Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (ACST) trials. When CAS is compared with CEA, the CREST resulted in similar rates of ipsilateral stroke and death rates regardless of symptoms. However, CAS not only increased adverse effects in women, it also amplified stroke rates and death in elderly patients compared with CEA. CAS can maximize its utility in treating focal restenosis after CEA and patients with overwhelming cardiac risk or prior neck irradiation. When performing CEA, using a patch was equated to a more durable result than primary closure, whereas eversion technique is a new methodology deserving a spotlight. Comparing the three major treatment strategies of carotid stenosis has intrinsic drawbacks, as most trials are outdated and they vary in their premises, definitions, and study designs. With the newly codified best medical management including antiplatelet therapies with aspirin and clopidogrel, statin, antihypertensive agents, strict diabetes control, smoking cessation, and life style change, the current trials may demonstrate that asymptomatic carotid stenosis is best treated with best medical therapy. The ongoing trials will illuminate and reshape the treatment paradigm for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:26417191

  5. Carotid artery access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Thourani, Vinod H; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We report three patients who had successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) via carotid artery access. None were candidates for thoracotomy (including minimal access incisions) and had no other vascular access sites that would accommodate the transcatheter valve sheath. Antegrade carotid perfusion and retrograde insertion of the delivery sheath maintained cerebral blood flow without sequelae. Carotid access for TAVR is an option for unusual patients without other access.

  6. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  7. Aterofisiol® in carotid plaque evolution

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Gallelli, Luca; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with carotid stenosis, the risk of plaque rupture is related to the composition of the atherosclerotic plaque rather than to its magnitude. In this regard, we evaluated the effects of a supplement, Aterofisiol,® containing omega-3 (EPA [eicosapen acid] DHA [docosahexaenoic acid]), vitamin K2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque and on neurological symptoms in patients with carotid stenosis undergoing carotid endarterectomy. Methods The study was randomized, prospective, and double-blinded. Eligible patients were of both sexes, with carotid stenosis >70% who underwent endarterectomy. Enrolled patients were randomly allocated to receive either one tablet of acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg (Cardioaspirin®) + one tablet of Aterofisiol every 24 hours or one tablet of Cardioaspirin + one tablet of placebo every 24 hours. Each treatment was started 30 days before the surgery and was stopped 5 days before the surgery. The plaques were removed “en bloc” using standard surgical technique. Results During the study period, 214 patients (135 men and 79 women) were enrolled for intent-to-treat and randomized in two groups: Group A: 107 patients (68 men and 39 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + Aterofisiol. Group B: 107 patients (67 men and 40 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + placebo. At the end of the study, 202 patients participated fully (103 patients in Group A and 99 patients in Group B), making up the protocol evaluation population (94.4%). The mean lipid content of removed plaques was significantly lower (P<0.05) in Group A. We recorded a significantly lower incidence of neurological symptoms in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05). Conclusion In the study, Aterofisiol showed to be effective in reducing the amounts of cholesterol and lipids in the plaques and in reducing adverse neurological events in the study group with respect to controls

  8. The prognosis of carotid siphon stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wechsler, L R; Kistler, J P; Davis, K R; Kaminski, M J

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the clinical course and angiograms of 15 patients with carotid siphon stenosis of 50% or greater. Fourteen had less than 50% stenosis at the origin of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery, and one had a greater degree of stenosis but underwent endarterectomy after an initial angiogram. Angiograms were examined for evidence of hemodynamic abnormalities in addition to residual lumen diameter. Seven patients initially had TIAs, 5 had strokes, and 3 were asymptomatic. In an average followup of 51 months (range 4-123 months) subsequent cerebral ischemic events occurred in 6 (40%), but only 1 had a stroke with a persisting neurological deficit that could be directly attributed to the siphon stenosis. Stenoses were hemodynamically significant by angiography in 5 of 7 TIA patients, and only 1 of 5 stroke patients. The incidence of subsequent ischemic events in this study was similar to 2 previous studies of siphon stenosis, however in this study most of the events ipsilateral to the siphon stenosis were TIAs or minor strokes. The association of hemodynamic angiographic abnormalities and initial TIAs but not strokes suggests that the mechanism producing ischemic symptoms may differ in patients with TIA and stroke who have carotid siphon stenosis.

  9. The anterior loop of the carotid siphon.

    PubMed

    Alencastro, L C

    1991-01-01

    The extracavernous-presubarachnoid segment of the carotid artery (EPCA), medial to the clinoid process, was studied in 48 sphenoid bones. Ten specimens were submitted to microdissection; the remainders were cut in 1 mm thick slices after electrolytic decalcification. The studies showed that the EPCA has a mean length of 3.09 mm (0.5 to 6.5 mm). It has a shorter length than the whole medioclinoid (paraclinoid) segment of the artery because the subarachnoid space may enter between the artery and the clinoid process, as well as the venous space of the cavernous sinus. Venous channels of extremely small diameter were found between the EPCA and the clinoid process in 30.3% of the cases and between the EPCA and the sphenoid body in 48.6%. The distal limit of the intracavernous cartoid artery is the projection of the caudal surface of the clinoid process, which is coincident with the vertex of the anterior loop of the carotid siphon in 91.7% of the cases. The origin of the ophthalmic artery was verified to be from the EPCA in 9.7%, at the transition to the subarachnoid space in 6.5%, and intracavernous in 3.2%. Immediately proximal to the EPCA, the anterior horizontal segment of the carotid artery may be reached without entering the venous space of the cavernous sinus through the superior wall in 27.8% and through the lateral wall in 66.6%.

  10. Carotid artery rupture and cervicofacial actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Anne; Lhermitte, Benoît; Ödman, Micaela; Grabherr, Silke; Mangin, Patrice; Palmiere, Cristian

    2012-11-01

    Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon, progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus. Actinomyces are common commensal saprophytes in the oral cavity which may have medical importance as facultative pathogens. Subsequent to local injuries to the oral mucosa, they may penetrate the deep tissues and be responsible for suppurative or granulomatous infections. We herein report a case of a 65-year-old man who underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a tonsillar carcinoma. An ulcerous lesion in the base of the tongue developed and spread to the carotid artery wall. The man died of a massive hemorrhage due to left carotid artery rupture. Postmortem computed tomography angiography performed prior to autopsy allowed the precise localization of the source of bleeding to be detected. Postmortem biochemical investigations confirmed the presence of inflammation associated with local bacterial infection. Histological investigations revealed the rupture of the left carotid artery surrounded by numerous colonies of Actinomyces. Acute and chronic inflammation with tissue necrosis as well as post-actinic, fibrotic changes were also found in the tissues surrounding the ruptured artery wall. PMID:22819527

  11. Noninvasive evaluation and management of the "asymptomatic" carotid bruit.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P

    1977-12-01

    Cervical bruits in patients who are asymptomatic or who have nonhemispheric neurological symptoms present a universal challenge. Of 4,000 patients evaluated noninvasively for carotid occlusive disease, 1,287 presented with "asymptomatic" bruits (697 had nonhemispheric neurological symptoms and 590 were clinically asymptomatic). Carotid phonoangiography (CPA), the visual analysis of carotid bruits, identifies bruits indicative of significant stenosis, documents progression, and differentiates bruits of carotid bifurcation and sub-bifurcation origin. Sub-bifurication bruits were diagnosed in 619, insignificant bifurcation bruits in 426, and significant carotid bruits in 242 patients by CPA. Oculoplethysmography (OPG) evaluates the hemodynamic significance of carotid bruits by comparative timing of simultaneously recorded ocular and ear lobe pulses. OPG detected 273 asymptomatic bruit patients with significant internal carotid flow reduction and indicated 5% of the bifurcation bruits were of external carotid origin. An accuracy of 89% in determining greater than 40% stenosis by OPG/CPA in 295 patients having arteriography increases to 97% when both OPG and CPA are positive. Six-month to 70-month clinical follow-up of the 1,287 patients documented 154 carotid endarterectomies and 38 strokes. Analysis of the strokes favors arteriography and operation only for those patients with appropriately positive or progressive OPG/CPA or with focal transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  12. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  13. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  14. Carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  15. Mass transport of low density lipoprotein in reconstructed hemodynamic environments of human carotid arteries: the role of volume and solute flux through the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Giddens, Don P

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the arterial intima is a critical step in the initiation and progression of atheromatous lesions. In this study we examine subject-specific LDL transport into the intima of carotid bifurcations in three human subjects using a three-pore model for LDL mass transfer. Subject-specific carotid artery computational models were derived using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain the geometry and phase-contract MRI (PC-MRI) to acquire pulsatile inflow and outflow boundary conditions for each subject. The subjects were selected to represent a wide range of anatomical configurations and different stages of atherosclerotic development from mild to moderate intimal thickening. A fluid-solid interaction (FSI) model was implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach in order to consider the effects of a compliant vessel on wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS-dependent response of the endothelium to LDL mass transfer was modeled by multiple pathways to include the contributions of leaky junctions, normal junctions, and transcytosis to LDL solute and plasma volume flux from the lumen into the intima. Time averaged WSS (TAWSS) over the cardiac cycle was computed to represent the spatial WSS distribution, and wall thickness (WTH) was determined from black blood MRI (BBMRI) so as to visualize intimal thickening patterns in the bifurcations. The regions which are exposed to low TAWSS correspond to elevated WTH and higher mass and volume flux via the leaky junctions. In all subjects, the maximum LDL solute flux was observed to be immediately downstream of the stenosis, supporting observations that existing atherosclerotic lesions tend to progress in the downstream direction of the stenosis.

  16. Transitional flow analysis in the carotid artery bifurcation by proper orthogonal decomposition and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kefayati, Sarah; Poepping, Tamie L

    2013-07-01

    Blood flow instabilities in the carotid artery bifurcation have been highly correlated to clot formation and mobilization resulting in ischemic stroke. In this work, PIV-measured flow velocities in normal and stenosed carotid artery bifurcation models were analyzed by means of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Through POD analysis, transition to more complex flow was visualized and quantified for increasing stenosis severity. While no evidence of transitional flow was seen in the normal model, the 50%-stenosed model started to show characteristics of transitional flow, which became highly evident in the 70% model, with greatest manifestation during the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle. By means of a model comparison, we demonstrate two quantitative measures of the flow complexity through the power-law decay slope of the energy spectrum and the global entropy. The more complex flow in the 70%-stenosed model showed a flatter slope of energy decay (-0.91 compared to -1.34 for 50% stenosis) and higher entropy values (0.26 compared to 0.17). Finally, the minimum temporal resolution required for POD analysis of carotid artery flow was found to be 100 Hz when determined through a more typical energy-mode convergence test, as compared to 400 Hz based on global entropy values.

  17. Increased carotid intima media thickness is associated with prolactin levels in subjects with untreated prolactinoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-Bing; Li, Cui-Ling; He, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Dong-Hong; Fan, Xiang; Hu, Bin; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2014-06-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherogenic risk factors, but carotid intima media thickness (IMT) has not been studied in hyperprolactinemic patients. To determine whether untreated hyperprolactinemia contributes to increased carotid IMT. Thirty-one prolactinoma patients and 60 healthy controls were respectively studied. Participants underwent hormone evaluation. Anthropometric parameters (body mass index and blood pressure), inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fibrinogen), serum glucose, insulin, lipid and apolipoprotein profiles were also determined. Endothelial function measured as the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of a brachial artery and carotid IMT were evaluated using high-resolution ultrasonography. Multivariate linear regression analysis was applied to identify independent determinants of FMD and carotid IMT. Triglycerides, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA-I ratio, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and fibrinogen were significantly higher, while apoA-I was significantly lower in patients with prolactinomas than in the controls. Meanwhile, decreased FMD and increased carotid IMT were observed in hyperprolactinemic group. Serum prolactin was positively correlated with triglycerides, apoB/apoA-I ratio, hypogonadal, hsCRP and fibrinogen (P < 0.05), but inversely associated with apoA-I and HDL-C (P ≤ 0.001). Moreover, prolactin was found negatively correlated with FMD (r = -0.576, P < 0.0001), and positively correlated with mean carotid IMT (r = 0.652, P < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that prolactin determined, independent of traditional risk factors, FMD (B = -0.589, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.525 to -0.804, P = 0.001) and mean carotid IMT (B = 0.527, 95% CI 0.027-0.069, P < 0.0001). Hyperprolactinemia may be involved in the preclinical increase in carotid IMT, directly or by promoting atherogenic factors, including

  18. Numerical simulation of blood flow and plaque progression in carotid-carotid bypass patient specific case.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Milosevic, Zarko; Kovacevic, Pavle; Velicki, Lazar

    2015-01-01

    This study describes computer simulation of blood flow and plaque progression pattern in a patient who underwent surgical treatment for infected carotid prosthetic tube graft using carotid-carotid cross-over bypass. The 3D blood flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation. Mass transfer within the blood lumen and through the arterial wall is coupled with the blood flow and is modelled by the convection-diffusion equation. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport in lumen of the vessel is described by Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process is solved using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. Calculation based on a computer simulation showed that flow distribution in the left carotid artery (CA) was around 40-50% of the total flow in the right common CA. Also, the left CA had higher pressure gradient after surgical intervention. Plaque progression simulation predicted development of the atherosclerotic plaque in the position of the right common CA and the left internal CA. A novel way of atherosclerotic plaque progression modelling using computer simulation shows a potential clinical benefit with significant impact on the treatment strategy optimization. PMID:26291584

  19. Carotid and vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks: clinical and angiographic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Toole, J F; McHenry, L C

    1979-08-01

    Carotid and vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) were clinically and angiographically correlated in 85 patients who had four-vessel angiography within 2 weeks after a TIA. The patients were divided into carotid and vertebrobasilar groups by clinical criteria. In the correlations of symptoms with arteriography, lesions of the contralateral internal carotid artery were observed in 54 percent of the patients. Of 39 patients with vertebrobasilar symptoms, 34 percent also had one carotid lesion and six patients had combinations of symptoms of both carotid and vertebrobasilar disease. In correlation with carotid bruits of the 85 patients, bruits were heard over one carotid artery in 42 percent. Subclavian bruits were heard in 47 percent of the patients with vertebrobasilar symptomatology. TIAs owing to arteriosclerosis of the cervical arteries occurred in 85 percent of the patients, but there was no significant difference in the incidence of atherosclerosis-induced TIA in the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. For accurate population surveys of the prevalence of TIAs, and for clinical decisions, proper categorization of patients is necessary.

  20. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3850 Carotid...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3850 Carotid...

  2. Stroke. Geometry is destiny for carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The geometry of carotid arteries, both normal and narrowed, produces flow characteristics that predict the location of atherosclerosis and the site of plaque rupture. A recent study has shown that the upstream carotid plaque undergoes profound biochemical and apoptotic changes that are closely linked to the development of stroke symptoms.

  3. Internal carotid artery dissection associated with scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E E

    1995-01-01

    A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department with dysphasia and a headache after scuba diving. He was treated initially for decompression sickness. Subsequent workup revealed bilateral internal carotid artery dissection. The risk factors, presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of internal carotid artery dissection are reviewed. The importance of considering unusual causes of neurologic deficits after scuba diving is emphasized.

  4. Traumatic internal carotid artery dissections caused by blunt softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Schievink, W I; Atkinson, J L; Bartleson, J D; Whisnant, J P

    1998-03-01

    This report describes recently treated patients with carotid artery dissection caused by blunt softball injuries, as well as the results of a study of carotid artery trauma in a community. Data obtained through the medical records linkage system used for epidemiologic studies in Olmsted County, MN were used to identify all cases of traumatic internal carotid artery dissection diagnosed from 1987 through 1994. Four patients with traumatic internal carotid artery dissections were identified during the 8-year period under study. In two patients (50%) the carotid dissection was a result of the direct impact of a softball. A 39-year-old-man, who developed transient cerebral ischemic symptoms, and a 35-year-old woman, who developed a painful Horner's syndrome, were struck by a softball on the anterolateral aspect of the neck. Both patients had a low carotid bifurcation. These data suggest that internal carotid artery dissections may be underrecognized sequelae of direct softball injuries to the anterolateral neck. A low carotid bifurcation may be a risk factor for such injuries.

  5. Accurate Estimation of Carotid Luminal Surface Roughness Using Ultrasonic Radio-Frequency Echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    It would be useful to measure the minute surface roughness of the carotid arterial wall to detect the early stage of atherosclerosis. In conventional ultrasonography, the axial resolution of a B-mode image depends on the ultrasonic wavelength of 150 µm at 10 MHz because a B-mode image is constructed using the amplitude of the radio-frequency (RF) echo. Therefore, the surface roughness caused by atherosclerosis in an early stage cannot be measured using a conventional B-mode image obtained by ultrasonography because the roughness is 10-20 µm. We have realized accurate transcutaneous estimation of such a minute surface profile using the lateral motion of the carotid arterial wall, which is estimated by block matching of received ultrasonic signals. However, the width of the region where the surface profile is estimated depends on the magnitude of the lateral displacement of the carotid arterial wall (i.e., if the lateral displacement of the arterial wall is 1 mm, the surface profile is estimated in a region of 1 mm in width). In this study, the width was increased by combining surface profiles estimated using several ultrasonic beams. In the present study, we first measured a fine wire, whose diameter was 13 µm, using ultrasonic equipment to obtain an ultrasonic beam profile for determination of the optimal kernel size for block matching based on the correlation between RF echoes. Second, we estimated the lateral displacement and surface profile of a phantom, which had a saw tooth profile on its surface, and compared the surface profile measured by ultrasound with that measured by a laser profilometer. Finally, we estimated the lateral displacement and surface roughness of the carotid arterial wall of three healthy subjects (24-, 23-, and 23-year-old males) using the proposed method.

  6. Consumption of fruit and berries is inversely associated with carotid atherosclerosis in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, I; Hjerkinn, E M; Seljeflot, I; Arnesen, H; Tonstad, S

    2008-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a lowered risk of CVD. We assessed the association between the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery and dietary intake of vegetables, fruit and berries in elderly men with a high risk of CVD. Subjects (age 70 +/- 5 years) were survivors from a cohort of 1232 men that participated in the Oslo Diet and Antismoking Study in 1972-3. Measurements of the carotid IMT by high resolution B-mode ultrasound, risk factor assessment and dietary data based on an FFQ were collected in 1997-9. Complete dietary and ultrasound data were available for 547 subjects. The carotid IMT in the highest quartile of dietary intake of fruit and berries was 0.89 (SE 0.18) mm compared with 0.96 (SE 0.25) mm in the lowest quartile, giving a mean difference of 0.075 (SE 0.027) mm (P = 0.033). In multivariate regression analysis increased intake of fruit and berries remained inversely associated with IMT after adjustment for age, cigarette smoking, dietary cholesterol and saturated fat, consumption of milk, cream and ice cream and energy intake (multivariate regression coefficient 0.257; R(2) 0.066; SE 0.209; P < 0.001). The difference of 348 g of fruit and berries per d between the lowest and highest quartile of intake was associated with a 5.5 % adjusted difference in mean IMT. These findings suggest that consumption of fruit and berries may be protective against carotid atherosclerosis in elderly men at high risk of CVD.

  7. MR Imaging of Carotid Plaque Composition During Lipid-Lowering Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Dong, Li; Hatsukami, Tom; Phan, Binh An; Chu, Baocheng; Moore, Andrew; Lane, Trevor; Neradilek, Moni B.; Polissar, Nayak; Monick, Duane; Lee, Colin; Underhill, Hunter; Yuan, Chun

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to test the lipid depletion hypothesis and to establish the time course of change in carotid plaque morphology and composition during lipid therapy using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BACKGROUND Lipid therapy is thought to improve plaque stability and reduce cardiovascular events by targeting the plaque rupture risk features such as large lipid core, thin fibrous cap, and high level of inflammatory infiltrates. However, the plaque stabilizing process during lipid therapy has not been clearly demonstrated in humans and in vivo. METHODS Subjects with coronary or carotid artery disease, apolipoprotein B ≥120 mg/dl, and lipid treatment history <1 year, were randomly assigned to atorvastatin monotherapy or to atorvastatin-based combination therapies with appropriate placebos for 3 years. All subjects underwent high-resolution, multicontrast bilateral carotid MRI scans at baseline and annually for 3 years. All images were analyzed for quantification of wall area and plaque composition blinded to therapy, laboratory results, and clinical course. RESULTS After 3 years of lipid therapy, the 33 subjects with measurable lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC) at baseline had a significant reduction in plaque lipid content: LRNC volume decreased from 60.4 ± 59.5 mm3 to 37.4 ± 69.5 mm3 (p < 0.001) and %LRNC (LRNC area/wall area in the lipid-rich regions) from 14.2 ± 7.0% to 7.4 ± 8.2% (p < 0.001). The time course showed that %LRNC decreased by 3.2 (p < 0.001) in the first year, by 3.0 (p = 0.005) in the second year, and by 0.91 (p = 0.2) in the third year. Changes in LRNC volume followed the same pattern. Percent wall volume (100 × wall/outer wall, a ratio of volumes) in the lipid-rich regions significantly decreased from 52.3 ± 8.5% to 48.6 ± 9.7% (p = 0.002). Slices containing LRNC had significantly more percent wall volume reduction than those without (−4.7% vs. −1.4%, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Intensive lipid

  8. [Ophthalmological complications associated with clinically significant carotid stenosis].

    PubMed

    Rozegnał-Madej, Agnieszka; Bielecka, Emilia; Swiech-Zubilewicz, Anna; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Karakuła, Wacław; Zubilewicz, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to show ocular manifestations in carotid artery occlusive disease, with pathogenesis, diagnostic and therapeutic abilities of this changes. Carotid arteries are the main route by which the blood is supplied to the cerebrum and eyes. Clinical significant carotid artery stenosis is mainly caused by atherosclerosis. Most frequent neurological symptoms are transient ischemic attacks (TIA) and temporary visual loss (amaurosos fugax) are most common ocular symptoms. Other ocular pathologies in fundus examination are retinal embolies, retinal vein occlusion, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, ocular ischemic syndrome or glaucoma. Most dangerous complications are stroke, blindness, or even patients death. Besides clinical examination the diagnosis is usually confirmed by carotid artery color Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance angiography and retinal fluorescein angiography. It is important to refer a patient with suspected or confirmed significant carotid artery stenosis for appropriate evaluation and treatment to a endovascular surgeon. PMID:22783748

  9. Everted cervical vein for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Yu, A; Dardik, H; Wolodiger, F; Raccuia, J; Kapadia, I; Sussman, B; Kahn, M; Pecoraro, J P; Ibrahim, I M

    1990-11-01

    Because of the theoretic benefits of autologous vein we undertook an investigation to evaluate cervical veins (facial, external jugular) as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. A device that stimulated both circumferential fixation by sutures and radial tension exerted on in vivo patches was constructed to measure burst strength of tissue. Mean bursting pressure for groin saphenous vein (n = 10) was 94.5 +/- 15.1 pounds per square inch (psi), 75.5 +/- 8.9 psi for ankle saphenous vein (n = 10), 83.3 +/- 14.5 psi for everted (double layer) cervical vein (n = 5) and 10 +/- 3.3 psi for single layer cervical vein (n = 5). No significant differences between saphenous vein at any level and everted (double layer) cervical vein, but all were significantly different from single layer cervical vein (p less than 0.05). From June 1987 through November 1989, 19 patients underwent 21 carotid endarterectomies complemented with adjunctive everted cervical vein patch angioplasty. Indications for surgery were asymptomatic stenosis (53%), transient ischemic attack (29%), and cerebrovascular accident with recovery (18%). All patients were studied after surgery with duplex scanning. Asymptomatic recurrent stenosis was observed in one patient. Transient hypoglossal nerve dysfunction occurred in one other patient. One postoperative death occurred as a result of massive aspiration. These results indicate that everted cervical vein is comparable to the saphenous vein in resistance to bursting and can yield similar results as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. Accordingly, saphenous vein can be spared and lower extremity incisions avoided.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  11. Carotid Stent Fracture from Stylocarotid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jeffrey D; Joyner, David A; Farley, Edward P; Khan, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a rare condition resulting from elongation of the temporal styloid process or calcification of its associated stylohyoid ligaments. Although usually presenting with pain or odynophagia, Eagle syndrome has been reported to cause a multitude of neurologic symptoms or vascular complications, some of which can be life-threatening. We present a case in which an endovascularly placed internal carotid artery stent in close proximity to a calcified stylohyoid ligament resulted in stent fracture with subsequent stent and vessel occlusion. We review and discuss the presentation, diagnosis, etiology, complications and treatment options of the syndrome. PMID:27761179

  12. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  13. Concomitant Carotid and Coronary Artery Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Craver, Joseph M.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Jones, Ellis L.; Curling, Patrick E.; Bone, David K.; Smith, Robert B.; Perdue, Garland D.; Hatcher, Charles R.; Kandrach, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on 68 patients who underwent concomitant carotid endarterectomy (CE) and coronary artery bypass surgery (CAB) at Emory University Hospital from January 1974 to February 1981. This group is then compared with a randomly selected, matched population without known carotid disease who underwent CAB alone. Asymptomatic bruit was the reason for investigation in 40 patients (59%); another 23 patients (34%) experienced transient cerebral ischemic attacks (TIAs); and five patients (7%) had TIA and prior stroke. Carotid stenoses (>75% luminal narrowing) were demonstrated as follows: isolated left, 24 patients; isolated right, 27 patients; and bilateral lesions, 16 patients. One patient had innominate artery stenosis. Associated total occlusion of one or both vertebral arteries was demonstrated in six patients. Ninety-seven per cent of patients had disabling angina pectoris prior to operation; the angina was unstable in 57%, 15% had congestive heart failure, and 54% had had at least one prior myocardial infarction (MI). Single-vessel coronary disease was present in 12.5% of patients, double in 37.5%, triple in 41.1%, and left main stenosis in 9%; 43% of patients had abnormal ventricular contractility. CE was performed on 67 patients (36 left and 31 right); aortocarotid bypass was performed on one. The CE procedures were performed immediately prior to the sternotomy for CAB under the same anesthesia. CAB consisted of single bypass in eight patients (11.8%); double in 16 patients (23.5%); triple in 22 patients (32.4%); and quadruple or more in 22 patients (32.4%) (mean = 2.9 grafts per patient). There was no hospital mortality. Perioperative MI occurred in 2.0% and stroke with residual deficit in 1.3%. Cumulative survival is 98.5% at two years. Sixty-three patients (92%) reported improvement or elimination of anginal symptoms after operation. Rehospitalization for stroke was necessary in 3.7% patients. Postoperative activity levels are; self-care only, 3

  14. Clinical Carotid Measurements: Present and Future State

    PubMed Central

    Strandness, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The most satisfactory methods of evaluating the carotid artery have included Doppler imaging and ultrasonic duplex scanning. It is now recognized that these techniques are most accurate when used in combination with spectral analysis to more objectively determine the flow patterns present across this important bifurcation. In the centers where there is the most experience in their use, the sensitivity of the methods approach 90% and are most accurate for detecting high-grade stenoses (greater than 50% diameter reduction). The most promising future applications include the use of computerized pattern recognition techniques to quantitatively separate patients with varying degrees of disease. PMID:15226956

  15. Recommendations for Carotid Stenting in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyuk Won; Suh, Sang-il; Jeong, Hae Woong; Suh, Dae Chul

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is being performed in many hospitals in Korea. Most of the guidelines which are being used are similar, but the practical aspects such as techniques are different between hospitals. For example, usage of various protective devices, the oral antiplatelet regimen prior to procedure and placing of temporary pacemaker to prevent bradycardia are different between hospitals. In this article, we summarize and propose the guidelines for CAS which is currently being accepted in Korea. These guidelines may be helpful in providing protocol to neurointerventionalist who perform CAS and to standardize the process including reporting of CAS in the future comparative trials in Korea. PMID:25763292

  16. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  17. Association between the Gensini Score and Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Serdar; Tabakçı, Mehmet Mustafa; Toprak, Cuneyt; Alizade, Elnur; Acar, Emrah; Bayam, Emrah; Tellice, Muhammet; Naser, Abdurrahman; Kargın, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the extent of coronary artery disease assessed by the Gensini score and/or the SYNTAX score and the significant carotid stenosis in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Subjects and Methods A total of 225 patients who had carotid doppler ultrasonography prior to CABG were included retrospectively. Significant coronary artery disease was assumed as a lumen diameter stenosis of ≥50% in any of the major epicardial coronary arteries. The severity of carotid stenosis was determined by B-mode and duplex ultrasonography. Clinically significant carotid stenosis was defined as peak systolic velocity greater than 125 cm/s. Results The mean value of SYNTAX score and Gensini score was highest in patients allocated to significant carotid stenosis (22.98±7.32, p<0.001 and 77.40±32.35, p<0.001, respectively). The other risk factors for significant carotid stenosis were found to be male gender (p=0.029), carotid bruit (p<0.001), diabetes (p=0.021), left main disease (p=0.002), 3-vessel disease (p=0.008), chronic total coronary occlusion (p=0.001), and coronary artery calcification (p=0.001) in univariate analysis. However, only the Gensini score (odds ratio[OR]=1.030, p=0.004), carotid bruit (OR=0.068, p<0.001), and male gender (OR=0.190, p=0.003) were the independent predictors. The Gensini score cut off value predicting significant carotid stenosis was 50.5 with 77% sensitivity (p<0.001). Conclusion The Gensini score may be used to identify patients at high risk for significant carotid stenosis prior to CABG. PMID:27721854

  18. Orbital compartment syndrome following transvenous embolization of carotid-cavernous fistula.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Sia, David Ik Tuo; Scroop, Rebecca; Selva, Dinesh

    2014-02-01

    Superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) thrombosis is a rare complication of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) embolization and is usually associated with a paradoxical worsening of signs followed by subsequent spontaneous resolution. We report a case in a 69-year-old female who developed orbital compartment syndrome due to SOV thrombosis following transvenous embolization of an indirect CCF. The patient was treated with an urgent lateral canthotomy and cantholysis and had good recovery. This report demonstrates that the paradoxical worsening due to SOV thrombosis in CCF may result in orbital compartment syndrome and require early recognition and prompt decompressive measures to avoid permanent visual sequelae.

  19. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  20. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  1. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p < 0.001). There was a good coleration between the extent of expansion and expected histological findings. All conplications were two cases of small cerebral infarction and a case of bleeding from the complicated lung cancer. The protection at prePTA lead to no complications in case of acute cerebral infarctions. It is very important to check the histological specimen carefully for safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  2. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  3. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34–35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5–35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. Methods The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60–90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. Results All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Conclusions Systemic cooling to 34.5–35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653 PMID:27058874

  4. Noninvasive Assessment of Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandyk, Dennis F.; Thiele, Brain L.

    1983-01-01

    Noninvasive methods of detecting carotid disease were developed to avoid the morbidity and occasional mortality associated with cerebral angiography. The tests developed are of the following two types: direct, which uses imaging or the detection of flow disturbances to identify disease at the bifurcation, and indirect, which infers the presence of bifurcation disease by detecting changes at a remote site. The initial goal of only detecting disease has now been broadened, with this technology being used to address important clinical and epidemiologic questions such as the natural history of carotid bifurcation disease. The recognition of these important contributions has been compounded, however, by the large number of tests that are available, producing the problem of deciding which test or tests should be used for a particular patient. The use of multiple tests avoids the deficiencies of single tests but compounds medical costs. For a cost-effective single form of testing for all circumstances, duplex scanning methods offer the greatest possibility of detecting all degrees of disease. Images PMID:6649597

  5. Medical treatment in carotid artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Kolkert, J L; Meerwaldt, R; Lefrandt, J D; Geelkerken, R H; Zeebregts, C J

    2011-12-01

    Medical treatment has a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with occlusive carotid artery disease. Large trials have provided the justification for operative treatment besides medical treatment in patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis two decades ago. Since then, medical therapy has evolved tremendously. Next to aspirin, antiplatelet regimens acting on a different level in the modulation of platelet aggregation have made their entry. Moreover, statin therapy has been introduced. These changes among others in secondary stroke prevention, along with better understanding in life-style adjustments and perioperative medical management, have led to a decrease in stroke recurrence. Secondary prevention is therefore now the most important pillar of medical therapy. It consists of antiplatelet therapy, statins and blood pressure lowering agents in all patients. Small adjustments are recommended for those patients referred for invasive treatment. Moreover, long-term medical treatment is imperative. In this article, we summarize current evidence in literature regarding medical management in patients with previous stroke or TIA. PMID:22051989

  6. Radiation therapy of carotid body tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Valdagni, R.; Amichetti, M. )

    1990-02-01

    Chemodectomas of carotid artery bifurcation are generally managed with surgery, irradiation being reserved for inoperable, bulky, and recurrent tumors. Probably due to this pretreatment selection of patients, chemodectomas are anedoctally considered radioresistant tumors, although this concept is not supported by the recent literature. From 1968 to 1987, 13 carotid body tumors in seven patients were treated with irradiation as sole treatment (10 lesions) or as postoperative modality (three lesions). Familial occurrence and bilateral presentation were observed in 3 of 7 and in 6 of 7 patients, respectively. Total dose of irradiation was of 46-60 Gy (median 50 Gy, mean 52.25 Gy) with dose per fraction of 1.8-2.5 Gy. Local control (subjective or objective) was obtained in all the patients. Clinical results following World Health Organization (WHO) criteria were: 3 of 13 complete response, 7 of 13 partial response and 3 of 13 no change. Follow-up range is 1-19 years. Acute side effects were minimal and mid- or long-term toxicity was absent.32 references.

  7. Medical treatment in carotid artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Kolkert, J L; Meerwaldt, R; Lefrandt, J D; Geelkerken, R H; Zeebregts, C J

    2011-12-01

    Medical treatment has a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with occlusive carotid artery disease. Large trials have provided the justification for operative treatment besides medical treatment in patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis two decades ago. Since then, medical therapy has evolved tremendously. Next to aspirin, antiplatelet regimens acting on a different level in the modulation of platelet aggregation have made their entry. Moreover, statin therapy has been introduced. These changes among others in secondary stroke prevention, along with better understanding in life-style adjustments and perioperative medical management, have led to a decrease in stroke recurrence. Secondary prevention is therefore now the most important pillar of medical therapy. It consists of antiplatelet therapy, statins and blood pressure lowering agents in all patients. Small adjustments are recommended for those patients referred for invasive treatment. Moreover, long-term medical treatment is imperative. In this article, we summarize current evidence in literature regarding medical management in patients with previous stroke or TIA.

  8. Should patients with asymptomatic significant carotid stenosis undergo simultaneous carotid and cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ogutu, Peter; Werner, Raphael; Oertel, Frank; Beyer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether patients with severe asymptomatic carotid and coronary artery diseases should undergo simultaneous carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A total of 624 papers were found using the reported search, of which 20 represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study results of these papers are tabulated. Previous cohort studies showed mixed results, while advocating for the necessity of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). A recent RCT showed that patients undergoing prophylactic or simultaneous CEA + CABG had lower rates of stroke (0%) compared with delayed CEA 1–3 months after CABG (7.7%), without significant perioperative mortality difference. This study included patients with unilateral severe (>70%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis requiring CABG. An earlier partly randomized trial also showed better outcomes for patients undergoing simultaneous procedures (P = 0.045). Interestingly, systematic reviews previously failed to show compelling evidence supporting prophylactic CEA. This could be partly due to the fact that these reviews collectively analyse different cohort qualities. Neurological studies have, however, shown reduced cognitive and phonetic quality and function in patients with unilateral and bilateral asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Twenty-one RCTs comparing lone carotid artery stenting (CAS) and CEA informed the American Heart Association guidelines, which declared CAS comparable with CEA for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS). However, the risk of death/stroke for CAS alone is double that for CEA alone in the acute phase following onset of symptoms, while CEA alone is associated with a doubled risk of myocardial infarction. There is

  9. Effects of active and passive smoking on the development of cardiovascular disease as assessed by a carotid intima-media thickness examination in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Miao; Peng, Danfeng; Sun, Xue; Yan, Jing; Luo, Yi; Tang, Shanshan; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping

    2015-05-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness has been widely used as a surrogate end-point for cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. This study aimed to assess the effects of active and passive smoking exposure on the development of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seven hundred twenty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited for the study. A standardized questionnaire on smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and the number of years of smoking cessation was provided to the patients, and their responses were collected for analysis. The carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque, and the internal diameter of the common carotid artery were determined by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Compared to non-smokers, passive female smokers had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (odds ratio = 3.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.29-9.49, P = 0.009); they also had a significantly larger common carotid artery (P = 0.041) and risk of carotid plaque (odds ratio = 2.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.1980-4.0505, P = 0.01). Both active and passive male smokers had a significantly greater carotid intima-media thickness than non-smokers (P = 0.003 and P = 0.005, respectively). Male active smokers had a significantly higher risk of carotid plaque (odds ratio = 2.88, 95% confidence interval: 1.4788-5.6094, P = 0.001). In conclusion, cumulative active and passive smoking exposures are significant risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our results highlight the importance of endorsing a smoke-free environment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25708055

  10. Effects of active and passive smoking on the development of cardiovascular disease as assessed by a carotid intima-media thickness examination in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Miao; Peng, Danfeng; Sun, Xue; Yan, Jing; Luo, Yi; Tang, Shanshan; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping

    2015-05-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness has been widely used as a surrogate end-point for cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. This study aimed to assess the effects of active and passive smoking exposure on the development of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seven hundred twenty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited for the study. A standardized questionnaire on smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and the number of years of smoking cessation was provided to the patients, and their responses were collected for analysis. The carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque, and the internal diameter of the common carotid artery were determined by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Compared to non-smokers, passive female smokers had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (odds ratio = 3.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.29-9.49, P = 0.009); they also had a significantly larger common carotid artery (P = 0.041) and risk of carotid plaque (odds ratio = 2.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.1980-4.0505, P = 0.01). Both active and passive male smokers had a significantly greater carotid intima-media thickness than non-smokers (P = 0.003 and P = 0.005, respectively). Male active smokers had a significantly higher risk of carotid plaque (odds ratio = 2.88, 95% confidence interval: 1.4788-5.6094, P = 0.001). In conclusion, cumulative active and passive smoking exposures are significant risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our results highlight the importance of endorsing a smoke-free environment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. [Simultaneous carotid and vertebral revascularization in the aged].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; Bertagni, A; Piermattei, A; Vietri, F; Martinelli, V

    1997-09-01

    Five patients of a mean age of 76, have been submitted to combined vertebral and carotid artery revascularization for a severe vertebro-basilar insufficiency. Vertebral artery revascularization consisted of a transposition to the common carotid artery in one case and of a carotid-distal vertebral artery saphenous bypass graft. The associated carotid artery revascularization consisted of a carotid endarterectomy with patch in 4 cases and without patch in one case. There were no postoperative mortality and no postoperative stroke. Postoperative morbidity included a transitory revascularization syndrome, a myocardial ischemia and a Horner's syndrome. Complete relief of vertebrobasilar symptoms was obtained in 4 patients whereas in one patient only a mild positional vertigo persisted. All vascular reconstructions have been assessed with postoperative arteriography and duplex-scan every six months. At 11 months mean follow-up, all revascularizations are patent. Combined carotid and vertebral artery surgery is effective in well selected cases, and it does not enhance the risk of the two operations performed separately. It also eliminate the possibility of failure of isolated carotid revascularization for vertebrobasilar symptoms.

  12. Carotid Stenting vs Endarterectomy: New Results in Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, William J.; Lanzino, Guiseppe; Brott, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for stroke, and treatments for this condition to decrease the risk of stroke include medical therapy, carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and, more recently, carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS). Randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of CEA vs medical therapy showed a clear benefit for CEA in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis of greater than 70% and a lesser benefit in patients with 50% to 69% stenosis. Treatments have evolved in the ensuing 20 years, and a new method, CAS, has emerged as a possible alternative to CEA. In early results, CAS proved feasible but did not compare favorably with CEA. Later and larger-scale studies comparing CAS to CEA failed to reach conclusions regarding a clear neurologic outcome advantage of one method over the other. This subject was of sufficient interest that 2 larger-scale randomized controlled trials comparing CAS and CEA, the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial and the International Carotid Stenting Study, were undertaken to further explore this issue. This brief review places the new data arising from these studies in the context of prior efforts to address the problem of carotid artery stenosis and explores further opportunities for improvement and patient recommendations in light of these new findings. PMID:21123637

  13. Life expectancy and late stroke following carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, E F; Humber, P B; Collins, G M; Dilley, R B; Devin, J B; Stuart, S H

    1983-01-01

    A review of the UCSD experience with 456 consecutive carotid endarterectomy procedures confirms the acceptably low operative mortality and morbidity associated with this operation. Immediate complications were not different when routine or selective shunting was performed, but the patients with a low internal carotid artery back pressure had higher operative complication rates. The coexistence of atherosclerosis in other parts of the body severe-enough to warrant surgery for them was not associated with either higher early or late carotid surgery complication rates. Following both coronary bypass and carotid procedures, the late mortality was decreased, and the late incidence of stroke was particularly low in comparison to the remainder of the patient group. Late follow-up emphasized the high continuing attrition rate from all causes in these patients. Late strokes continued to occur, particularly in patients with prior strokes and severe preoperative bilateral carotid disease. The late course of patients with posterior circulation transient ischemic attacks treated by carotid endarterectomy was quite similar to that of patients treated for anterior circulation transient ischemia attacks (TIAs). Newer postoperative screening procedures may decrease the incidence of late postoperative stroke by identifying recurrent carotid stenosis while it is still in the asymptomatic stage. PMID:6602597

  14. [A Novel, Less Invasive Protection Method for Carotid Artery Stenting].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Imai, Tasuku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel, less invasive protection method for carotid artery stenting. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presented with symptomatic severe left carotid artery stenosis. A transfemoral approach was dangerous because of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 6Fr Axcelguide Simmonds catheter was inserted into the right brachial artery, and advanced into the left common carotid artery. Next, a 6Fr Optimo 100-cm catheter was coaxially navigated into the left common carotid artery. A PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was coaxially navigated into the left external carotid artery. Under flow reversal with the 2 balloons, another PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was navigated into the distal left internal carotid artery through the lesion. After both PercuSurge GuardWire balloons were inflated, the 6Fr Optimo was deflated and retrieved using a catheter exchange technique. Then, under distal double-balloon protection, routine stenting was performed. Conclusions: This technique is safer and less invasive than previous methods, especially in cases with difficult femoral access and vulnerable carotid plaque. PMID:27384116

  15. Peripheral Chemoreceptors: Function and Plasticity of the Carotid Body

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prem; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the sensory nature of the carotid body dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Following these seminal discoveries, research into carotid body mechanisms moved forward progressively through the 20th century, with many descriptions of the ultrastructure of the organ and stimulus-response measurements at the level of the whole organ. The later part of 20th century witnessed the first descriptions of the cellular responses and electrophysiology of isolated and cultured type I and type II cells, and there now exist a number of testable hypotheses of chemotransduction. The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current concepts on sensory transduction and transmission of the hypoxic stimulus at the carotid body with an emphasis on integrating cellular mechanisms with the whole organ responses and highlighting the gaps or discrepancies in our knowledge. It is increasingly evident that in addition to hypoxia, the carotid body responds to a wide variety of blood-borne stimuli, including reduced glucose and immune-related cytokines and we therefore also consider the evidence for a polymodal function of the carotid body and its implications. It is clear that the sensory function of the carotid body exhibits considerable plasticity in response to the chronic perturbations in environmental O2 that is associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. The mechanisms and consequences of carotid body plasticity in health and disease are discussed in the final sections of this article. PMID:23728973

  16. An absent ophthalmic artery or carotid siphon signal on transcranial Doppler confirms the presence of severe ipsilateral internal carotid artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wilterdink, J L; Feldmann, E; Bragoni, M; Brooks, J M; Benavides, J G

    1994-10-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound provides a useful adjunct to extracranial ultrasound in the diagnosis of carotid bifurcation disease. Previous studies have shown that collateral flow patterns and diminished flow velocities in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery correlate with hemodynamically significant carotid disease. In a series of 7,054 carotid duplex and transcranial Doppler examinations, 12.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.4) of 287 ophthalmic arteries ipsilateral to an apparent carotid occlusion had no detectable flow signal, compared with 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3, 0.7) of 6,767 ophthalmic arteries ipsilateral to a non-occluded carotid artery (p < 0.001). Carotid siphon signals were not detectable in 24.4% (95% CI: 19.4, 29.4) of arteries ipsilateral to the carotid occlusion, versus 1.0% (95% CI: 0.8, 1.3) ipsilateral to nonoccluded carotid arteries (p < 0.001). A significant number of absent ophthalmic artery and carotid siphon signals (5.7 and 8.7%, respectively) were also found in patients with 80 to 99% extracranial carotid stenosis. A subset of 216 studies with angiographic correlation confirmed the high association of these transcranial Doppler findings with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. Primary ophthalmological disease or siphon occlusion did not explain these findings. An absent ophthalmic artery or carotid siphon signal on transcranial Doppler examination is believed to represent a failure to detect slow flow distal to severe carotid bifurcation lesions. As a sign of ipsilateral carotid occlusion, the sensitivities of absent ophthalmic artery and carotid siphon signals are quite low (12.5 and 24.4%, respectively). The high specificities of 99.5 and 99.0%, however, make these findings useful in confirming the diagnosis of presumptive carotid occlusion by carotid duplex ultrasound.

  17. Heavy Snoring as a Cause of Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sharon A.; Amis, Terence C.; Byth, Karen; Larcos, George; Kairaitis, Kristina; Robinson, Tracey D.; Wheatley, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have suggested that snoring and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome may be important risk factors for the development of carotid atherosclerosis and stroke. However, it is not clear if snoring per se is independently related to the risk of developing carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Volunteer sample examined in a sleep laboratory. Participants: One hundred ten volunteers (snorers and nonsnorers with only mild, nonhypoxic obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome) underwent polysomnography with quantification of snoring, bilateral carotid and femoral artery ultrasound with quantification of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular risk factor assessment. Subjects were categorized into 3 snoring groups: mild (0%–25% night snoring), moderate (> 25%–50% night snoring), and heavy (> 50% night snoring). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis was 20% with mild snoring, 32% with moderate snoring, and 64% with heavy snoring (P < 0.04, Χ2). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent effect of snoring on the prevalence of carotid and femoral atherosclerosis. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking history, and hypertension, heavy snoring was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio 10.5; 95% confidence interval 2.1–51.8; P = 0.004) but not with femoral atherosclerosis. Conclusions: Heavy snoring significantly increases the risk of carotid atherosclerosis, and the increase is independent of other risk factors, including measures of nocturnal hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea severity. Considering the high prevalence of snoring in the community, these findings have substantial public health implications for the management of carotid atherosclerosis and the prevention of stroke. Citation: Lee SA; Amis TC; Byth K; Larcos G; Kairaitis K; RobinsonTD; Wheatley JR. Heavy snoring as a cause of carotid

  18. Hydrocortisone supresses inflammatory activity of metalloproteinase - 8 in carotid plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sthefano Atique; Antonangelo, Leila; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Beteli, Camila Baumann; de Camargo Júnior, Otacílio; de Aquino, José Luis Braga; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Matrix metalloproteinases are inflammatory biomarkers involved in carotid plaque instability. Our objective was to analyze the inflammatory activity of plasma and carotid plaque MMP-8 and MMP-9 after intravenous administration of hydrocortisone. Methods The study included 22 patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the carotid artery (11 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic) who underwent carotid endarterectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: Control Group - hydrocortisone was not administered, and Group 1 - 500 mg intravenous hydrocortisone was administered during anesthetic induction. Plasma levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured preoperatively (24 hours before carotid endarterectomy) and at 1 hour, 6 hours and 24 hours after carotid endarterectomy. In carotid plaque, tissue levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured. Results Group 1 showed increased serum levels of MMP- 8 (994.28 pg/ml and 408.54 pg/ml, respectively; P=0.045) and MMP-9 (106,656.34 and 42,807.69 respectively; P=0.014) at 1 hour after carotid endarterectomy compared to the control group. Symptomatic patients in Group 1 exhibited lower tissue concentration of MMP-8 in comparison to the control group (143.89 pg/ml and 1317.36 respectively; P=0.003). There was a correlation between preoperative MMP-9 levels and tissue concentrations of MMP-8 (P=0.042) and MMP-9 (P=0.019) between symptomatic patients in the control group. Conclusion Hydrocortisone reduces the concentration of MMP- 8 in carotid plaque, especially in symptomatic patients. There was an association between systemic and tissue inflammation. PMID:26313719

  19. Experimental determination of circumferential properties of fresh carotid artery plaques.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Michael G; O'Donnell, Michael R; O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is currently accepted as the gold standard for interventional revascularisation of diseased arteries belonging to the carotid bifurcation. Despite the proven efficacy of CEA, great interest has been generated in carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) as an alternative to open surgical therapy. CAS is less invasive compared with CEA, and has the potential to successfully treat lesions close to the aortic arch or distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Following promising results from two recent trials (CREST; Carotid revascularisation endarterectomy versus stenting trial, and ICSS; International carotid stenting study) it is envisaged that there will be a greater uptake in carotid stenting, especially amongst the group who do not qualify for open surgical repair, thus creating pressure to develop computational models that describe a multitude of plaque models in the carotid arteries and their reaction to the deployment of such interventional devices. Pertinent analyses will require fresh human atherosclerotic plaque material characteristics for different disease types. This study analysed atherosclerotic plaque characteristics from 18 patients tested on site, post-surgical revascularisation through endarterectomy, with 4 tissue samples being excluded from tensile testing based on large width-length ratios. According to their mechanical behaviour, atherosclerotic plaques were separated into 3 grades of stiffness. Individual and group material coefficients were then generated analytically using the Yeoh strain energy function. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each sample was also recorded, showing large variation across the 14 atherosclerotic samples tested. Experimental Green strains at rupture varied from 0.299 to 0.588 and the Cauchy stress observed in the experiments was between 0.131 and 0.779 MPa. It is expected that this data may be used in future design optimisation of next generation interventional medical devices for the

  20. External Carotid-Internal Jugular Fistula as a Late Complication After Carotid Endarterectomy: A Rare Case

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Bulent; Cekirge, Saruhan; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2011-02-15

    A 66-year-old man presented with mild amnesia, progressive fatigue, ataxia, visual hallucinations, and debility. His past medical history included right-sided carotid endarterectomy performed elsewhere 6 years previously. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed left parieto-occipital arteriovenous malformation-like tortous vessels, venous congestion, and ischemic areas. Cerebral angiography showed right-sided compound external carotid artery-internal jugular vein (IJV) fistula, and distal occlusion of the right IJV. Transvenous embolization via contralateral IJV was performed, and the fistula, together with fistulous portion of the distal IJV, was sealed using coils. Two years later, patient is well with normal neurologic examination findings. The presence of an arteriovenous communication after vascular surgery is a serious complication with potential long-term effects and therefore should be diagnosed and treated as promptly as possible.

  1. Pathophysiology and management of reperfusion injury and hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Goshgarian, Christopher; Min, Jiangyong; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion is a relatively rare syndrome with significant and potentially preventable clinical consequences. The pathophysiology of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may involve dysregulation of the cerebral vascular system and hypertension, in the setting of increase in cerebral blood flow. The early recognition of CHS is important to prevent complications such as intracerebral hemorrhage. This review will focus on CHS following carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. We will discuss the typical clinical features of CHS, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnostic modalities for detection, identification of patients at risk, and prevention and treatment. Although currently there are no specific guidelines for the management of CHS, identification of patients at risk for CHS and aggressive treatment of hypertension are recommended. PMID:27602202

  2. Opposite effects of plasma homocysteine and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation on carotid artery geometry in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Demuth, K; Moatti, N; Hanon, O; Benoit, M O; Safar, M; Girerd, X

    1998-12-01

    Studies of symptomatic patients have identified hyperhomocysteinemia as an independent risk factor for vascular disease. In case-control studies, a point mutation (C677T) in the gene encoding 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has also been linked to an increased risk of vascular disease through its effect on homocysteinemia. Our aim was to extend these observations to asymptomatic subjects by studying the influence of both homocysteinemia and its mutation on carotid artery geometry. We examined 144 subjects free of atherosclerotic lesions. Fasting homocysteinemia was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. MTHFR genotype was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by HinfI digestion. Carotid artery geometry was characterized by internal diameter and intima-media thickness, as assessed by a high-resolution echo-tracking system. Subjects in the upper homocysteine tertile had a greater carotid internal diameter than did subjects in the middle and lower tertiles (6516+/-770 versus 6206+/-641 and 5985+/-558 microm, respectively; P<0.001). Subjects homozygous for the mutation had a smaller carotid artery internal diameter than did subjects heterozygous or homozygous for the wild-type allele (5846+/-785 versus 6345+/-673 and 6199+/-671 microm, respectively; P<0.05). Homocysteinemia was not significantly increased in subjects homozygous for the mutation. In multivariate regression analysis, homocysteinemia was independently and positively associated with lumen diameter (P=0.0008) and wall thickness (P=0.020). Conversely, homozygosity for the mutation was negatively associated with internal diameter (P=0.009). These preliminary data suggest that mildly elevated homocysteinemia and homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation are associated with opposite preclinical modifications of carotid artery geometry. If confirmed, these results may have important implications for new treatment strategies for vascular disease

  3. [Non-invasive explorations of the carotid arteries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Persson, A V; Dyer, V E

    1981-01-01

    For the non-invasive evaluation of patients suspected of having extracranial carotid artery disease, the non-invasive vascular laboratory at the Lahey Clinic, Boston, Massachusetts uses three tests. Carotid phonoangiography (C.P.A.) by itself is 60% accurate, the Kartchner-McRae Oculoplethysmograph (O.P.G.) by itself 80% accurate, and the Echoflow doppler arterial imager, by itself 90% accurate. These examinations are used for surveillance of high-risk patients and to determine the need for carotid arteriography. In a series of 94 patients, the combination of these non-invasive methods yielded one false negative and 2 false positive studies, for an overall accuracy of 95%.

  4. Glomus tissue in the vicinity of the human carotid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Garfia, A

    1980-01-01

    Three of 60 cadavers have shown, in the adventitia or in the adipose tissue from the human carotid sinus region, small islands of tissue richly and typically vascularized and with nerve endings contacting cells like the tissue of the principal carotid body. In two of the cases such 'miniglomera' were single but in the third there were several all on the same side. A modified en bloc silver nitrate reduction stain was used to demonstrate the microvascular arrangements and the nerve endings by light microscopy of serial tangential sections of the carotid bifurcation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7364653

  5. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K.; Kun, Emily W.; Cheng, Isaac T.; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K.; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients’ group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (−2.918, [−6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  6. Implications of carotid sinus hypersensitivity following preoperative embolization of a carotid body tumor. An indication for prophylactic intraoperative cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ashley M; Smith, Russell B; Thorell, William E

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Carotid body tumors are rare neoplasms of neural crest origin that are both highly vascularized and locally invasive. Treatment options for these tumors often include surgery with preoperative embolization, which can pose major cardiovascular risk to patients. As demonstrated by this case report, hemodynamic instability following preoperative embolization of a carotid body tumor may indicate severe carotid sinus hypersensitivity and the need for temporary cardiac pacing. OBSERVATIONS This case report describes a man in his early 30s who presented for staged surgical resection of bilateral carotid body tumors with preoperative embolization. After embolization of the second tumor, the patient displayed transient episodes of bradycardia and hypotension, which resolved with medical management. Surgery commenced, and with minimal manipulation intraoperatively, the patient became asystolic and required resuscitation. Following a negative cardiac workup, a temporary pacemaker was implanted, and surgical resection of the tumor was successfully completed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Carotid sinus hypersensitivity is a rare but serious risk of preoperative embolization of carotid body tumors. Postembolization bradycardia or hypotension should be assessed as potential harbingers of carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and the need for temporary intraoperative cardiac pacing should be strongly considered. PMID:24651937

  7. Carotid siphon geometry and variants of the circle of Willis in the origin of carotid aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Silva Neto, Ângelo Raimundo; Câmara, Ródio Luis Brandão; Valença, Marcelo Moraes

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated anatomical variants in the carotid siphon and of the circle of Willis in patients with aneurysms. We performed a retrospective analysis of cerebral angiographies. The Control Group was composed of patients without aneurysms. Posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysms were more common in women (p<0.05), and the anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysms in men (p<0.1). The incidence of fetal-type PcomA was higher in cases with co-occurring PcomA aneurysm (24 versus 8%, p<0.05). Patients with AcomA aneurysm had higher incidence of A1 hypoplasia (p<0.0001, OR=32.13, 95%CI 12.95-79.71) and lower frequency of fetal-type PcomA compared to their control counterparts (p=0.0125). The angle of carotid siphon was narrower in patients with PcomA aneurysm (27.3±19.1 versus 34.8±22.6, p=0.028). In conclusion, a narrower carotid siphon or the presence of fetal-type PcomA or A1 hypoplasia may cause hemodynamic stress, thereby promoting the formation of aneurysms in susceptible individuals.

  8. Comparison of Neurocognitive Outcomes after Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry J; Schwartz, Samuel; Wen, Johnny; deVirgilio, Christian; Lobue, Abeline; Walot, Irwin; Koopmann, Matthew; Donayre, Carlos; White, Rodney A

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and emotional outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting with embolic protection device (CAS + EPD) are not clear. Patients were entered prospectively into a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved single-center physician-sponsored investigational device exemption between 2004 and 2010 and received either CEA or CAS + EPD. Patients underwent cognitive testing preprocedure and at 6, 12, and 60 months postprocedure. Cognitive domains assessed included attention, memory, executive, motor function, visual spatial functioning, language, and processing speed. Beck Depression and anxiety scales were also compared. There were a total of 38 patients that met conventional indications for carotid surgery (symptomatic with ≥50% stenosis or asymptomatic with ≥70% stenosis)-12 patients underwent CEA, whereas 26 patients underwent CAS + EPD. Both CEA and CAS + EPD patients showed postprocedure improvement in memory and executive function. No differences were seen at follow-up in regards to emotional dysfunction (depression and anxiety), attention, visual spatial functioning, language, motor function, and processing speed. Only two patients underwent neuropsychiatric testing at 60 months-these CAS + EPD patients showed sustained improvement in memory, visual spatial, and executive functions. In conclusion, cognitive and emotional outcomes were similar between CEA and CAS + EPD patients. PMID:26463299

  9. The relationship between preoperative serum cortisol level and the stability of plaque in carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng; Sun, Yudong; Hu, Wenping; Wei, Xiaolong; Li, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stability of plaque has been implicated as risk factor for stroke. Serum cortisol regulates lipoprotein metabolism and immune response, contributing to plaque stability in atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between serum cortisol and stability of carotid plaque has not been well characterized. We conducted a serology analysis to identify the relationship between serum cortisol and carotid plaque stability. Methods Between May 2013 to October 2015, 73 patients with carotid stenosis patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) were enrolled in our study. Serum cortisol was analyzed at 8:00 AM in the morning before surgery via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. According to the classification made by the American Heart Association, hematoxylin-and-eosin staining was performed to divide these patients into either a stable or unstable group, according to the morphology of fibrous cap, lipid core and intima layer. A curve fitting method was used to identify the relationship between preoperative serum cortisol and stability of carotid plaque. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to identify carotid plaque stability-associated serum cortisol. Results Curve fitting’s result represents a U-shape characteristic. A total of 314.92 and 395.23 nmol/L were considered as the cut point for preoperative serum cortisol when trisected the patients. When adjusted for degree of stenosis, hyperlipemia, smoking and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis’ results demonstrated that preoperative serum cortisol can significantly affect carotid plaque stability. The odds ratio values in multivariate logistic regression analysis for C reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and preoperative serum cortisol level were 7.67 and 20.86 respectively. Conclusions Preoperative serum cortisol was associated with stability of carotid plaque in patients

  10. Carotid and vertebral artery dissection syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Thanvi, B; Munshi, S; Dawson, S; Robinson, T

    2005-01-01

    Cervicocerebral arterial dissections (CAD) are an important cause of strokes in younger patients accounting for nearly 20% of strokes in patients under the age of 45 years. Extracranial internal carotid artery dissections comprise 70%–80% and extracranial vertebral dissections account for about 15% of all CAD. Aetiopathogenesis of CAD is incompletely understood, though trauma, respiratory infections, and underlying arteriopathy are considered important. A typical picture of local pain, headache, and ipsilateral Horner's syndrome followed after several hours by cerebral or retinal ischaemia is rare. Doppler ultrasound, MRI/MRA, and CT angiography are useful non-invasive diagnostic tests. The treatment of extracranial CAD is mainly medical using anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents although controlled studies to show their effectiveness are lacking. The prognosis of extracranial CAD is generally much better than that of the intracranial CAD. Recurrences are rare in CAD. PMID:15937204

  11. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  12. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  13. Assessment of Carotid Artery Stenosis and the Use of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Whayne, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    General thinking has previously centered on managing carotid artery stenosis (CAS) by carotid endarterectomy and subsequently, stenting for higher risk patients. However for CAS and other forms of vascular disease, especially when asymptomatic, there is new emphasis on defining underlying mechanisms. Knowledge of these mechanisms can lead to medical treatments that result in possible atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, and even plaque regression, including in the patient with CAS. For now, the key medication class for a medical approach are the statins. Their use is supported by good cardiovascular clinical trial evidence including some directed carotid artery studies, especially with a demonstrated decrease in carotid intima-media thickness. Procedural controversy still exists but the current era in medicine offers significant support for medical management of asymptomatic CAS while techniques to recognize the vulnerable plaque evolve. If CAS converts to a symptomatic status, early referral for endarterectomy or stenting is indicated. PMID:26417184

  14. Branch retinal artery occlusion following carotid stenting: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Peng, Xiao-Yan; You, Qi-Sheng; Jiao, Li-Qun; Liu, Da-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    A 70 year old male was diagnosed with carotid stenosis and underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS). Severe postoperative complications arose subsequent to the procedure, including decreased visual acuity and symptoms of a visual field defect, and the patient was eventually diagnosed with retinal artery embolism. CAS reduces carotid plaque; however, the subsequent shedding of carotid plaque may cause retinal artery embolism, resulting in the serious loss of visual function in patients. This complication is of paramount importance and requires great consideration from the neurologist and the patients undergoing CAS. Ophthalmic evaluation is paramount following CAS due to the possibility of embolic occlusion of the retinal artery. It is imperative that patients be informed of the risk of permanent vision loss as a result of CAS.

  15. Data on TREM-1 activation destabilizing carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Rao, Velidi H; Rai, Vikrant; Stoupa, Samantha; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-09-01

    The data described herein are related to the article entitled "Tumor necrosis factor-α regulates triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinases in the carotid plaques of symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis" (Rao et al., 2016) [1]. Additional data are provided on the dose-response effect of TNF-α, TREM-1 antibody and recombinant rTREM-1/Fc fusion chimera (TREM-1/FC) on the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) isolated from human carotid endarterectomy tissues. Data are also presented on the distribution of CD86+ M1- and CD206+ M2-macrophages and their co-localization with TREM-1 in symptomatic carotid plaques as visualized by dual immunofluorescence. The interpretation of this data and further extensive insights can be found in Rao et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27331093

  16. Carotid body tumor imitator: An interesting case of Castleman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Hakeem J.; Diletti, Sara M.; Hart, Alexandra M.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Dumont, Travis M.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are very few reports in the literature of Castleman's disease affecting the carotid artery and a single previous report of a case of Castleman's disease of the neck originally mistaken as a carotid body tumor. Case Description: We describe a rare case of Castleman's disease, manifesting with classic radiographic hallmarks of a carotid body tumor. The postoperative pathologic examination identified the resected mass as Castleman's lymphadenopathy. The management of this particular case is discussed, and the findings are highlighted. Conclusions: We present a unique case of a tumor initially and incorrectly diagnosed as a carotid body tumor. However, after comprehensive treatment with endovascular and surgical modalities and subsequent pathologic examination, the diagnosis of this rare entity was made. PMID:26677415

  17. Common carotid artery dissection caused by radiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayan; Yue, Dandan; Chen, Xin; Wei, Zhenyu; Lu, Wenmei; Wu, Danhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a case of acute cerebral infarction with radiation-induced carotid artery dissection is reported. Carotid artery dissection is generally asymptomatic at the early stages. Due to the non-specific clinical manifestations of carotid artery dissection, a detailed inquiry of the past history of a patient has a critical role in making a diagnosis of radiation-induced common carotid artery dissection. Onset of acute ischemic stroke is the predominant manifestation, and for patients with a history of head-and-neck radiotherapy, dissection should be considered. The condition may progress rapidly, and result in a poor prognosis. Therefore, a correct early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy may lead to rapid recovery, and influence the overall prognosis.

  18. Ultrasonic imaging and oculoplethysmography in diagnosis of carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, D H; Hobson, R W; Lynch, T G; Berry, S M; Jamil, Z

    1983-10-01

    Pulsed Doppler ultrasonic imaging (UI) of the cervical carotid artery provides flow-dependent anatomic detail of the carotid bifurcation, while oculoplethysmography (Kartchner) (OPG-K) and ocular pneumoplethysmography (Gee) (OPG-G) reflect changes in flow and pressure resulting from hemodynamically significant lesions. We examined 66 patients prospectively with UI, OPG-K, and OPG-G to compare the relative accuracy of these techniques with contrast arteriography. Both UI and OPG-G were significantly more accurate than OPG-K. While the accuracies of UI and OPG-G were not significantly different, their combined use resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity compared with that of Doppler imaging alone. In addition, UI correctly identified 22 (85%) of 26 occlusions of the internal carotid artery. The use of UI and OPG-G together provided accurate anatomic and hemodynamic information useful in the evaluation of carotid occlusive disease.

  19. Common carotid artery dissection caused by radiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayan; Yue, Dandan; Chen, Xin; Wei, Zhenyu; Lu, Wenmei; Wu, Danhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a case of acute cerebral infarction with radiation-induced carotid artery dissection is reported. Carotid artery dissection is generally asymptomatic at the early stages. Due to the non-specific clinical manifestations of carotid artery dissection, a detailed inquiry of the past history of a patient has a critical role in making a diagnosis of radiation-induced common carotid artery dissection. Onset of acute ischemic stroke is the predominant manifestation, and for patients with a history of head-and-neck radiotherapy, dissection should be considered. The condition may progress rapidly, and result in a poor prognosis. Therefore, a correct early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy may lead to rapid recovery, and influence the overall prognosis. PMID:27699045

  20. Aneurysm of the internal carotid artery after minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Laissaoui, Younès; Noureddine El Alami, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of posttraumatic aneurysm of the internal carotid artery. The aneurysm was surgically removed, followed by a simple postoperative course. Such lesions should be highly suspected in cases of penetration into the retroangulomandibular neck region.

  1. Cavernous Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following a Radical Cavernous Sinus Resection

    PubMed Central

    Katzir, Miki; Gil, Ziv; Cohen, José Enrique; Sviri, Gill Efraim

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysms are a special group among other intracranial aneurysms. They can occur during the dissection phase of the surgery if the tumor encases a vessel. Complications of their rupture as hemorrhage or stroke are life threatening. Early recognition and treatment is mandatory to avoid catastrophic sequelae. We present the successful diagnosis and endovascular treatment of a postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm following radical cavernous sinus resection. PMID:27330923

  2. Cavernous Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following a Radical Cavernous Sinus Resection.

    PubMed

    Katzir, Miki; Gil, Ziv; Cohen, José Enrique; Sviri, Gill Efraim

    2016-06-01

    Iatrogenic cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysms are a special group among other intracranial aneurysms. They can occur during the dissection phase of the surgery if the tumor encases a vessel. Complications of their rupture as hemorrhage or stroke are life threatening. Early recognition and treatment is mandatory to avoid catastrophic sequelae. We present the successful diagnosis and endovascular treatment of a postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm following radical cavernous sinus resection. PMID:27330923

  3. ESVS guidelines. Invasive treatment for carotid stenosis: indications, techniques.

    PubMed

    Liapis, C D; Bell, P R F; Mikhailidis, D; Sivenius, J; Nicolaides, A; Fernandes e Fernandes, J; Biasi, G; Norgren, L

    2009-04-01

    The European Society for Vascular Surgery brought together a group of experts in the field of carotid artery disease to produce updated guidelines for the invasive treatment of carotid disease. The recommendations were rated according to the level of evidence. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is recommended in symptomatic patients with >50% stenosis if the perioperative stroke/death rate is <6% [A], preferably within 2 weeks of the patient's last symptoms [A]. CEA is also recommended in asymptomatic men <75 years old with 70-99% stenosis if the perioperative stroke/death risk is <3% [A]. The benefit from CEA in asymptomatic women is significantly less than in men [A]. CEA should therefore be considered only in younger, fit women [A]. Carotid patch angioplasty is preferable to primary closure [A]. Aspirin at a dose of 75-325 mg daily and statins should be given before, during and following CEA. [A] Carotid artery stenting (CAS) should be performed only in high-risk for CEA patients, in high-volume centres with documented low peri-operative stroke and death rates or inside a randomized controlled trial [C]. CAS should be performed under dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel [A]. Carotid protection devices are probably of benefit [C].

  4. Imaging of the Fibrous Cap in Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Luca; Potters, Fons; Lugt, Aad van der; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2010-08-15

    In the last two decades, a substantial number of articles have been published to provide diagnostic solutions for patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. These articles have resulted in a shift of opinion regarding the identification of stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. In the recent past, the degree of carotid artery stenosis was the sole determinant for performing carotid intervention (carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting) in these patients. We now know that the degree of stenosis is only one marker for future cerebrovascular events. If one wants to determine the risk of these events more accurately, other parameters must be taken into account; among these parameters are plaque composition, presence and state of the fibrous cap (FC), intraplaque haemorrhage, plaque ulceration, and plaque location. In particular, the FC is an important structure for the stability of the plaque, and its rupture is highly associated with a recent history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. The subject of this review is imaging of the FC.

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Iatrogenic and Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Stefan; Donas, Konstantinos P. Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Horsch, Svante

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the early and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute carotid artery dissections, its specific problems, and its limitations. We encountered seven patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, three cases of which occurred after carotid endarterectomy, two after carotid angioplasty and stenting, and two after trauma. Balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents were placed using a transfemoral approach. Success in restoring the carotid lumen was achieved in all patients. No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients experienced significant clinical improvement while in the hospital and achieved complete long-term recovery. At follow-up (mean, 22.4 months), good luminal patency of the stented segments was observed. In conclusion, in this small series, primary stent-supported angioplasty seems to be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of selected patients having acute traumatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, with excellent early and midterm results. Larger series and longer-term follow-up are required before definitive recommendations can be made.

  6. Association of SERPINA9 gene variants with carotid artery atherosclerosis: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weihong; Morrison, Alanna; Wasserman, Bruce A; Folsom, Aaron R; Sun, Wei; Campbell, Stephen; Kao, W H Linda; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The SNP rs11628722 in the SERPINA9 gene was previously associated with incident ischemic stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Centerin, the protein encoded by SERPINA9, is involved in maturation and maintenance of naïve B cells, which play a role in atherogenesis. We investigated whether 21 tag SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene are associated with features of carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Carotid MRI data were obtained from 1,282 European Americans and 341 African Americans of the ARIC Carotid MRI study, which recruited participants from ARIC by a stratified sampling plan that over-sampled participants with carotid intima-media thickening. Five MRI measures, focused on carotid wall volume, wall thickness, and lipid core, were analyzed. Genetic associations between the MRI measurements and each of the 21 SNPs were analyzed in linear regression models with adjustment for sample weights and traditional risk factors. Rs11628722 was tested a priori. In African Americans, rs11628722 was significantly associated with carotid wall volume (p < 0.05). Among the other 20 SNPs, adjusted for multiple testing, rs4905204, which encodes an Ala to Val amino acid change, was significantly associated with maximum wall thickness (p < 0.000625) and suggestively associated with total wall volume (p < 0.0026) in European Americans. In conclusion, SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene showed race-specific associations with characteristics of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Replications in other populations are needed to validate findings of this study and to establish the SERPINA9 gene as a candidate in the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:24319541

  7. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the vasa vasorum of carotid artery plaque

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ze-Zhou; Zhang, Yan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The vasa vasorum of carotid artery plaque is a novel marker of accurately evaluating the vulnerability of carotid artery plaque, which was associated with symptomatic cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease. The presence of ultrasound contrast agents in carotid artery plaque represents the presence of the vasa vasorum in carotid artery plaque because the ultrasound contrast agents are strict intravascular tracers. Therefore, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a novel and safe imaging modality for evaluating the vasa vasorum in carotid artery plaque. However, there are some issues that needs to be assessed to embody fully the clinical utility of the vasa vasorum in carotid artery plaque with CEUS. PMID:26120382

  8. Carotid occlusive disease as a risk factor in major cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P

    1982-08-01

    Carotid occlusive disease in patients undergoing major cardiovascular surgery raises the question of the perioperative risk factor of stroke. We evaluated 234 cardiovascular patients preoperatively by oculoplethysmography (OPG) to detect hemodynamically severe carotid occlusive disease. The perioperative stroke risk without flow-reducing carotid occlusive disease was 1%, in contrast to a 17% incidence of stroke when OPG studies indicated internal carotid artery stenosis of more than 60%. Oculoplethysmography is a reliable indicator of hemodynamically severe carotid occlusive disease with an associated high risk of stroke that warrants prophylactic carotid endarterectomy before major cardiovascular surgery.

  9. Carotid Artery Stenting: Review of Technique and Update of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sun Ho; Prince, Ethan A.; Dubel, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the number one cause of long-term disability in the United States. Carotid stenosis is an important cause of ischemic strokes, accounting for 20 to 25%. Previous studies have established carotid endarterectomy as standard of care of symptomatic patients with > 50% stenosis and asymptomatic patients with > 60% stenosis; recently, carotid artery stenting has emerged as an alternative treatment for carotid stenosis. Several studies have been published comparing carotid artery stenting with endarterectomy with mixed results. In this article, the authors discuss carotid artery stenting technique, the results from the most recent trials, and future directions. PMID:24436551

  10. Automated calculation of bifurcation carotid angle for analyzing the risk of carotis plaques by using carotid CT angiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, N.; Demir, S.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is calculation of bifurcation carotid angle by detection of vessel boundaries to assist the medical doctors if this angle is a risk factor about formation of carotid plaques.Carotid ct angiography images are clustered automatically by ISODATA unsupervised classification algorithm. Since the spectral digital numbers (DN) of vessel pixels are bigger than the other part of the images, the cluster which has the biggest median value of DN among all other classes gives the vessel class. The cluster image in raster format is converted into the vector format which allows working on the vessel geometry. The converted vector vessel cluster dataset has been simplified using Douglas-Peucker algorithm to eliminate the zigzag effects of pixel data which are remained on the vector form dataset. Then the cluster polygon is converted to lines and the vertices which will be used for the calculation of bifurcation carotid angle. For sorting the vertex points to calculate the angle on each vertex, alpha-shapes algorithm is applied along the boundary. Then all the angles on each vertex point along the boundary of vessels are calculated. It is also visually clear that the angle which has the minimum value among all the calculated angles, gives the bifurcation carotid angle for one projected plane. The final carotid angle has calculated and 18 sample datasets are used to test the method.

  11. The Prognostic Significance of Asymptomatic Carotid Bruits in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shorr, Ronald I; Johnson, Karen C; Wan, Jim Y; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Pahor, Marco; Bailey, James E; Applegate, William B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the association between asymptomatic carotid bruits and the development of subsequent stroke in older adults with isolated systolic hypertension. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING The Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program (SHEP), a 5-year randomized trial testing the efficacy of treating systolic hypertension in noninstitutionalized persons aged 60 years or older. From the original 4,736 SHEP participants, we identified a cohort of 4,442 persons who had no prior history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or myocardial infarction at randomization. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The end point for this ancillary study was the development of a stroke. The average follow-up was 4.2 years. Carotid bruits were found in 284 (6.4%) of the participants at baseline. Strokes developed in 21 (7.4%) of those with carotid bruits and in 210 (5.0%) of those without carotid bruits. The unadjusted risk of stroke among persons with carotid bruits was 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98, 2.40). Adjusting for age, gender, race, blood pressure, smoking, lipid levels, self-reported aspirin use, and treatment group assignment, the relative risk of stroke among persons with asymptomatic carotid bruits was 1.29 (95% CI 0.80, 2.06). Among SHEP enrollees aged 60 to 69 years, there was a trend (p=.08) toward increased risk (relative risk [RR] 2.05; 95% CI 0.92, 4.68) of subsequent stroke in persons with, compared to those without, carotid bruits. However, among enrollees aged 70 years or over, there was no relation between carotid bruit and subsequent stroke (RR 0.98; 95% CI 0.55, 1.76). In no other subgroup of SHEP enrollees did the presence of carotid bruit independently predict stroke. CONCLUSIONS Although we cannot rule out a small increased risk of stroke associated with bruits in asymptomatic SHEP enrollees aged 60 to 69 years, the utility of carotid bruits as a marker for increased risk of stroke among asymptomatic elderly with isolated

  12. Haemodynamic impact of stent-vessel (mal)apposition following carotid artery stenting: mind the gaps!

    PubMed

    De Santis, G; Conti, M; Trachet, B; De Schryver, T; De Beule, M; Degroote, J; Vierendeels, J; Auricchio, F; Segers, P; Verdonck, P; Verhegghe, B

    2013-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to endarterectomy but its use in clinical treatment is limited due to the post-stenting complications. Haemodynamic actors, related to blood flow in the stented vessel, have been suggested to play a role in the endothelium response to stenting, including adverse reactions such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis. Accessing the flow-related shear forces acting on the endothelium in vivo requires space and time resolutions which are currently not achievable with non-invasive clinical imaging techniques but can be obtained from image-based computational analysis. In this study, we present a framework for accurate determination of the wall shear stress (WSS) in a mildly stenosed carotid artery after the implantation of a stent, resembling the commercially available Acculink (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA). Starting from angiographic CT images of the vessel lumen and a micro-CT scan of the stent, a finite element analysis is carried out in order to deploy the stent in the vessel, reproducing CAS in silico. Then, based on the post-stenting anatomy, the vessel is perfused using a set of boundary conditions: total pressure is applied at the inlet, and impedances that are assumed to be insensitive to the presence of the stent are imposed at the outlets. Evaluation of the CAS outcome from a geometrical and haemodynamic perspective shows the presence of atheroprone regions (low time-average WSS, high relative residence time) colocalised with stent malapposition and stent strut interconnections. Stent struts remain unapposed in the ostium of the external carotid artery disturbing the flow and generating abnormal shear forces, which could trigger thromboembolic events.

  13. Two Automated Techniques for Carotid Lumen Diameter Measurement: Regional versus Boundary Approaches.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Kumar, P Krishna; Suri, Harman S; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Gupta, Ajay; Saba, Luca; Rajan, Jeny; Lavra, Francesco; Sharma, Aditya M; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-07-01

    The degree of stenosis in the carotid artery can be predicted using automated carotid lumen diameter (LD) measured from B-mode ultrasound images. Systolic velocity-based methods for measurement of LD are subjective. With the advancement of high resolution imaging, image-based methods have started to emerge. However, they require robust image analysis for accurate LD measurement. This paper presents two different algorithms for automated segmentation of the lumen borders in carotid ultrasound images. Both algorithms are modeled as a two stage process. Stage one consists of a global-based model using scale-space framework for the extraction of the region of interest. This stage is common to both algorithms. Stage two is modeled using a local-based strategy that extracts the lumen interfaces. At this stage, the algorithm-1 is modeled as a region-based strategy using a classification framework, whereas the algorithm-2 is modeled as a boundary-based approach that uses the level set framework. Two sets of databases (DB), Japan DB (JDB) (202 patients, 404 images) and Hong Kong DB (HKDB) (50 patients, 300 images) were used in this study. Two trained neuroradiologists performed manual LD tracings. The mean automated LD measured was 6.35 ± 0.95 mm for JDB and 6.20 ± 1.35 mm for HKDB. The precision-of-merit was: 97.4 % and 98.0 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for JDB and 99.7 % and 97.9 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for HKDB. Statistical tests such as ANOVA, Chi-Squared, T-test, and Mann-Whitney test were conducted to show the stability and reliability of the automated techniques. PMID:27299355

  14. Evaluation of carotid wave intensity in firefighters following firefighting.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huimin; Fahs, Christopher A; Ranadive, Sushant; Rossow, Lindy M; Lane, Abbi D; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Echols, George; Smith, Denise; Horn, Gavin P; Rowland, Thomas; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-07-01

    Sudden cardiac events are the leading cause of line-of-duty firefighter deaths, but little information exists elucidating the physiologic responses. Wave intensity (WI) is a new hemodynamic index that provides information about the dynamic behavior of the heart and the vascular system and their interaction. The larger first peak wave (W1) occurs during early systole and is associated with cardiac contractility. The second smaller peak (W2) follows a period of relatively little net wave (NA) production and may be caused by reflected waves from the brain. This study aimed at determining arterial WI changes in response to live firefighting activities. We examined the WI of 39 firefighters (2 females) with a mean age of 28 ± 1 years and BMI of 26.6 ± 0.7 kg m(-2) at rest, and immediately after 3 h of live firefighting drills. WI was assessed on the right common carotid artery using an Aloka high-resolution ultrasound. The magnitude of the W1 decreased significantly from 15,925 ± 1,341 to 11,540 ± 886 mmHg m s(-3), p < 0.05. The magnitude of W2 remained unchanged (W2: from 2,080 ± 200 to 2,144 ± 358 mmHg m s(-3)). Net NA decreased from 53 ± 5 to 40 ± 4 mmHg m s(-2). In conclusions, our data suggest that left ventricular function and arterial-ventricular coupling decreased following live firefighting, and this may be related to the documented increase in risk of clinical events during and after firefighting activities.

  15. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  16. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  17. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described.

  18. Venous Drainage Patterns in Carotid Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Alkan, Alpay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous communication and its drainage pathways may affect the clinic presentation and change treatment approach. We evaluated drainage patterns of CCFs by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and categorized drainage pathways according to their types and etiology. Materials and Methods. Venous drainage patterns of 13 CCFs from 10 subjects were studied and categorized as anterior, posterior, superior, inferior, and contralateral on DSA. Drainage patterns were correlated to types and etiology of CCFs. Diagnosis of CCFs was first made by noninvasive imaging techniques. Results. On DSA, traumatic CCFs were usually high flow, direct type while spontaneous CCFs were usually slow flow, indirect type. Bilaterality and mixed types were observed among the indirect spontaneous CCFs. In all CCFs, anterior and inferior drainages were the most common. Contrary to the literature, posterior and superior drainages were noted only in high flow and long standing direct fistulas. Contralateral drainage was not observed in all, supporting plausible compartmentalization of cavernous sinuses. Conclusion. Types, etiology, and duration of the CCFs may affect their drainage patterns. DSA is valuable for categorization of CCFs and verification of drainage patterns. Drainage pathways may affect the clinic presentation and also change treatment approach. PMID:24967298

  19. Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e

  20. Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e

  1. Quest for the Vulnerable Atheroma: Carotid Stenosis and Diametric Strain--A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Canxing; Yuan, Chun; Stutzman, Edward; Canton, Gador; Comess, Keith A; Beach, Kirk W

    2016-03-01

    The Bernoulli effect may result in eruption of a vulnerable carotid atheroma, causing a stroke. We measured electrocardiography (ECG)-registered QRS intra-stenotic blood velocity and atheroma strain dynamics in carotid artery walls using ultrasonic tissue Doppler methods, providing displacement and time resolutions of 0.1 μm and 3.7 ms. Of 22 arteries, 1 had a peak systolic velocity (PSV) >280 cm/s, 4 had PSVs between 165 and 280 cm/s and 17 had PSVs <165 cm/s. Eight arteries with PSVs <65 cm/s and 4 of 9 with PSVs between 65 and 165 cm/s had normal systolic diametric expansion (0% and 7%) and corresponding systolic wall thinning. The remaining 10 arteries had abnormal systolic strain dynamics, 2 with diametric reduction (>-0.05 mm), 2 with extreme wall expansion (>0.1 mm), 2 with extreme wall thinning (>-0.1 mm) and 4 with combinations. Decreases in systolic diameter and/or extreme systolic arterial wall thickening may indicate imminent atheroma rupture. PMID:26705891

  2. Texture characterization of carotid atherosclerotic plaque from B-mode ultrasound using gabor filters.

    PubMed

    Stoitsis, John; Golemati, Spyretta; Tsiaparas, Nikolaos; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2009-01-01

    Texture analysis of B-mode ultrasound images of carotid atheromatous plaque can be valuable for the accurate diagnosis of atherosclerosis. In this paper, Gabor filters were used to characterize the texture of carotid artery atherosclerotic tissue. B-mode ultrasound images of 10 symptomatic and 9 asymptomatic plaques were interrogated. A total of 40 texture features were estimated for each plaque. The bootstrap method was used to compare the mean values of the texture features extracted from the two groups. After bootstrapping, the mean value and the standard deviation of the energy estimated using the Gabor filters was found to be significantly different between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques in the first scale of analysis and for all orientations. In addition, a number of texture features that correspond to larger resolution scales were found to be significantly different between the two types of plaques. It is concluded that Gabor-filter-based texture analysis in combination with a powerful statistical technique, such as bootstrapping, may provide valuable information about the plaque tissue type.

  3. Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula Concomitant with Pseudoaneurysm in the Sphenoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Huai, R.C.; Yi, C.L.; Ru, L.B.; Chen, G.H.; Guo, H.H.; Luo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary This study was designed to elucidate the generating mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of traumatic carotid cavernous fistula (tCCF) concomitant with pseudoaneurysm in the sphenoid sinus. Six cases of tCCF concomitant with pseudoaneurysm in the sphenoid sinus were analyzed in this study. Clinical history, neurological examination, CT and MRI scans, pre- and postembolization cerebral angiograms and follow-up data were included. All patients presented with massive epistaxis and symptoms of tCCF. The pseudoaneurysms and fistulas were occluded with detachable balloons, and preservation of the parent artery in two cases. One patient also had indirect carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) on the contralateral side embolized by transfacial vein approach with microcoils. Complete symptom resolution was achieved in all cases, without procedure related complications. During the follow-up period all patients returned to work. Falling from a high speed motorcycle without wearing a helmet may be one of the main causes of this disease. The site of impact during the accident mostly localizes in the frontal and lateral of the orbit. Intracavernous sinus hypertension of tCCF combining with fracture of the lateral wall of the sphenoid may lead to the formation of a pseudoaneurysm in the sphenoid sinus. MRI scan is very helpful in the diagnosis of this disease before the patient receives angiography. Detachable balloon occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm and fistula is a safe and efficient treatment. PMID:20557787

  4. On the effect of calcification volume and configuration on the mechanical behaviour of carotid plaque tissue.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex molecular process that exhibits a number of relatively characteristic morphology patterns in atherosclerotic plaques. Treatment of arterial stenosis by endovascular intervention, involving forceful circumferential expansion of the plaque, can be unpredictable in calcified lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical stretching mechanisms and define the mechanical limits for circumferentially expanding carotid plaque lesions under the influence of distinct calcification patterns. Mechanical and structural characterisation was performed on 17 human carotid plaques acquired from patients undergoing endarterectomy procedures. The mechanical properties were determined using uniaxial extension tests that stretch the lesions to complete failure along their circumferential axis. Calcification morphology of mechanically ruptured plaque lesions was characterised using high resolution micro computed tomography imaging. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the mechanically induced failure sites and to identify the interface boundary conditions between calcified and non-calcified tissue. The mechanical tests produced four distinct trends in mechanical behaviour which corresponded to the calcification patterns that structurally defined each mechanical group. Each calcification pattern produced unique mechanical restraining effects on the plaque tissue stretching properties evidenced by the variation in degree of stretch to failure. Resistance to failure appears to rely on interactions between calcification and non-calcified tissue. Scanning electron microscopy examination revealed structural gradations at interface boundary conditions to facilitate the transfer of stress. This study emphasises the mechanical influence of distinct calcification configurations on plaque expansion properties and highlights the importance of pre-operative lesion characterisation to optimise treatment outcomes.

  5. Reversible and Asymptomatic Gyral and Subarachnoid Contrast Enhancement after Carotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Vangosa, Alessandra Briatico; Tortora, Domenico; Modestino, Francesco; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2015-01-01

    The presence of sulcal hyperdensity in patients after endovascular procedures is not necessarily attributable to hemorrhage. It may frequently indicate the absolute or concomitant extravasation of contrast material into the subarachnoid spaces. This case report describes the clinical case of an 84-year-old patient with 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid who presented with a diffuse gyral and sulcal hyperdensity in the right temporal-occipital and frontal lobes at routine post-carotid stenting (CAS) brain CT scan. The patient was asymptomatic and CT findings were interpreted as contrast enhancement hyperattenuation and no therapeutic decisions were made. A 24-hour follow-up brain CT demonstrated the complete resolution of the hyperdensity, confirming the diagnosis. In this patient we considered the concomitant presence of gyral and sulcal hyperdensity as the consequence of reversible damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) determining a transitory extravasation of contrast material. Asymptomatic gyral and subarachnoid contrast enhancement following CAS is generally indicative of benign and transitory damage to the BBB and is not to be misinterpreted as hemorrhage. PMID:25923674

  6. Independent Association of Muscular Strength and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Children.

    PubMed

    Melo, X; Santa-Clara, H; Santos, D A; Pimenta, N M; Minderico, C S; Fernhall, B; Sardinha, L B

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the influence of muscular strength on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in children, controlling for the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and central adiposity and to examine if differences among muscular strength tertiles translate to physiological differences. We assessed cIMT of the common carotid artery in 366 children between 11-12 years of age (191 girls). Measures included cIMT assessed with high-resolution ultrasonography, a maximal handgrip strength test, body fat mass and lean mass from DXA and CRF determined using a maximal cycle ergometer test. Association between muscular strength and cIMT adjusted for CRF and central adiposity, as measured by trunk fat, was tested with multiple linear regression analysis. Differences in risk factors among muscular strength groups were tested with ANOVA. The Muscular Strength Index (MSI) was inversely associated with cIMT independently of CRF and central adiposity (p<0.05). The low MSI group had the highest values of cIMT, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure and the lowest CRF (p<0.05). There was an inverse and independent association between muscular strength and cIMT. Low muscular strength was associated with higher levels of cardiovascular disease risk factors in children.

  7. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  8. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  9. The distribution of cholinesterases in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Biscoe, T J; Silver, A

    1966-03-01

    1. The distribution of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase in the carotid body of the cat has been examined histochemically. Studies were made on normal carotid bodies and on carotid bodies from cats in which certain nerves had been cut some time previously. The nerves sectioned were the sinus nerve, the post-ganglionic sympathetic branch of the superior cervical ganglion or the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk.2. It was confirmed that more butyrylcholinesterase than acetylcholinesterase is present. Both enzymes are found in three sites: (i) as strands, (ii) as plexuses, (iii) inside a few cells.3. The distribution is unaffected by cutting the sinus nerve or preganglionic cervical sympathetic nerves. Disorganization and depletion of the cholinesterases in the strands and plexuses occurs when the post-ganglionic branch of the superior cervical ganglion is cut. The cholinesterase in cells is unaffected.4. In carotid bodies in which vessels were filled with red blood cells or in which the vascular bed was injected with carmine-gelatine, it was seen that strands and plexuses are associated with blood vessels, and with blood vessels and cells respectively.5. It is suggested that a cholinergic pathway controlling carotid body blood vessels runs in the post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic.

  10. Delayed presentation of a carotid pseudoaneurysm following penetrating neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alfawaz, Abdullah; Li, Xiaoyi; Kénel-Pierre, Stefan; Yang, Jane; Rey, Jorge; Robinson, Handel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Penetrating carotid trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient invariably presents with a pseudoaneurysm on initial imaging. Although extremely rare, delayed pseudoaneurysm formation has been reported. The purpose of this paper is to define this rare entity and propose a diagnostic and treatment plan. Methods: We present a case of delayed presentation of carotid pseudoaneurysm following penetrating neck trauma. A systematic review of the literature was performed. Results: A 21-year-old male presents to the trauma center after sustaining a gunshot wound to the left upper back resulting in a zone 2 hematoma and pneumothorax. Bullet fragment artifact interfered with computed tomography. Carotid angiogram was normal. The patient was discharged after 3 days. He returned to the Emergency Department 3 months later with a painful pulsatile hematoma. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a 6-cm pseudoaneurysm arising from the proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA). A left common carotid artery (CCA) to ICA bypass with reversed great saphenous vein was performed. The patient’s post-operative course was uneventful, neurologic deficits improved, and he was discharged. Conclusion: Delayed presentation of traumatic pseudoaneurysms has been reported, although usually these cases are iatrogenic access complications in extremities. While endovascular therapies are first line for zone 1 and 3 vascular injuries, management of zone 2 injuries is still controversial. This patient was treated with a bypass due to the need to evacuate the hematoma that was exerting a mass effect in the neck. PMID:27489718

  11. Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

  12. An Experimental and Computational Study of Blunt Carotid Artery Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gayzik, F. Scott; Bostrom, Ola; Örtenwall, Per; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    A carotid artery dissection begins as a tear or defect of the intimal lining of the artery, and can lead to luminal occlusion and ultimately cerebral ischemia. Our aim is to conduct an organ level validation of a finite element model of the carotid artery using an experiment designed to elicit internal layer failure within fluid-filled carotid artery samples. A 2.4-kg beveled guillotine is dropped from three heights (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m) onto fluid-filled porcine carotid arteries and resulting damage is recorded. These events are modeled using finite element analysis. Stress, strain and strain rate are correlated to experimental outcome. Internal layer damage is reported in half of the experiments, with damage occurring with 100% frequency at a drop height of 0.7 m. Simulations of this experiment result in maximum principal stress and strain values of 1.43 MPa and 46.2% respectively. The strain level predicted by the model for this impact scenario approaches the strain to intimal failure level for porcine arteries found in the literature. The results of this study represent an important step in validating this finite element carotid artery model at the organ level. PMID:16968627

  13. [Endovascular treatment for cervical carotid artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yasuhiko; Sugiu, Kenji; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Tokunaga, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Date, Isao

    2013-06-01

    We report here a case of cervical carotid artery aneurysm. This 37-year-old male suffered from acute neck swelling when he was taking lunch after physical work. Ultrasonography demonstrated a cervical pseudoaneurysm and a jet flow, which was blowing into the dome from the carotid artery. Angiogram revealed an aneurysm with a diameter of 3 cm at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. Coil embolization using double-catheter technique was performed and complete occlusion of the aneurysm was obtained without any complications. The patient returned to his normal life. Cervical carotid artery aneurysms are rare and they induce pain by swelling in the neck, hoarseness, swallowing disturbance, hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to embolism. In case of a cervical carotid artery aneurysm, safe and effective treatments are required and endovascular treatment should be considered. Although stent-assisted coil embolization or covered-stent placement were reported as an effective treatment for cervical aneurysms, coil embolization without using a stent was performed in this particular patient who is a young, blue-collar worker because the avoidance of long-term anti-platelet therapy was desirable. Preoperative evaluation is important to select adequate treatment. PMID:23732763

  14. Carotid Artery Stenting Trials: Conduct, Results, Critique, and Current Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira

    2012-02-15

    The carotid stenting trialists have demonstrated persistence and determination in comparing an evolving technique, carotid artery stenting (CAS), against a mature and exacting standard for carotid revascularisation, carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This review focuses on their endeavours. A total of 12 1-on-1 randomised trials comparing CAS and CEA have been reported; 6 of these can be considered major, and 5 of these reflect (in part) current CAS standards of practice and form the basis of this review. At least 18 meta-analyses seeking to compare CAS and CEA exist. These are limited by the quality and heterogeneity of the data informing them (e.g., five trials were stopped prematurely such that they collectively failed to reach recruitment target by >4000 patients). The Carotid Stenting Trialists' Collaboration Publication represents a prespecified meta-analysis of European trials that were sufficiently similar to allow valid conclusions to be drawn; these trials and conclusions will be explored. When the rate of myocardial infarction (MI) is rigorously assessed, CAS and CEA are equivalent for the composite end point of stroke/death and MI, with more minor strokes for CAS and more MIs for CEA. These outcomes have a discrepant impact on quality of life and subsequent mortality. The all-stroke death outcomes for patients <70 years old are equivalent, with more minor strokes occurring in the elderly during CAS than CEA. There are significantly more severe haematomas and cranial nerve injuries after CEA. The influence of experience on outcome cannot be underestimated.

  15. Clinical use of noninvasive evaluation of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Persson, A V; O'Leary, D H; Kovacs, A; Dyer, V E

    1980-06-01

    The noninvasive evaluation of carotid artery disease should include a battery of tests that includes one direct and one indirect assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. The resulting data should be correlated with the clinical findings and the patient's general status so the risks and benefits of carotid endarterectomy may be determined. These studies are usually outpatient procedures and allow one to determine in the office which patients would benefit from carotid surgery and who should be followed serially. Carotid arteriography is reserved for those patients who will be subjected to surgery. In our hands, the combination of CPA, Kartchner-McRae OPG, and Echoflow fulfill these requirements. In a small number of patients the history, physical examination, and noninvasive studies are inconclusive. For most patients, we are able to make decisions as to the best therapy in the office and can discuss risks and benefits with patients and their families with an accuracy of approximately 95 per cent before hospitalization and arteriography are considered.

  16. Gasotransmitter regulation of ion channels: a key step in O2 sensing by the carotid body.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Peers, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Carotid bodies detect hypoxia in arterial blood, translating this stimulus into physiological responses via the CNS. It is long established that ion channels are critical to this process. More recent evidence indicates that gasotransmitters exert powerful influences on O2 sensing by the carotid body. Here, we review current understanding of hypoxia-dependent production of gasotransmitters, how they regulate ion channels in the carotid body, and how this impacts carotid body function.

  17. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  18. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  19. Left or Right Carotid Endarterectomy in Patients with Atherosclerotic Disease: Ipsilateral Effects on Cognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, N.; Bossema, E. R.; van Ommen, M.; Moll, F. L.; Ackerstaff, R. G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated hemispheric functions ipsilateral to the side of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with a severe stenosis in the left or right carotid artery. Assessments took place 1 day before and 3 months after CEA. Only right-handed males were included. Nineteen patients underwent surgery of the left carotid artery and 17 of the right.…

  20. Hemodynamic Effects of Long-term Morphological Changes in the Human Carotid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Jaehoon; Jeong, Woowon; Smith, Nataliya; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations of morphology for human carotid artery bifurcation from infancy to young adulthood found substantial growth of the internal carotid artery with advancing age, and the development of the carotid sinus at the root of the internal carotid artery during teen age years. Although the reasons for the appearance of the carotid sinus are not clearly understood yet, it has been hypothesized that the dilation of the carotid sinus serves to support pressure sensing, and slows the blood flow to reduce pulsatility to protect the brain. In order to understand this interesting evolvement at the carotid bifurcation in the aspects of fluid mechanics, we performed in vitro phase-contrast MR flow experiments using compliant silicone replicas of age-dependent carotid artery bifurcations. The silicone models in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood were fabricated using a rapid prototyping technique, and incorporated with a bench-top flow mock circulation loop using a computer-controlled piston pump. The results of the in vitro flow study showed highly complex flow characteristics at the bifurcation in all age-dependent models. However, the highest magnitude of kinetic energy was found at the internal carotid artery in the child model. The high kinetic energy in the internal carotid artery during childhood might be one of the local hemodynamic forces that initiate morphological long-term development of the carotid sinus in the human carotid bifurcation. PMID:25702250

  1. Carotid Endothelial VCAM-1 Is an Early Marker of Carotid Atherosclerosis and Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, I.; Bowles, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine if endothelial VCAM-1 (eVCAM-1) expression in the common carotid artery (CCA) would correlate with predictive markers of atherosclerotic disease, would precede reduction of markers of endothelial cell function and would predict coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Carotid arterial segments (bifurcation, proximal and distal CCA) were harvested from 14 and 24 month-old male castrated familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, a model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Quantification of local expression of eVCAM-1, intimal macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, intima-media (I/M) ratio, intima-media thickness (IMT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) in selected regions of the carotids revealed a relationship between local inflammation and atheroscle-rotic plaque progression. Importantly, inflammation was not uniform throughout the CCA. Endo-thelial VCAM-1 expression was the greatest at the bifurcation and increased with age. Finally, eV-CAM-1 best estimated the severity of CAD compared to blood levels of glucose, hypercholestero-lemia, carotid IMT, and p-eNOS. Conclusion Our data suggested that eVCAM-1 was closely associated with atherosclerotic plaque progression and preceded impairment of EDD. Thus, this study supported the use of carotid VCAM-1 targeting agents to estimate the severity of CAD. PMID:26702331

  2. Border Detection of Common Carotid Artery Using Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Nagahara, Yoshihiro

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. The arteriosclerosis of the common carotid artery is diagnosed using Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) which is obtained from echocardiogram. In order to measure IMT from echocardiogram, it is required to detect a border which is a boundary between vessel tissue layers. The method of border detection requires reproducibility and high accuracy. The conventional methods to detect the border curve depend on differential value of brightness on the common carotid artery. Therefore, we can't extract a good candidate point by influence of a noise. In this paper, we propose the high-accuracy detection method by Hough Transform. About high-accuracy, it realized by attaching importance to high reliable candidate point of border.

  3. Carotid body tumors: advantages of contrast ultrasound investigation.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Maria F; Irace, Luigi; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Massa, Rita; Gossetti, Bruno; Benedetti-Valentini, Fabrizio

    2009-10-01

    Carotid body tumors are rare neoplasms that have to be considered in the evaluation of all lateral neck mass. Early surgical removal has been recommended to avoid possible cranial nerve injury, the most common perioperative complication. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRA) angiographies are the preferred pre-operative diagnostic imaging investigations, as well as the 111 In-pentetreotide scintigraphic scan, whereas the standard ultrasound investigations have poor sensitivity in characterizing of the blood flows of the parenchimal structure of the carotid body tumors. We describe a case of a patient with a carotid body tumor assessed with contrast ultrasonography that clearly improved the quality of the standard color Duplex. This technique may represent a non-invasive method, easy to use and to repeat, and able to achieve high diagnostic accuracy.

  4. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  5. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  6. Automated landmarking and geometric characterization of the carotid siphon.

    PubMed

    Bogunović, Hrvoje; Pozo, José María; Cárdenes, Rubén; Villa-Uriol, María Cruz; Blanc, Raphaël; Piotin, Michel; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2012-05-01

    The geometry of the carotid siphon has a large variability between subjects, which has prompted its study as a potential geometric risk factor for the onset of vascular pathologies on and off the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we present a methodology for an objective and extensive geometric characterization of carotid siphon parameterized by a set of anatomical landmarks. We introduce a complete and automated characterization pipeline. Starting from the segmentation of vasculature from angiographic image and its centerline extraction, we first identify ICA by characterizing vessel tree bifurcations and training a support vector machine classifier to detect ICA terminal bifurcation. On ICA centerline curve, we detect anatomical landmarks of carotid siphon by modeling it as a sequence of four bends and selecting their centers and interfaces between them. Bends are detected from the trajectory of the curvature vector expressed in the parallel transport frame of the curve. Finally, using the detected landmarks, we characterize the geometry in two complementary ways. First, with a set of local and global geometric features, known to affect hemodynamics. Second, using large deformation diffeomorphic metric curve mapping (LDDMCM) to quantify pairwise shape similarity. We processed 96 images acquired with 3D rotational angiography. ICA identification had a cross-validation success rate of 99%. Automated landmarking was validated by computing limits of agreement with the reference taken to be the locations of the manually placed landmarks averaged across multiple observers. For all but one landmark, either the bias was not statistically significant or the variability was within 50% of the inter-observer one. The subsequently computed values of geometric features and LDDMCM were commensurate to the ones obtained with manual landmarking. The characterization based on pair-wise LDDMCM proved better in classifying the carotid siphon shape classes than the one

  7. [Correlation of some biochemical and coagulological parameters in carotid atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Akhvlediani, M V; Vorob'eva, E O; Emukhvari, M G; Sharashidze, N A; Kupreishvili, S B

    2009-11-01

    It has been established positive correlation of the degree of stenosis and intima-media thickness of carotid arteries with the following biochemical parameters: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, Apo-B, Lp(a), triglycerides, hs-C-reactive protein(CRP), interleukines (IL-1beta and IL-6), fibrinogen, D-dimers. Negative correlation was stated with respect to HDL cholesterol, Apo-A-1, protein C. Relation between the parameters of the blood lipid spectre, proteins and mediators of inflammation as well as those of hemostasis enables us to approach pathophysiological mechanisms of carotid atherosclerosis, define the processes of inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  8. Tissue Characterization on Common Carotid Artery using AR Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao

    This study uses one image with a echocardiography and detects arteriosclerosis on the common carotid artery by tissue characterization. The conventional methods are measurement of thickness on the vessel wall or stiffness on the common carotid artery. However, they need frames of several beats and great calculation times. But, we detect the arteriosclerosis with only one image. Our method estimate the grade of arteriosclerosis by AR model parameters fitted to the texture on the lumen-intima wall. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

  9. Injury of the peripheral cranial nerves during carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Theodotou, B; Mahaley, M S

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of local nerve injury among 192 consecutive carotid endarterectomies in 162 patients between 1977-1983 was determined from review of the medical records. Two facial nerve, 5 hypoglossal nerve, and 2 vagus nerve injuries were discovered for a total incidence of 4.7%. Only the 2 facial nerve injuries failed to improve over 2 years. Followup ranged from 1 to 60 months in this group of patients. Careful attention to details of tissue dissection at surgery should lower the incidence of nerve injury during carotid endarterectomy. PMID:4049454

  10. Heuber Maneuver in Evaluation of Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Rengarajan; Mehta, Neeraj; Saran, Sonal; Khera, Pushpinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carotid-cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Elevated venous pressure produces congestion in the orbit with resultant transudation of fluid and increased intraocular pressure, thereby leading to secondary glaucoma which may result in visual loss. Immediate treatment is hence, warranted in these cases. The planning of endovascular management is dependent on many parameters, the most important of which are the size and location of the fistula. Since these are high-flow fistulas, assessment requires certain manoeuvers. Heuber manoeuver is one of the manoeuvers used to demonstrate the size of the fistula. PMID:27781074

  11. Focal, transient mechanical narrowing of a pipeline embolization device following treatment of an internal carotid artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Timothy Ryan; Jindal, Gaurav; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2014-01-01

    Flow diversion is a promising technique for cerebral aneurysm treatment but presents new and sometimes unique challenges. Transient reversible narrowing due to device reconfiguration of the pipeline embolization device (PED) has not been previously described. Here we describe a patient with dolichoectasia of the distal right internal carotid artery with an associated saccular sidewall aneurysm who developed asymptomatic circumferential narrowing of the proximal aspect of the PED in the first month following deployment. The patient was followed conservatively and demonstrated partial resolution of device narrowing on 6 month follow-up imaging. PMID:25267804

  12. A cohort study of duplex Doppler examinations of the carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmion, Vincent J; Aldoori, Munther I; Woodcock, John P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the possibility of pathological change in the common carotid artery at the bifurcation and in the internal carotid artery beyond the bifurcation which could contribute to a reduced diastolic pressure as observed in primary open angle glaucoma. Design Duplex ultrasonic examinations of carotid bifurcations were conducted on 80 patients. Carotid artery defects were allocated into three types: no demonstrable flow defects, internal carotid artery abnormalities and disease in the carotid bulb. Setting Bristol Royal Infirmary Vascular Laboratory. Participants Eighty patients (mean age 69.6 years) providing a total of 160 sides to the analysis. Main outcome measures An estimated central retinal artery pressure, intraocular pressure and field loss were recorded for each side measured. Results Doppler investigations revealed significant levels of pathological change in the internal carotid distinct from changes at the carotid bulb. The disease revealed in the internal carotid artery was significantly associated with intraocular pressure (p = 0.032), with an effect small to medium in magnitude. The Q2 measure, derived from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure, was also substantively associated with disease in the internal carotid artery. Both intraocular pressure and the Q2 measure effectively discriminated between groups, with field loss providing rather less discriminating capability. There was a strong trend towards a higher intraocular pressures and a greater visual field loss with internal carotid artery disease. Conclusions Pathological changes in the extra cranial carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma exceed those in the arteries classified as normal. The presence of disease specifically in the internal carotid artery emphasised the need for a mechanism for the evaluation of the internal carotid apart from the carotid bulb. A basis for clarifying the presence of an ischaemic zone is proposed. PMID:25289141

  13. Cerebral hemodynamics after contralateral carotid endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid occlusion: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Baracchini, Claudio; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Manara, Renzo; Ermani, Mario; Ballotta, Enzo

    2006-07-01

    We sought to investigate whether carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can achieve long-term cerebral hemodynamic improvement and reduce recurrence of cerebral ischemic events in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with severe (>70%) carotid artery stenosis contralateral to carotid occlusion (CO). Thirty-nine patients with severe carotid lesion contralateral to CO were studied before (1 day) and after CEA (at 7 days, 1, 3 and 6 months, and then yearly thereafter). Collateral flow and cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR) were assessed by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). A total of 32 unoperated patients with severe carotid lesion contralateral to CO, who were comparable with respect to age and sex, served as a control group. The average period of TCD follow-up was 10 years and was obtained in all patients; during this period, major clinical events (stroke, acute myocardial infarction and death) were also recorded. The proportion of patients with collateral flow via the anterior communicating artery increased significantly from 61.5% before to 89.7% after CEA (P = 0.01). Cerebral VMR ipsilateral to CO improved in 85.7% of patients (30 of 35) within 30 days of CEA, and in all patients within 90 days. No significant spontaneous VMR recovery was recorded in the control group. After the initial recovery, no significant change in VMR was observed in the surgical group or the control group during the follow-up. In conclusion, in patients with severe carotid stenosis, CEA contralateral to symptomatic and asymptomatic CO determines a durable cerebral hemodynamic improvement not only on the side of the CEA but also on the contralateral side, with no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.

  14. Treatment of a ballistic wound of the common carotid artery revealed by a spontaneous carotid-jugular fistula.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Amélie; Mocellin, Nicolas; Imperato, Marc; Molimard, Benoît; Bordier, Emmanuel; Menguy, Paul; Baranger, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    The case reported is of a 30-year-old patient with a left internal carotid-jugular fistula secondary to the explosion of an improvised explosive device during the Afghan war. Carotid resection with arterial bypass using a venous allograft and internal jugular ligation were performed by left cervicotomy associated with sternotomy at a specialized center. The management of cervical arteriovenous fistulas that occur as a result of penetrating trauma faced during the war must be considered and it should be noted that, on battlefields, treatment is not always performed in specialized units. PMID:21183314

  15. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of internal carotid arterial Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya; Güler, Inan

    2006-06-01

    In this study, internal carotid arterial Doppler signals recorded from 130 subjects, where 45 of them suffered from internal carotid artery stenosis, 44 of them suffered from internal carotid artery occlusion and the rest of them were healthy subjects, were classified using wavelet-based neural network. Wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals. Multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis and occlusion in internal carotid arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform (WT). The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All these data sets were obtained from internal carotid arteries of healthy subjects, subjects suffering from internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. The correct classification rate was 96% for healthy subjects, 96.15% for subjects having internal carotid artery stenosis and 96.30% for subjects having internal carotid artery occlusion. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. PMID:16848135

  16. Reflections by contrarians on the post-CREST evaluation of carotid stenting for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Henry J M; Pelz, David M; Lownie, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting has become a popular alternative to carotid endarterectomy for the treatment of carotid stenosis in stroke. Evidence from early randomized controlled trials comparing these interventions revealed mixed results. The largest such trial, the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial recently showed equivalence of the procedures in a mixed cohort of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. These results have been heralded in North America as definitively demonstrating the safety and efficacy of carotid angioplasty and stenting, making it an attractive alternative to carotid endarterectomy. It is therefore probable that many more asymptomatic patients will be subjected to Carotid angioplasty and stenting, perceived by many to be less invasive than carotid endarterectomy. The authors argue that the design of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial was flawed by the mixture of two dissimilar patient groups, thus violating the principle of ceteris paribus, essential for the validity of a randomized controlled trials. The evidence for any invasive treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is weak, with recent data favouring purely medical management. The authors believe that carotid angioplasty and stenting in asymptomatic patients should cease until better evidence is available. PMID:21050401

  17. Cranial nerve palsies in spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed Central

    Sturzenegger, M; Huber, P

    1993-01-01

    Two patients had isolated unilateral cranial nerve palsies due to spontaneous internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection without ischaemic cerebral involvement. One had acute glossopharyngeal and vagal, the other isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy. Reviewing all reported cases of angiographically confirmed ICA dissection in the literature, 36 additional cases with unequivocal ipsilateral cranial nerve palsies were analysed. While an isolated palsy of the IXth and Xth has not been reported previously, palsies of the XIIth nerve or the IXth to XIIth nerves were most frequently found. In these patients, lower cranial nerve palsies are probably the result of compression by an enlarging ICA due to mural haematoma. Symptoms and signs indicative of carotid dissection were concurrently present only in some reported cases. This raises the question of unrecognised carotid dissection as a cause of isolated cranial nerve palsies. When the dissection occurs in the subadventitial layer without relevant narrowing of the arterial lumen and when an aneurysm is thrombosed, angiography does not reliably yield the diagnosis. Therefore, carotid dissection might have been underestimated as a cause of isolated lower cranial nerve palsies before the advent of MRI. MRI demonstrates directly the extension of the wall haematoma in the axial and longitudinal planes. Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Images PMID:8229030

  18. A Parallel Lattice Boltzmann Model of a Carotid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.; Ryan, S. J.; Buick, J. M.

    2008-11-01

    A parallel implementation of the lattice Boltzmann model is considered for a three dimensional model of the carotid artery. The computational method and its parallel implementation are described. The performance of the parallel implementation on a Beowulf cluster is presented, as are preliminary hemodynamic results.

  19. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Köklü, Erkan Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  20. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population.

  1. Serum Osteoprotegerin Is Associated With Calcified Carotid Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ami; Choi, Yun-Seok; Choi, Yong-Won; Chung, Woo-Baek; Park, Chul-Soo; Chung, Wook-Sung; Lee, Man-Young; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a kind of tumor necrosis factor, which is related to bone metabolism and vascular calcification. The increase of Osteoprotegerin concentration in serum is related to cardiovascular diseases in humans. The purpose of this study was to figure out the relevance between osteoprotegerin in serum and carotid calcification. Serum OPG concentrations were compared in 145 patients who underwent carotid sonography (average age: 68 ± 9 years old, male: female = 81:64). A calcified plaque (CP) (37 people [27%]), a noncalcified plaque (NCP) (54 people [37%]), and a nonplaque (NP) (54 people [37%]) were classified for this study. No significant differences among 3 groups were demonstrated in the distribution of age, diabetes, high blood pressure, and hyperlipidemia. Serum osteoprotegerin concentrations were significantly increased in CP group rather than NCP group or NP group; (median [interquartile range], 4016 [1410] vs 3210 [1802] pg/mL, P < 0.05 and 4016 [1410] vs 3204 [1754] pg/mL, P < 0.05). Serum osteoprotegerin concentrations did not indicate a significant difference between NCP Group or NP Group. This study had proved that patient group accompanied with carotid calcification in carotid artery disease had an increased serum OPG concentration, so it could consider that OPG plays an important function on calcification related to arteriosclerosis. PMID:27082605

  2. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  3. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+) rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  4. Factor analytic reduction of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David A.

    1989-01-01

    An accepted method for measuring the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex to arterial pressure changes is to artificially stimulate the baroreceptors in the neck. This is accomplished by using a pressurized neck cuff which constricts and distends the carotid artery and subsequently stimulates the baroreceptors. Nine physiological responses to this type of stimulation are quantified and used as indicators of the baroreflex. Thirty male humans between the ages 27 and 46 underwent the carotid-cardiac baroreflex test. The data for the nine response parameters were analyzed by principle component factor analysis. The results of this analysis indicated that 93 percent of the total variance across all nine parameters could be explained in four dimensions. Examination of the factor loadings following an orthogonal rotation of the principle components indicated four well defined dimensions. The first two dimensions reflected location points for R-R interval and carotid distending pressure respectively. The third dimension was composed of measures reflecting the gain of the reflex. The fourth dimension was the ratio of the resting R-R interval to R-R interval during simulated hypertension. The data suggests that the analysis of all nine baroreflex parameters is redundant.

  5. Unusual presentation of traumatic extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, P G; Lambert, C D

    1978-07-01

    A young man presented with apparent transient ischemic attacks following a motorcycle accident in which he sustained minor injuries only. Computerized axial tomography demonstrated a small right frontal infarct, and angiography revealed an aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery in its extracranial course. This was thought to be traumatic in origin.

  6. Differential modulation by extracellular ATP of carotid chemosensory responses.

    PubMed

    Spergel, D; Lahiri, S

    1993-06-01

    The possibility that the carotid body has ATP surface receptors that mediate O2 chemoreception was tested. To distinguish between the event(s) initiating chemoreception and those at the neurotransmitter level, we also tested the chemosensory response to nicotine before and after ATP administration. Carotid bodies from cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium were perfused and superfused in vitro with modified Tyrode solution (PCO2 < 1 Torr, pH 7.4, 36 degrees C) equilibrated at PO2 > 400 or approximately 150 Torr while chemosensory discharge was recorded extracellularly. ATP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate stimulated discharge with similar dose dependence, whereas adenosine had little effect. ATP infusion for > or = 2 min evoked an initial stimulation of discharge followed by a decline to baseline (desensitization). Desensitization did not affect the response to hypoxia (perfusate flow interruption) but inhibited the response to nicotine (4-nmol pulse). Therefore, 1) the carotid body has surface ATP receptors that may mediate the chemosensory response to nicotine but not to hypoxia and 2) nicotinic receptors are not required for carotid body O2 chemoreception. PMID:8366007

  7. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors.

  8. Outcome After Surgical Treatment of Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualin, Alberto; Meneghelli, Pietro; Cozzi, Francesco; Chioffi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Surgery on paraclinoid carotid aneurysms is technically demanding and entails considerable risks, especially to visual function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and visual outcome after surgery in 66 patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms (30 ruptured and 36 unruptured) treated between 1990 and 2014. Thirty-six aneurysms were of standard size, and 30 were large (16-20 mm) or giant (>20 mm); the Barami classification was used in every case. During surgery, multiple clips were needed in 25 % of patients with standard, and in 80 % of patients with large-giant aneurysms; temporary carotid occlusion was performed on 11 % of patients with standard and 63 % with large-giant aneurysms. Postoperatively, a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was repaired surgically in two patients. At the 3-month follow-up, the modified Rankin Score (mRS) was favorable (0-2) in 63 % of patients with ruptured and in 97 % with unruptured aneurysms; four patients presenting with large hematomas died. Postoperative visual impairment (worsening or newly developing deficit) was noted in 25 % of cases with standard and 14 % of cases with large-giant ruptured aneurysms, and, respectively, in 10 % with standard and 31 % with large-giant unruptured aneurysms. It has been concluded that surgery remains a reasonable choice in the management of patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms. PMID:27637626

  9. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population. PMID:15803810

  10. Design of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST)

    PubMed Central

    Sheffet, Alice J.; Roubin, Gary; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia; Moore, Wesley; Meschia, James F.; Hobson, Robert W.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and medical therapy were shown superior to medical therapy alone for symptomatic (≥50%) and asymptomatic (≥60%) stenosis. Carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS) offers a less invasive alternative. Establishing safety, efficacy, and durability of CAS requires rigorous comparison with CEA in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Aims The objective is to compare the efficacy of CAS versus CEA in patients with symptomatic (≥50%) or asymptomatic (≥60%) extracranial carotid stenosis. Design The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST) is a prospective, randomized, parallel, two-arm, multi-center trial with blinded endpoint adjudication. Primary endpoints are analyzed using standard time-to-event statistical modeling with adjustment for major baseline covariates. Primary analysis is on an intent-to-treat basis. Study Outcomes The primary outcome is the occurrence of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during a 30-day peri-procedural period, and ipsilateral stroke during follow-up of up to four years. Secondary outcomes include restenosis and health-related quality of life. PMID:20088993

  11. Improvement in Cerebral and Ocular Hemodynamics Early after Carotid Endarterectomy in Patients of Severe Carotid Artery Stenosis with or without Contralateral Carotid Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Weici; Jin, Bi; Zhang, Yanrong; Xu, Ping; Xiang, Feixiang; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Juan; Sheng, Shi; Ouyang, Chenxi; Li, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the alternation in cerebral and ocular blood flow velocity (BFV) in patients of carotid stenosis (CS) with or without contralateral carotid occlusion (CO) early after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients and Methods. Nineteen patients underwent CEA for ≥50% CS. Fourteen patients had the unilateral CS, and five patients had the ipsilateral CS and the contralateral CO. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and Color Doppler Imaging (CDI) were performed before and early after CEA. Results. In patients with unilateral CS, significant improvements in BFV were observed in anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the ipsilateral side after CEA. In patients of ipsilateral CS and contralateral CO, significant improvements in BFV were observed in the ACA and MCA not only on the ipsilateral side but also on the contralateral side postoperatively. The ipsilateral ophthalmic artery (OA) retrograde flows in two patients were recovered to anterograde direction following CEA. The BFV in short posterior ciliary artery (SPCA) of the ipsilateral side significantly increased postoperatively irrespective of the presence of contralateral CO. Conclusions. CEA improved cerebral anterior circulation hemodynamics especially in patients of unilateral CS and contralateral CO, normalized the OA reverse flow, and increased the blood perfusion of SPCA. PMID:27642593

  12. Improvement in Cerebral and Ocular Hemodynamics Early after Carotid Endarterectomy in Patients of Severe Carotid Artery Stenosis with or without Contralateral Carotid Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Weici; Jin, Bi; Zhang, Yanrong; Xu, Ping; Xiang, Feixiang; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the alternation in cerebral and ocular blood flow velocity (BFV) in patients of carotid stenosis (CS) with or without contralateral carotid occlusion (CO) early after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients and Methods. Nineteen patients underwent CEA for ≥50% CS. Fourteen patients had the unilateral CS, and five patients had the ipsilateral CS and the contralateral CO. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and Color Doppler Imaging (CDI) were performed before and early after CEA. Results. In patients with unilateral CS, significant improvements in BFV were observed in anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the ipsilateral side after CEA. In patients of ipsilateral CS and contralateral CO, significant improvements in BFV were observed in the ACA and MCA not only on the ipsilateral side but also on the contralateral side postoperatively. The ipsilateral ophthalmic artery (OA) retrograde flows in two patients were recovered to anterograde direction following CEA. The BFV in short posterior ciliary artery (SPCA) of the ipsilateral side significantly increased postoperatively irrespective of the presence of contralateral CO. Conclusions. CEA improved cerebral anterior circulation hemodynamics especially in patients of unilateral CS and contralateral CO, normalized the OA reverse flow, and increased the blood perfusion of SPCA.

  13. Improvement in Cerebral and Ocular Hemodynamics Early after Carotid Endarterectomy in Patients of Severe Carotid Artery Stenosis with or without Contralateral Carotid Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Weici; Jin, Bi; Zhang, Yanrong; Xu, Ping; Xiang, Feixiang; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the alternation in cerebral and ocular blood flow velocity (BFV) in patients of carotid stenosis (CS) with or without contralateral carotid occlusion (CO) early after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients and Methods. Nineteen patients underwent CEA for ≥50% CS. Fourteen patients had the unilateral CS, and five patients had the ipsilateral CS and the contralateral CO. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and Color Doppler Imaging (CDI) were performed before and early after CEA. Results. In patients with unilateral CS, significant improvements in BFV were observed in anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the ipsilateral side after CEA. In patients of ipsilateral CS and contralateral CO, significant improvements in BFV were observed in the ACA and MCA not only on the ipsilateral side but also on the contralateral side postoperatively. The ipsilateral ophthalmic artery (OA) retrograde flows in two patients were recovered to anterograde direction following CEA. The BFV in short posterior ciliary artery (SPCA) of the ipsilateral side significantly increased postoperatively irrespective of the presence of contralateral CO. Conclusions. CEA improved cerebral anterior circulation hemodynamics especially in patients of unilateral CS and contralateral CO, normalized the OA reverse flow, and increased the blood perfusion of SPCA. PMID:27642593

  14. Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Cognition in Patients Undergoing Carotid Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hitchner, Elizabeth; Morrison, Doug; Liao, Phoebe; Rosen, Allyson; Zhou, Wei

    2016-09-01

    While carotid interventions help decrease the risk of stroke, nearly 40% of patients experience cognitive deterioration. Genetic polymorphism in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in cognitive impairment; however, it is unclear whether they may influence cognitive changes in patients undergoing carotid intervention. In this study, we seek to assess the role of genetic polymorphisms in carotid intervention-related cognitive change. Polymorphisms related to cognitive function were chosen for this preliminary analysis. Over 2 years, patients undergoing carotid interventions were prospectively recruited. Patients underwent neuropsychological testing 2 weeks prior to and at 1 month following their procedure. Saliva samples were collected for genetic analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify associations between polymorphisms and cognitive measures. A total of 91 patients were included; all were male with an average age of 70 years. The majority of patients exhibited hypertension (95%) and a history of smoking (81%). Presence of ApoE 4 allele was associated with depression (p= 0.047). After correcting for age and genetic polymorphisms in BDNF and serotonin transporter (5-HTT), ApoE 4 allele was associated with depression (p= 0.044) and showed a trend with baseline cognitive impairment (p= 0.10). Age ≥ 70 years was associated with baseline cognitive impairment after adjusting for the three genetic polymorphisms (p= 0.03). Patients with ApoE 4 and BDNF A polymorphisms performed less well on the visual and verbal memory measures, respectively. Polymorphisms in ApoE and BDNF may provide insight on cognition in patients undergoing carotid interventions; however, the mechanism of this relationship remains unclear. PMID:27574384

  15. Cerebral hemodynamic changes and electroencephalography during carotid endarterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rehncrona, S.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Ryding, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Some patients undergoing endarterectomy for occlusive carotid artery disease run a risk of brain ischemia during cross-clamping of the artery. The present study of 15 patients was undertaken to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), as measured with an intravenous (IV) tracer (133Xenon) technique, and to relate CBF changes to changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). CBF was measured before and after induction of anesthesia, during cross-clamping of the carotid artery, after release of the clamps, and at 24 hours after the operation. All the patients were anesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl, and nitrous oxide and oxygen. EEG was continuously recorded during the operation. Carotid artery shunts were not used. In 8 patients, cross-clamping of the carotid artery did not influence the EEG. In this group of patients, induction of anesthesia caused a 38% decrease in CBF, which presumably reflects the normal reaction to the anesthetic agent given. There were no further changes in CBF during cross-clamping. In 7 patients, the EEG showed signs of deterioration during the intraoperative vascular occlusion. In these patients, anesthesia did not cause any CBF change, whereas cross-clamping the artery induced a 33% decrease in CBF. In individual patients, the severity of EEG changes correlated with the decrease in CBF. The absence of a change in CBF by anesthesia and a decrease due to cross-clamping of the carotid artery may be explained by the presence of a more advanced cerebrovascular disease and an insufficiency to maintain CBF during cross-clamping.

  16. Vascular balloon injury and intraluminal administration in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The carotid artery balloon injury model in rats has been well established for over two decades. It remains an important method to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation, neointima formation and vascular remodeling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are the most frequently employed animals for this model. Female rats are not preferred as female hormones are protective against vascular diseases and thus introduce a variation into this procedure. The left carotid is typically injured with the right carotid serving as a negative control. Left carotid injury is caused by the inflated balloon that denudes the endothelium and distends the vessel wall. Following injury, potential therapeutic strategies such as the use of pharmacological compounds and either gene or shRNA transfer can be evaluated. Typically for gene or shRNA transfer, the injured section of the vessel lumen is locally transduced for 30 min with viral particles encoding either a protein or shRNA for delivery and expression in the injured vessel wall. Neointimal thickening representing proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells usually peaks at 2 weeks after injury. Vessels are mostly harvested at this time point for cellular and molecular analysis of cell signaling pathways as well as gene and protein expression. Vessels can also be harvested at earlier time points to determine the onset of expression and/or activation of a specific protein or pathway, depending on the experimental aims intended. Vessels can be characterized and evaluated using histological staining, immunohistochemistry, protein/mRNA assays, and activity assays. The intact right carotid artery from the same animal is an ideal internal control. Injury-induced changes in molecular and cellular parameters can be evaluated by comparing the injured artery to the internal right control artery. Likewise, therapeutic modalities can be evaluated by comparing the injured and treated artery to the

  17. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Arterial bifurcations are commonly the sites of developing atherosclerotic plaque that lead to arterial occlusions and plaque rupture (myocardial infarctions and strokes). Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy provides an effective nondestructive method supplying spectral information on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition, specifically collagen and elastin. Purpose: To investigate regional differences in the ECM proteins -- collagen I, III and elastin in unstable plaque by analyzing data from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Methods: Gels of ECM protein extracts (elastin, collagen types I & III) were measured as reference spectra and internal thoracic artery segments (extra tissue from bypass surgery) were used as tissue controls. Arterial segments and the endarterectomy specimens (n=21) were cut into 5mm cross-sectional rings. Ten fluorescence spectra per sampling area were then recorded at 5 sites per ring with argon laser excitation (357nm) with a penetration depth of 200 μm. Spectra were normalized to maximum intensity and analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Tissue rings were fixed in formalin (within 3 hours of surgery), sectioned and stained with H&E or Movat's Pentachrome for histological analysis. Spectroscopy data were correlated with immunohistology (staining for elastin, collagen types I, III and IV). Results: Quantitative fluorescence for the thoracic arteries revealed a dominant elastin component on the luminal side -- confirmed with immunohistology and known artery structure. Carotid endarterectomy specimens by comparison had a significant decrease in elastin signature and increased collagen type I and III. Arterial spectra were markedly different between the thoracic and carotid specimens. There was also a significant elevation (p<0.05) of collagen type I distal to the bifurcation compared to proximal tissue in the carotid specimens. Conclusion: Fluorescence

  18. Comparative analysis of the biaxial mechanical behavior of carotid wall tissue and biological and synthetic materials used for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Pipinos, Iraklis I; MacTaggart, Jason N; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Dzenis, Yuris A

    2011-11-01

    Patch angioplasty is the most common technique used for the performance of carotid endarterectomy. A large number of patching materials are available for use while new materials are being continuously developed. Surprisingly little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials and how these properties compare with those of the carotid artery wall. Mismatch of the mechanical properties can produce mechanical and hemodynamic effects that may compromise the long-term patency of the endarterectomized arterial segment. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate and compare the biaxial mechanical behavior of the most commonly used patching materials. We compared PTFE (n  =  1), Dacron (n  =  2), bovine pericardium (n  =  10), autogenous greater saphenous vein (n  =  10), and autogenous external jugular vein (n  =  9) with the wall of the common carotid artery (n  =  18). All patching materials were found to be significantly stiffer than the carotid wall in both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Synthetic patches demonstrated the most mismatch in stiffness values and vein patches the least mismatch in stiffness values compared to those of the native carotid artery. All biological materials, including the carotid artery, demonstrated substantial nonlinearity, anisotropy, and variability; however, the behavior of biological and biologically-derived patches was both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the behavior of the carotid wall. The majority of carotid arteries tested were stiffer in the circumferential direction, while the opposite anisotropy was observed for all types of vein patches and bovine pericardium. The rates of increase in the nonlinear stiffness over the physiological stress range were also different for the carotid and patching materials. Several carotid wall samples exhibited reverse anisotropy compared to the average behavior of the carotid tissue. A similar characteristic was

  19. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  20. The Human Carotid Body Gene Expression and Function in Signaling of Hypoxia and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kåhlin, Jessica; Mkrtchian, Souren; Ebberyd, Anette; Eriksson, Lars I; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson

    2015-01-01

    Although animal carotid body oxygen sensing and signaling has been extensively investigated, the human carotid body remains essentially uncharacterized. Therefore, we aimed to study the human carotid body in terms of morphology, global and specific expression of sensing and signaling genes as well as inflammatory genes. The human carotid body response to brief or prolonged hypoxia was studied in carotid body slices from adult surgical patients and ACh, ATP and cytokine release was analyzed. We demonstrate that the human carotid body expresses key oxygen sensing and signaling genes in similarity with animal carotid bodies with a few diverging data. The human carotid body moreover shows enrichment of genes in the inflammatory response and releases pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to prolonged hypoxia. In response to acute hypoxia the human carotid body releases ACh and ATP and we thus translate previous findings in animal models to human tissue. We conclude that by releasing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during hypoxia the human carotid body displays a structural and functional capacity to participate in sensing and mediating systemic inflammation.

  1. Collaborative retrospective multicentre series of giant intracavernous carotid aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Penchet, G; Mourier, K

    2015-12-01

    Giant intracavernous carotid aneurysms (GICCA) occur with very unusual clinical symptoms often resulting from a compressive mechanism that may possibly resolve although seldom from a rupture or haemorrhage. In fact, due to their clinical presentation their treatment is different from that of the intracranial subarachnoid aneurysms. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical symptoms, therapeutic decisions, and the clinical state at 6 months follow up in a retrospective consecutive multicentre series of 27 GICCA between 2004 and 2008. All the patients in the series were female, mean age 65 years (21 to 82 years). A pseudo tumoural cavernous sinus syndrome revealed the disease in 25 patients (92.6%), an atypical headache in one patient, and in another patient an intraoperative haemorrhage led to the diagnosis. In most of the cases the aneurysms were sacciform in shape (89%), with a size between 25 and 30 millimeters (66.6%) and contained a blood clot due to intrasacular thrombosis (57.5%). An occlusion test of the internal carotid artery was performed during the diagnostic angiography in 24 cases (88.8%) and good tolerance of occlusion was observed in 16 of them. An endovascular procedure was performed in 21 patients (77.7%): selective coiling of the aneurysm facilitated by stenting or by remodeling techniques in 2 cases, whereas internal carotid artery occlusion was performed on the 19 other cases. Among these latter patients, 2 of them (10.5%) presented with a poor tolerance during the pre-therapeutic carotid occlusion test, necessitating a surgical intra-extra cranial by-pass prior to the carotid endovascular occlusion. In 1 other case of these 19, the internal carotid endovascular occlusion was carried-out in emergency because the aneurysm was revealed by a major haemorrhage during the surgical transsphenoidal approach of a hypophyseal tumour. No treatment was decided in the remaining 6 cases of the series (22.2%). At 6 months follow-up, 18 of the 21

  2. Liver imaging at 3.0 T: diffusion-induced black-blood echo-planar imaging with large anatomic volumetric coverage as an alternative for specific absorption rate-intensive echo-train spin-echo sequences: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; Krestin, Gabriel P; Wielopolski, Piotr A

    2008-07-01

    Institutional Review Board approval and signed informed consent were obtained by all participants for an ongoing sequence optimization project at 3.0 T. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breath-hold diffusion-induced black-blood echo-planar imaging (BBEPI) as a potential alternative for specific absorption rate (SAR)-intensive spin-echo sequences, in particular, the fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, at 3.0 T. Fourteen healthy volunteers (seven men, seven women; mean age +/- standard deviation, 32.7 years +/- 6.8) were imaged for this purpose. Liver coverage (20 cm, z-axis) was always performed in one 25-second breath hold. Imaging parameters were varied interactively with regard to echo time, diffusion b value, and voxel size. Images were evaluated and compared with fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE images for image quality, liver delineation, geometric distortions, fat suppression, suppression of the blood signal, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An optimized short- (25 msec) and long-echo (80 msec) BBEPI provided full anatomic, single breath-hold liver coverage (100 and 50 sections, respectively), with resulting voxel sizes of 3.3 x 2.7 x 2.0 mm and 3.3 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, respectively. Repetition time was 6300 msec, matrix size was 160 x 192, and an acceleration factor of 2.00 was used. b Values of more than 20 sec/mm(2) showed better suppression of the blood signal but b values of 10 sec/mm(2) provided improved volume coverage and signal consistency. Compared with fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE, the optimized BBEPI sequence provided (a) comparable image quality and liver delineation, (b) acceptable geometric distortions, (c) improved suppression of fat and blood signals, and (d) high CNR and SNR. BBEPI is feasible for fast, low-SAR, thin-section morphologic imaging of the entire liver in a single breath hold at 3.0 T. PMID:18566178

  3. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures. PMID:27699162

  4. Time-Resolved 4-Dimensional Computed-Tomography Angiography Can Correctly Identify Carotid Pseudo-Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felix C; Datta, Mineesh; Choi, Philip M C

    2016-04-01

    Correct identification of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis from low-grade or total chronic occlusion is critical for patient selection for urgent carotid endarterectomy. Carotid pseudo-occlusion is a flow-related artifact on noninvasive imaging that can lead to an incorrect diagnosis of total internal carotid artery occlusion, thereby denying an eligible patient for appropriate surgical treatment. We present an 82-year-old man with a symptomatic critical internal carotid artery, which was detected on time-resolved 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography, whereas single-phase computed-tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasonography suggested apparent occlusion. To our understanding, the use of 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography to identify carotid pseudo-occlusion has not been previously reported.

  5. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures.

  6. Correlation of carotid artery disease severity and vasomotor response of cerebral blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Krdžić, Ivana; Čovičković-Šternić, Nadežda; Katsiki, Niki; Isenović, Esma R; Radak, Đorđe

    2015-05-01

    We assessed reactivity of cerebral vessels on hypercapnia in patients with carotid occlusive disease. The effects of vascular risk factors on carotid atherosclerosis and vasomotor reactivity (VMR) of cerebral arterioles were also examined. Patients (n = 50) with carotid stenosis (≥30% in 1 or both sides) were included; 30 patients acted as controls. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, cardiac diseases, inflammation, and smoking were recorded. Vasomotor reactivity was assessed with the apnea test by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and estimated by flow velocity changes in the middle cerebral artery before and after hypercapnia induction. Vasomotor reactivity was defined by the breath holding index, and values under 0.69 were considered critical for VMR impairment. Vasomotor reactivity reduction was significant (P = .004) in patients with severe carotid stenosis (>70%) and with symptomatic carotid disease (P < .05). The risk factors did not significantly influence VMR reduction. Severe carotid stenosis impairs VMR and may increase the risk of stroke, especially in symptomatic patients.

  7. Direct Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula: Angiographic Classification and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Cuong Tran; Nguyen, Dang; Duc, Vo Tan; Chau, Huynh Hong; Son, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report our experience in treatment of traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) via endovascular intervention. We hereof recommend an additional classification system for type A CCF and suggest respective treatment strategies. Only type A CCF patients (Barrow's classification) would be recruited for the study. Based on the angiographic characteristics of the CCF, we classified type A CCF into three subtypes including small size, medium size and large size fistula depending on whether there was presence of the anterior carotid artery (ACA) and/or middle carotid artery (MCA). Angiograms with opacification of both ACA and MCA were categorized as small size fistula. Angiograms with opacification of either ACA or MCA were categorized as medium size fistula and those without opacification of neither ACA nor MCA were classified as large size fiatula. After the confirm angiogram, endovascular embolization would be performed impromptu using detachable balloon, coils or both. All cases were followed up for complication and effect after the embolization. A total of 172 direct traumatic CCF patients were enrolled. The small size fistula was accountant for 12.8% (22 cases), medium size 35.5% (61 cases) and large size fistula accountant for 51.7% (89 cases). The successful rate of fistula occlusion under endovascular embolization was 94% with preservation of the carotid artery in 70%. For the treatment of each subtype, a total of 21/22 cases of the small size fistulas were successfully treated using coils alone. The other single case of small fistula was defaulted. Most of the medium and large size fistulas were cured using detachable balloons. When the fistula sealing could not be obtained using detachable balloon, coils were added to affirm the embolization of the cavernous sinus via venous access. There were about 2.9% of patient experienced direct carotid artery puncture and 0.6% puncture after carotid artery cut-down exposure. About 30% of cases

  8. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients. PMID:25917634

  9. Is siphon disease important in predicting outcome of carotid endarterectomy?

    PubMed

    Roederer, G O; Langlois, Y E; Chan, A R; Chikos, P M; Thiele, B L; Strandness, D E

    1983-10-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation and in the siphon was reviewed in 141 patients who underwent 149 endarterectomies. The relationship between the presence and severity of siphon lesions and focal neurologic symptoms, both before and after operation, was also examined. Siphon disease was found in 84% of the 282 sides. Most lesions (42%) were in the 20% to 49% diameter-reduction category. Only 9% were stenoses greater than 50%, and 10% were occlusions. The majority (65%) were smooth. No relationship was found between the severity of disease at the carotid bifurcation and in the siphon. No pattern of siphon disease could be related to the occurrence of symptoms. Furthermore, no relation was found between the severity of siphon disease and recurrent symptoms after endarterectomy.

  10. Treatment of Carotid Siphon Aneurysms with a Microcell Stent

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall’Olio, M.; Princiotta, C.; Simonetti, L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The treatment of giant, large, multiple or wide-necked carotid siphon aneurysms has always represented a challenge for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists. Very recently the use of stents with tiny holes has been proposed by two companies: Balt Silk Stent in Europe and Pi-peline in America. We have used the Silk stent on a few patients and describe our first case who now has an eleven month follow-up. The carotid siphon presented three converging aneurysms sharing a very large common neck. The Silk stent (Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France) was deployed through a 4F Balt introducer. The procedure was uneventful and very quick. As soon as the stent was positioned contrast medium stagnation was displayed within the aneur-ysm. The patient’s post-operative course was normal and she was discharged three days later in good health. PMID:20557742

  11. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients.

  12. Non-invasive diagnosis of internal carotid artery dissections.

    PubMed Central

    Müllges, W; Ringelstein, E B; Leibold, M

    1992-01-01

    Arteriography is thought to be mandatory for the diagnosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection. With the introduction of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, this is no longer the case. In 13 consecutive patients with ICA dissections the diagnosis was made by means of non-invasive tests including extracranial and transcranial Doppler sonography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (ceCT), and, in five patients, MRI. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography used as the gold standard in all cases was confirmative. Extracranial and transcranial ultrasound findings indicative of the diagnosis could be identified. MRI directly demonstrated the intramural haematoma and the false lumen of the dissected artery. These non-invasive techniques also allowed for repetitive follow up examinations. They were, however, unable to demonstrate false aneurysms in the chronic state. Results show that the diagnosis of carotid dissection can be made by means of cerebrovascular ultrasound and MRI. Images PMID:1538235

  13. Compliant Wall Simulation of a Healthy Carotid Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Shobha; Rayz, Vitaliy; Saloner, David; Berger, Stanley

    2003-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the industrialized world. Together with the genetic causes of this disease, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) in the arterial system plays a role in the development of arteriosclerosis. In an effort to further understand this disease, an FSI model of the carotid artery is in progress. To construct this model, we begin with compliant arterial wall deformation considered under transient global blood pressure. Vessel walls are composed of collagen fibers, elastin, smooth muscle, and water. Due to its complexity and variation among humans, it is difficult to create an accurate mechanical description of this material. Hence, we begin by way of isotropic properties with the future intent of anisotropic modeling. Using these parameters, a pulsatile 3D model of wall movement for a healthy carotid artery is presented. Supported under a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, NIH Grant HL61823, and PBD, Inc.

  14. Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: A Different Entity without Specific Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Filis, Konstantinos; Sigala, Fragiska; Sianou, Argiri

    2016-01-01

    According to literature data, there are no distinct guidelines regarding the proper diagnostic and therapeutic management of traumatic carotid artery dissection (TCAD). Although most of cases evaluated in research studies refer to spontaneous carotid artery dissection, traumatic cases demand special considerations as far as diagnosis and treatment are concerned. Although both types of dissection share some common characteristics, a patient with TCAD usually presents with several concomitant injuries as well as a higher bleeding risk, thus complicating decision making in such patients. Therefore, aim of this review is to present available data regarding epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment strategy in cases with TCAD in order to produce useful conclusions for everyday clinical practice. PMID:27051653

  15. Treatment of a Recurrent Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm with the Wallgraft Endoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sibtain, N.; Shah, J.; Johnson, D.; Clifton, A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The use of covered stents to treat traumatic carotid artery pseudoaneurysms is increasingly being documented. Adjunctive antiplatelet therapy is mandatory. We present a case of bilateral traumatic carotid artery pseudoaneuryms in which antiplatelet therapy was contraindicated at presentation, thereby dictating alternative treatment with coil embolization alone. Subsequent aneurysmal recurrence was successfully treated with the Wallgraft prosthesis. The literature on the use of the Wallgraft prosthesis for the treatment of carotid artery pseudoaneurysms is also reviewed. PMID:20569570

  16. Endovascular Exclusion of an External Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Riesenman, Paul J.; Mendes, Robert R.; Mauro, Matthew A.; Farber, Mark A.

    2007-09-15

    Aneurysmal lesions of the external carotid artery are extremely rare. A case is presented of a 3.8 cm right external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm treated by transluminal exclusion using an endovascular stent-graft. Following stent-graft placement, complete occlusion of the aneurysmal sac and main vessel lumen patency was successfully demonstrated. This report demonstrates the technical feasibility of utilizing stent-grafts to treat aneurysmal lesions involving the external carotid artery.

  17. Missed Total Occlusion Due to the Occipital Artery Arising from the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ustunsoz, Bahri Gumus, Burcak; Koksal, Ali; Koroglu, Mert; Akhan, Okan

    2007-02-15

    A 56-year-old man was referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with an ultrasound diagnosis of right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis for possible carotid artery stenting. DSA revealed total occlusion of the ICA and an occipital artery arising from the stump and simulating continuation of the ICA. An ascending pharyngeal artery also arose from the same occipital artery. This case is of interest because this is a rare variation besides being a cause of misdiagnosis at carotid ultrasound.

  18. Frequency, severity, and physiologic importance of carotid siphon lesions.

    PubMed

    Keagy, B A; Poole, M A; Burnham, S J; Johnson, G

    1986-03-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of the intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery (SIPHON) may be the cause of neurologic symptoms. The frequency and severity of these lesions were studied in 226 vessels subjected to conventional two-plane carotid angiography, and the impact of sequential or tandem lesions on cerebral flow was assessed in the 167 arteries from this group that also underwent Gee oculoplethysmography (OPG-Gee), a commonly accepted indicator of the physiologic importance of internal carotid stenosis. Atherosclerotic involvement of the SIPHON was present in 46% (103/226) of the vessels studied, including six total occlusions, 11 severe stenoses (severe, 80% to 99% area reduction [AR]), 27 moderate stenoses (moderate, 50% to 79% AR), 40 mild stenoses (mild, 10% to 49% AR), and 19 instances of mural disease (MUR). This was compared with a 73% rate (166 of 226) of proximal internal carotid artery (PICA) stenosis in the neck, including six to 43 severe, 29 moderate, 50 mild, and 38 MUR. There was little correlation (r = 0.33) between the degree of angiographic stenosis in the PICA and the SIPHON. All of the totally occluded arteries had a positive OPG-Gee, whereas a positive study was noted in only 6% (7 of 109) of the arteries with less than moderate stenosis in the PICA. Twenty-one vessels had moderate stenosis of the PICA. Eight of these arteries had an associated moderate or severe lesion in the SIPHON, and seven of eight (88%) had a positive OPG-Gee. The remaining 13 of this subset had had a normal or mildly diseased SIPHON, and 12 of 13 (92%) had a normal OPG-Gee.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  20. Carotid Artery Stenting: Single-Center Experience Over 11 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Nolz, Richard Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Cejna, Manfred; Schernthaner, Melanie Lammer, Johannes Schoder, Maria

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the results of carotid artery stenting during an 11-year period. Data from 168 carotid artery stenting procedures (symptomatic, n = 55; asymptomatic, n = 101; symptoms not accessible, n = 12) were retrospectively collected. Primary technical success rate, neurological events in-hospital, access-site complications, and contrast-induced nephropathy (n = 118) were evaluated. To evaluate the influence of experience in carotid artery stenting on intraprocedural neurologic complications, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included the first 80 treated patients, and group 2 the remainder of the patients (n = 88). In-stent restenoses at last-follow-up examinations (n = 89) were assessed. The overall primary technical success rate was 95.8%. The in-hospital stroke-death rate was 3.0% (n = 5; symptomatic, 5.4%; asymptomatic, 2.0%; p = 0.346). Neurologic complications were markedly higher in group 1 (4.2%; three major strokes; symptomatic, 2.8%, asymptomatic, 1.4%) compared to group 2 (2.4%; one major and one minor stroke-symptomatic, 1.2%, asymptomatic 1.2%), but this was not statistically significant. Further complications were access-site complications in 12 (7.1%), with surgical revision required in 1 (0.6%) and mild contrast-induced nephropathy in 1 (0.85%). Twenty-one (23.6%) patients had >50% in-stent restenosis during a mean follow-up of 28.2 months. In conclusion, advanced experience in carotid artery stenting leads to an acceptable periprocedural stroke-death rate. In-stent restenosis could be a critical factor during the follow-up course.

  1. Anesthetic Management During Emergency Surgical Ligation for Carotid Blowout Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klein Nulent, Casper G A; de Graaff, Henri J D; Ketelaars, Rein; Sewnaik, Aniel; Maissan, Iscander M

    2016-08-15

    A 44-year-old man presented to our emergency department with a pharyngeal hemorrhage, 6 weeks after a total laryngectomy and extensive neck dissection. Immediate surgical intervention was necessary to stop massive arterial hemorrhage from the pharynx. The head and neck surgeon successfully ligated the common carotid artery during this procedure. We describe the anesthetic strategy and the thromboelastometry (ROTEM®)-guided massive transfusion protocol. PMID:27310900

  2. [Ectopic internal carotid artery of the oropharynx: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Xie, Sanlin; Chen, Shiyan; Chen, Xianming

    2016-02-01

    Ectopic internal carotid artery (ICA) is a very rare congenital variation. Unless the diagnosis is made before neck or tonsil surgery, massive hemorrhage and even death may result from injury to the vessel. Therefore, knowledge of the presence of ectopic ICAs may be important. We report two cases suffering from dysphagia associated with ectopic ICA manifesting itself as a pulsative protruding of the right lateral wall of the oropharynx. PMID:27373046

  3. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Schwartz, Alan R; Shirahata, Machiko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.-9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  4. The role of completion imaging following carotid artery endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Schneider, Fabrice; Illuminati, Giulio; Samson, Russell H

    2013-05-01

    A variety of completion imaging methods can be used during carotid endarterectomy to recognize technical errors or intrinsic abnormalities such as mural thrombus or platelet aggregation, but none of these methods has achieved wide acceptance, and their ability to improve the outcome of the operation remains a matter of controversy. It is unclear if completion imaging is routinely necessary and which abnormalities require re-exploration. Proponents of routine completion imaging argue that identification of these abnormalities will allow their immediate correction and avoid a perioperative stroke. However, much of the evidence in favor of this argument is incidental, and many experienced vascular surgeons who perform carotid endarterectomy do not use any completion imaging technique and report equally good outcomes using a careful surgical protocol. Furthermore, certain postoperative strokes, including intracerebral hemorrhage and hyperperfusion syndrome, are unrelated to the surgical technique and cannot be prevented by completion imaging. This controversial subject is now open to discussion, and our debaters have been given the task to clarify the evidence to justify their preferred option for completion imaging during carotid endarterectomy.

  5. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  6. Synaptic and paracrine mechanisms at carotid body arterial chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Nurse, Colin A

    2014-08-15

    Mammalian carotid bodies are the main peripheral arterial chemoreceptors, strategically located at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. When stimulated these receptors initiate compensatory respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes to maintain homeostasis. Thus, in response to low oxygen (hypoxia) or increased CO2/H(+) (acid hypercapnia), chemoreceptor type I cells depolarize and release excitatory neurotransmitters, such as ATP, which stimulate postsynaptic P2X2/3 receptors on afferent nerve terminals. The afferent discharge is shaped by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms involving both excitatory and inhibitory neuromodulators such as adenosine, serotonin (5-HT), GABA and dopamine. Recent evidence suggests that paracrine activation of P2Y2 receptors on adjacent glia-like type II cells may help boost the ATP signal via the opening of pannexin-1 channels. The presence of an inhibitory efferent innervation, mediated by release of nitric oxide, provides additional control of the afferent discharge. The broad array of neuromodulators and their receptors appears to endow the carotid body with a remarkable plasticity, most apparent during natural and pathophysiological conditions associated with chronic sustained and intermittent hypoxia.

  7. Time to rethink management strategies in asymptomatic carotid artery disease.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A Ross

    2011-10-11

    Despite level I evidence, no worldwide consensus of opinion exists on how best to manage patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. In this article, I present the evidence supporting intervention in these patients, highlighting a number of 'inconvenient truths' that challenge the current 'one size fits all' approach to treatment. I will demonstrate that, even if one could identify and treat every individual with a 60-99% asymptomatic stenosis, >95% of all strokes will still occur. Evidence shows that 94% of all carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting procedures in asymptomatic patients in the US are ultimately unnecessary, costing health-care providers US$2 billion annually. Evidence also exists that the risk of stroke in patients treated medically is lower than when the asymptomatic trials were recruiting, challenging the appropriateness of basing contemporary guidelines upon historical data. A small cohort of 'high-risk for stroke' patients will undoubtedly benefit from intervention and our goal must be to identify and treat these individuals, rather than continuing with a policy of mass intervention that benefits very few patients in the long term.

  8. The role of completion imaging following carotid artery endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Schneider, Fabrice; Illuminati, Giulio; Samson, Russell H

    2013-05-01

    A variety of completion imaging methods can be used during carotid endarterectomy to recognize technical errors or intrinsic abnormalities such as mural thrombus or platelet aggregation, but none of these methods has achieved wide acceptance, and their ability to improve the outcome of the operation remains a matter of controversy. It is unclear if completion imaging is routinely necessary and which abnormalities require re-exploration. Proponents of routine completion imaging argue that identification of these abnormalities will allow their immediate correction and avoid a perioperative stroke. However, much of the evidence in favor of this argument is incidental, and many experienced vascular surgeons who perform carotid endarterectomy do not use any completion imaging technique and report equally good outcomes using a careful surgical protocol. Furthermore, certain postoperative strokes, including intracerebral hemorrhage and hyperperfusion syndrome, are unrelated to the surgical technique and cannot be prevented by completion imaging. This controversial subject is now open to discussion, and our debaters have been given the task to clarify the evidence to justify their preferred option for completion imaging during carotid endarterectomy. PMID:23601598

  9. Protected carotid artery stenting (PCAS): a short medical technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Bonneux, L; Cleemput, I; Ramaekers, D

    2005-01-01

    After a period of experimenting with angioplasty and stenting, carotid artery stenting under embolic protection (PCAS) is becoming a viable alternative for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). A standard literature review showed that, at January 2005, there was no evidence that PCAS is more effective than CEA. The high costs of stent and protection device makes PCAS then inferior to CEA. PCAS may be the sole possible option in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis unfit for surgery, where the high risk of stroke overrides uncertainty about health effects and overrides cost-effectiveness. These are a few patients per year in Belgium. Several randomised controlled trials comparing PCAS and CEA are now recruiting patients. To have answers on key questions of cost-effectiveness, it is of paramount importance that these trials recruit and publish rapidly. The KCE (Belgian HealthCare Knowledge Center/Centre Fédéral d'Expertise des Soins de Santé/Federaal Kenniscentrum voor de Gezondheidszorg) therefore advises cooperation with these trials. Outside these trials and compassionate use in the few symptomatic patients unfit for CEA, the use of PCAS raises serious ethical questions. PMID:16315822

  10. Pressure Drop in Tortuosity/Kinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Simulation and Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Daming; Hu, Shen; Liu, Jiachun; Zhou, Zhilun; Lu, Jun; Qi, Peng; Song, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whether carotid tortuosity/kinking of the internal carotid artery leads to cerebral ischemia remains unclear. There is very little research about the hemodynamic variation induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking in the literature. The objective of this study was to research the blood pressure changes induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking. Methods. We first created a geometric model of carotid tortuosity/kinking. Based on hemodynamic boundary conditions, the hemodynamics of carotid tortuosity and kinking were studied via a finite element simulation. Then, an in vitro system was built to validate the numerical simulation results. The mean arterial pressure changes before and after carotid kinking were measured using pressure sensors in 12 patients with carotid kinking. Results. Numerical simulation revealed that the pressure drops increased with increases in the kinking angles. Clinical tests and in vitro experiments confirmed the numerical simulation results. Conclusions. Carotid kinking leads to blood pressure reduction. In certain conditions, kinking may affect the cerebral blood supply and be associated with cerebral ischemia. PMID:27195283

  11. Carotid-cardiac baroreflex influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David

    1990-01-01

    Twelve healthy males were tested at low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) with and without artificial stimulation of the carotid-cardiac baroreceptors. The carotid-cardiac baroreceptors were stimulated by applying a pressure of 10 mmHg to the carotid artery via a pressurized neck chamber. During the procedure, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) were measured using a Whitney mercury silastic strain gauge technique. FBF decreased while FVR increased with increased intensity of LBNP. Both FBF and FVR were unaffected by carotid-cardiac baroreceptor stimulation.

  12. Comparative studies on the vascular organization of carotid labyrinths of anurans and caudates.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, T

    1990-04-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the carotid labyrinth in five species of anurans representing four families (Rana nigromaculata, Rana catesbeiana, Bufo japonicus, Hyla arborea, and Xenopus laevis), and three species of caudates representing three families (Cynops pyrrhogaster, Hynobius nebulosus, Ambystoma mexicanum) were compared using vascular corrosion castings and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Anuran carotid labyrinths are spherical in shape and are classified into two groups according to the origin of the external and internal carotid arteries. One group, which included Rana, Hyla, and Bufo, is characterized by the presence of a vascular ring at the proximal end and some vascular routes at the distal end of the labyrinth. The external and internal carotid arteries originate from these structures. The other group, which includes only Xenopus, is characterized by the external carotid artery opening directly from the central chamber or the common carotid artery, and by the internal carotid artery originating from within the vascular maze. The vascular maze is most complex in Xenopus, less so in Rana and Bufo, and simplest in Hyla. The carotid labyrinths in Cynops and Hynobius are oblong in shape. The fundamental organization in salamanders is similar to that in anurans. The vascular maze, however, is much simpler than in Hyla. There is no specialized swelling in Ambystoma mexicanum. The present findings suggest that most amphibian carotid labyrinths have the appropriate architecture for controlling vascular tone.

  13. Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Carotid Artery in an Infant due to Swallowed Fish Bone

    PubMed Central

    Jean Roger, Moulion Tapouh; Marcus, Fokou; Emmanuel, Fongang; Boniface, Moifo; Alain Georges, Juimo

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, particularly in the paediatric population. Only about 30 cases of carotid artery aneurysms in infants have been published until now. This paper reports the case of a giant pseudoaneurysm of the left common carotid artery due to swallowed fish bone by an 8-year-old boy. This pseudoaneurysm was 5.5 cm transverse-diameter and resulted in severe respiratory distress. It was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis with satisfactory outcome after one-year follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest carotid artery pseudoaneurysm ever described in children. PMID:26783485

  14. Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Carotid Artery in an Infant due to Swallowed Fish Bone.

    PubMed

    Jean Roger, Moulion Tapouh; Marcus, Fokou; Emmanuel, Fongang; Boniface, Moifo; Alain Georges, Juimo

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, particularly in the paediatric population. Only about 30 cases of carotid artery aneurysms in infants have been published until now. This paper reports the case of a giant pseudoaneurysm of the left common carotid artery due to swallowed fish bone by an 8-year-old boy. This pseudoaneurysm was 5.5 cm transverse-diameter and resulted in severe respiratory distress. It was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis with satisfactory outcome after one-year follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest carotid artery pseudoaneurysm ever described in children.

  15. The human carotid body releases acetylcholine, ATP and cytokines during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kåhlin, Jessica; Mkrtchian, Souren; Ebberyd, Anette; Hammarstedt-Nordenvall, Lalle; Nordlander, Britt; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Prabhakar, Nanduri; Poellinger, Lorenz; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I

    2014-08-01

    Studies on experimental animals established that the carotid bodies are sensory organs for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and that the ensuing chemosensory reflex is a major regulator of cardiorespiratory functions during hypoxia. However, little information is available on the human carotid body responses to hypoxia. The present study was performed on human carotid bodies obtained from surgical patients undergoing elective head and neck cancer surgery. Our results show that exposing carotid body slices to hypoxia for a period as brief as 5 min markedly facilitates the release of ACh and ATP. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia for 1 h induces an increased release of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that type 1 cells of the human carotid body express an array of cytokine receptors as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ACh and ATP are released from the human carotid body in response to hypoxia, suggesting that these neurotransmitters, as in several experimental animal models, play a role in hypoxic signalling also in the human carotid body. The finding that the human carotid body releases cytokines in response to hypoxia adds to the growing body of information suggesting that the carotid body may play a role in detecting inflammation, providing a link between the immune system and the nervous system.

  16. Age and gender disparities in the risk of carotid revascularization procedures.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Vasdekis, Spyros N; Boviatsis, Efstathios; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos Iota; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2013-10-01

    The potential effect of age and gender stratification in the outcome of patients with carotid artery stenosis undergoing carotid revascularization procedures (CRP) may have important implications in clinical practice. Both European Stroke Organization and American Heart Association guidelines suggest that age and sex should be taken into account when selecting a CRP for an individual patient. We reviewed available literature data through Medline and Embase. Our search was based on the combination of terms: age, gender, sex, carotid artery stenosis, carotid artery stenting (CAS) and carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Postoperative stroke and mortality rates increased with age after any CRP (CEA or CAS), especially in patients aged over 75 years. Older patients with carotid artery stenosis undergoing CAS were found to have a nearly double risk of stroke or death compared with CEA, while CEA was found to benefit more patients aged over 70 years with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Male patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis had lower stroke/mortality rates and benefited more from CEA compared with females. For the periprocedural risk of stroke or death in patients with carotid artery stenosis after CAS no sex differences were found. Therefore, CEA appears to have lower perioperative risks than CAS in patients aged over 70 years, and thus should be the treatment of choice if not contraindicated. The periprocedural risk of CEA is lower in men than in women, while there was no effect of gender on the periprocedural risk of CAS.

  17. Segmentation of the common carotid artery walls based on a frequency implementation of active contours: segmentation of the common carotid artery walls.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Jumilla, M Consuelo; Menchón-Lara, Rosa M; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Sancho-Gómez, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most extended cardiovascular diseases nowadays. Although it may be unnoticed during years, it also may suddenly trigger severe illnesses such as stroke, embolisms or ischemia. Therefore, an early detection of atherosclerosis can prevent adult population from suffering more serious pathologies. The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) has been used as an early and reliable indicator of atherosclerosis for years. The IMT is manually computed from ultrasound images, a process that can be repeated as many times as necessary (over different ultrasound images of the same patient), but also prone to errors. With the aim to reduce the inter-observer variability and the subjectivity of the measurement, a fully automatic computer-based method based on ultrasound image processing and a frequency-domain implementation of active contours is proposed. The images used in this work were obtained with the same ultrasound scanner (Philips iU22 Ultrasound System) but with different spatial resolutions. The proposed solution does not extract only the IMT but also the CCA diameter, which is not as relevant as the IMT to predict future atherosclerosis evolution but it is a statistically interesting piece of information for the doctors to determine the cardiovascular risk. The results of the proposed method have been validated by doctors, and these results are visually and numerically satisfactory when considering the medical measurements as ground truth, with a maximum deviation of only 3.4 pixels (0.0248 mm) for IMT. PMID:22552539

  18. An important clue in the sonographic diagnosis of internal carotid artery agenesis: ipsilateral common carotid artery hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Omer; Yilmaz, Cengiz; Gulek, Bozkurt; Soker, Gokhan; Cikman, Gokalp; Inan, Ibrahim; Demirduzen, Selahaddin

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old female patient, who had been diagnosed with an occlusion of her left internal carotid artery (ICA) following Doppler ultrasonographic (US) and digitally-subtracted angiographic (DSA) examinations performed in an outer healthcare center in order to eliminate the underlying cause of her complaint of amorosis fugax, later applied to our hospital with the same complaint. At Doppler US performed in our hospital's radiology department, her right common carotid artery (CCA) was normal, but her left CCA was hypoplastic. The right internal artery (ICA) was validated as normal. At the left side, however, the ICA was apparent only as a stump and it did not demonstrate a continuity. The diagnosis of ICA agenesis was confirmed by the utilization of Doppler US, CT, and DSA imaging, and it was concluded also that ipsilateral CCA hypoplasia could be evaluated as an important clue to the diagnosis of ICA agenesis. PMID:25097789

  19. Role of Chemoreceptor Activation in Hemodynamic Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Carotid Sinus in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Pedro L; Castania, Jaci A; Dias, Daniel P M; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-09-01

    Electric carotid baroreflex activation has been used to treat patients with resistant hypertension. It is hypothesized that, in conscious rats, combined activation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors afferences attenuates the reflex hypotension. Rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, with unilateral denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors; (2) chemoreceptor denervation group, with bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery; (3) baroreceptor denervation group, with unilateral denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and right carotid chemoreceptors; and (4) carotid bifurcation denervation group, with denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors, plus denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors. Animals were subjected to 4 rounds of electric stimulation (5 V, 1 ms), with 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz applied randomly for 20 s. Electric stimulation caused greater hypotensive responses in the chemoreceptor denervation group than in the control group, at 60 Hz (-37 versus -19 mm Hg) and 90 Hz (-33 versus -19 mm Hg). The baroreceptor denervation group showed hypertensive responses at all frequencies of stimulation. In contrast, the carotid sinus denervation group showed no hemodynamic responses. The control group presented no changes in heart rate, whereas the chemoreceptor denervation group and the baroreceptor denervation group showed bradycardic responses. These data demonstrate that carotid chemoreceptor activation attenuates the reflex hypotension caused by combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. These findings may provide useful insight for clinical studies using baroreflex activation therapy in resistant hypertension and heart failure.

  20. Variable resolution reconstruction for Cartesian data acquired with nonconstant sampling density in phase-encoding direction.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Volker; Bornstedt, Axel; Hombach, Vinzenz

    2008-03-01

    The variable-kernel extent technique is applied for providing local high-resolution images from k-space data sampled on a Cartesian sampling grid with gradually decreasing sampling density in the phase-encoding direction. The approach is based on a variable spatial resolution reconstruction technique providing gradually decreasing resolution in the phase-encoding direction with increasing distance to the image center, while preserving full spatial resolution in a narrow slab centered in spatial domain. Reconstruction is performed by a variable convolution kernel gridding technique. The convolution kernel width is chosen proportional to the k-space sampling spacing to utilize the respective apodization in the image for reduction of the aliasing artifacts. Application of this technique to carotid artery wall imaging shows the potential of the technique for a significant reduction of image acquisition time without sacrificing image quality in the region of the carotid arteries.

  1. Carotid Endarterectomy National Trends Over A Decade: Does gender matter?

    PubMed Central

    Kuy, SreyRam; Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan; Rossi, Peter J; Seabrook, Gary R.; Lewis, Brian D.; Patel, Bhavin; Kuy, SreyReath; Lee, Cheong J.; Subbarayan, Rishi; Brown, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective is to evaluate among hospitalized men and women with carotid disease if there is a difference in timing of in-hospital carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or outcomes of CEA based on gender. Methods Retrospective cross-sectional study utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample Database. All patients from 2000-2009 who underwent carotid endarterectomy during their hospitalization were examined. ICD-9 codes were used to identify patients who underwent CEA during hospitalization, stratify asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, determine time in days from admission to carotid endarterectomy, and examine in-hospital complications including perioperative stroke, cardiac events, and death. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square and t-tests. Linear and logistic regression models were used to evaluate relationships between gender and outcomes. Main outcome measures were time from admission to surgery, in-hospital mortality, complications, mean length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition. Results 221,253 patients underwent CEA during hospitalization. 9.2% had symptomatic carotid disease. Among symptomatic patients, on bivariate analysis women had a longer mean time from admission to surgery (2.8 vs. 2.6 days, p < .001), and a longer length of hospitalization (6.4 vs. 5.9 days, p < .001) than their male counterparts on bivariate analysis. However, there was no difference between men and women in rates of perioperative stroke, cardiac complications, myocardial infarction, or death. Among asymptomatic patients, women had a longer mean time from admission to surgery (0.53 v. 0.48 days, p < .001) and a trend toward increased perioperative stroke (0.6% vs. 0.5%, p=.06); but a lower rate of cardiac complications (1.5% vs. 1.7%, p = .01) and in-hospital mortality (0.26% vs. 0.31%, p = .05). However, on multivariable analysis adjusting for differences in age, elective status, insurance, race, hospital location, hospital region, and hospital teaching

  2. Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenting in Surgically High-Risk Patients Using the Carotid Wallstent Endoprosthesis:Midterm Clinical and Ultrasound Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, Geert Bernaerts, Pauwel; Thijs, Vincent; Daenens, Kim; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Fourneau, Inge; Nevelsteen, Andre

    2003-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and midterm outcome of elective implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) in patients considered to be at high surgical risk. In a prospective study, 54 carotid artery stenoses in 51 patients were stented over a 24-month period. Three patients underwent bilateral carotid artery stenting. Institutional inclusion criteria for invasive treatment of carotid occlusive disease (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) are patients presenting with a 70% or more symptomatic stenosis and those with an 80% or more asymptomatic stenosis having a life-expectancy of more than 1 year. All patients treated by carotid artery stenting were considered at high risk for carotid endarterectomy because of a hostile neck (17 patients-31.5%) or because of severe comorbidities (37 patients-68.5%). No cerebral protection device was used. Of the 54 lesions, 33 (61.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (38.8%) were asymptomatic. Follow-up was performed by physical examination and by duplex ultrasonography at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the procedure. All 54 lesions could be stented successfully without periprocedural stroke. Advert events during follow-up (mean 13.9 {+-} 5.7 months) were non-stroke-related death in 6 patients (11.1%), minor stroke in 4 stented hemispheres(7.4%), transient ipsilateral facial pain in 1 patient (1.8%),infection of the stented surgical patch in 1 patient (1.8%) and asymptomatic in stent restenosis in 4 patients (7.4%). The percutaneous implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) , even without cerebral protection device, appears to be a safe procedure with acceptable clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up results in patients at high surgical risk. But some late adverse events such as ipsilateral recurrence of non-disabling (minor) stroke or in stent restenosis still remain real challenging problems.

  3. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Klooster, R. van 't; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der; Klein, S.; Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  4. Improved correlation between carotid and coronary atherosclerosis SYNTAX score using automated ultrasound carotid bulb plaque IMT measurement.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Nobutaka; Gupta, Ajay; Dey, Nilanjan; Bose, Soumyo; Shafique, Shoaib; Arak, Tadashi; Godia, Elisa Cuadrado; Saba, Luca; Laird, John R; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-05-01

    Described here is a detailed novel pilot study on whether the SYNTAX (Synergy between percutaneous coronary intervention with TAXUS and cardiac surgery) score, a measure of coronary artery disease complexity, could be better predicted with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measures using automated IMT all along the common carotid and bulb plaque compared with manual IMT determined by sonographers. Three hundred seventy consecutive patients who underwent carotid ultrasound and coronary angiography were analyzed. SYNTAX score was determined from coronary angiograms by two experienced interventional cardiologists. Unlike most methods of cIMT measurement commonly used by sonographers, our method involves a computerized automated cIMT measurement all along the carotid artery that includes the bulb region and the region proximal to the bulb (under the class of AtheroEdge systems from AtheroPoint, Roseville, CA, USA). In this study, the correlation between automated cIMT that includes bulb plaque and SYNTAX score was found to be 0.467 (p < 0.0001), compared with 0.391 (p < 0.0001) for the correlation between the sonographer's IMT reading and SYNTAX score. The correlation between the automated cIMT and the sonographer's IMT was 0.882. When compared against the radiologist's manual tracings, automated cIMT system performance had a lumen-intima error of 0.007818 ± 0.0071 mm, media-adventitia error of 0.0179 ± 0.0125 mm and automated cIMT error of 0.0099 ± 0.00988 mm. The precision of automated cIMT against the manual radiologist's reading was 98.86%. This current automated algorithm revealed a significantly stronger correlation between cIMT and coronary SYNTAX score as compared with the sonographer's cIMT measurements with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. We benchmarked our correlation between the automated cIMT that includes bulb plaque and SYNTAX score against a previously published (Ikeda et al. 2013) AtheroEdgeLink (AtheroPoint) correlation between the

  5. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  6. Carotid arterial stiffness and its relationship to exercise intolerance in older patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Kitzman, Dalane W; Herrington, David M; Brubaker, Peter H; Moore, J Brian; Eggebeen, Joel; Haykowsky, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the dominant form of heart failure in the older population. The primary chronic symptom in HFpEF is severe exercise intolerance; however, its pathophysiology and therapy are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that older patients with HFpEF have increased arterial stiffness beyond what occurs with normal aging and that this contributes to their severe exercise intolerance. Sixty-nine patients ≥60 years of age with HFpEF and 62 healthy volunteers (24 young healthy subjects ≤30 years and 38 older healthy subjects ≥60 years old) were examined. Carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using high-resolution ultrasound, and peak exercise oxygen consumption was measured using expired gas analysis. Peak exercise oxygen consumption was severely reduced in the HFpEF patients compared with older healthy subjects (14.1±2.9 versus 19.7±3.7 mL/kg per minute; P<0.001) and in both was reduced compared with young healthy subjects (32.0±7.2 mL/kg per minute; both P<0.001). In HFpEF compared with older healthy subjects, carotid arterial distensibility was reduced (0.97±0.45 versus 1.33±0.55×10(-3) mm Hg(-1); P=0.008) and Young's elastic modulus was increased (1320±884 versus 925±530 kPa; P<0.02). Carotid arterial distensibility was directly (0.28; P=0.02) and Young's elastic modulus was inversely (-0.32; P=0.01) related to peak exercise oxygen consumption. Carotid arterial distensibility is decreased in HFpEF beyond the changes attributed to normal aging and is related to peak exercise oxygen consumption. This supports the hypothesis that increased arterial stiffness contributes to exercise intolerance in HFpEF and is a potential therapeutic target.

  7. Evaluation of the Beta Stiffness Index and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Asian Patients With Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Yang, Hyun Suk; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2015-10-01

    The risk of cardiovascular (CV) events is reportedly elevated in patients with psoriasis. Evaluation of the beta stiffness index (BSI) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) are noninvasive methods of assessing arterial stiffness and subclinical atherosclerosis. We aimed to determine carotid arterial stiffness and cIMT, using high-resolution ultrasonography, in patients with psoriasis compared with controls, and to analyze whether psoriasis is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. A total of 54 consecutive patients with psoriasis and 60 age and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Compared with control participants, patients with psoriasis exhibited a significantly higher BSI (P < .001). The cIMT tended to be higher in patients with psoriasis but statistically not significant (P = .076). BSI was positively correlated with age, systolic blood pressure, disease severity defined according to history of systemic treatment, and traditional CV risk factors. Also, psoriasis was independently associated with BSI. These findings suggest that psoriasis is an independent risk factor for arterial stiffness, and the BSI is an earlier indicator of atherosclerosis than cIMT in these patients.

  8. Completely automated multiresolution edge snapper (CAMES): a new technique for an accurate carotid ultrasound IMT measurement and its validation on a multi-institutional database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Filippo; Loizou, Christos; Zeng, Guang; Pattichis, Costantinos; Pantziaris, Marios; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-03-01

    Since 2005, our research team has been developing automated techniques for carotid artery (CA) wall segmentation and intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement. We developed a snake-based technique (which we named CULEX1,2), a method based on an integrated approach of feature extraction, fitting, and classification (which we named CALEX3), and a watershed transform based algorithm4. Each of the previous methods substantially consisted in two distinct stages: Stage-I - Automatic carotid artery detection. In this step, intelligent procedures were adopted to automatically locate the CA in the image frame. Stage-II - CA wall segmentation and IMT measurement. In this second step, the CA distal (or far) wall is segmented in order to trace the lumen-intima (LI) and media-adventitia (MA) boundaries. The distance between the LI/MA borders is the IMT estimation. The aim of this paper is the description of a novel and completely automated technique for carotid artery segmentation and IMT measurement based on an innovative multi-resolution approach.

  9. High-resolution CT and angiographic evaluation of NexStent wall adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Lukács, Levente; Balázs, György; Dósa, Edit; Bérczi, Viktor; Hüttl, Kálmán

    2009-05-01

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 +/- 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 +/- 8% before the procedure to 15.7 +/- 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation. PMID:19159971

  10. High-Resolution CT and Angiographic Evaluation of NexStent Wall Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Balazs Lukacs, Levente; Balazs, Gyoergy; Dosa, Edit; Berczi, Viktor; Huettl, Kalman

    2009-05-15

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 {+-} 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 {+-} 8% before the procedure to 15.7 {+-} 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation.

  11. Longitudinal displacement of the carotid wall and cardiovascular risk factors: associations with aging, adiposity, blood pressure and periodontal disease independent of cross-sectional distensibility and intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Alibay, Djhianne; Bartold, Mark; Brown, Alex; Durand, Marion; Jamieson, Lisa M; Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; O'Dea, Kerin; Moulin, Philippe; Celermajer, David S; Skilton, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    The recently discovered longitudinal displacement of the common carotid arterial wall (i.e., the motion along the same plane as the blood flow), may be associated with incident cardiovascular events and represents a novel and relevant clinical information. At present, there have only been a few studies that have been conducted to investigate this longitudinal movement. We propose here a method to assess noninvasively the wall bi-dimensional (two-dimensional [2-D], cross-sectional and longitudinal) motion and present an original approach that combines a robust speckle tracking scheme to guidance by minimal path contours segmentation. Our method is well suited to large clinical population studies as it does not necessitate strong imaging prerequisites. The aim of this study is to describe the association between the longitudinal displacement of the carotid arterial wall and cardiovascular risk factors, among which periodontal disease. Some 126 Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease, an emerging risk factor, and 27 healthy age- and sex-matched non-indigenous control subjects had high-resolution ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery. Carotid intima-media thickness and arterial wall 2-D motion were then assessed using our method in ultrasound B-mode sequences. Carotid longitudinal displacement was markedly lower in the periodontal disease group than the control group (geometric mean (IQR): 0.15 mm (0.13) vs. 0.42 mm (0.30), respectively; p < 0.0001), independent of cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and carotid intima-media thickness (p < 0.0001). A multivariable model indicated that the strongest correlates of carotid longitudinal displacement in adults with periodontal disease were age (β-coefficient = -.235, p = .03), waist (β-coefficient = -.357, p = 0.001), and pulse pressure (β-coefficient = .175, p = 0.07), independent of other cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and pulse wave velocity. Carotid

  12. [Extracranial aneurysm of the carotid artery in a 12-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, S; Grotemeyer, D; Heinen, W; Ramp, U; Heusch, A; Sandmann, W

    2006-02-01

    Extracranial aneurysms of the carotid artery in childhood are rare, and we found just nine cases described in the literature within the last 20 years. We report on the clinical appearance, diagnosis, and therapy of a carotid artery aneurysm in a 12-year-old girl and review the literature.

  13. The carotid sinus connections: a WGA-HRP study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Torrealba, F; Claps, A

    1988-07-01

    The neural connections of the carotid sinus were studied by administration of horseradish peroxidase or a lectin conjugate to the adventitia of the carotid sinus of cats. The carotid sinus afferents project exclusively to the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS). Rostral to the obex the projection is mainly ipsilateral with a strong contralateral component caudal to the obex. The carotid sinus projects to several NTS territories that do not receive afferents from the carotid body chemoreceptors; they are: the dorsolateral, the lateral extension of the commissural, the caudal intermediate, the ventrolateral and the gelatinosus subnuclei. In addition the carotid sinus central representation includes territories occupied also by carotid body terminals: dorsal, interstitial, rostral intermediate, medial and the medial part of commissural subnuclei (see previous paper). Labeled cell bodies were found in the petrosal (216 +/- 37, mean +/- S.E.M.) nodose (825 +/- 434) and superior cervical ganglia (3583 +/- 1227) demonstrating the sympathetic efferent innervation of the carotid sinus and a dual sensory innervation via both the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves. PMID:2458165

  14. Spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula: challenges in clinical and radiologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sobin, Lindsay; Jones, Kristin; Tatum, Sherard

    2014-06-01

    We present a 47-year-old female patient with spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula without comorbidities. The symptoms of a carotid-cavernous fistula may be confused with other pathology in the region of the orbit and cavernous sinus such as cavernous sinus thrombosis. Carotid-cavernous fistulas most commonly result from direct injury to the internal carotid artery, as with skull base or surgical trauma, but it can also result from weakness in the arterial wall, as with an aneurysm. Because of the high flow of the internal carotid artery, carotid-cavernous fistulas typically present with rapidly progressive symptoms. The case study presented demonstrates the usefulness of radiologic studies in distinguishing between these similarly presenting disease processes. Clinically, cavernous sinus thrombosis generally presents bilaterally and carotid-cavernous fistula presents unilaterally; however, there are a number of exceptions in the literature. The use of a variety of radiologic and angiographic studies will help differentiate between these pathologies. On magnetic resonance imaging, both pathologies can appear as an enlargement of cavernous sinus. Magnetic resonance angiography sequence can reveal aneurysms communicating with the cavernous sinus, and magnetic resonance venography will define thrombosis within the cavernous sinus. Differentiating between cavernous sinus thrombosis and carotid-cavernous fistula can be clinically difficult, and a team approach including emergency physicians, neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, and otolaryngologists will be called upon to assist in diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis and management can allow for potentially vision and lifesaving interventions. PMID:24656959

  15. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Hallett, John W.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  16. Oculoplethysmography: an adjunct to arteriography in the diagnosis of extracranial carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P; Crain, V; Whitaker, B

    1976-12-01

    A four and a half year study documents that oculoplethysmography, in conjunction with carotid phonoangiography, fulfills the criteria of an effective noninvasive adjunct to arteriography in the diagnosis of extracranial carotid occlusive disease. The risk and expense of unnecessary arteriographic studies can be reduced and accuracy of arteriographic technics and interpretations can be enhanced by routine application of oculoplethysmography.

  17. Acute effects of supramaximal exercise on carotid artery compliance and pulse pressure in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Rossow, Lindy; Fahs, Christopher A; Guerra, Myriam; Jae, Sae Young; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative effects of repeated cycling sprints (Wingate tests) on carotid compliance and blood pressure (BP). Fourteen young, healthy men and women completed this study. Vascular and hemodynamic measurements were taken at rest, 5 min following a first Wingate test, 25 min following the first Wingate test, 5 min following a second Wingate test, and 25 min following the second Wingate test. At each time point, the measurements taken included brachial and carotid pulse pressure (PP), heart rate, carotid artery maximum and minimum diameters, and carotid compliance. Carotid BP was obtained with applanation tonometry. Carotid diameters were obtained using ultrasonography and compliance was calculated from carotid diameters and BP. Carotid and brachial PP increased significantly (P < 0.05) 5 min after each Wingate test and returned to near baseline 25 min after each Wingate test. No cumulative PP effects were seen. A cumulative effect was seen for carotid compliance: 5 min following the second sprint, carotid arterial compliance decreased significantly more than 5 min following the first sprint (P < 0.05). A single cycling sprint reduces carotid artery compliance immediately after exercise. Performance of a second identical cycling sprint further compounds this vascular change, reducing carotid artery compliance beyond levels seen following a single cycling sprint.

  18. Antibodies Against β2-Glycoprotein I Complexed With an Oxidised Lipoprotein Relate to Intima Thickening of Carotid Arteries in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ames, P. R. J.; Alves, J. Delgado; Lopez, L. R.; Gentile, F.; Margarita, A.; Pizzella, L.; Batuca, J.; Scenna, G.; Brancaccio, V.; Matsuura, E.

    2006-01-01

    To explore whether antibodies against β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) complexed to 7-ketocholesteryl-9-carboxynonanoate (oxLig-1) and to oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) relate to paraoxonase activity (PONa) and/or intima media thickness (IMT) of carotid arteries in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). As many as 29 thrombotic patients with PAPS, 10 subjects with idiopathic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) without thrombosis, 17 thrombotic patients with inherited thrombophilia and 23 healthy controls were investigated. The following were measured in all participants: β2GPI−oxLDL complexes, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLig-1, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLDL antibodies (ELISA), PONa, (para-nitrophenol method), IMT of common carotid (CC) artery, carotid bifurcation (B), internal carotid (IC) by high resolution sonography. β2GPI−oxLDL complex was highest in the control group (p < 0.01), whereas, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLig1 and IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLDL were highest in PAPS (p < 0.0001). In healthy controls, β2GPI−oxLDL complexes positively correlated to IMT of the IC (p = 0.007) and negatively to PONa after correction for age (p < 0.03). PONa inversely correlated with age (p = 0.008). In PAPS, IgG anti-2GPI−oxLig-1 independently predicted PONa (p = 0.02) and IMT of B (p = 0.003), CC, (p = 0.03) and of IC (p = 0.04). In PAPS, PONa inversely correlated to the IMT of B, CC and IC (p = 0.01, 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). IgG anti-2GPI−oxLig-1 may be involved in PAPS related atherogenesis via decreased PON activity. PMID:16603439

  19. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking.

  20. A case of congenital agenesis of the common carotid artery associated with an ectopic parathyroid adenoma mimicking a carotid body tumor.

    PubMed

    Malm, Ian-James; Olcott, Clara M; Chan, Jason Y K; Loyo, Myriam; Kim, Young J

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic parathyroid adenomas can be encountered during four gland explorations, but nearly 80% of adenomas are localized with ultrasound and sestamibi imaging. Ectopic adenomas are thought to arise from abnormal migration during development. As a cervical congenital anomaly, common carotid artery agenesis is an extremely rare anomaly characterized by separate origins of the internal and external carotid arteries directly from the aortic arch. Here we present a case of a 75 year old man with primary hyperparathyroidism who was found to have congenital agenesis of the common carotid artery associated with an ectopic parathyroid adenoma within the parapharyngeal space, which mimicked a carotid body tumor based on location and imaging. The successful identification and resection of the ectopic parathyroid adenoma presented here demonstrate the importance of preoperative imaging studies to allow appropriate operative planning as well as the utility of intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay in predicting cure during surgery.

  1. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking. PMID:19875014

  2. LDV arterial pulse signal: Evidence for local generation in the carotid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.; Casacanditella, Luigi; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2016-06-01

    The external blood pressure pulse, recorded on a non-contact basis using the method of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), has been shown to be a rich source of information regarding cardiac and vascular dynamics. Considerable attention has been directed specifically to the pulse from the neck, overlying the carotid artery, which is of special interest because the carotid pulse is highly similar to the central aortic pressure pulse. The findings presented here are consistent with an interpretation of the signal at the neck as originating in the carotid artery. A detailed mapping study involving a 35 point matrix over the right neck disclosed a focal zone of maximal signal amplitude, with a course consistent with the tract of the underlying carotid. Appreciable individual differences in the 22 examinees were disclosed, particularly at lower sites. In addition to confirming a local source for the LDV carotid pulse, the data highlight the importance of accurate targeting considerations.

  3. Revelations about carotid body function through its pathological role in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paton, Julian F R; Ratcliffe, Laura; Hering, Dagmara; Wolf, Jacek; Sobotka, Paul A; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-08-01

    Much recent attention has been given to the carotid body because of its potential role in cardiovascular disease states. One disease, neurogenic hypertension, characterised by excessive sympathetic activity, appears dependent on carotid body activity that may or may not be accompanied by sleep-disordered breathing. Herein, we review recent literature suggesting that the carotid body acquires tonicity in hypertension. We predict that carotid glomectomy will be a powerful way to temper excessive sympathetic discharge in diseases such as hypertension. We propose a model to explain that signalling from the 'hypertensive' carotid body is tonic, and hypothesise that there will be a sub-population of glomus cells that channel separately into reflex pathways controlling sympathetic motor outflows. PMID:23828147

  4. Characterization of the carotid and adjacent anatomy using non-contrast CT for biomechanical model development.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Callie C; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2007-01-01

    The path of the carotid artery and its branches through the neck is characterized through an analysis of non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scans. The distance from the vessel wall of the carotid arteries to the skin and vertebral bodies are recorded from the level of the 2nd cervical vertebrae (C2) to the 6th cervical vertebrae (C6). A total of seven individuals were included in the study. The common carotid artery exhibited the closest average distance to the skin (23.5 +/- 6.9 mm) whereas the internal carotid artery exhibited the closest average distance to the vertebral body (7.36 +/- 3.8 mm, measured to the transverse process). This study provides morphological validation data towards the development of a regional-level finite element model of the neck and may also be used for the design of biomechanical experiments for the study of carotid artery injury.

  5. David M. Hume Memorial Lecture. An overview of the stroke problem in the carotid territory.

    PubMed

    Callow, A D

    1980-08-01

    In a review of 1,000 carotid endarterectomies performed over a 20 year period, there was relief of transient ischemic attacks in approximately 85% of patients, an operative mortality of 1.3%, due almost exclusively to myocardial infarction, and a recurrent stenosis rate of 3.1%. Coexisting cardiac disease constitutes the greatest operative hazard. Continuous electroencephalographic monitoring is a reliable method of detecting inadequate cerebral perfusion during carotid cross clamping and for the selective use of a temporary inlying carotid shunt. An atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid system constitutes a greater risk than elsewhere in the peripheral arterial system and should not be considered an innocent lesion. Prophylactic carotid endarterectomy can be performed with almost no mortality and morbidity. Antiplatelet agents, while useful in reducing the incidence of transient ischemic attacks, do not seem to provide equal protection against stroke and death from stroke.

  6. The natural history of isolated carotid siphon stenosis.

    PubMed

    Borozan, P G; Schuler, J J; LaRosa, M P; Ware, M S; Flanigan, D P

    1984-11-01

    Between August 1978 and July 1983, 93 patients (71 with unilateral and 22 with bilateral isolated carotid siphon stenosis) were identified from a review of 885 consecutive cerebral arteriograms. This yielded 115 cerebral hemispheres at risk. At the time of arteriography, 93 hemispheres were asymptomatic regarding the hemisphere with siphon stenosis (group I), whereas 22 hemispheres in 22 patients had had neurologic events referable to the hemisphere with siphon stenosis (group II). During follow-up (range 1 to 62 months, mean 22.5 months), 64.5% of initially asymptomatic hemispheres remained asymptomatic, 6.5% experienced transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), and 4.3% developed strokes. During the same follow-up period, 63.6% of initially symptomatic hemispheres became asymptomatic, 9.1% had recurrence of TIAs, and 9.1% developed strokes. Sixteen of 71 group I patients (22.5%) and 5 of 22 group II patients (22.7%) died during follow-up. The overall incidence of nonfatal stroke and TIAs was 6.5% and 8.6%, respectively. Myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke accounted for deaths in 6.5% and 4.3% of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of TIA, stroke, or death between group I and group II. The percentage of siphon stenosis in all patients experiencing stroke or TIA (35.4 +/- 14.4%) was not significantly different from that in patients who remained asymptomatic (32.3 +/- 10.6%). Patients with carotid siphon stenosis are at an increased risk of death, stroke, and TIAs compared with the population at large. However, the risk of stroke is less than the risk of stroke in patients with TIAs assumed to be caused by carotid bifurcation disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, M; Thandi, I; Brown, S; Gotto, A; Patsch, W; Boerwinkle, E

    1995-01-01

    From the cohort taking part in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a multicenter investigation of atherosclerosis and its sequelae in women and men ages 45-64 years, a sample of 145 subjects with significant carotid artery atherosclerosis but without clinically recognized coronary heart disease was identified along with 224 group-matched control subjects. The aim of this paper is to measure the association of the apolipoprotein (apo) E polymorphism with the prevalence of significant carotid artery atherosclerotic disease (CAAD) after considering the contribution of established risk factor variables. The first model used a stepwise selection procedure to define a group of significant physical and lifestyle characteristics and a group of significant plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein variables that were predictive of CAAD status in this sample. Those variables selected included age (years), body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), consumption of cigarettes (CigYears; number of cigarettes/d x the number of smoking years), hypertension status, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (mg/dl), total cholesterol (mg/dl), and Lp[a] (micrograms/ml). The second model was built by forcing into the equation an a priori set of demographic, anthropometric, and lipoprotein variables, which were age, BMI, CigYears, hypertensive status, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. In both models, the apo E genotype epsilon 2/3 was related to CAAD status. For both models, the estimated odds ratio of being a CAAD case associated with the apo E genotype epsilon 2/3 was > 2:1. The mechanism of the observed association between the epsilon 2/3 genotype and carotid atherosclerosis is unknown, but it is likely due to the known effects of the E2 isoform in causing delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. PMID:7762561

  8. Introduction of a Rabbit Carotid Artery Model for Sonothrombolysis Research

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, David J.; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an in vivo sonothrombolysis model for stroke research. The rabbit carotid artery has average vessel diameters similar to human M1/M2 segments and allows generation of a thrombotic occlusion using various kinds of thrombus material as well as thrombus placement under visual control. It further allows real-time monitoring of flow and clot mechanics during the sonothrombolysis procedure using high-frequency diagnostic ultrasound. In the present study, the model will be introduced and first results to show feasibility using diagnostic as well as high-intensity focused ultrasound will be presented. PMID:23275798

  9. Wave transmission characteristics and anisotropy of canine carotid arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritz, W. E.; Anliker, M.

    1974-01-01

    A method was developed to generate and record three types of small amplitude waves (pressure, torsion and axial) in the exposed carotid artery of anesthetized dogs. The pressure waves were studied with the aid of miniature pressure transducers; electro-optical tracking units monitored the axial and circumferential surface displacements. Results from 6 dogs are presented in the form of the phase velocities and attenuation of three types of waves. The data demonstrate incompatibility with an isotropic elastic model for the mechanical behavior of the artery. The measured damping appears to be primarily due to the viscoelastic properties of the vessel wall material.

  10. Direct Superficial Temporal Vein Approach for Dural Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Kazekawa, K.; Aikawa, H.; Onizuka, M.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ikou, M.; Kodama, T.; Nii, K.; Nagata, S.; Tanaka, A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We present an alternative endovascular approach to treat dural carotid cavernous fistulae (dural CCF) that drain only into the superior ophthalmic vein. Four cases of cavernous dural AVFs that could not be treated via the inferior petrosal vein were accessed via the direct superficial temporal vein approach through the superior ophthalmic vein. Successful embolization was documented radiographically and clinically in all patients. The trans-superficial temporal vein approach is safe and useful for inaccessible dural CCFs through the inferior petrosal sinus. PMID:20566079

  11. Ultrasonic Imaging of Hemodynamic Force in Carotid Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N.; Homma, K.

    Hemodynamic forces including blood pressure and shear stress affect vulnerable plaque rupture in arteriosclerosis and biochemical activation of endothelium such as NO production. In this study, a method for estimating and imaging shear stress and pressure gradient distributions in blood vessel as the hemodynamic force based on viscosity estimation is presented. Feasibility of this method was investigated by applying to human carotid blood flow. Estimated results of shear stress and pressure gradient distributions coincide with the ideal distributions obtained by numerical simulation and flow-phantom experiment.

  12. Physical and computational fluid dynamics models for the hemodynamics of the artiodactyl carotid rete.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D; Bourke, Jason

    2015-12-01

    In the mammalian order Artiodactyla, the majority of arterial blood entering the intracranial cavity is supplied by a large arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This vascular structure functionally replaces the internal carotid artery. Extensive experimentation has demonstrated that the artiodactyl carotid rete drives one of the most effective selective brain cooling mechanisms among terrestrial vertebrates. Less well understood is the impact that the unique morphology of the carotid rete may have on the hemodynamics of blood flow to the cerebrum. It has been hypothesized that, relative to the tubular internal carotid arteries of most other vertebrates, the highly convoluted morphology of the carotid rete may increase resistance to flow during extreme changes in cerebral blood pressure, essentially protecting the brain by acting as a resistor. We test this hypothesis by employing simple and complex physical models to a 3D surface rendering of the carotid rete of the domestic goat, Capra hircus. First, we modeled the potential for increased resistance across the carotid rete using an electrical circuit analog. The extensive branching of the rete equates to a parallel circuit that is bound in series by single tubular arteries, both upstream and downstream. This method calculated a near-zero increase in resistance across the rete. Because basic equations do not incorporate drag, shear-stress, and turbulence, we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate the impact of these computationally intensive factors on resistance. Ultimately, both simple and complex models demonstrated negligible changes in resistance and blood pressure across the arterial meshwork. We further tested the resistive potential of the carotid rete by simulating blood pressures known to occur in giraffes. Based on these models, we found resistance (and blood pressure mitigation as a whole) to be an unlikely function for the artiodactyl carotid rete.

  13. The Accuracy of Noninvasive Imaging Techniques in Diagnosis of Carotid Plaque Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Lukanova, Detelina Valchkova; Nikolov, Nadelin Krasimirov; Genova, Kameliya Zaharieva; Stankev, Mario Draganov; Georgieva, Elisaveta Valcheva

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The stroke is leading cause of death and severe disability worldwide. Atherosclerosis is responsible for over 30% of all ischemic strokes. It has been recently discovered that plaque morphology may help predict the clinical behavior of carotid atherosclerosis and determine the risk of stroke. The noninvasive imaging techniques have been developed to evaluate the vascular wall in an attempt to identify “vulnerable plaques”. AIM: The purpose is to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification of plaque components associated with plaque vulnerability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred patients were admitted for carotid endarterectomy for high grade carotid stenosis. We defined the diagnostic value of B-mode ultrasound of carotid plaque in a half, and the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the other group, for detection of unstable carotid plaque. The reference standard was histology. RESULTS: Sensitivity of ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is 94%, 83% and 100%, and the specificity is 93%, 73% and 89% for detection of unstable carotid plaque. CONCLUSION: The ultrasound has high accuracy for diagnostics of carotid plaque morphology, magnetic resonance imaging has high potential for tissue differentiation and multidetector computed tomography determines precisely degree of stenosis and presence of ulceration and calcifications. The three noninvasive imaging modalities are complementary for optimal evaluation of the morphology of carotid plaque. This will help to determine the risk of stroke and to decide on the best treatment – carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting. PMID:27275225

  14. Physical and computational fluid dynamics models for the hemodynamics of the artiodactyl carotid rete.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D; Bourke, Jason

    2015-12-01

    In the mammalian order Artiodactyla, the majority of arterial blood entering the intracranial cavity is supplied by a large arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This vascular structure functionally replaces the internal carotid artery. Extensive experimentation has demonstrated that the artiodactyl carotid rete drives one of the most effective selective brain cooling mechanisms among terrestrial vertebrates. Less well understood is the impact that the unique morphology of the carotid rete may have on the hemodynamics of blood flow to the cerebrum. It has been hypothesized that, relative to the tubular internal carotid arteries of most other vertebrates, the highly convoluted morphology of the carotid rete may increase resistance to flow during extreme changes in cerebral blood pressure, essentially protecting the brain by acting as a resistor. We test this hypothesis by employing simple and complex physical models to a 3D surface rendering of the carotid rete of the domestic goat, Capra hircus. First, we modeled the potential for increased resistance across the carotid rete using an electrical circuit analog. The extensive branching of the rete equates to a parallel circuit that is bound in series by single tubular arteries, both upstream and downstream. This method calculated a near-zero increase in resistance across the rete. Because basic equations do not incorporate drag, shear-stress, and turbulence, we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate the impact of these computationally intensive factors on resistance. Ultimately, both simple and complex models demonstrated negligible changes in resistance and blood pressure across the arterial meshwork. We further tested the resistive potential of the carotid rete by simulating blood pressures known to occur in giraffes. Based on these models, we found resistance (and blood pressure mitigation as a whole) to be an unlikely function for the artiodactyl carotid rete. PMID:26403501

  15. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Brajesh K.; Beach, Kirk W.; Roubin, Gary S.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Moore, Wesley S.; Malas, Mahmoud B.; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Burke, J. Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R.; Weaver, Fred A.; Narins, Craig R.; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Meschia, James F.; Bergelin, Robert O.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Methods Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. Findings 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63–1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25–2

  16. Carotid baroreflex response following 30 days exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Eckberg, D. L.; Fritsch, J. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of the carotid-baroreflex response to weightlessness was investigated in human subjects exposed to simulated microgravity (30 days of 6-day head-down bed rest followed by 5 days of recovery). Baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses were elicited by a complex sequence of pressure changes delivered to a neck chamber device. The shape of the sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac response curve was examined for alterations and the occurrence of resetting, as well as for a possible association of the impaired baroreflex function with hypotension during the postexposure orthostatic stress. It was found that the exposure to head-down bed rest caused a significant shift on the R-R interval axis, which paralleled reductions and elevations in baseline HR such that the baseline R-R (operational point) remained in the same position on the response curve. This shift in the location of the reflex relation indicates a significant resetting of the carotid baroreceptors, which may represent an appropriate adaptation which contributes to the maintenance of a constant resting arterial blood pressure before, during, and after bed rest, observed in these study.

  17. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  18. Impedance-based outflow boundary conditions for human carotid haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Malvè, M; Chandra, S; García, A; Mena, A; Martínez, M A; Finol, E A; Doblaré, M

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop structured tree outflow boundary conditions for modelling the human carotid haemodynamics. The model geometry was reconstructed through computerised tomography scan. Unsteady-state computational fluid dynamic analyses were performed under different conditions using a commercial software package ADINA R&D, Inc., (Watertown, MA, USA) in order to assess the impact of the boundary conditions on the flow variables. In particular, the results showed that the peripheral vessels massively impact the pressure while the flow is relatively unaffected. As an example of application of these outflow conditions, an unsteady fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation was carried out and the dependence of the wall shear stress (WSS) on the arterial wall compliance in the carotid bifurcation was studied. In particular, a comparison between FSI and rigid-wall models was conducted. Results showed that the WSS distributions were substantially affected by the diameter variation of the arterial wall. In particular, even similar WSS distributions were found for both cases, and differences in the computed WSS values were also found.

  19. Perivascular carotid inflammation: an unusual case of carotidynia.

    PubMed

    Azar, Lama; Fischer, Harry D

    2012-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a fever and rigors for 2 days. She was on chemotherapy (docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab) for her stage II invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Her physical exam was unremarkable except for the fever. The white blood cells were 21,200/mm(3) with 92% of neutrophils. ESR was 106 mm/h. An extensive infectious workup was negative. On day 6, while still febrile, the patient complained of a left-sided neck pain. She exhibited tenderness over the left carotid artery. A CT scan of the neck without intravenous contrast showed perivascular inflammation of the left common carotid artery, without evidence of a collection, arterial thrombosis, aneurysm, or dissection. The etiology of this finding was possibly chemotherapy related. It dramatically responded to oral prednisone. A repeat CT scan of the neck with IV contrast 2 weeks later showed a remarkable improvement. Drug reactions can simulate systemic inflammatory diseases and should always be considered in the diagnosing process.

  20. Guidelines for noninvasive evaluation of asymptomatic carotid bruits.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P

    1981-01-01

    Basic recommendations for follow-up utilizing OPG/CPA results are as follows: Grade 1: Repeat studies in 12 months in the absence of specific focal TIAs or increase of bifurcation level bruit. Grade 2: Serial studies in 6 to 12 months in the absence of focal TIAs which provide their own indications for evaluation. If stability is established, 12-month interval testing is adequate. Grade 3: Serial studies in 3 to 6 months until a progression trend is established. Anticipation of major surgery with possible hypotension or severe blood loss is an indication for arteriography and possible endarterectomy. Grade 4: If repeat studies confirm grade 4 status, prophylactic carotid arteriography and endarterectomy should be seriously considered. If surgery is not employed, repeat OPG/CPA evaluation at 2 to 4 month intervals detects further progression toward total occlusion. Grade 5: Indications for arteriography in anticipation of surgery are tempered by the lower probability (30%) of a surgically correctable stenosis and the clinical status of the patient. In conclusion, we feel that OPG/CPA represents one valid means of noninvasively evaluating the presence and underlying hemodynamic significance of an asymptomatic bruit with sufficient reliability to justify angiography and prophylactic carotid endarterectomy on the basis of appropriate findings.

  1. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.37±0.26 and 0.007±0.001 min−1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.11±0.13 and 0.003±0.002 min−1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  2. Three-dimensional ultrasound-based texture analysis of the effect of atorvastatin on carotid atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Joseph; Krasinski, Adam; Spence, David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is the major cause of ischemic stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. This is driving the development of image analysis methods to quantitatively evaluate local arterial effects of potential treatments of carotid disease. Here we investigate the use of novel texture analysis tools to detect potential changes in the carotid arteries after statin therapy. Three-dimensional (3D) carotid ultrasound images were acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of 35 subjects (16 treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and 19 treated with placebo) at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. Two-hundred and seventy texture features were extracted from 3D ultrasound carotid artery images. These images previously had their vessel walls (VW) manually segmented. Highly ranked individual texture features were selected and compared to the VW volume (VWV) change using 3 measures: distance between classes, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and accuracy of the classifiers. Six classifiers were used. Using texture feature (L7R7) increases the average accuracy and area under the ROC curve to 74.4% and 0.72 respectively compared to 57.2% and 0.61 using VWV change. Thus, the results demonstrate that texture features are more sensitive in detecting drug effects on the carotid vessel wall than VWV change.

  3. Impaired carotid artery elastic function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    László, Andrea; Pintér, Alexandra; Horváth, Tamás; Kádár, Krisztina; Temesvári, András; Kollai, Márk; Studinger, Péter

    2011-09-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases with abnormal formation of the aorticopulmonary septum are also associated with defective large artery elastogenesis. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that carotid artery elastic function was impaired in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF). The study included 45 Fallot-patients (male:female 27:18; age 21.0 ± 11.8 years) and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy control individuals. Carotid artery diameter, pulsatile distension, and intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured by echotracking device, and carotid blood pressure was determined using applanation tonometry. Carotid artery elasticity was characterized by compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index β, and incremental elastic modulus. All carotid artery elastic parameters showed significant differences between groups. The compliance coefficient was 36%, and the distensibility coefficient was 33% smaller, whereas stiffness index β was 46% and incremental elastic modulus was 40% larger in Fallot-patients. Fallot-patients also had larger carotid artery IMT as compared to that of healthy individuals. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in Fallot-patients suggesting that impaired elastogenesis is a component of the congenital abnormality. Increased large artery stiffness might contribute directly and indirectly (through impairment of baroreflex function) to the higher mortality found in ToF patients.

  4. Tortuous Common Carotid Artery: A Report of Four Cases Observed in Cadaveric Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Koichi; Tsuyoshi, Saga; Tabira, Yoko; Yamaki, Koh-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A tortuous common carotid artery poses a high risk of injury during tracheotomy. Preoperative diagnosis is therefore important to avoid serious complications. We found four cases of tortuous common carotid artery during an anatomical dissection course for students. The first case was a 91-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 2 was a 78-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 3 was an 86-year-old woman who died from bladder cancer and who also had a right tortuous common carotid artery without arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was an 89-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries and a tortuous brachiocephalic artery with severe arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was also examined using computed tomography to evaluate the arteriosclerosis. Computed tomography revealed severe calcification of the vascular wall, which was confirmed in the aortic arch and origins of its branches. In all four cases, the tortuosity was located below the level of the thyroid gland. Based on prior study results indicating that fusion between the carotid sheath and visceral fascia was often evident at the level of the thyroid gland, we speculated that the major region in which tortuosity occurs is at the same level or inferior to the level of the thyroid gland.

  5. Baroreflex activation therapy lowers arterial pressure without apparent stimulation of the carotid bodies.

    PubMed

    Alnima, Teba; Goedhart, Emilie J B M; Seelen, Randy; van der Grinten, Chris P M; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2015-06-01

    Carotid baroreflex activation therapy produces a sustained fall in blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. Because the activation electrodes are implanted at the level of the carotid sinus, it is conceivable that the nearby located carotid body chemoreceptors are stimulated as well. Physiological stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors not only stimulates respiration but also increases sympathetic activity, which may counteract the effects of baroreflex activation. The aim of this exploratory study is to investigate whether there is concomitant carotid chemoreflex activation during baroreflex activation therapy. Fifteen participants with the Rheos system were included in this single-center study. At arrival at the clinic, the device was switched off for 2 hours while patients were at rest. Subsequently, the device was switched on at 6 electric settings of high and low frequencies and amplitudes. Respiration and blood pressure measurements were performed during all device activation settings. Multilevel statistical models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, antihypertensive therapeutic index, sleep apnea, coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate. There was no change in end-tidal carbon dioxide, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, breath duration, and breathing frequency during any of the electric settings with the device. Nevertheless, mean arterial pressure showed a highly significant decrease during electric activation (P<0.001). Carotid baroreflex activation therapy using the Rheos system did not stimulate respiration at several electric device activation energies, which suggests that there is no appreciable coactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors during device therapy.

  6. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. PMID:21336554

  7. Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the rat carotid body by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1992-04-01

    The activity (Vmax) of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; EC 1.14.16.2), the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines, is increased in carotid body, superior cervical ganglion, and the adrenal medulla during hypoxia (i.e., reduced PaO2). The present study was undertaken to determine if the increase in TH activity in these tissues during hypoxia is regulated at the level of TH mRNA. Adult rats were exposed to hypoxia (10% O2) or room air for periods lasting from 1 to 48 h. The carotid bodies, superior cervical ganglia, and adrenals were removed and processed for in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled oligonucleotide probes. The concentration of TH mRNA was increased by hypoxia at all time points in carotid body type I cells, but not in cells of either superior cervical ganglion or adrenal medulla. The increase in TH mRNA in carotid body during hypoxia did not require innervation of the carotid body or intact adrenal glands. In addition, hypercapnia, another physiological stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to induce an increase in TH mRNA in type I cells. Our findings suggest that hypoxia stimulates TH gene expression in the carotid body by a mechanism that is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:1347783

  8. The internal carotid artery does not directly supply the brain in the Monodontidae (order Cetacea).

    PubMed

    Vogl, A W; Fisher, H D

    1981-11-01

    In this paper we describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of the internal carotid artery and demonstrate that this vessel does not directly supply blood to the brain, in the Monodontidae (order Cetacea). Our account is based on gross dissections and perfusion casts of the arterial vasculature in Delphinapterus leucas and Monodon monoceros and on histological material from the latter species. The internal carotid artery originates low in the neck and extends to the carotid rete at the base of the brain. The vessel tapers dramatically along its cervical course and changes from an artery elastic in nature to one more muscular. A single large cervical branch occurs in D. leucas and supplies cerebrally related retia in this region and prevertebral muscles. No cervical branches occur in M. monoceros. In otic regions, the internal carotid artery is small and muscular. A lumen is present; however, a split internal and external elastic lamella and a thickened subendothelial layer are evident. Though patent in the neck and ear, the vessel appears occluded within the carotid canal. At this level, the vessel is characterized by absence of a lumen and by fragmented elastic lamellae. We conclude that the internal carotid artery is anatomically closed at a level just proximal to the carotid rete and hence has no direct involvement with cerebral blood supply in the Monodontidae. Our results confirm other investigators' work on smaller cetacean species. PMID:7299829

  9. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis.

  10. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  11. Trends in the Diagnosis and Outcomes of Traumatic Carotid and Vertebral Artery Dissections among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, Karina; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Stone, David H.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early identification of carotid and vertebral artery dissections has been advocated to reduce stroke among trauma patients. We sought to characterize trends in the diagnosis of traumatic carotid and vertebral artery dissections and association changes in stroke rate among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods Using Medicare claims, we created a cohort of 5,961 beneficiaries admitted with a new traumatic carotid or vertebral artery dissection from 2001 to 2012. We calculated rates of stroke during hospitalization and 90 days of discharge. We calculated rates of carotid imaging using computed tomography-angiography, carotid duplex, and plain angiography index hospitalization. To study concurrent secular trends, we created a secondary cohort of patients admitted after any traumatic injury from 2001 to 2012 and determined rates of stroke and carotid imaging within this cohort. Results From 2001 to 2012, incidence of traumatic carotid dissection increased 72% among Medicare beneficiaries (1.1–1.76 per 100,000 patients; rate ratio [RR], 1.72; 95% CI, 1.6–1.9, P < 0.001). Among patients diagnosed with traumatic carotid or vertebral artery dissections, the combined in-hospital and 90-day stroke rate did not change significantly (4.9% in 2001; 5.2% in 2012; RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.93–1.20; P = 0.094). Likewise, there was little change in mortality (10.3%; RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.95–1.06; P = 0.88). Among all trauma patients, the use of computed tomography angiography has increased 16-fold (2–35 per 100,000 patients; RR, 16.7; 95% CI, 13–19; P < 0.0001). Conclusions Despite increased diagnosis of carotid or vertebral artery dissection, there has been little change in stroke risk among trauma patients. Efforts to more effectively target imaging and treatment for these patients are necessary. PMID:27371360

  12. Compensatory intracranial arterial dilatation in extracranial carotid atherosclerosis: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Gomez-Schneider, Maia; DeRosa, Janet T.; Cheung, Ken; Bagci, Ahmet; Alperin, Noam; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Rundek, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data supporting the association between atherosclerosis and dolichoectasia (DE) in unbiased samples. Aims To test the hypothesis that the association between DE and extracranial carotid atherosclerosis depends on the degree of collateral circulation. Methods The Northern Manhattan Study MRI substudy consists of 1290 participants who remained stroke-free at the time of MRI. Arterial diameters were collected in all participants with available MRA. Dolichoectasia was defined as a head-size adjusted diameter > 2 SD for each artery. Carotid Doppler was used to evaluate for carotid atherosclerosis (carotid plaque, maximum plaque thickness [MCPT] and intima media thickness [cIMT]). Results We included 994 participants with available Doppler and MRA data (mean age 63 years, 60% female). Any DE was reported in 16% of participants, 54% had at least one carotid plaque and the mean cIMT was 0.92 ± 0.09 mm. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, there was no association between markers of carotid atherosclerosis and DE. However, stratifying by collaterals, it was observed that DE was more likely in the anterior and posterior circulations when collaterals were available among participants with carotid atherosclerosis. These associations were confirmed by noting an increment in arterial diameters in the corresponding arteries ipsilateral and contralateral to each carotid as well as in the posterior circulation. Conclusions We did not find an association of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis with DE. However, we found that DE is more frequent when intracranial collaterals are available suggesting a compensatory process that needs further investigation. PMID:25753026

  13. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity: Impact of Different Arterial Path Length Measurements.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yokoi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most established index of arterial stiffness. Yet there is no consensus on the methodology in regard to the arterial path length measurements conducted on the body surface. Currently, it is not known to what extent the differences in the arterial path length measurements affect absolute PWV values. METHODS: Two hundred fifty apparently healthy adults (127 men and 123 women, 19-79 years) were studied. Carotid-femoral PWV was calculated using (1) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites (PWV(car-fem)), (2) the straight distance between suprasternal notch and femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car))), (3) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites minus carotid arterial length (PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car))), and (4) the combined distance from carotid site to the umbilicus and from the umbilicus to femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car))). RESULTS: All the calculated PWV were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.966-0.995). PWV accounting for carotid arterial length were 16-31% lower than PWV(car-fem). PWV(car-fem) value of 12 m/sec corresponded to 8.3 m/sec for PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car)), 10.0 m/sec for PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car)), and 8.9 m/sec for PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car)). CONCLUSION: Different body surface measurements used to estimate arterial path length would produce substantial variations in absolute PWV values.

  14. [Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coiling in a Patient with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion via the Posterior Communicating Artery].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Noriaki; Saitoh, Minoru; Fujita, Atsushi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Background:De novo aneurysms after internal carotid artery(ICA)occlusion occur in the contralateral ICA or anterior communicating artery. Hemodynamic changes with increased blood flow to the contralateral carotid circulation were considered the main factor for the formation of these aneurysms. We report a rare case of ruptured ICA aneurysm associated with ipsilateral ICA occlusion treated with coil embolization via the vertebrobasilar and posterior communicating arteries. Case Presentation:An 82-year-old woman presented with sudden-onset disturbance of consciousness at our outpatient clinic and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. Computed tomography(CT)performed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation revealed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a right ICA aneurysm associated with the ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Considering that the patient showed clinical improvement with the critical care for neurogenic pulmonary edema, the aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery. With this technique, complete obliteration was attained without perioperative complication. Conclusion:Endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery was proven effective as a treatment method for ruptured ICA aneurysms with ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Hemodynamic stress due to increased blood flow in the posterior communicating artery may play an important role in the growth and rupture of ICA aneurysms. PMID:27605482

  15. Paraclinoid aneurysms of the internal carotid artery: hydraulic simulation study on their locations and shape of the carotid siphon.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Nagasawa, S; Kawabata, S; Kawanishi, M; Tada, Y; Ohta, T

    1999-12-01

    Hemodynamics of paraclinoid aneurysms were investigated focusing on the effects of their locations and shape of the carotid siphon. A transparent silicon model of the carotid siphon was constructed and a model aneurysm was attached to the outside of the curvature at three different sites. Glycerol solution was perfused into the model, and the half-life of the dye injected into the aneurysm was calculated as an index of the stagnant flow. Values of half-life changed significantly depending on the aneurysmal location and the siphon angle. When the siphon angle was 0 degree where C2 and C4 segments were parallel to each other, the half-life value was the lowest in the C2-C3 junction aneurysm, highest in the C3 segment aneurysm and intermediate in the C2 segment aneurysm. While the C2-C3 junction aneurysm maintained low values regardless of the angle, the C3 segment aneurysm values decreased and C2 segment aneurysm values increased with increases in the angle. These changes of half-life occur because the point at which the faster moving fluid component strikes the curved wall changes according to the siphon angle. These results are considered useful to determine the surgical indications, treatment modalities and post-surgical management of the aneurysms.

  16. Novel methodology for 3D reconstruction of carotid arteries and plaque characterization based upon magnetic resonance imaging carotid angiography data.

    PubMed

    Sakellarios, Antonis I; Stefanou, Kostas; Siogkas, Panagiotis; Tsakanikas, Vasilis D; Bourantas, Christos V; Athanasiou, Lambros; Exarchos, Themis P; Fotiou, Evangelos; Naka, Katerina K; Papafaklis, Michail I; Patterson, Andrew J; Young, Victoria E L; Gillard, Jonathan H; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we present a novel methodology that allows reliable segmentation of the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for accurate fully automated three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the carotid arteries and semiautomated characterization of plaque type. Our approach uses active contours to detect the luminal borders in the time-of-flight images and the outer vessel wall borders in the T(1)-weighted images. The methodology incorporates the connecting components theory for the automated identification of the bifurcation region and a knowledge-based algorithm for the accurate characterization of the plaque components. The proposed segmentation method was validated in randomly selected MRI frames analyzed offline by two expert observers. The interobserver variability of the method for the lumen and outer vessel wall was -1.60%±6.70% and 0.56%±6.28%, respectively, while the Williams Index for all metrics was close to unity. The methodology implemented to identify the composition of the plaque was also validated in 591 images acquired from 24 patients. The obtained Cohen's k was 0.68 (0.60-0.76) for lipid plaques, while the time needed to process an MRI sequence for 3D reconstruction was only 30 s. The obtained results indicate that the proposed methodology allows reliable and automated detection of the luminal and vessel wall borders and fast and accurate characterization of plaque type in carotid MRI sequences. These features render the currently presented methodology a useful tool in the clinical and research arena.

  17. The use of fibrin and gelatin fixation to repair a kinked internal carotid artery in carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hisashi; Sanada, Yasuhiro; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kato, Amami

    2016-01-01

    Background: The kinking of the internal carotid artery (ICA) after final closure in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is thought to be uncommon. When it occurs, it is mandatory to reconstruct ICA to preserve normal blood flow. We herein present a case in which a fixation technique was applied to repair an ICA that became kinked during CEA. Case Description: A 68-year-old man presented with cerebral infarction due to an artery-to-artery embolism from the right cervical ICA stenosis. CEA was performed 12 days after admission. After final closure, a distal portion of ICA was found to have been kinked following plaque resection in CEA procedure. Fixation with fibrin glue and gelatin was used to reinforce the arterial wall and repair the kink. Postoperative magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the release of the kink in ICA. Conclusion: Fixation with fibrin and gelatin is a salvage armamentarium that can be considered in CEA for the repair of kinked or tortuous ICA. PMID:27308092

  18. Internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongzhou; Li, Liang; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis. A 59-year-old male patient presented with a new infarction in the left basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography showed that the right internal carotid artery disappeared from the origin to the foramen lacerum segment, and there was an anastomotic artery with severe stenosis passed through the floor of the sella and in front of the cavernous sinus. The right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery was absent and A2 segment was supplied by the normal contralateral internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. PMID:27231043

  19. Internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongzhou; Li, Liang; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-07-01

    We report a rare case of internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis. A 59-year-old male patient presented with a new infarction in the left basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography showed that the right internal carotid artery disappeared from the origin to the foramen lacerum segment, and there was an anastomotic artery with severe stenosis passed through the floor of the sella and in front of the cavernous sinus. The right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery was absent and A2 segment was supplied by the normal contralateral internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. PMID:27231043

  20. BILATERAL ANEURYSMS OF THE INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY—Successful Surgical Approach in One Stage

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Robert D.; Schmerl, E. F.; Rhee, James L.

    1959-01-01

    When intracranial aneurysm is suspected, carotid arteriogram should be done not only on the suspected side but always on both sides. Without surgical intervention the prognosis of bilateral aneurysms is notoriously poor. With the aid of hypothermic anesthesia it is now possible to operate on both sides in a single procedure. This was demonstrated in a case in which both carotid arteries were simultaneously occluded twice during the surgical repair of bilateral carotid aneurysms. Occlusion was done once for eight minutes and once for ten minutes, without clinical evidence of brain damage. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13671362

  1. Internal and external carotid artery embolism following facial injection of autologous fat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Autologous fat injection is a common aesthetic procedure for soft-tissue augmentation of the face. Although this procedure is generally regarded as safe, several patients have experienced acute visual loss or cerebral infarction after these injections. We describe a case of internal and external carotid artery fat embolism that occurred following injection of autologous fat into the face. It appeared that the injected fat entered a branch of the left external carotid artery and that the embolus likely migrated into the left internal carotid artery and distally into the left ophthalmic artery, left anterior artery, and middle cerebral artery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: PMID:24936097

  2. Treatment Strategies for Acute Ischemic Stroke Caused by Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yin, Qin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute ischemic stroke caused by internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion usually has a poor prognosis, especially the T occlusion cases without functional collaterals. The efficacy of intravenous (IV) or intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) remains ambiguous in these patients. Eendovascular recanalization of the occluded carotid has been attempted in recent years as a potential strategy. However, the different etiologies of ICA occlusion pose a significant challenge to neurointerventionists. Recently, several endovascular evolvements have been reported in treating carotid occlusion-related stroke. This review summarizes the current status of treatment for acute ICA occlusion.

  3. Acute Hemichorea as an Unusual Presentation of Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Ko, Youngchai; Jang, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Soo Jin; Oh, Gun-Sei; Lee, Soo Joo; Yun, Dong Joo

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary movement associated with deep watershed ischemic lesions has been rarely reported. A 67-year-old woman presented with acute hemichorea on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging showed acute infarcts in the anterior border zone. On perfusion studies, impaired cerebral blood flow was observed on the subcortical region sparing the basal ganglia. Cerebral angiogram confirmed severe stenosis in the right internal carotid artery. Her hemichorea gradually improved along with normalization of perfusion after carotid artery stenting with angioplasty. We suggest that impaired cerebral blood flow in critical watershed territories may be an important contributing factor in hemichorea associated with carotid occlusive disease. PMID:24868420

  4. [Neuroradiologic and surgical treatment of a recurrent angiofibroma supplied by the internal carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Zeumer, H; Elies, W; Brückmann, H; Buchner, H; Adelt, D

    1986-07-01

    If blood supply to the brain hemisphere is disturbed following closure of internal homolateral carotid artery tumors of the skull base with involvement of this artery should not be operated on radically. The authors describe the electrophysiological monitoring of cortical evoked somato-sensory potentials. If there is no alteration of the evoked potentials after preliminary reversible blockade of the internal carotid artery this vessel can be definitely closed using a detachable balloon. Thereafter the whole tumor including the carotid artery can be removed. The authors describe a case of juvenile angiofibroma operated on in this way. The combined interventional-neuroradiological and surgical management widens the range of skull base surgery.

  5. National trends in carotid endarterectomy and stenting in Korea from 2004 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Shin; Joh, Jin Hyun; Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Park, Ho-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Stroke imposes a substantial clinical and socioeconomic burden. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or carotid artery stenting (CAS) are proven procedures in stroke prevention for the lesions of extracranial carotid disease. Although several studies have addressed national trends regarding carotid revascularization in Western countries, limited data is available with respect to the Korean population. The aim of the present study was to identify the national trend in carotid revascularization in Korea over the previous decade. A serial, cross-sectional study was conducted with the use of time trends to analyze patients undergoing carotid revascularization using CEA and CAS between 2004 and 2013. Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service data was used. The present study endeavored to analyze trends in the number of CEA and CAS procedures for the treatment of extracranial carotid disease in Medicare beneficiaries. A linear-by-linear association was performed to determine the changes of carotid revascularization for the aforementioned period. A total of 23,142 patients received carotid revascularization between 2004 and 2013. CEA was performed in 4,012 and CAS in 19,130 patients. The rate of total carotid revascularization per 1,000,000 Medicare beneficiaries substantially increased during the study period from 22 procedures in 2004 to 57 in 2013 (risk ratio (RR), 2.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.58–4.24; P=0.001). CAS increased from 18 procedures in 2004, to 45 in 2013 (RR, 2.50; 95% CI; 1.45–4.32; P=0.001). In addition, the number of CEA procedures performed per 1,000,000 Medicare beneficiaries increased from four procedures in 2004, to 11 in 2013 (RR, 2.75; 95% CI, 0.88–8.64; P=0.08). In conclusion, total carotid revascularization increased by 255% during the previous 10 years in Korea. This increase predominantly resulted from the 249% increase of CAS. The number and population-based rates of carotid revascularization remained low, as compared with Western

  6. An Unusual Case of Laryngeal Paraganglioma in a Patient with Carotid Body Paraganglioma: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Serap; Senol, Serkan; Imamoglu, Hakan; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Ekinci, Afra; Yuce, Imdat; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare conditions. Carotid paragangliomas are most common multiple paragangliomas. Laryngeal paragangliomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumors and usually are seen as symptomatic solitary lesions. We present multimodality imaging findings of incidentally detected laryngeal paraganglioma in a woman with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma and positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of laryngeal and carotid body paragangliomas in a patient with positive family history. Radiologists should keep in mind that paragangliomas may occur in various locations as multiple tumors. PMID:26649218

  7. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  8. HW 03-4 CAROTID BAROREFLEX ACTIVATION THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Alnima, Teba

    2016-09-01

    Electrical carotid baroreflex activation therapy is an emerging device-based treatment for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Its blood pressure lowering effect has been demonstrated in several animal and human studies. In addition, this treatment has showed its prolonged effect over the long-term. The main mechanism of the blood pressure reduction during this therapy is by inhibition of the sympathetic outflow. Yet the question arises whether the inhibition of central sympathetic activity is sufficient to be the sole mechanism behind the sustained reduction in blood pressure. In this lecture, we will present the latest data on the effect of baroreflex activation therapy on blood pressure, the mechanisms of action that account for the persistent blood pressure lowering, the most suitable candidates for this treatment and future developments on the field of baropacing. PMID:27643277

  9. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  10. Statistics over features for internal carotid arterial disorders detection.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to extract the representative features of the internal carotid arterial (ICA) Doppler ultrasound signals and to present the accurate classification model. This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the extracted features (Lyapunov exponents and the power levels of the power spectral density estimates obtained by the eigenvector methods) in order to reduce the dimensionality of the extracted feature vectors. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Mixture of experts (ME) and modified mixture of experts (MME) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of arterial disorders. Three types of ICA Doppler signals (Doppler signals recorded from healthy subjects, subjects having stenosis, and subjects having occlusion) were classified. The classification results confirmed that the proposed ME and MME has potential in detecting the arterial disorders. PMID:18179791

  11. Ultrasonography of the internal carotid artery during therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Sumio; Tanimura, Tomoshige; Iwaki, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Machiko; Suyama, Megumi; Goto, Tomoki; Koide, Wakato; Maki, Kanemasa; Ushijima, Katsumi; Ban, Kyoko

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of mean blood flow velocity (mean V) in the internal carotid artery (ICA) for prediction of outcome in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) exposed to therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Five newborns with HIE who met the criteria for TH were enrolled. Ultrasonography of the right and left ICA was performed before, during, and after TH. Mean V of the sampling point in each ICA was measured. Mean V was suppressed during TH and increased after rewarming in four infants with normal neurological development. In one infant with neurological disability, however, mean V increased during TH and decreased after therapy. In conclusion, cervical ultrasonography for ICA in infants during TH may be useful for the prediction of neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:27460402

  12. Flow-area relationship in internal carotid and vertebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, J R; Castro, M A; Putman, C M; Alperin, N

    2009-01-01

    Subject-specific computational and experimental models of hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms require the specification of physiologic flow conditions. Because patient-specific flow data is not always available, researchers have used “typical” or population average flow rates and waveforms. However, in order to be able to compare the magnitude of hemodynamic variables between different aneurysms or groups of aneurysms (e.g. ruptured vs. unruptured) it is necessary to scale the flow rates to the area of the inflow artery. In this work, a relationship between flow rates and vessel areas is derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance measurements in the internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries of normal subjects. PMID:18460763

  13. Brainstem Hemorrhage Caused by Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fook-How; Shen, Chao-Yu; Liu, Jung-Tung; Li, Cho-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 34-year-old woman presented with a history of persisting headache for years, and a newly developed dizziness, left facial palsy and right hemiparesis two days prior to this admission. Initial computed tomographic angiography of the head demonstrated an area of increased density in the left middle and posterior fossae. Multiple aneurysmally dilated venous ectasias with contrast enhancement at the left pre-pontine cistern causing a massive mass effect to the brainstem were also noted, suggesting a huge vascular abnormality. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an abnormal vascular lesion surrounding the brainstem, which indicated a left direct carotid-cavernous fistula with posterior drainage. As her consciousness deteriorated the next day, a follow-up computed tomography scan was done which revealed a pontine hemorrhage. Subsequently, endovascular closure of the fistula with sacrifice of the left ICA was performed, which successfully eliminated the imaging abnormalities. PMID:25207913

  14. Rare case of bilateral traumatic internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Joanne May; Norton, Joel; Hampton, Timothy; Weeks, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was working in a trench when the wall collapsed in on him, pinning him to the wall. On arrival in the emergency department the patient began reporting of right-sided headache. Neurological examination revealed left-sided reduced sensation with weakness. Whole-body CT scan showed right-sided flail chest and bilateral haemothorax as well as loss of flow and thinning of the distal right internal carotid artery (ICA) and loss of grey white matter differentiation in keeping with traumatic ICA dissection with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarct. He was started on aspirin 300 mg once daily. 3 days postadmission the patient experienced worsening of vision and expressive dysphasia. CT angiogram showed bilateral ICA dissections extending from C2 to the skull base. The patient was managed conservatively in the stroke unit for infarction and was discharged home for follow-up in stroke clinic. PMID:27651410

  15. Carotid body, insulin, and metabolic diseases: unraveling the links

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V.; Sacramento, Joana F.; Guarino, Maria P.; Gonzalez, Constancio; Obeso, Ana; Diogo, Lucilia N.; Monteiro, Emilia C.; Ribeiro, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The carotid bodies (CB) are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2, and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN). CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future. PMID:25400585

  16. Carotid restenosis: should they all be reoperated on?

    PubMed

    Courbier, R; Jausseran, J M; Bergeron, P; Reggi, M; Formichi, M; Mangialardi, N

    1988-01-01

    Restenosis of carotid arteries after endarterectomy is a rare complication; in our series 1.2% (19 patients - 20 recurrences out of 1658 operations - Dec. 1985). It usually occurs early, i.e. in the first months (12 cases) with features of myointimal hyperplasia. Peroperative angiography should be routinely performed to rule out technical errors that might be mistaken for restenosis. At the time of reoperation, 12 patients were symptomatic. The operation consisted of 6 second endarterectomies, 13 saphenous vein grafts and 1 PTFE graft. The postoperative period was uneventful in 14 cases, but in the remaining patients there were 2 transient ischemic attacks, 2 monoplegias and 1 dysphasia (with immediate thrombosis of the bypass in 3 cases). Five patients were lost at follow-up. In the remaining 14 patients, the follow-up period varied between 3 and 84 months (mean: 20 months). Presently 11 carotid arteries are patent. In one case involving a venous patch, the artery is dilated. All 12 of these patients are asymptomatic. One thrombosed bypass is also asymptomatic. The two monoplegias occurred in patients whose bypasses occluded immediately. The recurrence rate varied according to the imaging technique. i.e. pulsed Doppler, B-mode scanning or angiography, used to detect restenosis. Restenosis usually remains asymptomatic even in patients with hemodynamically significant lesions. Restenosis due to myointimal hyperplasia does not carry the risk of embolism and atheromatous stenosis does not have the same prognosis. In our experience immediate and long term results of red are not as good the first endarterectomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3198974

  17. Heterogeneous Impact of ROCK2 on Carotid and Cerebrovascular Function.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T Michael; Kinzenbaw, Dale A; Modrick, Mary L; Reinhardt, Lindsey D; Faraci, Frank M

    2016-09-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) has been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological processes, including regulation of vascular function. ROCK signaling is thought to be a critical contributor to cardiovascular disease, including hypertension and effects of angiotensin II (Ang II). Two isoforms of ROCK (1 and 2) have been identified and are expressed in vascular cells. In this study, we examined the importance of ROCK2 in relation to vessel function using several models and a novel inhibitor of ROCK2. First, incubation of carotid arteries with the direct RhoA activator CN-03 or Ang II impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation by ≈40% to 50% (P<0.05) without altering endothelium-independent relaxation. Both CN-03- and Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction was prevented by Y-27632 (an inhibitor of both ROCK isoforms) or the selective ROCK2 inhibitor SLX-2119. In contrast, SLX-2119 had little effect on contraction of carotid arteries to receptor-mediated agonists (serotonin, phenylephrine, vasopressin, or U46619). Second, in basilar arteries, SLX-2119 inhibited constriction to Ang II by ≈90% without significantly affecting responses to serotonin or KCl. Third, in isolated pressurized brain parenchymal arterioles, SLX-2119 inhibited myogenic tone in a concentration-dependent manner (eg, 1 μmol/L SLX-2119 dilated by 79±4%). Finally, SLX-2119 dilated small pial arterioles in vivo, an effect that was augmented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that ROCK2 has major, but heterogeneous, effects on function of endothelium and vascular muscle. The data support the concept that aberrant ROCK2 signaling may be a key contributor to select aspects of large and small vessel disease, including Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27432870

  18. How Safe is Eptifibatide during Urgent Carotid Artery Stenting?

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Hesham; Vora, Nirav; Edgell, Randall C.; Callison, R. Charles; Al-Khalili, Yasir; Storkan, Michelle; Alshekhlee, Amer

    2013-01-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIB/IIIA inhibitors are occasionally utilized during carotid artery stenting (CAS) in the presence or absence of a visualized intra-operative thrombus. Objective: We assess the hemorrhagic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of eptifibatide during CAS. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on patients with the diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis underwent CAS in a single center. We identified those who received intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively and compared to the rest of the cohort. Hemorrhagic outcomes included intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or groin hematoma that occurred during the hospital stay. Results: In this analysis, 81 patients had CAS during a 3-year span; 16 of those had received 15 mg of intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively. The mean age of the treated and untreated patients was similar (65.6 ± 13.4 versus 65.4 ± 10.2; P = 0.13). One patient (1.2%) in this series had ICH in the perioperative period that occurred in the non-eptifibatide group. Five patients (6.2%) in this series had groin hematoma; only one in the non-eptifibatide group required surgical repair. No mortality was reported and clinical outcomes including discharge modified Rankin scale, NIH stroke scale, as well as discharge destination were similar in both groups. A stratified analysis among those who underwent an urgent CAS showed no significant differences in the risks of hemorrhages or any clinical outcome (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of eptifibatide during CAS is safe. The risk of any hemorrhagic complication is rare in this series; however, a prospective study to validate this observation will be helpful. PMID:23408773

  19. Effects of carotid artery stenting on cognitive function in patients with mild cognitive impairment and carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Wang, Yan Jiang; Yan, Jia Chuan; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Hua Dong

    2013-04-01

    Carotid stenosis is known to be an independent risk factor in the transformation process of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is treated by carotid artery stenting (CAS); however, the effects of CAS on cognitive function are unclear. In this study, 240 patients were prospectively assigned to a CAS or control group according to patient preference and underwent detailed neuropsychological examinations (NPEs) before and 6 months after treatment. Cerebral perfusion was assessed with computed tomography perfusion (CTP). Among the 240 patients included in the study, 208 patients completed NPEs at baseline and 6 months after therapy. The patients in the two groups did not differ with regard to baseline characteristics, educational level, vascular risk factors (VRFs) and NPEs prior to therapy. Significant improvements in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; before, 24.6±1.7 vs. after, 24.8±1.9; P=0.016), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA; before, 23.7±1.7 vs. after, 24.1±2.0; P=0.006), Fuld Object Memory Evaluation (FOME; before, 13.8±2.2 vs. after, 14.0±2.3; P=0.031) and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-digital span (WAIS-DS; before, 6.7±2.1 vs. after, 6.9±2.3; P=0.040) were observed in the CAS group; however, improvements were not observed in the control group. Of the 84 patients in the CAS group who received CTP follow-up, 72 (86%) presented improvements in ipsilateral brain perfusion 6 months after the procedure; however, no improvement was observed in the control group. Close correlations were identified between the change in perfusion and the change in MMSE (r=0.575) and MOCA (r=0.574). CAS improves global cognitive function in patients with carotid stenosis and MCI and the improvement of cognition is closely related to the improvement of cerebral perfusion. PMID:23596467

  20. History of carotid surgery: from ancient greeks to the modern era.

    PubMed

    Tallarita, Tiziano; Gerbino, Maurizio; Gurrieri, Carmelina; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    A relationship between decreased carotid arterial flow and apoplectic manifestations was already suspected by the ancient Greeks. Early attempts at carotid surgery, however, were limited to emergency arterial ligation in patients with neck trauma. Attempts to suture arterial stumps together to restore blood flow paved the way for Carrel's revolutionary idea of reconstructing the resected or injured arterial segment with an interposition vein graft. DeBakey and Eastcott were the first to perform carotid endarterectomy in North America and the United Kingdom, respectively. In 1959, DeBakey proposed a cooperative study to assess the effectiveness of carotid endarterectomy in the treatment and prevention of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The study was officially designated the Joint Study of Extracranial Arterial Occlusion and represented the first trial in the United States in which large numbers of patients were randomly allocated to surgical or nonsurgical therapy.

  1. The expanding indications for virtual histology intravascular ultrasound for plaque analysis prior to carotid stenting.

    PubMed

    Schiro, B J; Wholey, M H

    2008-12-01

    Complications of carotid artery stenting (CAS), including stroke, remain relatively high when compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Current selection criteria for patients undergoing CAS are based predominately on surgical risk related to other comorbidities. Little attention is given to the morphology of the atherosclerotic plaque, although studies have shown that extensive variability exists which confers certain risks for plaque vulnerability. Virtual Histology intravascular ultrasound (VH IVUS) offers a unique method of assessing plaque morphology prior to CAS. Herein, the authors review the concepts of atherosclerotic plaque morphology and discuss the background of VH IVUS and illustrate its use in the carotid system. With selection of the appropriate patient and the appropriate plaque, more favorable outcomes of CAS may be achieved which will solidify its place as a frontline treatment of carotid vascular disease.

  2. Surgical management for retained distal embolic protection device and fractured guidewire after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongxun; Zha, Yuanting; Bo, Liyang; Wirthlin, Douglas J.; Zhang, Qinyi

    2016-01-01

    Entrapment and fracture of carotid angioplasty and stenting hardware is a rare complication of percutaneous stenting procedures. We describe a case of a retained distal filter embolic protection device and guidewire in a 57-year-old male in Beijing, China. After unsuccessful attempts at removal via interventional methods, a second stent was deployed to secure the original hardware in situ, and the patient was discharged. He later experienced guidewire fragmentation in the carotid artery and aortic arch, with subsequent thrombus formation. We report partial removal of the guidewire and stent via carotid artery cutdown and open thoracotomy without complication. When efforts to retrieve stenting hardware are unsuccessful, it is never a suitable choice to leave them within the artery. We advocate for early surgical management of retained materials after unsuccessful carotid artery stenting. Furthermore, improved quality monitoring and assurance programs are needed to prevent such complications in the future. PMID:27316621

  3. The carotid siphon: a scanning electron microscope assessment of its embolic potential.

    PubMed

    Saunders, F W; Shedden, P

    1985-08-01

    The role of the carotid siphon as a source of embolic material has had limited morphological or clinical study. The morphologic data available suggests that the siphon plays only a small role in embolic cerebrovascular disease. Clinical studies, however, suggest that it has a significant ischemic potential. To clarify this apparent discrepancy, we have designed a scanning electron microscope study of the carotid siphon. Eighty percent of the specimens from the carotid bifurcation and 30% of the siphon specimens showed evidence of damaged endothelium with attached red cell and platelet debris. The embolic potential of the siphon is estimated to be between 1/3 to 1/2 that of the carotid bifurcation. This supports the most recent clinical studies.

  4. Posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula: Pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnostic management and proper treatment. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Román-Ramos, María; Fernandez-Solis, José; Martínez-Lara, Ildefonso

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas are an uncommon diseases characterized by abnormal communications between arteries and veins located in the cavernous sinus. According with Barrow´s classification they could be divided in two groups: direct and indirect. The typical symptoms showed by theses pathologies are: pulsating exophthalmos and orbital blow. The present study describes a case of direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula in a 26 years old man. Furthermore, we present the images that we used to make the diagnosis. In this light, we decided to treat this case with endovascular approach after considering several therapeutic options. The aim of the present report is twofold. First, we examine the importance of the proper management of the direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula. Second, we describe this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Carotid cavernous fistulas, pulsating exophthalmos, orbital blow, endovascular approach, Barrow´s classification. PMID:27034767

  5. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation: chances and challenges in the management of treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Jordan, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is associated with excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Electrical carotid sinus stimulators engaging baroreflex afferent activity have been developed for such patients. Indeed, baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term blood pressure control by governing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. The first-generation carotid sinus stimulator applying bilateral bipolar stimulation reduced blood pressure in a controlled clinical trial but nevertheless failed to meet the primary efficacy endpoint. The second-generation device utilizes smaller unilateral unipolar electrodes, thus decreasing invasiveness of the implantation while saving battery. An uncontrolled clinical study suggested improvement in blood pressure with the second-generation device. We hope that these findings as well as preliminary observations suggesting cardiovascular and renal organ protection with electrical carotid sinus stimulation will be confirmed in properly controlled clinical trials. Meanwhile, we should find ways to better identify patients who are most likely to benefit from electrical carotid sinus stimulation.

  6. Congenital oculomotor nerve palsy due to effects of carotid artery agenesis.

    PubMed

    Cherungottil, Lakshmi; Shetty, Shashikant; Vijayalakshmi, Perumalsamy; Dwivedi, Malay Kumar; Srinivasan, Kaliappan Gurusamy; Saravanan, Muniasamy

    2014-10-01

    Isolated carotid artery agenesis is not generally recognized as a cause of congenital oculomotor nerve palsy. We report this rare association in 2 children and examine the underlying mechanism. PMID:25439306

  7. Carotid baroreceptor influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of forearm vasoconstriction induced by low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) provides a measure of the responsiveness of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The validity of this measurement is based on the assumption that this vasoconstriction response is not influenced by unloading of carotid baroreceptors. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreceptor unloading does not alter the degree of forearm vascular resistance during low levels of LBNP, 12 subjects were exposed to -15 and -20 mm Hg LBNP with and without additional artificial (+ 10 mm Hg neck pressure) unloading of the carotid baroreceptors. There was no measurable influence of carotid unloading on forearm vascular resistance at either level of LBNP. It is concluded that forearm vascular resistance measured during cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading is unaffected by carotid baroreceptor unloading within the magnitude encountered during low levels of LBNP.

  8. Selective Expression of Galanin in Neuronal-Like Cells of the Human Carotid Body.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Camillo; Marconi, Guya Diletta; Zara, Susi; Di Tano, Andrea; Porzionato, Andrea; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Cataldi, Amelia; Mazzatenta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The carotid body is a neural-crest-derived organ devoted to respiratory homeostasis through sensing changes in blood oxygen levels. The sensory units are the glomeruli composed of clusters of neuronal-like (type I) cells surrounded by glial-like (type II) cells. During chronic hypoxia, the carotid body shows growth, with increasing neuronal-like cell numbers. We are interested in the signals involved in the mechanisms that underlie such response, because they are not well understood and described. Considering that, in literature, galanin is involved in neurotrophic or neuroprotective role in cell proliferation and is expressed in animal carotid body, we investigated its expression in human. Here, we have shown the expression and localisation of galanin in the human carotid body.

  9. Diagnosis by ultrasound of severe carotid artery disease in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R R; Beasley, M G; Ayoub, A; Deverall, P B; Yates, A K; Gosling, R G

    1980-01-01

    A non-invasive method using continuous wave Doppler shift ultrasound and spectral analysis was used as a screening test for severe carotid artery disease in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations. One hundred and eighty-eight patients were examined before cardiac surgery (91 for ischaemic heart disease, 17 for ischaemic heart disease and valve replacement, 66 for valve replacement alone, and 14 for congenital abnormalities). The mean age of the 108 patients suffering from ischaemic heart disease was 54 years (+/- 8) and that of the 80 patients admitted either for valve replacement alone or for congenital abnormalities was 52 years (+/- 12). Five of the 108 patients suffering from ischaemic heart disease were found to have severe occlusive disease of the internal carotid artery by the ultrasound test, while the test was normal in the other two groups. Patients with severe carotid artery disease proceeded to carotid arteriography and endarterectomy before the planned heart operation. Images PMID:7397042

  10. [Retinal and carotid changes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Baloşeanu, Cristina; Rogoveanu, I; Mocanu, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on 85 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We evaluate the retinal vascular changes using retinal photography and carotid vascular changes, by ultrasounds, occured in this group of patients.

  11. Multimodality management of carotid artery stenosis: reviewing the class-I evidence.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Shearwood

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality in the United States; approximately every three minutes a person will die from a stroke. Extracranial internal carotid artery stenosis (EICAS) accounts for approximately 25% of ischemic strokes, with an incidence as high as 10% in people aged > 80 years. Clinically, EICAS can manifest as a transient ischemic attack, although the vast majority of EICAS patients are asymptomatic. Symptomatic EICAS patients are at high risk for ischemic stroke if left untreated, and previous literature has shown that even patients with asymptomatic EICAS require treatment because the natural history of the disease precipitates an overall mortality rate of 4-7%. The three major treatment modalities for EICAS presently are medical management, carotid endarterectomy and carotid angioplasty with stenting. This review examines the class-I evidence (prospective randomized controlled trials) regarding optimal treatment modalities for management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:18020098

  12. Sepsis progression to multiple organ dysfunction in carotid chemo/baro-denervated rats treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Martin, Aldo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Jorge; Simon, Felipe; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Navarro, Cristina; Cortes, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2015-01-15

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators. Carotid chemo/baro-receptors could play a protective role during sepsis. In anesthetized male rats, we measured cardiorespiratory variables and plasma TNF-α, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and MOD marker levels 90min after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in control (SHAM surgery) and bilateral carotid chemo/baro-denervated (BCN) rats. BCN prior to LPS blunted the tachypneic response and enhanced tachycardia and hypotension. BCN-LPS rats also showed blunted plasma glucocorticoid responses, boosted epinephrine and TNF-α responses, and earlier MOD onset with a lower survival time compared with SHAM-LPS rats. Consequently, the complete absence of carotid chemo/baro-sensory function modified the neural, endocrine and inflammatory responses to sepsis. Thus, carotid chemo/baro-receptors play a protective role in sepsis.

  13. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening.

  14. [Treatment policy in patients with bilateral lesion of internal carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Rudush, V E; Karpovsky, A B; Kudryashov, K A; Baranov, A S; Kalichinin, A E; Lunkov, V G; Terebinov, S V; Falbotsky, N V

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of managing patients presenting with bilateral atherosclerotic lesions of internal carotid arteries (ICA). The problem is currently important enough since the number of patients with multiple symptomatic lesions of carotid arteries grows annually. The authors analysed the outcomes of treatment in two groups of patients with bilateral ICA lesions: Group A patients (n=30) underwent carotid endarterectomies (CEA) sequentially during one hospital stay with a 5-7-day interval; Group B patients (n=40) were subjected to CEA also sequentially but with an interval of 2-3 months. The groups were matched for age, character of lesion and ICA stenosis degree. The operations were performed under local anaesthesia with no use of temporary intraarterial bypasses. All patients were subjected to eversion carotid endarterectomy. It was shown that the complication rate in the groups was virtually similar. Hence, it was proved that performing CEA from the two sides sequentially is possible during one hospital stay.

  15. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm×30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23257942

  16. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2013-11-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm × 30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23299103

  17. Prevalence and frequency of microembolic signals in 105 patients with extracranial carotid artery occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Droste, D.; Dittrich, R.; Kemeny, V.; Schulte-Altedorne..., G.; Ringelstein, E

    1999-01-01

    Besides the established factors "presence of symptoms" and "degree of stenosis", plaque echolucency is considered to be associated with increased risk of stroke in patients with carotid artery disease. An evaluation was carried out as to whether the prevalence and number of microembolic signals (MES) detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were higher in patients with echolucent carotid plaques. One hundred and five patients with carotid artery stenosis from 20%-99% or occlusion underwent clinical investigations, duplex ultrasound of the carotid arteries, and a 1 hour recording from the middle cerebral artery downstream to the carotid artery pathology using the four gate technique. The presence of MES was more frequent and the number greater in symptomatic patients (21 out of 64 patients (33%); mean number of MES in all 64 patients 3.1) than in asymptomatic patients (four out of 41 patients (10%); mean number of MES in all 41 patients 0.3) (p=0.007, and p=0.006, respectively). Echogenicity of the lesions did not affect either number or presence of MES. Positivity for MES and the number of MES increased with increasing degree of stenosis (both p=0.002). Four out of 12 patients with carotid artery occlusion showed MES. No MES could be detected in carotid artery stenosis below 80%. There was a decline in positivity of MES and of the number of MES with the time after the ischaemic event. After 80 days or more after the index event, only one patient showed MES. In conclusion, increasing degree of stenosis and presence of symptoms similarly affect macroembolic and microembolic risk. Thus MES may be a surrogate parameter for risk of stroke. The presence of MES in a few asymptomatic patients suggests that clinically silent circulating microemboli may give additional information on the pending embolic potential of carotid artery stenoses. Echolucency of the plaque was not related to an increased number of MES.

 PMID:10486404

  18. Visceral fat thickness is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jung; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Jwa-Kyung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Visceral fat has been known to associate with atherosclerosis, inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the influence of visceral fat on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients has never been elucidated. We investigated whether visceral fat thickness (VFT) has a predictive role in carotid atherosclerosis determined by carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in PD patients. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 88 prevalent PD patients. BMI and waist circumference (WC) were measured as anthropometric indexes of obesity. VFT and subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) were determined by sonographic measurement of abdominal fat. Carotid atherosclerosis was defined as increased cIMT (>1.0 mm) or presence of plaque. Thirty-two (36.3%) patients had carotid atherosclerosis. Patients with carotid atherosclerosis showed significantly higher VFT, BMI, and WC. In univariate logistic analysis, BMI, WC, and VFT except SFT were significant risk factors of carotid atherosclerosis. However, multivariate analysis revealed VFT was an independent factor associated with carotid atherosclerosis after adjusting for demographic, biochemical parameters, and anthropometric indexes (per 1 mm increase, odds ratio (OR) = 2.294, 95% confidence interval: 1.048-5.021, P = 0.038). When the patients were divided into three groups according to VFT, log high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)) were both higher in the third tertile compared to other tertiles. In conclusion, VFT, not SFT, is independently associated with carotid atherosclerosis in PD patients. Therefore sonographic measurement of VFT could be useful to stratify the risk of cardiovascular disease in PD patients.

  19. O3.01PROGRESSION OF CAROTID INTIMA MEDIA THICKNESS AFTER RADIOTHERAPY: A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilbers, J.; Dorresteijn, L.; Haast, R.; Hoebers, F.; Boogerd, W.; van Werkhoven, E.; Hansen, H.; de Korte, C.; Kappelle, A.; van Dijk, E.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carotid artery vasculopathy is a long-term complication of radiotherapy (RT) of the neck with an increased risk of cerebrovascular events. We investigated the change in carotid Intima Media Thickness (IMT) and the incidence of ischemic stroke in the first 7 years after RT. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre prospective cohort study among patients treated for Head and Neck Cancer (HNC). We assessed carotid Intima Media Thickness at baseline before and after RT with a median follow-up of 7 years. We also assessed cerebrovascular risk factors and incident vascular events. RESULTS: 48 HNC patients underwent IMT measurement at baseline and follow-up (median age 61 years, range 29-87). Mean IMT of the irradiated common carotid arteries was 0.64 mm at baseline and 0.74mm at follow-up (p = 0.002 for change). Mean delta IMT in the irradiated versus non-irradiated common carotid arteries was 0.11 and 0.02 mm (p = 0.03 for difference), respectively. In a subgroup of unilaterally irradiated patients mean change in common carotid IMT from baseline to follow-up was 0.06 mm in the irradiated artery and 0.02 mm in the non-irradiated artery (p = 0.18 for difference). Within a mean follow-up of 3 years after radiotherapy 10 patients had an ischemic event. In these patients mean common carotid IMT increase was 0.08 mm. CONCLUSION: Our study showed an increase in IMT in irradiated carotid arteries in the first 7 years after treatment of HNC, which was significantly larger than in non-irradiated arteries. Patients treated with RT for HNC have a high risk of future stroke. This knowledge needs to be used to improve diagnostic and preventive strategies.

  20. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream.

  1. Microneurographic evidence of sudden sympathetic withdrawal in carotid sinus syncope; treatment with ergotamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.

    1994-01-01

    A proportion of patients with carotid sinus syncope (CSS) remain symptomatic even after pacemaker implantation because of persistence of a vasodepressor component. We report a patient with CSS whose syncopal episodes could be reproduced by carotid sinus massage and were due to profound hypotension associated with sudden sympathetic withdrawal, based on direct measurements of sympathetic nerve traffic. A double-blind trial with inhaled ergotamine provided significant symptomatic relief.

  2. Do not forget the contralateral side: late onset bilateral carotid dissecting aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Velioglu, Murat; Cuce, Ferhat; Saglam, Muzaffer

    2013-07-29

    Internal carotid artery dissection may occur spontaneously or following a blunt or penetrating trauma to the head and/or neck. Bilateral dissections and pseudoaneurysm formations are extremely rare and usually detected simultaneously. In this report, we present a trauma case with bilateral dissecting pseudoaneurysms of the carotid arteries; in whom, the one side was initially occult and then developed during the follow-up of the contralateral side.

  3. Effects of exercise pressor reflex activation on carotid baroreflex function during exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, K. M.; Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Smith, S. A.; Querry, R. G.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    1. This investigation was designed to determine the contribution of the exercise pressor reflex to the resetting of the carotid baroreflex during exercise. 2. Ten subjects performed 3.5 min of static one-legged exercise (20 % maximal voluntary contraction) and 7 min dynamic cycling (20 % maximal oxygen uptake) under two conditions: control (no intervention) and with the application of medical anti-shock (MAS) trousers inflated to 100 mmHg (to activate the exercise pressor reflex). Carotid baroreflex function was determined at rest and during exercise using a rapid neck pressure/neck suction technique. 3. During exercise, the application of MAS trousers (MAS condition) increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma noradrenaline concentration (dynamic exercise only) and perceived exertion (dynamic exercise only) when compared to control (P < 0.05). No effect of the MAS condition was evident at rest. The MAS condition had no effect on heart rate (HR), plasma lactate and adrenaline concentrations or oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise. The carotid baroreflex stimulus-response curve was reset upward on the response arm and rightward to a higher operating pressure by control exercise without alterations in gain. Activation of the exercise pressor reflex by MAS trousers further reset carotid baroreflex control of MAP, as indicated by the upward and rightward relocation of the curve. However, carotid baroreflex control of HR was only shifted rightward to higher operating pressures by MAS trousers. The sensitivity of the carotid baroreflex was unaltered by exercise pressor reflex activation. 4. These findings suggest that during dynamic and static exercise the exercise pressor reflex is capable of actively resetting carotid baroreflex control of mean arterial pressure; however, it would appear only to modulate carotid baroreflex control of heart rate.

  4. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  5. Association of parity with carotid diameter and distensibility: multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Dhananjay; Bennett, Wendy L; Sibley, Christopher T; Polak, Joseph F; Herrington, David M; Ouyang, Pamela

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy and childbirth are associated with hemodynamic changes and vascular remodeling. It is not known whether parity is associated with later adverse vascular properties such as larger arterial diameter, wall thickness, and lower distensibility. We used baseline data from 3283 women free of cardiovascular disease aged 45 to 84 years enrolled in the population-based Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants self-reported parity status. Ultrasound-derived carotid artery lumen diameters and brachial artery blood pressures were measured at peak-systole and end-diastole. Common carotid intima-media thickness was also measured. Regression models to determine the association of carotid distensibility coefficient, lumen diameter, and carotid intima-media thickness with parity were adjusted for age, race, height, weight, diabetes mellitus, current smoking, blood pressure medication use, and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The prevalence of nulliparity was 18%. In adjusted models, carotid distensibility coefficient was 0.09×10−5 Pa−1 lower (P=0.009) in parous versus nulliparous women. Among parous women, there was a nonlinear association with the greatest carotid distensibility coefficient seen in women with 2 live births and significantly lower distensibility seen in primiparas (P=0.04) or with higher parity >2 (P=0.005). No such pattern of association with parity was found for lumen diameter or carotid intima-media thickness. Parity is associated with lower carotid artery distensibility, suggesting arterial remodeling that lasts beyond childbirth. These long-term effects on the vasculature may explain the association of parity with cardiovascular events later in life.

  6. Carotid intimal-medial thickness and stiffness are not affected by hypercholesterolemia in uncomplicated essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saba, P S; Roman, M J; Longhini, C; Scorzoni, D; Pini, R; Devereux, R B; Ganau, A

    1999-11-01

    The combined effects of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia on carotid anatomy and stiffness were studied in 62 normotensives, 141 uncomplicated essential hypertensives with a total cholesterol level <240 mg/dL, and 60 essential hypertensives with a total cholesterol level >/=240 mg/dL. Carotid ultrasonography was performed to evaluate intimal-medial thickness (IMT), relative wall thickness, and the presence of plaque. Carotid pressure waveforms were recorded by applanation tonometry to measure carotid stiffness (beta) and pressure wave reflection (ie, augmentation index). After adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking habit by analysis of covariance, no significant differences were found between normocholesterolemic hypertensives and hypercholesterolemic hypertensives in terms of IMT (0.79+/-0.19 versus 0.81+/-0.19 mm), relative wall thickness (0.27+/-0.07 versus 0.28+/-0.07), carotid stiffness (6.1+/-3.2 versus 5.6+/-2.7), augmentation index (18. 7+/-12.9% versus 17.3+/-12.8%), and prevalence of plaque (30.8% versus 30.7%). In the whole population, carotid IMT was significantly related to age (r=0.43), systolic (r=0.35) and diastolic (r=0.35) blood pressures, body surface area (r=0.22), and cholesterol levels (r=0.22) (all P<0.05). Carotid stiffness was significantly related to age, blood pressure, body mass index, and body surface area but not to cholesterol levels. In multivariate analyses, age, body surface area, and systolic blood pressure, but not cholesterol, smoking habit, or sex, were independent correlates of IMT (multiple R=0.54, P<0.0001), whereas carotid stiffness was independently associated with age, body surface area, and sex (R=0. 38, P<0.0001). In conclusion, hypertension is a potent stimulus of vascular hypertrophy. The superimposition of hypercholesterolemia does not substantially augment these changes or further increase arterial stiffness in uncomplicated hypertensive subjects.

  7. Carotid stenosis evaluation by 64-slice CTA: comparison of NASCET, ECST and CC grading methods.

    PubMed

    Kılıçkap, Gülsüm; Ergun, Elif; Başbay, Elif; Koşar, Pınar; Kosar, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    Purpose is to evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver variability of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET), European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and Common Carotid (CC) methods, which are used to measure the degree of ICA stenosis, using 64-slice CT angiography and to compare the measurements made by these three methods. 88 cases (111 carotid arteries) were included in the study. Carotid CTA was performed by a 64 slice scanner (Toshiba, Aqullion 64).Two radiologists measured the degree of carotid stenosis by using NASCET, ECST and CC methods. Intraobserver and interobserver variability of each method was determined by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots and kappa and linear weighted kappa statistics. The relation between the measurements was assessed by correlation coefficient (with linear and quadratic methods). Correlation coefficients showed that there is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods. The degree of stenosis measured with the NASCET method had the lowest value, while the corresponding values measured with the ECST and CC methods were close to each other. ICC and Bland-Altman plots showed high intra and inter observer agreement for NASCET, ECST and CC methods whereas kappa statistics showed moderate to substantial agreement. CC method had slightly higher agreement when compared with the other two methods. Intra and interobserver agreement is high for NASCET, ECST and CC methods however CC method has a slightly higher reproducibility. There is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods.

  8. Markers of inflammation associated with plaque progression and instability in patients with carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ammirati, Enrico; Moroni, Francesco; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Magnoni, Marco; Camici, Paolo G

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the focal expression of a systemic disease affecting medium- and large-sized arteries, in which traditional cardiovascular risk factor and immune factors play a key role. It is well accepted that circulating biomarkers, including C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, reliably predict major cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction or death. However, the relevance of biomarkers of systemic inflammation to atherosclerosis progression in the carotid artery is less established. The large majority of clinical studies focused on the association between biomarkers and subclinical atherosclerosis, that is, carotid intima-media thickening (cIMT), which represents an earlier stage of the disease. The aim of this work is to review inflammatory biomarkers that were associated with a higher atherosclerotic burden, a faster disease progression, and features of plaque instability, such as inflammation or neovascularization, in patients with carotid atherosclerotic plaque, which represents an advanced stage of disease compared with cIMT. The association of biomarkers with the occurrence of cerebrovascular events, secondary to carotid plaque rupture, will also be presented. Currently, the degree of carotid artery stenosis is used to predict the risk of future cerebrovascular events in patients affected by carotid atherosclerosis. However, this strategy appears suboptimal. The identification of suitable biomarkers could provide a useful adjunctive criterion to ensure better risk stratification and optimize management. PMID:25960621

  9. Neonatal Maternal Separation Augments Carotid Body Response to Hypoxia in Adult Males but Not Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soliz, Jorge; Tam, Rose; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to adverse experiences disrupts brain development, including the brainstem network that regulates breathing. At adulthood, rats previously subjected to stress (in the form of neonatal maternal separation; NMS) display features reported in patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing, including an increased hypoxic ventilatory response and hypertension. This effect is also sex-specific (males only). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that NMS augments the carotid body's O2-chemosensitivity. Using an isolated and perfused ex vivo carotid body preparation from adult rats we compared carotid sinus nerve (CSN) responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in carotid bodies harvested from adult rats that either experienced control conditions (no experimental manipulation) or were subjected to NMS (3 h/day from postnatal days 3 to 12). In males, the CSN response to hypoxia measured in preparations from NMS males was 1.5 fold higher than controls. In control rats, the female's response was similar to that of males; however, the increase in CSN activity measured in NMS females was 3.0 times lower than controls. The CSN response to hypercapnia was not influenced by stress or sex. We conclude that NMS is sufficient to have persistent and sex-specific effects on the carotid body's response to hypoxia. Because NMS also has sex-specific effects on the neuroendocrine response to stress, we propose that carotid body function is influenced by stress hormones. This, in turn, leads to a predisposition toward cardio-respiratory disorders. PMID:27729873

  10. Evidence for a carotid body homolog in the lizard Tupinambis merianae.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michelle N; Brink, Deidre L; Milsom, William K

    2015-01-15

    The homolog to the mammalian carotid body has not yet been identified in lizards. Observational studies and evolutionary history provide indirect evidence for the existence of a chemoreceptor population at the first major bifurcation of the common carotid artery in lizards, but a chemoreceptive role for this area has not yet been definitively demonstrated. We explored this possibility by measuring changes in cardiorespiratory variables in response to focal arterial injections of the hypoxia mimic sodium cyanide (NaCN) into the carotid artery of 12 unanesthetized specimens of Tupinambis merianae. These injections elicited increases in heart rate (f(H); 101±35% increase) and respiratory rate (f(R); 620±119% increase), but not mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). These responses were eliminated by vagal denervation. Similar responses were elicited by injections of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) but not norepinephrine. Heart rate and respiratory rate increases in response to NaCN could be blocked or reduced by antagonists to ACh (atropine) and/or 5-HT (methysergide). Finally, using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate the presence of putative chemoreceptive cells immunopositive for the cholinergic cell marker vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT) and 5-HT on internal lattice-like structures at the carotid bifurcation. These results provide evidence in lizards for the existence of dispersed chemoreceptor cells at the first carotid bifurcation in the central cardiovascular area that have similar properties to known carotid body homologs, adding to the picture of chemoreceptor evolution in vertebrates.

  11. Carotid chemoreceptors do not mediate hypoxic-induced gasping and autoresuscitation in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Lun, Rongzhi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fewell, James E

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out on 48, 5-6-day-old rat pups to investigate the influence of carotid denervation on their time to last gasp during a single period of hypoxia, and on their ability to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic challenge. One group of pups was studied with intact carotid chemoreceptors and one group was studied following surgical denervation of the carotid chemoreceptors. Carotid denervation eliminated the early tachypneic phase during exposure to hypoxia and delayed the time to arousal/excitement but did not alter the time to primary apnea, the time to last gasp or the total number of gasps during exposure to a single period of unrelenting hypoxia. Furthermore, carotid denervation did not alter the number of successful autoresuscitations from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic exposure. Thus, the carotid chemoreceptors are not essential for the initiation or maintenance of gasping nor are they are integral to gasping effecting successful autoresuscitation from hypoxic-induced apnea in newborn rats. PMID:25907031

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Associated with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Tanabe, T.; Muraoka, K.; Terada, K.; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cases of aneurysm associated with the occlusion of both common carotid arteries are very rare. We present a case of ruptured aneurysms of the basilar bifurcation and posterior cerebral artery coexisting with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, successfully treated by endovascular coil embolization with a double-balloon remodeling technique. Finally, we review the literature. A 62-year-old woman presented with severe headache; a computed tomography scan demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed that the bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded. The muscle branches of the vertebral arteries had anastomosed to the bilateral external carotid arteries. Bilateral posterior communicating arteries had developed and supplied the bilateral internal carotid arteries. Two aneurysms (a saccular aneurysm of the P1 portion of the left posterior cerebral artery and a wide-necked aneurysm of the basilar bifurcation) were also observed. Endovascular embolization of the aneurysms was successfully performed using a double-balloon remodeling technique. The patient made a full recovery after treatment, and the aneurysms remained obliterated 12 months after embolization. We believe that this is the first report of ruptured aneurysms associated with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion successfully treated by endovascular coiling. The double-balloon remodeling technique was useful for treatment of wide-necked basilar bifurcation aneurysm. PMID:20557745

  13. Mitral and aortic valve sclerosis/calcification and carotid atherosclerosis: results from 1065 patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Faggiano, Pompilio; Amado, Alexandra E; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Bonapace, Stefano; Franceschini, Lorenzo; Dini, Frank L; Ghio, Stefano; Agricola, Eustachio; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-11-01

    This study assesses whether aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) and mitral annulus calcification (MAC) are associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1065 patients underwent both echocardiography and carotid artery ultrasound scanning. AVS and MAC were defined as focal areas of increased echogenicity and thickening of the aortic leaflets or mitral valve annulus. Carotid artery atherosclerosis was defined as presence/absence of any atherosclerotic plaque or presence/absence of plaque >50 %. Of 1065 patients (65 ± 9 years; 38 % female) who comprised the study population, 642 (60 %) had at least one atherosclerotic plaque. AVS, but not mitral valve sclerosis; was associated with the presence of carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.9; P = 0.005) and the degree of carotid atherosclerosis (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.9; P = 0.01) in a multivariate model including age, gender, previous ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes, family cardiovascular history, left ventricular size, mass, and ejection fraction, and left atrial size. AVS is a significant predictor of carotid atherosclerosis, independently of other cardiovascular clinical and echocardiographic risk factors.

  14. Automatic active contour-based segmentation and classification of carotid artery ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Asmatullah; Hassan, Mehdi; Khan, Asifullah; Kim, Jin Young

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present automatic image segmentation and classification technique for carotid artery ultrasound images based on active contour approach. For early detection of the plaque in carotid artery to avoid serious brain strokes, active contour-based techniques have been applied successfully to segment out the carotid artery ultrasound images. Further, ultrasound images might be affected due to rotation, scaling, or translational factors during acquisition process. Keeping in view these facts, image alignment is used as a preprocessing step to align the carotid artery ultrasound images. In our experimental study, we exploit intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement to detect the presence of plaque in the artery. Support vector machine (SVM) classification is employed using these segmented images to distinguish the normal and diseased artery images. IMT measurement is used to form the feature vector. Our proposed approach segments the carotid artery images in an automatic way and further classifies them using SVM. Experimental results show the learning capability of SVM classifier and validate the usefulness of our proposed approach. Further, the proposed approach needs minimum interaction from a user for an early detection of plaque in carotid artery. Regarding the usefulness of the proposed approach in healthcare, it can be effectively used in remote areas as a preliminary clinical step even in the absence of highly skilled radiologists.

  15. Combining carotid endarterectomy with off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery is safe and effective

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Arun; Bansal, Atma Ram; Singh, Dilip; Mishra, Manisha; Sharma, Pooja; Kasliwal, Ravi Ratan; Trehan, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Background: We, as neurologists, are frequently consulted to give neurological clearance for surgery in patients who are undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and have suffered from stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in past. Similarly clearance is also sought in another group of patients who, though have not suffered from stroke or TIA, but found to have significant carotid stenosis on routine screening prior to surgery. Cardiac surgeons and anesthetists want to know the risk of perioperative stroke in such patients and should carotid endarterectomy (CEA) be done along with CABG. In absence of any clear-cut guideline, neurologists often fail to give any specific recommendation. Aim: To find out safety and efficacy of synchronous CEA in patients undergoing CABG. Design: Retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Out of 3,700 patients who underwent CABG, 150 were found to have severe carotid stenosis of >70%. Out of this, 46 patients with >80% stenosis (three symptomatic and 43 asymptomatic) and one patient with >70% symptomatic carotid stenosis (TIA within last 2 weeks) were taken for simultaneous CEA along with CABG. These three symptomatic carotid patients had suffered from stroke within last 6 months. Results: One patient with asymptomatic near total occlusion of carotid artery suffered from hyperperfusion syndrome. None suffered from ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or death during perioperative period. Conclusion: Combining CEA along with CABG is a safe and effective procedure. PMID:26713014

  16. Carotid chemoreceptors do not mediate hypoxic-induced gasping and autoresuscitation in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Lun, Rongzhi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fewell, James E

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out on 48, 5-6-day-old rat pups to investigate the influence of carotid denervation on their time to last gasp during a single period of hypoxia, and on their ability to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic challenge. One group of pups was studied with intact carotid chemoreceptors and one group was studied following surgical denervation of the carotid chemoreceptors. Carotid denervation eliminated the early tachypneic phase during exposure to hypoxia and delayed the time to arousal/excitement but did not alter the time to primary apnea, the time to last gasp or the total number of gasps during exposure to a single period of unrelenting hypoxia. Furthermore, carotid denervation did not alter the number of successful autoresuscitations from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic exposure. Thus, the carotid chemoreceptors are not essential for the initiation or maintenance of gasping nor are they are integral to gasping effecting successful autoresuscitation from hypoxic-induced apnea in newborn rats.

  17. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  18. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  19. Automatic segmentation of the lumen of the carotid artery in ultrasound B-mode images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, André M. F.; Tavares, Jão. Manuel R. S.; Sousa, Luísa; Santos, Rosa; Castro, Pedro; Azevedo, Elsa

    2013-02-01

    A new algorithm is proposed for the segmentation of the lumen and bifurcation boundaries of the carotid artery in B-mode ultrasound images. It uses the hipoechogenic characteristics of the lumen for the identification of the carotid boundaries and the echogenic characteristics for the identification of the bifurcation boundaries. The image to be segmented is processed with the application of an anisotropic diffusion filter for speckle removal and morphologic operators are employed in the detection of the artery. The obtained information is then used in the definition of two initial contours, one corresponding to the lumen and the other to the bifurcation boundaries, for the posterior application of the Chan-vese level set segmentation model. A set of longitudinal B-mode images of the common carotid artery (CCA) was acquired with a GE Healthcare Vivid-e ultrasound system (GE Healthcare, United Kingdom). All the acquired images include a part of the CCA and of the bifurcation that separates the CCA into the internal and external carotid arteries. In order to achieve the uppermost robustness in the imaging acquisition process, i.e., images with high contrast and low speckle noise, the scanner was adjusted differently for each acquisition and according to the medical exam. The obtained results prove that we were able to successfully apply a carotid segmentation technique based on cervical ultrasonography. The main advantage of the new segmentation method relies on the automatic identification of the carotid lumen, overcoming the limitations of the traditional methods.

  20. Perioperative and Long-term Outcomes of Carotid Endarterectomy for Japanese Asymptomatic Cervical Carotid Artery Stenosis: A Single Institution Study.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Taichi; Yoneyama, Taku; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Koji; Kawashima, Akitsugu; Kawamata, Takakazu; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    As the recently developed medical treatments for asymptomatic cervical carotid artery stenosis (ACCAS) have shown excellent stroke prevention, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) should be carried out for more selected patients and with lower complication rates and better long-term outcomes. We have performed CEA for Japanese ACCAS patients with a uniform surgical technique and strict perioperative management. In this study, we retrospectively investigated the perioperative complications and long-term outcomes of our CEA series. A total of 147 CEAs were carried out in 139 Japanese ACCAS patients. All patients were routinely checked for their cardiac function and high risk coronary lesions were preferentially treated before CEA. All CEAs were performed under general anesthesia using a shunt system. The postoperative cerebral blood flow was routinely measured under continued sedation to prevent postoperative hyperperfusion. The 30-day perioperative morbidity rate was 2.04%, including a perioperative stroke rate of 0.68%. There were no perioperative deaths. With regard to the long-term outcomes of the 134 followed-up patients, 9 patients were dead and 5 patients suffered from strokes, including 2 patients with ipsilateral hemispheric ischemia. The annual rates of death, all stroke and ipsilateral ischemic stroke were 1.15%, 0.64%, and 0.25%, respectively. These results showed that the perioperative morbidity and mortality rates of our CEAs were lower than those in the previous large trials. Furthermore, the long-term outcomes of this series were favorable to those reported in the latest medical treatment trials for ACCAS patients. CEA may be useful for preventing ischemic stroke in Japanese ACCAS patients. PMID:26458845

  1. Perioperative and Long-term Outcomes of Carotid Endarterectomy for Japanese Asymptomatic Cervical Carotid Artery Stenosis: A Single Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    ISHIGURO, Taichi; YONEYAMA, Taku; ISHIKAWA, Tatsuya; YAMAGUCHI, Koji; KAWASHIMA, Akitsugu; KAWAMATA, Takakazu; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    As the recently developed medical treatments for asymptomatic cervical carotid artery stenosis (ACCAS) have shown excellent stroke prevention, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) should be carried out for more selected patients and with lower complication rates and better long-term outcomes. We have performed CEA for Japanese ACCAS patients with a uniform surgical technique and strict perioperative management. In this study, we retrospectively investigated the perioperative complications and long-term outcomes of our CEA series. A total of 147 CEAs were carried out in 139 Japanese ACCAS patients. All patients were routinely checked for their cardiac function and high risk coronary lesions were preferentially treated before CEA. All CEAs were performed under general anesthesia using a shunt system. The postoperative cerebral blood flow was routinely measured under continued sedation to prevent postoperative hyperperfusion. The 30-day perioperative morbidity rate was 2.04%, including a perioperative stroke rate of 0.68%. There were no perioperative deaths. With regard to the long-term outcomes of the 134 followed-up patients, 9 patients were dead and 5 patients suffered from strokes, including 2 patients with ipsilateral hemispheric ischemia. The annual rates of death, all stroke and ipsilateral ischemic stroke were 1.15%, 0.64%, and 0.25%, respectively. These results showed that the perioperative morbidity and mortality rates of our CEAs were lower than those in the previous large trials. Furthermore, the long-term outcomes of this series were favorable to those reported in the latest medical treatment trials for ACCAS patients. CEA may be useful for preventing ischemic stroke in Japanese ACCAS patients. PMID:26458845

  2. The Effects of Rituximab on Lipids, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine lipid profiles, arterial stiffness (AS), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), in 55 women with RA without overt cardiovascular disease (СVD) treated with rituximab (RTX).The following parameters were recorded before and 24 weeks after RTX therapy (2 infusions of 500 or 1,000 mg RTX intravenously, fortnightly): plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, DAS 28-ESR, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), RF IgM, AS (SI - stiffness index, RI – reflection index) by digital volume pulse contour analysis (Micro Medical, UK), and common cIMT by high-resolution B-mode carotid ultrasound. Based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, patients were divided into two groups: 1) moderate/good response to RTX therapy after 24 weeks (41 patients, 75%), 2) no response to RTX therapy (14 patients, 25%). Effective RTX therapy resulted in 9% increase in TC, 23% increase in HDL-C and 14% decrease in atherogenic index, 57% decrease in SI and 24% decrease in RI. We observed a 9% decrease of cIMTmax at 24 weeks. The improvement of cardiovascular parameters was accompanied by statistically significant decreases of CRP, ESR, RF IgM and DAS 28 in group 1 (P < 0.05). There were not significant changes in lipid profile, AS parameters, and cIMT in group 2. Two infusions of RTX in case of moderate/good EULAR effect of therapy exerted favorable effects on lipid profile, AS and cIMT in women with RA without overt CVD. PMID:26839473

  3. The predictive value of retinal vascular findings for carotid artery atherosclerosis: are further recommendations with regard to carotid atherosclerosis screening needed?

    PubMed

    Song, Yeo-Jeong; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Seong-Man; Jang, Hyun-Duk; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Dong-Jun; Lee, Hyeon-Gook; Kim, Tae-Ik

    2013-05-01

    Vascular retinopathy is the consequence of vascular disease, and the retina is the only place where the arteries can be visualized directly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of retinal vascular findings for carotid artery atherosclerosis. From December 2009 to January 2011, the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and total plaque area (TPA) were measured in 179 consecutive patients, who received a fundoscopic examination. The patients were divided into groups as follows: normal retinal artery (normal; n = 44), diabetic retinopathy (DR; n = 25), retinal artery occlusion (RAO; n = 17), retinal vein occlusion (RVO; n = 67), and hypertensive retinopathy (HTN-R; n = 26). The subjects were classified according to the presence of an increased (≥ 1 mm) IMT and plaque. The values of the mean carotid IMT in the patients with vascular retinopathy (DR, 0.87 ± 0.14 mm; RAO, 1.18 ± 0.47 mm; RVO, 0.84 ± 0.14 mm; HTN-R, 0.90 ± 0.20 mm) were significantly increased compared with those in the normal subjects (0.77 ± 0.13 mm). A total 77 of 135 vascular retinopathy patients demonstrated an increased IMT (57 %), and 97 vascular retinopathy patients had carotid artery plaque (72 %). The relative risk of vascular retinopathy in the prediction of an increased IMT and the presence of plaque was 2.79 and 3.95, respectively. Although The TPA was significantly increased in the patients with RAO (1.87 ± 2.67 cm(2)) and RVO (0.27 ± 0.23 cm(2)) compared with the normal subjects (0.18 ± 0.23 cm(2), all Ps < 0.05), there was no significant difference in the ipsilateral carotid IMT and TPA of the affected eye compared with that of the contralateral eye. In conclusion, vascular retinopathy demonstrated a good predictive value in identifying asymptomatic carotid artery atherosclerosis, and this was not confined to the ipsilateral carotid artery of the affected eye. Further recommendations with regard to carotid atherosclerosis screening in patients with

  4. Extracranial-intracranial bypass for internal carotid/middle cerebral atherosclerotic steno-occlusive diseases in conjunction with carotid endarterectomy for contralateral cervical carotid stenosis: clinical results and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomohiro; Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Akira; Tsutsumi, Kazuo; Saito, Isamu; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-10-01

    Clinical results as well as cognitive performances after extracranial to intracranial (EC-IC) bypass in conjunction with contralateral carotid endarterectomy (CEA) are poorly understood. Data from 14 patients who underwent unilateral EC-IC bypass for atherosclerotic internal carotid artery (ICA)/middle cerebral artery (MCA) steno-occlusive disease in conjunction with CEA for contralateral cervical carotid stenosis were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative results were evaluated by MRI imagings. Nine patients also underwent neuropsychological examinations (NPEs), including assessment by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) before and about 6 months after bilateral surgeries. Postoperative MRI follow-up (median, 8 months; interquartile range, 7-8 months) confirmed successful bypass in all patients, with no additional ischemic lesions on T2WI when compared with preoperative imaging. Further, MRA showed patent bypass and contralateral smooth patency at CEA portion in all patients. In the group rate analysis, all five postoperative NPE scores (Verbal IQ, Performance IQ, WMS-memory, WMS-attention, and Average scores of all those four scores) were improved relative to preoperative NPE scores. Performance IQ and Average score improvements were statistically significant. Clinical results after EC-IC bypass in conjunction with contralateral CEA were feasible. Based on the group rate analysis, we conclude that successful unilateral EC-IC bypass and contralateral carotid endarterectomy does not adversely affect postoperative cognitive function.

  5. Acute abducens nerve palsy as a presenting feature in carotid-cavernous fistula in a 6-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishanan, R.; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF) are abnormal communications between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae are rare potential complications of craniofacial trauma. Typical findings of CCF are proptosis, chemosis, headache, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, trigeminal pain and pulsating bruit over the temporal skull and the bulb. CCF are reported very rarely in childhood. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a pediatric patient presented with CCF.

  6. Nonvisualization of the Internal Carotid Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography: Discussion of Two Cases with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sonal; Rajagopal, Rengarajan; Khera, Pushpinder S.; Mehta, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Nonvisualization of the internal carotid artery (ICA) on cross-sectional imaging studies can be due to congenital (dysgenesis of the ICA) or acquired (complete occlusion of ICA) causes. We report two cases, one with absent carotid canal on bone window setting of computed tomography (CT) suggestive of congenital cause and the other with normal carotid canal, suggesting acquired cause. Development of aortic arches with six pathways of collateral circulation in brain is also discussed. PMID:27298744

  7. Acute abducens nerve palsy as a presenting feature in carotid-cavernous fistula in a 6-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishanan, R.; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF) are abnormal communications between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae are rare potential complications of craniofacial trauma. Typical findings of CCF are proptosis, chemosis, headache, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, trigeminal pain and pulsating bruit over the temporal skull and the bulb. CCF are reported very rarely in childhood. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a pediatric patient presented with CCF. PMID:27625935

  8. Comparison of intraoperative completion flowmeter versus duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gabor A; Calligaro, Keith D; Kolakowski, Steven; Doerr, Kevin J; McAffee-Bennett, Sandy; Muller, Kathy; Dougherty, Matthew J

    Intraoperative completion studies of the internal carotid artery following carotid endarterectomy are recommended to ensure technical perfection of the repair. Transit time ultrasound flowmeter does not require trained technicians, requires less time than other completion studies such as duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography, and is noninvasive. Flowmetry was compared with duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography to determine if the relatively simpler flowmetry could replace these two more widely accepted completion studies in the intraoperative assessment of carotid endarterectomy. Comparative intraoperative assessment was performed in 116 carotid endarterectomies using all three techniques between December 1, 2000 and November 30, 2003. Eversion endarterectomy was performed in 51 cases and standard endarterectomy with prosthetic patching in 65 cases. Patients underwent completion flowmetry, duplex ultrasonography, and contrast arteriography studies of the exposed arteries, which were performed by vascular fellows or senior surgical residents under direct supervision of board-certified vascular surgeons. Duplex ultrasonography surveillance was performed 1 and 6 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). The combined ipsilateral stroke and death rate was 0%. The mean internal carotid artery flow using flowmetry was 249 mL/min (range, 60-750 mL/min). Five (4.3%) patients had flow < 100 mL/min as measured with flowmetry, but completion contrast arteriography and duplex ultrasonography were normal and none of the arteries were re-explored. One carotid endarterectomy was re-explored based on completion duplex ultrasonography that showed markedly elevated internal carotid artery peak systolic velocity (> 500 cm/sec); however, exploration was normal and completion flowmetry and contrast arteriography were normal. Duplex ultrasonography studies revealed internal carotid artery peak systolic

  9. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  10. Resistance of endothelium-dependent relaxation to elevation of O(-)(2) levels in rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Pagano, P J; Griswold, M C; Najibi, S; Marklund, S L; Cohen, R A

    1999-11-01

    Endogenous superoxide anion (O(-)(2)) interferes with the bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) in endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation (EDR). Using the lucigenin chemiluminescence assay, we measured O(-)(2) in the thoracic and abdominal aortas and the carotid artery of rabbits to determine whether ambient O(-)(2) varies among the three arteries and differentially diminishes the effect of NO. Basal levels of O(-)(2) were significantly higher in carotid arteries than in the thoracic aorta [23 +/- 6.1 vs. 3.9 +/- 1.4 chemiluminescence units (CU); P < 0.05], whereas EDR in response to ACh (10(-8)-10(-5) M) was not significantly different on ANOVA. After treatment with the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC; 10 mM), O(-)(2) levels were significantly elevated, becoming greater in the carotid artery and abdominal aorta than in the thoracic aorta (185 +/- 31.2 and 202 +/- 40.3 vs. 89 +/- 18 CU; P < 0.05). DDC significantly reversed EDR in the thoracic aorta but not in the carotid artery; at 10(-6) M ACh, the decrease seen with DDC was 48 +/- 6.2 vs. 6.8 +/- 8.0% of maximal relaxation in the thoracic aorta and carotid artery, respectively. In the thoracic aorta, exogenous SOD reversed the inhibition of EDR caused by DDC. Moreover, DDC/O(-)(2)-resistant EDR in the carotid artery was ablated by the addition of nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (300 microM; P < 0.05), an NO synthase inhibitor, consistent with peroxynitrite or an O(-)(2)-resistant NO donor being involved in carotid relaxation. Indeed, exogenous peroxynitrite caused similar relaxation of the carotid artery and thoracic aorta, which was unaffected by DDC. Our studies show a greater production of nitrite and O(-)(2) per unit area by the carotid artery, suggesting a greater amount of their product peroxynitrite. These findings support the hypothesis that peroxynitrite is the relaxing agent that resists high O(-)(2) in the carotid artery. PMID:10564167

  11. [Development and optimization of diagnostically informative boichemical and coagulative correlators in various atherosclerotic lesions of carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Akhvlediani, M; Vorobiova, E; Emukhvari, M; Gachechiladze, D

    2014-12-01

    Diagnostically informative biochemical and coagulative correlators in various atherosclerotic lesions of carotid arteries are developed. It has been established positive correlation of the degree of stenosis and intima-media thickness of carotid arteries with the following biochemical parameters: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, Apo-B, Lp(a), triglycerides, hs-C-reactive protein(CRP), interleukines (IL-1ß and IL-6), fibrinogen, D-dimers. Negative correlation was stated with respect to HDL cholesterol, Apo-A-1, protein C. The established correlators of carotid intima-medial layer and the studied laboratory indices favour their inclusion into carotid atherosclerosis monitoring.

  12. Semi-automatic 3D segmentation of carotid lumen in contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Hamidreza; Kamli-Asl, Alireza; Talebpour, Alireza; Shirani, Shapour

    2015-12-01

    The atherosclerosis disease is one of the major causes of the death in the world. Atherosclerosis refers to the hardening and narrowing of the arteries by plaques. Carotid stenosis is a narrowing or constriction of carotid artery lumen usually caused by atherosclerosis. Carotid artery stenosis can increase risk of brain stroke. Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is a minimally invasive method for imaging and quantification of the carotid plaques. Manual segmentation of carotid lumen in CTA images is a tedious and time consuming procedure which is subjected to observer variability. As a result, there is a strong and growing demand for developing computer-aided carotid segmentation procedures. In this study, a novel method is presented for carotid artery lumen segmentation in CTA data. First, the mean shift smoothing is used for uniformity enhancement of gray levels. Then with the help of three seed points, the centerlines of the arteries are extracted by a 3D Hessian based fast marching shortest path algorithm. Finally, a 3D Level set function is performed for segmentation. Results on 14 CTA volumes data show 85% of Dice similarity and 0.42 mm of mean absolute surface distance measures. Evaluation shows that the proposed method requires minimal user intervention, low dependence to gray levels changes in artery path, resistance to extreme changes in carotid diameter and carotid branch locations. The proposed method has high accuracy and can be used in qualitative and quantitative evaluation. PMID:26429385

  13. The Use of Contrast-enhanced Ultrasonography for Imaging of Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques: Current Evidence, Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sandeep A; Gourineni, Venu; Feinstein, Steven B

    2016-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is a rapidly evolving modality for imaging carotid artery disease and systemic atherosclerosis. CEUS coupled with diagnostic ultrasonography predicts the degree of carotid artery stenosis and is comparable with computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography. This article reviews the literature on the evolving role of CEUS for the identification and characterization of carotid plaques with an emphasis on detection of intra-plaque neovascularization and related high-risk morphologic features notably present in symptomatic patients. CEUS carotid imaging may play a prominent additive role in risk stratifying patients and serve as a powerful tool for monitoring therapeutic interventions.

  14. A Novel Carotid Device for Embolic Diversion: Lessons Learned from a 'First in Man' Trial in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievert, Horst Franke, Jennifer; Grad, Ygael; Nishri, Boaz; Assaf, Yaron; Yodfat, Ofer; Roemer, Albrecht; Robertson, Greg C.; Stone, Gregg W.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate a novel device that was developed to direct emboli away from the internal carotid artery to the external carotid artery to prevent embolic stroke while avoiding the necessity for anticoagulation with warfarin. Methods: A stent-like, self-expandable filter was developed consisting of fine cobalt alloy mesh. After promising preclinical animal testing, the device was implanted into the common carotid artery extending into the external carotid artery in three patients with atrial fibrillation, each of whom were at high-risk for cerebral emboli and were suboptimal candidates for anticoagulation. Follow-up was performed clinically and with carotid duplex ultrasound. Results: The implantation was successful in all three patients. Unrestricted flow through the filter was demonstrated in each patient at 6 months by duplex sonography. However, at 7 months ultrasound demonstrated occlusion of the internal carotid artery filter in one patient, which was subsequently confirmed by angiography. Subtotal filter occlusion occurred in a second patient at 14 months. Neither patient had clinical symptoms. Both internal carotid arteries were successfully recanalized using standard angioplasty techniques without complication. The third patient had completely normal carotid blood flow at 29 months follow-up. Conclusions: Implantation of a novel device intended to divert emboli away from the internal carotid artery was feasible, but resulted in occlusive neointimal proliferation in two of three patients. These results demonstrate a discrepancy from the findings of preclinical animal studies and human investigation.

  15. Surgical Position, Cause of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Dissection, Presenting as Pourfour Du Petit Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Villalba Martinez, Gloria; Navalpotro Gomez, Irene; Serrano Perez, Laura; Gonzalez Ortiz, Sofia; Fernández-Candil, Juan L; Steinhauer, Eva Giralt

    2015-01-01

    Dissection of the internal carotid artery is a rare cause of stroke overall, but causes 22% of strokes in younger patients. A common clinical presentation is as Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. We report a craniotomy with 30 degrees rotation of the neck (standard position) in a patient with no major risk factors for carotid dissection, who showed a Pourfour du Petit syndrome due to a dissection of the internal carotid artery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which a common surgical position causes an internal carotid artery dissection in a patient without relevant risk factors. The presentation with Pourfour du Petit syndrome is extremely unusual.

  16. Syncope in Patient with Bilateral Severe Internal Carotid Arteries Stenosis/Near Occlusion: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Miran, Muhammad Shah; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Ahmad, Aamir; Suri, Mariam K.; Basreen, Rabia; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncope is commonly worked up for carotid stenosis, but only rarely attributed to it. Considering paucity of such cases in literature, we report a case and discuss the pathophysiology. Design/methods We report a patient with high-grade bilateral severe internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis who presented with syncopal episodes in the absence of stroke, orthostatic hypotension, significant cardiovascular disease, or vasovagal etiology. We reviewed all literature pertaining to syncope secondary to carotid stenosis and other cerebrovascular disease. Results A 67-year-old man presented with two brief syncopal episodes. History and physical examination was not suggestive of seizure or vasovagal syncope. Other workup was negative for any stroke or syncope secondary to cardiac or vasovagal etiology. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed bilateral ICA severe stenosis. This was confirmed by transfemoral carotid vessels angiography. Internal carotid angioplasty and stenting was performed on one side. After this, the patient remained asymptomatic. After one month, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) of contralateral side was performed. Patient remained symptom free after that. On review of literature, we identified only 12 cases of syncope attributable to carotid stenosis and reviewed 24 cases attributable to other cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion Syncope secondary to carotid stenosis, especially in the absence of any focal ischemic events is rare. It can only be expected in those patients who have bilateral hemodynamically significant carotid disease, which is unlikely in the absence of any focal ischemic events. PMID:27403223

  17. Role of Extracranial Carotid Duplex and Computed Tomography Perfusion Scanning in Evaluating Perfusion Status of Pericarotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenting is an effective treatment of choice in terms of treating ischemic stroke patients with concomitant carotid stenosis. Though computed tomography perfusion scan has been recognized as a standard tool to monitor/follow up this group of patients, not everyone could endure due to underlying medical illness. In contrast, carotid duplex is a noninvasive assessment tool and could track patient clinical condition in real time. In this study we found that “resistance index” of the carotid ultrasound could detect flow changes before and after the stenting procedure, thus having great capacity to replace the role of computed tomography perfusion exam. PMID:27051669

  18. Covered Stent Implantation for the Treatment of Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula and Its Mid-Term Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, F.; Tortora, F.; Marseglia, M.; Napoli, M.; Cirillo, L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Carotid-cavernous fistulas are abnormal arteriovenous communications either directly between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus or between the dural branches of the internal and external carotid arteries. These fistulas predominantly present with ocular manifestations and they are treated mainly by endovascular techniques in most cases. A detailed review of the literature allowed us to make a complete analysis of the information available on the topic. We describe a case of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula occluded by endovascular implantation of a covered stent, showing the persistence of results after three years. PMID:20465897

  19. Increased carotid intima-media thickness and reduced distensibility in human class III obesity: independent and differential influences of adiposity and blood pressure on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Xiao L; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B; Dart, Anthony M; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m(2)). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133(+)/KDR(+) angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10(-3)kpa(-1)vs. 29.91±12.37 10(-3)kpa(-1), P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity. PMID:23342053

  20. Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Reduced Distensibility in Human Class III Obesity: Independent and Differential Influences of Adiposity and Blood Pressure on the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Xiao L.; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R.; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B.; Dart, Anthony M.; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2 (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m2 and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m2). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133+/KDR+ angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10−3kpa−1 vs. 29.91±12.37 10−3kpa−1, P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2. Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2. In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity. PMID:23342053

  1. Increased carotid intima-media thickness and reduced distensibility in human class III obesity: independent and differential influences of adiposity and blood pressure on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Xiao L; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B; Dart, Anthony M; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m(2)). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133(+)/KDR(+) angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10(-3)kpa(-1)vs. 29.91±12.37 10(-3)kpa(-1), P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity.

  2. Automatic plaque characterization and vessel wall segmentation in magnetic resonance images of atherosclerotic carotid arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Isabel M.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Mohamed, Mona; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2004-05-01

    Composition and structure of atherosclerotic plaque is a primary focus of cardiovascular research. In vivo MRI provides a meanse to non-invasively image and assess the morphological features of athersclerotic and normal human carotid arteries. To quantitatively assess the vulnerability and the type of plaque, the contours of the lumen, outer boundary of the vessel wall and plaque components, need to be traced. To achieve this goal, we have developed an automated contou detection technique, which consists of three consecutive steps: firstly, the outer boundary of the vessel wall is detected by means of an ellipse-fitting procedure in order to obtain smoothed shapes; secondly, the lumen is segnented using fuzzy clustering. Thre region to be classified is that within the outer vessel wall boundary obtained from the previous step; finally, for plaque detection we follow the same approach as for lumen segmentation: fuzzy clustering. However, plaque is more difficult to segment, as the pixel gray value can differ considerably from one region to another, even when it corresponds to the same type of tissue. That makes further processing necessary. All these three steps might be carried out combining information from different sequences (PD-, T2-, T1-weighted images, pre- and post-contrast), to improve the contour detection. The algorithm has been validated in vivo on 58 high-resolution PD and T1 weighted MR images (19 patients). The results demonstrate excellent correspondence between automatic and manual area measurements: lumen (r=0.94), outer (r=0.92), and acceptable for fibrous cap thickness (r=0.76).

  3. Fully automated segmentation of carotid and vertebral arteries from contrast enhanced CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisenaire, Olivier; Virmani, Sunny; Olszewski, Mark E.; Ardon, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    We propose a method for segmenting and labeling the main head and neck vessels (common, internal, external carotid, vertebral) from a contrast enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) volume. First, an initial centerline of each vessel is extracted. Next, the vessels are segmented using 3D active objects initialized using the first step. Finally, the true centerline is identified by smoothly deforming it away from the segmented mask edges using a spline-snake. We focus particularly on the novel initial centerline extraction technique. It uses a locally adaptive front propagation algorithm that attempts to find the optimal path connecting the ends of the vessel, typically from the lowest image of the scan to the Circle of Willis in the brain. It uses a patient adapted anatomical model of the different vessels both to initialize and constrain this fast marching, thus eliminating the need for manual selection of seed points. The method is evaluated using data from multiple regions (USA, India, China, Israel) including a variety of scanners (10, 16, 40, 64-slice; Brilliance CT, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, USA), contrast agent dose, and image resolution. It is fully successful in over 90% of patients and only misses a single vessel in most remaining cases. We also demonstrate its robustness to metal and dental artifacts and anatomical variability. Total processing time is approximately two minutes with no user interaction, which dramatically improves the workflow over existing clinical software. It also reduces patient dose exposure by obviating the need to acquire an unenhanced scan for bone suppression as this can be done by applying the segmentation masks.

  4. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  5. A gene-centric study of common carotid artery remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Zabaneh, Delilah; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Drenos, Fotios; Jones, Gregory T.; Shah, Sonia; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gigante, Bruna; Holewijn, Suzanne; De Graaf, Jacqueline; Vermeulen, Sita; Folkersen, Lasse; van Rij, Andre M.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Talmud, Philippa J.; Deanfield, John E.; Agu, Obi; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Bown, Matthew J.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Giral, Philippe; Mannarino, Elmo; Silveira, Angela; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; de Borst, Gert J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Faire, Ulf; Baas, Annette F.; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Fowkes, Gerry; Tzoulaki, Ionna; Price, Jacqueline F.; Tremoli, Elena; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Eriksson, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansive remodelling is the process of compensatory arterial enlargement in response to atherosclerotic stimuli. The genetic determinants of this process are poorly characterized. Methods Genetic association analyses of inter-adventitial common carotid artery diameter (ICCAD) in the IMPROVE study (n = 3427) using the Illumina 200k Metabochip was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that met array-wide significance were taken forward for analysis in three further studies (n = 5704), and tested for association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). Results rs3768445 on Chromosome 1q24.3, in a cluster of protein coding genes (DNM3, PIGC, C1orf105) was associated with larger ICCAD in the IMPROVE study. For each copy of the rare allele carried, ICCAD was on average 0.13 mm greater (95% CI 0.08–0.18 mm, P = 8.2 × 10−8). A proxy SNP (rs4916251, R2 = 0.99) did not, however, show association with ICCAD in three follow-up studies (P for replication = 0.29). There was evidence of interaction between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and rs4916251 on ICCAD in two of the cohorts studies suggesting that it plays a role in the remodelling response to atherosclerosis. In meta-analysis of 5 case–control studies pooling data from 5007 cases and 43,630 controls, rs4916251 was associated with presence of AAA 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.17, p = 2.8 × 10−3, I2 = 18.8, Q = 0.30). A proxy SNP, rs4916251 was also associated with increased expression of PIGC in aortic tissue, suggesting that this may the mechanism by which this locus affects vascular remodelling. Conclusions Common variation at 1q24.3 is associated with expansive vascular remodelling and risk of AAA. These findings support a hypothesis that pathways involved in systemic vascular remodelling play a role in AAA development. PMID:23246012

  6. Carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy on early glottic cancer: preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Sik; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Hojin; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the dose distribution between carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and opposed lateral field technique (LAFT), and to determine the effects of carotid sparing IMRT in early glottic cancer patients who have risk factors for atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods Ten early glottic cancer patients were treated with carotid sparing IMRT. For each patient, the conventional LAFT plan was developed for comparison. IMRT and LAFT plans were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index, homogeneity index, and the doses to planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for carotid arteries, spinal cord and pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Results Recurrence was not observed in any patients during the follow-up period. V95% for PTV showed no significant difference between IMRT and LAFT plans, while V100% was significantly higher in the IMRT plan (95.5% vs. 94.6%, p = 0.005). The homogeneity index (11.6%) and conformity index (1.4) in the IMRT plan were significantly better than those in the LAFT plans (8.5% and 5.1, respectively) (p = 0.005). The median V5Gy (90.0%), V25Gy (13.5%), and V50Gy (0%) for carotid artery PRV in the IMRT plan were significantly lower than those in the LAFT plan (99.1%, 89.0%, and 77.3%, respectively) (p = 0.005). Conclusion Our study suggests that carotid sparing IMRT can significantly decrease the dose to carotid arteries compared to LAFT, and it would be considered for early glottic cancer patient with high risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27104164

  7. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke; Morawe, Gerald; Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  8. Genome-wide Linkage Analysis of Carotid Artery Lumen Diameter: The Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Jonathan N.; Cole, Shelley A.; Laston, Sandy; Almasy, Laura; Comuzzie, Anthony; Lee, Elisa T.; Best, Lyle G.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Roman, Mary J.; Devereux, Richard B.; Göring, Harald H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant proportion of the variability in carotid artery lumen diameter is attributable to genetic factors. Methods Carotid ultrasonography and genotyping were performed in the 3,300 American Indian participants in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) to identify chromosomal regions harboring novel genes associated with inter-individual variation in carotid artery lumen diameter. Genome-wide linkage analysis was conducted using standard variance component linkage methods, implemented in SOLAR, based on multipoint identity-by-descent matrices. Results Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed a significant evidence for linkage for a locus for left carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameter in Arizona SHFS participants on chromosome 7 at 120 cM (lod=4.85 and 3.77, respectively, after sex and age adjustment, and lod=3.12 and 2.72, respectively, after adjustment for sex, age, height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and current smoking). Other regions with suggestive evidence of linkage for left carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameter was found on chromosome 12 at 153 cM (lod=2.20 and 2.60, respectively, after sex and age adjustment, and lod=2.44 and 2.16, respectively, after full covariate adjustment) in Oklahoma SHFS participants; suggestive linkage for right carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameter was found on chromosome 9 at 154 cM (lod=2.72 and 3.19, respectively after sex and age adjustment, and lod=2.36 and 2.21, respectively, after full covariate adjustment) in Oklahoma SHFS participants. Conclusion We found significant evidence for loci influencing carotid artery lumen diameter on chromosome 7q and suggestive linkage on chromosomes 12q and 9q. PMID:23871337

  9. Acute effect of cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics: basketball athletes versus sedentary controls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of a cycling intervention on carotid arterial hemodynamics between basketball athletes and sedentary controls. Methods Ten young long-term trained male basketball athletes (BA) and nine age-matched male sedentary controls (SC) successively underwent four bouts of exercise on a bicycle ergometer at the same workload. Hemodynamic variables at right common carotid artery were determined at rest and immediately following each bout of exercise. An ANCOVA was used to compare differences between the BA and SC groups at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. The repeated ANOVA was used to assess differences between baseline and each bout of exercise within the BA or SC group. Results In both groups, carotid hemodynamic variables showed significant differences at rest and immediately after the cycling intervention. At rest, carotid arterial stiffness was significantly decreased and carotid arterial diameter was significantly increased in the BA group as compared to the SC group. Immediately following the cycling intervention, carotid arterial stiffness showed no obvious changes in the BA group but significantly increased in the SC group. It is worth noting that while arterial stiffness was lower in the BA group than in the SC group, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) was significantly higher in the BA group than in the SC group both at rest and immediately following the cycling intervention. Conclusion Long-term basketball exercise had a significant impact on common carotid arterial hemodynamic variables not only at rest but also after a cycling intervention. The role of OSI in the remodeling of arterial structure and function in the BA group at rest and after cycling requires clarification. PMID:25602805

  10. Establishment of an Animal Model of Vascular Restenosis with Bilateral Carotid Artery Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixiong; Lan, Bin; Zhu, Tianxiang; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Muting; Ma, Chensheng; Chen, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular restenosis occurring after CABG is a major clinical problem that needs to be addressed. Vein grafts are associated with a higher degree of stenosis than artery grafts. However, the mechanism responsible for this effect has not been elucidated. We aimed to establish a rabbit model of vascular restenosis after bilateral carotid artery grafting, and to investigate the associated spatiotemporal changes of intimal hyperplasia in carotid artery and jugular vein grafts after surgery. Material/Methods Twenty adult New Zealand white rabbits (10 males; 10 females), weighing 2.0–2.5 kg, were obtained from the Experimental Animal Center of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (License No.: scxk-Guangdong-2006-0015). We quantitatively analyzed intimal thickness, area, and degree of stenosis in carotid artery and jugular vein bridges. Results After 8 weeks of a high-fat diet, rabbit carotid arteries showed early atherosclerotic lesions. With increasing time after surgery, carotid artery and jugular vein grafts showed histopathological and morphological changes, including smooth muscle cell migration, lipid deposition, intimal hyperplasia, and vascular stenosis. The degree of vascular stenosis was significantly higher in vein grafts than in artery grafts at all time points – 35.1±6.7% vs. 16.1±2.6% at Week 12, 56.2±8.5% vs. 23.4±3.4% at Week 16, and 71.2±1.3% vs. 25.2±5.3% at Week 20. Conclusions Rabbit bilateral carotid arteries were grafted with carotid artery and jugular vein bridges to simulate pathophysiological processes that occur in people after CABG surgery. PMID:25549796

  11. Radical resection of a Shamblin type III carotid body tumour without cerebro-neurological deficit: Improved technique with preoperative embolization and carotid stenting.

    PubMed

    Ong, H S; Fan, X D; Ji, T

    2014-12-01

    The surgical resection of a large unfavourable Shamblin type III carotid body tumour (CBT) can be very challenging technically, with many potential significant complications. Preoperative embolization aids in shrinking the lesion, reducing intraoperative blood loss, and improving visualization of the surgical field. Preoperative internal carotid artery (ICA) stenting aids in reinforcing the arterial wall, thereby providing a better dissection plane. A woman presented to our institution with a large right-sided CBT. Failure of the preoperative temporary balloon occlusion (TBO) test emphasized the importance of intraoperative preservation of the ipsilateral ICA. A combination of both preoperative embolization and carotid stenting allowed a less hazardous radical resection of the CBT. An almost bloodless surgical field permitted meticulous dissection, hence reducing the risk of intraoperative vascular and nerve injury. Embolization and carotid stenting prior to surgical resection should be considered in cases with bilateral CBT or a skull base orientated high CBT, and for those with intracranial extension and patients who have failed the TBO test.

  12. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Progression in HIV-Infected Adults Occurs Preferentially at the Carotid Bifurcation and Is Predicted by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Scherzer, Rebecca; Hunt, Peter W.; Schnell, Amanda; Bolger, Ann F.; Kalapus, S.C.; Maka, Kristinalisa; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Ganz, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Shear stress gradients and inflammation have been causally associated with atherosclerosis development in carotid bifurcation regions. The mechanism underlying higher levels of carotid intima-media thickness observed among HIV-infected individuals remains unknown. Methods and Results We measured carotid intima-media thickness progression and development of plaque in the common carotid, bifurcation region, and internal carotid artery in 300 HIV-infected persons and 47 controls. The median duration of follow-up was 2.4 years. When all segments were included, the rate of intima-media thickness progression was greater in HIV-infected subjects compared with controls after adjustment for traditional risk factors (0.055 vs. 0.024 mm/year, P=0.016). Rate of progression was also greater in the bifurcation region (0.067 vs. 0.025 mm/year, P=0.042) whereas differences were smaller in the common and internal regions. HIV-infected individuals had a greater incidence of plaque compared with controls in the internal (23% vs. 6.4%, P=0.0037) and bifurcation regions (34% vs. 17%, P=0.014). Among HIV-infected individuals, the rate of progression in the bifurcation region was more rapid compared with the common carotid, internal, or mean intima-media thickness; in contrast, progression rates among controls were similar at all sites. Baseline hsCRP was elevated in HIV-infected persons and was a predictor of progression in the bifurcation region. Conclusions Atherosclerosis progresses preferentially in the carotid bifurcation region in HIV-infected individuals. hsCRP, a marker of inflammation, is elevated in HIV and is associated with progression in the bifurcation region. These data are consistent with a model in which the interplay between hemodynamic shear stresses and HIV-associated inflammation contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:jah3-e000422 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.111.000422.) Clinical Trial Registration URL: http

  13. On the atrophy of the internal carotid artery in capybara.

    PubMed

    Steele, Caroline; Fioretto, Emerson T; Sasahara, Tais H C; Guidi, Wanderley L; de Lima, Ana R; Ribeiro, Antonio A C M; Loesch, Andrzej

    2006-12-01

    Capybara might be a useful model for studying changes in cerebral circulation as the natural atrophy of the internal carotid artery (ICA) occurs in this animal at maturation. In this study, confocal and electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical techniques were applied in order to reveal the changes in morphology and innervation to the proximal part of ICA in young (6-month-old) and mature (12-month-old) capybaras. Some features of the basilar artery (BA) were also revealed. The ICA of young animals degenerated to a ligamentous cord in mature animals. Immunolabelling positive for pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 but negative for tyrosine hydroxylase was observed in the proximal part of ICA at both ages examined. Axon varicosities positive for synaptophysin were present in the adventitia of ICA of young animals but were absent in the ligamentous cord of mature animals. In the ICA of young animals, adventitial connective tissue invaded the media suggesting that the process of regression of this artery began within the first 6 months of life. An increase in size of the BA was found in mature animals indicating increased blood flow in the vertebro-basilar system, possibly making capybara susceptible to cerebrovascular pathology (e.g. stroke). Capybara may therefore provide a natural model for studying adaptive responses to ICA regression/occlusion.

  14. Continuous resetting of the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Kasting, G A; Eckberg, D L; Fritsch, J M; Birkett, C L

    1987-04-01

    Although human baroreflex responses have been studied during night as well as day, there has been no attempt to distinguish circadian changes of baroreflex function from those related to sleep. We measured carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses serially during a 24-h period in 11 normotensive volunteers who were awake and cooperative during testing. We applied sequences of ramped R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes from +40 to -65 mmHg, during held expiration, at 3-h intervals. Subjects maintained their usual sleep-wake cycles but were awakened for three 30-min periods for night testing. There was no systematic change of baroreflex slope during the 24-h period. There were, however, parallel shifts of the entire sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation along its R-R interval and arterial pressure axes associated with small, but significant, circadian changes of baseline R-R intervals and arterial pressures. Thus, although our data do not point toward major circadian variability of baro-reflex responsiveness, they provide evidence for an ongoing process of human baroreflex resetting.

  15. Carotid body oxygen sensing and adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, José; Macías, David; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Pardal, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the principal arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Our understanding of CB function and its role in disease mechanisms has progressed considerably in the last decades, particularly in recent years. The sensory elements of the CB are the neuron-like glomus cells, which contain numerous transmitters and form synapses with afferent sensory fibers. The activation of glomus cells under hypoxia mainly depends on the modulation of O2-sensitive K(+) channels which leads to cell depolarization and the opening of Ca(2+) channels. This model of sensory transduction operates in all mammalian species studied thus far, including man. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channel function by changes in the O2 level are as yet unknown. The CB plays a fundamental role in acclimatization to sustained hypoxia. Mice with CB atrophy or patients who have undergone CB resection due to surgical treatments show a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB growth under hypoxia is supported by the existence of a resident population of neural crest-derived stem cells of glia-like phenotype. These stem cells are not highly affected by exposure to low O2 tension; however, there are abundant synapse-like contacts between the glomus cells and stem cells (chemoproliferative synapses), which may be needed to trigger progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation under hypoxia. CB hypo- or hyper-activation may also contribute to the pathogenesis of several prevalent human diseases.

  16. Factors influencing acute thrombus formation on carotid artery vascular grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Torem, S.; Schneider, P.A.; Paxton, L.D.; Yasuda, H.; Hanson, S.R.

    1988-10-01

    Scintillation camera imaging of 111Indium-labeled platelets has been used to measure acute thrombus formation on modified expanded Teflon (ePTFE) vascular grafts placed in the carotid arteries of normal baboons. Platelet deposition plateaued over 2 hr postoperatively and occurred primarily at the graft-vessel anastomoses. A positive correlation was found between the circulating platelet count in individual animals and the extent of early platelet thrombus deposition. Unmodified ePTFE grafts accumulated 4.6 +/- 1.2 x 10(9) platelets per graft, or 2.3 +/- 0.71 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis. Acutely, platelet accumulation was reduced versus control graft results by coating the graft lumenal surfaces with a smooth layer of silicone rubber polymer (0.60 +/- 0.19 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis; P less than 0.02) but not by coating the grafts using a plasma polymer based on methane, which did not modify graft texture (8.2 +/- 1.7 x 10(9) platelets per graft; P greater than 0.10). The benefit of the silicone rubber coating persisted for at least 48 hr. However, longer term patency was not preserved because 10 of 12 grafts placed had failed within 1 to 2 months.

  17. General redox environment and carotid body chemoreceptor function.

    PubMed

    Agapito, Maria Teresa; Sanz-Alfayate, Gloria; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Gonzalez, Constancio; Obeso, Ana

    2009-03-01

    Carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor cells detect physiological levels of hypoxia and generate a hyperventilation, homeostatic in nature, aimed to minimize the deleterious effects of hypoxia. Intimate mechanisms involved in oxygen sensing in chemoreceptor cells remain largely unknown, but reactive oxygen species (ROS) had been proposed as mediators of this process. We have determined glutathione levels and calculated glutathione redox potential (E(GSH); indicator of the general redox environment of cells) in rat diaphragms incubated in the presence of oxidizing agents of two types: nonpermeating and permeating through cell membranes; in the latter group, unspecific oxidants and inhibitors of ROS-disposing enzymes were used. Selected concentrations of oxidizing agents were tested for their ability to modify the normoxic and hypoxic activity of chemoreceptor cells measured in vitro as their rate of release of neurotransmitters. Results evidence variable relationships between E(GSH) and the activity of chemoreceptor cells. The independence of chemoreceptor cell activity from the E(GSH) would imply that the ability of the CB to play its homeostatic role is largely preserved in any pathological or toxicological contingency causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this suggestion, it was also found that CB-mediated hypoxic hyperventilation was not altered by treatment of intact animals with agents that markedly decreased the E(GSH) in all tissues assayed.

  18. Carotid Thromboembolism Associated with Nephrotic Syndrome Treated with Dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yosuke; Raita, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Genta; Higa, Yasushi; Miyasato, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) may be complicated by thromboembolism, which occasionally manifests as stroke. Although the optimal, standardized approach to the prophylaxis and management of thromboembolic complications associated with NS has not been established, anticoagulation with heparin and subsequent warfarin is the de facto standard of treatment. Dabigatran, a novel direct thrombin inhibitor, has become a substitute for warfarin and heparin for many indications, including the prophylaxis of stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and postoperative thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic patients. We report a 35-year-old male with NS due to membranous nephropathy (MN) that presented with carotid thromboembolism. Because the patient developed drug-induced hepatitis due to warfarin, we attempted treatment with dabigatran and were successful in continuing the medication without any complications. We also reviewed the literature on stroke associated with NS. Twenty-one prior cases have been reported, and the review of these cases revealed some interesting points. The age of onset ranged from 19 to 59 years. Most of the reported cases sustained a stroke at earlier ages than patients with atherosclerosis and atrial fibrillation, which suggests that NS may independently predispose individuals to arterial and venous thromboses. MN was the most common underlying pathology. Given that a standardized approach to the prophylaxis and management of thrombotic complications associated with NS has not been established, our experience suggests that dabigatran is a valid new treatment option for thrombotic complications of NS. PMID:24803917

  19. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25342868

  20. The carotid body and arousal in the fetus and neonate.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Arousal from sleep is a major defense mechanism in infants against hypoxia and/or hypercapnia. Arousal failure may be an important contributor to SIDS. Areas of the brainstem that have been found to be abnormal in a majority of SIDS infants are involved in the arousal process. Arousal is sleep state dependent, being depressed during AS in most mammals, but depressed during QS in human infants. Repeated exposure to hypoxia causes a progressive blunting of arousal that may involve medullary raphe GABAergic mechanisms. Whereas CB chemoreceptors contribute heavily to arousal in response to hypoxia, serotonergic central chemoreceptors have been implicated in the arousal response to CO(2). Pulmonary or chest wall mechanoreceptors also contribute to arousal in proportion to the ventilatory response and decreases in their input may contribute to depressed arousal during AS. Little is known about specific arousal pathways beyond the NTS. Whether CB chemoreceptor stimulation directly stimulates arousal centers or whether this is done indirectly through respiratory networks remains unknown. This review will focus on arousal in response to hypoxia and CO(2) in the fetus and newborn and will outline what we know (and do not know) about the involvement of the carotid body in this process. PMID:22684039

  1. Mechanisms of carotid body chemoreflex dysfunction during heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Harold D.; Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have drawn interest in the potential for carotid body (CB) ablation or desensitization as an effective strategy for clinical treatment and management of cardio-respiratory diseases including hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and renal failure. These disease states have in common sympathetic overactivity, which plays an important role in the development and progression of the disease and is often associated with breathing dysregulation, which in turn likely mediates or aggravates the autonomic imbalance. Evidence from both chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and animal models indicates that the CB chemoreflex is enhanced in CHF and contributes to the tonic elevation in sympathetic activity and the development of periodic breathing associated with the disease. Although this maladaptive change likely derives from altered function at all levels of the reflex arc, a tonic increase in afferent activity from CB glomus cells is likely to be a main driving force. This report will focus on our understanding of mechanisms that alter CB function in CHF and their potential translational impact on treatment of CHF. PMID:25398713

  2. Pathophysiology and Medical Treatment of Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality. Approximately 80 to 85% strokes are ischemic due to carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The prevalence of significant CAS is 7% in women and 9% in men. Severe asymptomatic CAS varies from 0 to 3.1%. Prevalence of symptomatic CAS is high in patients with peripheral arterial disease. CAS is due to atherosclerosis, the major risk factors for which include dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, cigarette smoking, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and its receptors (RAGE, soluble RAGE [sRAGE]), lack of exercise and C-reactive protein (CRP). This article discusses the basic mechanism of atherosclerosis and the mechanisms by which these risk factors induce atherosclerosis. The role of AGEs and its receptors in the development and progression of CAS has been discussed in detail. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment of CAS such as lifestyle changes, lipid-lowering agents, antihypertensive agents, antidiabetic drugs, anti-AGE therapy, measures to elevate soluble receptors of AGE (sRAGE, esRAGE). CRP-lowering agents have been discussed in detail. The drugs especially lipid-lowering agents, and antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs suppress, regress, and slow the progression of CAS. The possible role of lowering the levels of AGEs and raising the levels of sRAGE in the treatment of CAS has been proposed. Lifestyle changes besides medical treatment have been stressed. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment not only would slow the progression of CAS but would also regress the CAS. PMID:26417183

  3. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  4. Risk of carotid atherosclerosis associated with genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and inflammatory genes among arsenic exposed residents in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Y.-C.; Hsieh, F.-I; Lien, L.-M.; Chou, Y.-L.; Chiou, H.-Y. Chen, C.-J.

    2008-02-15

    Arsenic had been reported to be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. However, there were few studies to evaluate the association between the susceptible gene of lipid metabolism and inflammation and carotid atherosclerosis among arsenic exposure residents. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of APOE and MCP-1 and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis among residents of Lanyang Basin in Taiwan which was a newly confirmed arsenic-endemic area. In total, 479 residents who had been genotyped of these two genes and examined the severity of carotid atherosclerosis were included in this study. The study subjects with carotid intima media thickness (IMT) {>=} 1.0 mm or with the observable plaque in the extracranial carotid artery were diagnosed as carotid atherosclerosis. A significantly age- and gender-adjusted odds ratio of 2.0 for the development of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in study subjects with {epsilon}4 allele of APOE than those without {epsilon}4 allele. Compared with study subjects who carried wild genotypes of APOE and MCP-1, those with both risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1 had 2.5-fold risk of carotid atherosclerosis after adjustment for age and gender, revealing a significant dose-response relationship between number of risk genotypes of these genes and risk of carotid atherosclerosis. Additionally, study subjects with two risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1 and either had ingested well water contained arsenic level > 10 {mu}g/L or had arsenic exposure > 0.22 mg/L-year would have strikingly highest risk of 10.3-fold and 15.7-fold, respectively, for the development carotid atherosclerosis, showing significant joint effect of arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1.

  5. p.Q192R SNP of PON1 seems not to be Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in an Asymptomatic and Normolipidemic Brazilian Population Sample

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Daniel Zanetti; Zago, Vanessa Helena de Souza; Vieira, Isabela Calanca; Parra, Eliane Soler; Panzoldo, Natália Baratella; Alexandre, Fernanda; Secolin, Rodrigo; Baracat, Jamal; Quintão, Eder Carlos Rocha; de Faria, Eliana Cotta

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidences suggest that paraoxonase 1 (PON1) confers important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Objective To investigate the relationships between p.Q192R SNP of PON1, biochemical parameters and carotid atherosclerosis in an asymptomatic, normolipidemic Brazilian population sample. Methods We studied 584 volunteers (females n = 326, males n = 258; 19-75 years of age). Total genomic DNA was extracted and SNP was detected in the TaqMan® SNP OpenArray® genotyping platform (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). Plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins were determined and PON1 activity was measured using paraoxon as a substrate. High-resolution β-mode ultrasonography was used to measure cIMT and the presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in a subgroup of individuals (n = 317). Results The presence of p.192Q was associated with a significant increase in PON1 activity (RR = 12.30 (11.38); RQ = 46.96 (22.35); QQ = 85.35 (24.83) μmol/min; p < 0.0001), HDL-C (RR= 45 (37); RQ = 62 (39); QQ = 69 (29) mg/dL; p < 0.001) and apo A-I (RR = 140.76 ± 36.39; RQ = 147.62 ± 36.92; QQ = 147.49 ± 36.65 mg/dL; p = 0.019). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that heterozygous and p.192Q carriers influenced by 58% PON1 activity towards paraoxon. The univariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that p.Q192R SNP was not associated with mean cIMT; as a result, in the multiple regression analysis, no variables were selected with 5% significance. In logistic regression analysis, the studied parameters were not associated with the presence of carotid plaques. Conclusion In low-risk individuals, the presence of the p.192Q variant of PON1 is associated with a beneficial plasma lipid profile but not with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:26039660

  6. The effect of (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide and other drugs on the carotid sinus reflex.

    PubMed

    GINZEL, K H

    1958-09-01

    In cats, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) selectively blocked the reflex blood pressure rise following carotid chemoreceptor stimulation. It also reduced or abolished the chemoreceptor component of the pressor response to occlusion of the common carotid arteries. It did not inhibit the respiratory reflexes arising from the carotid chemoreceptors, unless spontaneous respiration was interfered with as a whole. The site of action was central, probably below the intercollicular level, regardless of whether the drug was administered by the intravenous route or into the lateral ventricle of the brain.LSD did not block the baroreceptor depressor reflex elicited by stimulation of one carotid sinus nerve. LSD frequently caused the systemic pressure to fall, even after vagotomy and atropine, and this effect might account for the occasional reduction of the baroreceptor component of the carotid occlusion response. On the other hand, no relationship was found between the action of LSD on vasomotor tone and its blocking effect on the chemoreceptor pressor reflex.Some derivatives of LSD produced effects similar to those described for LSD, whether or not they possessed a psychotropic action in man, and independently of their efficiency as antagonists to 5-hydroxytryptamine. Of a series of compounds chemically unrelated to LSD, chlorpromazine was found to block the chemoreceptor pressor rise after intracerebroventricular injection.

  7. Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bosevski, Marijan; Stojanovska, Lily

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients), the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management. PMID:26527880

  8. [Quantitative evaluation of carotid elasticity in normal adults by ET technique].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuting; Luo, Yan; Jia, Yiping; Wen, Xiaorong; Lin, Ling

    2008-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to detect the carotid elasticity in normal adults by use of echo-tracking (ET) technique. The stiffness parameter (beta), pressure-strain elasticity modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), argumentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV beta) of carotid in 145 normal adults with the average age of 47.0 were calculated. The population were divided into five groups according to age: 20-29 y, 30-39 y,40-49 y, 50-59 y and > or = 60 y. The elasticity parameters between left and right side, between male female and between different age groups were compared using SAS 6.12 statistic software. There was no difference in carotid elasticity regarding the side and gender. The carotid beta, Ep, AI and PWV beta were noted to increase with age while AC was noted to decrease with age. The carotid elasticity was found to correlate with age significantly, but not with side and gender. This change can be detected by ET technique.

  9. A new radial strain and strain rate estimation method using autocorrelation for carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jihui; Kim, Hoonmin; Park, Jongho; Yeo, Sunmi; Shim, Hwan; Lim, Hyungjoon; Yoo, Yangmo

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is of clinical interest since it can prevent any adverse effects of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this paper, a new carotid artery radial strain estimation method based on autocorrelation is presented. In the proposed method, the strain is first estimated by the autocorrelation of two complex signals from the consecutive frames. Then, the angular phase from autocorrelation is converted to strain and strain rate and they are analyzed over time. In addition, a 2D strain image over region of interest in a carotid artery can be displayed. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed radial strain estimation method, radiofrequency (RF) data of 408 frames in the carotid artery of a volunteer were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (V10, Samsung Medison, Korea) by using a L5-13IS linear array transducer. From in vivo carotid artery data, the mean strain estimate was -0.1372 while its minimum and maximum values were -2.961 and 0.909, respectively. Moreover, the overall strain estimates are highly correlated with the reconstructed M-mode trace. Similar results were obtained from the estimation of the strain rate change over time. These results indicate that the proposed carotid artery radial strain estimation method is useful for assessing the arterial wall's stiffness noninvasively without increasing the computational complexity.

  10. Effects of acute hyperthermia on the carotid baroreflex control of heart rate in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, F.; Sagawa, S.; Torii, R.; Endo, Y.; Shiraki, K.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hyperthermia on the carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes in humans. Nine healthy males underwent acute hyperthermia (esophageal temperature 38.0° C) produced by hot water-perfused suits. Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) responses were determined during positive and negative R-wave-triggered neck pressure steps from +40 to -65 mm Hg during normothermia and hyperthermia. The carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity was evaluated from the maximum slope of the HR response to changes in carotid distending pressure. Buffering capacity of the HR response to carotid distending pressure was evaluated in % from a reference point calculated as (HR at 0 mm Hg neck pressure-minimum HR)/HR range ×100. An upward shift of the curve was evident in hyperthermia because HR increased from 57.7+/-2.4 beats/min in normothermia to 88.7+/-4.1 beats/min in hyperthermia (P<0.05) without changes in mean arterial pressure. The maximum slope of the curve in hyperthermia was similar to that in normothermia. The reference point was increased (P<0.05) during hyperthermia. These results suggest that the sensitivity of the carotid baroreflex of HR remains unchanged in hyperthermia. However, the capacity for tachycardia response to rapid onset of hypotension is reduced and the capacity for bradycardia response to sudden hypertension is increased during acute hyperthermia.

  11. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis.

  12. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys.

  13. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys. PMID:25156494