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Sample records for resolution chromosomal cgh

  1. Further delineation of chromosomal consensus regions in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas: an analysis of 37 tumor samples using high-resolution genomic profiling (array-CGH).

    PubMed

    Wessendorf, S; Barth, T F E; Viardot, A; Mueller, A; Kestler, H A; Kohlhammer, H; Lichter, P; Bentz, M; Döhner, H; Möller, P; Schwaenen, C

    2007-12-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is an aggressive extranodal B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with specific clinical, histopathological and genomic features. To characterize further the genotype of PMBL, we analyzed 37 tumor samples and PMBL cell lines Med-B1 and Karpas1106P using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (matrix- or array-CGH) to a 2.8k genomic microarray. Due to a higher genomic resolution, we identified altered chromosomal regions in much higher frequencies compared with standard CGH: for example, +9p24 (68%), +2p15 (51%), +7q22 (32%), +9q34 (32%), +11q23 (18%), +12q (30%) and +18q21 (24%). Moreover, previously unknown small interstitial chromosomal low copy number alterations (for example, -6p21, -11q13.3) and a total of 19 DNA amplifications were identified by array-CGH. For 17 chromosomal localizations (10 gains and 7 losses), which were altered in more than 10% of the analyzed cases, we delineated minimal consensus regions based on genomic base pair positions. These regions and selected immunohistochemistries point to candidate genes that are discussed in the context of NF-kappaB transcription activation, human leukocyte antigen class I/II defects, impaired apoptosis and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) activation. Our data confirm the genomic uniqueness of this tumor and provide physically mapped genomic regions of interest for focused candidate gene analysis. PMID:17728785

  2. Chromosomal Minimal Critical Regions in Therapy-Related Leukemia Appear Different from Those of De Novo Leukemia by High-Resolution aCGH

    PubMed Central

    Itzhar, Nathalie; Dessen, Philippe; Toujani, Saloua; Auger, Nathalie; Preudhomme, Claude; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Saada, Véronique; Bennaceur, Anelyse; Bourhis, Jean Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Bernheim, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML), is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML). Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA) at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case) in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case). In primary leukemia with a previously “normal” karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few) t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs) were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML. PMID:21339820

  3. Single-cell chromosomal imbalances detection by array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, Cedric; Spits, Claudia; Sermon, Karen; De Rycke, Martine; Thienpont, Bernard; Debrock, Sophie; Staessen, Catherine; Moreau, Yves; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Van Steirteghem, Andre; Liebaers, Inge; Vermeesch, Joris R.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic imbalances are a major cause of constitutional and acquired disorders. Therefore, aneuploidy screening has become the cornerstone of preimplantation, prenatal and postnatal genetic diagnosis, as well as a routine aspect of the diagnostic workup of many acquired disorders. Recently, array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has been introduced as a rapid and high-resolution method for the detection of both benign and disease-causing genomic copy-number variations. Until now, array CGH has been performed using a significant quantity of DNA derived from a pool of cells. Here, we present an array CGH method that accurately detects chromosomal imbalances from a single lymphoblast, fibroblast and blastomere within a single day. Trisomy 13, 18, 21 and monosomy X, as well as normal ploidy levels of all other chromosomes, were accurately determined from single fibroblasts. Moreover, we showed that a segmental deletion as small as 34 Mb could be detected. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility to detect aneuploidies in single blastomeres derived from preimplantation embryos. This technique offers new possibilities for genetic analysis of single cells in general and opens the route towards aneuploidy screening and detection of unbalanced translocations in preimplantation embryos in particular. PMID:16698960

  4. Array-CGH and multipoint FISH to decode complex chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; de Ståhl, Teresita Diaz; Sandlund, Agneta; Mantripragada, Kiran; Klein, George; Dumanski, Jan; Imreh, Stefan; Kost-Alimova, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Background Recently, several high-resolution methods of chromosome analysis have been developed. It is important to compare these methods and to select reliable combinations of techniques to analyze complex chromosomal rearrangements in tumours. In this study we have compared array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) and multipoint FISH (mpFISH) for their ability to characterize complex rearrangements on human chromosome 3 (chr3) in tumour cell lines. We have used 179 BAC/PAC clones covering chr3 with an approximately 1 Mb resolution to analyze nine carcinoma lines. Chr3 was chosen for analysis, because of its frequent rearrangements in human solid tumours. Results The ploidy of the tumour cell lines ranged from near-diploid to near-pentaploid. Chr3 locus copy number was assessed by interphase and metaphase mpFISH. Totally 53 chr3 fragments were identified having copy numbers from 0 to 14. MpFISH results from the BAC/PAC clones and array-CGH gave mainly corresponding results. Each copy number change on the array profile could be related to a specific chromosome aberration detected by metaphase mpFISH. The analysis of the correlation between real copy number from mpFISH and the average normalized inter-locus fluorescence ratio (ANILFR) value detected by array-CGH demonstrated that copy number is a linear function of parameters that include the variable, ANILFR, and two constants, ploidy and background normalized fluorescence ratio. Conclusion In most cases, the changes in copy number seen on array-CGH profiles reflected cumulative chromosome rearrangements. Most of them stemmed from unbalanced translocations. Although our chr3 BAC/PAC array could identify single copy number changes even in pentaploid cells, mpFISH provided a more accurate analysis in the dissection of complex karyotypes at high ploidy levels. PMID:17196103

  5. Detection of chromosomal imbalances in children with idiopathic mental retardation by array based comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH)

    PubMed Central

    Schoumans, J; Ruivenkamp, C; Holmberg, E; Kyllerman, M; Anderlid, B; Nordenskjold, M

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are a common cause of multiple anomaly syndromes that include growth and developmental delay and dysmorphism. Novel high resolution, whole genome technologies, such as array based comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH), improve the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities allowing re-investigation of cases where conventional cytogenetic techniques, Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and FISH failed to detect abnormalities. We performed a high resolution genome-wide screening for submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements using array-CGH on 41 children with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) and dysmorphic features. The commercially available microarray from Spectral Genomics contained 2600 BAC clones spaced at approximately 1 Mb intervals across the genome. Standard chromosome analysis (>450 bands per haploid genome) revealed no chromosomal rearrangements. In addition, multi-subtelomeric FISH screening in 30 cases and SKY in 11 patients did not detect any abnormality. Using array-CGH we detected chromosomal imbalances in four patients (9.8%) ranging in size from 2 to 14 Mb. Large scale copy number variations were frequently observed. Array-CGH has become an important tool for the detection of chromosome aberrations and has the potential to identify genes involved in developmental delay and dysmorphism. Moreover, the detection of genomic imbalances of clinical significance will increase knowledge of the human genome by performing genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:16141005

  6. Definition of a Critical Region on Chromosome 18 for Congenital Aural Atresia by ArrayCGH

    PubMed Central

    Veltman, Joris A.; Jonkers, Yvonne; Nuijten, Inge; Janssen, Irene; van der Vliet, Walter; Huys, Erik; Vermeesch, Joris; Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Admiraal, Ronald; Terhal, Paulien; Lacombe, Didier; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Smeets, Dominique; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.

    2003-01-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 occur in ∼1 in 10,000 live births. Congenital aural atresia (CAA), or narrow external auditory canals, occurs in ∼66% of all patients who have a terminal deletion 18q. The present report describes a series of 20 patients with CAA, of whom 18 had microscopically visible 18q deletions. The extent and nature of the chromosome-18 deletions were studied in detail by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH). High-resolution chromosome-18 profiles were obtained for all patients, and a critical region of 5 Mb that was deleted in all patients with CAA could be defined on 18q22.3-18q23. Therefore, this region can be considered as a candidate region for aural atresia. The array-based high-resolution copy-number screening enabled a refined cytogenetic diagnosis in 12 patients. Our approach appeared to be applicable to the detection of genetic mosaicisms and, in particular, to a detailed delineation of ring chromosomes. This study clearly demonstrates the power of the arrayCGH technology in high-resolution molecular karyotyping. Deletion and amplification mapping can now be performed at the submicroscopic level and will allow high-throughput definition of genomic regions harboring disease genes. PMID:12740760

  7. X chromosome array-CGH for the identification of novel X-linked mental retardation genes.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Marijke; Van Esch, Hilde; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Array-CGH technology for the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes in the genome has recently been developed for the identification of novel disease-associated genes. It has been estimated that submicroscopic genomic deletions or duplications will be present in 5-7% of patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR). Since 30% more males than females are diagnosed with MR, we have developed a full coverage X chromosome array-CGH with a theoretical resolution of 82 kb, for the detection of copy number alterations in patients with suspected X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, we have validated the genomic location of X-derived clones through male versus female hybridisations. Next, we validated our array for efficient and reproducible detection of known alterations in XLMR patients. In all cases, we were able to detect the deletions and duplications in males as well as females. Due to the high resolution of our X-array, the boundaries of the genomic aberrations could clearly be identified making genotype-phenotype studies more reliable. Here, we describe the production and validation of a full coverage X-array-CGH, which will allow for fast and easy screening of submicroscopic copy number alterations in XLMR patients with the aim to identify novel MR genes or mechanisms involved in a deranged cognitive development.

  8. Detection of chromosome imbalances in retinoblastoma by parallel karyotype and CGH analyses.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Pinglier, E; Gilbert, E; Peter, M; Validire, P; Desjardins, L; Doz, F; Aurias, A; Couturier, J

    2000-08-01

    We have studied a series of 20 primary retinoblastomas by karyotypic analysis and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to perform an exhaustive evaluation of chromosome imbalances in this tumor. In addition, 4 tumors were studied by CGH only. On the whole, CGH results were largely in agreement with those of karyotypic analysis and with known cytogenetic data. The most frequent imbalances were +6p (13/24 cases), +1q (12/24), -16/-16q (11/24), and +2p (9/24). Recurrent high-level amplifications were observed in 2p23-25 and 1q21. Amplification of 2p23-25, present in 4 cases among which 3 showed double-minute chromosomes, was related to MYCN amplification, as demonstrated by FISH and PCR. No evident correlation was found in this small series between any of the imbalances identified and either the differentiation or the histoprognostic risk. PMID:10862045

  9. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

    PubMed Central

    Kasakyan, Serdar; Lohmann, Laurence; Aboura, Azeddine; Quimsiyeh, Mazin; Menezo, Yves; Tachdjian, Gerard; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2008-01-01

    Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG). Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9)(p22.1p24) [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1)x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance. PMID:19105807

  10. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic and intellectual disability with normal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Pratte-Santos, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Katyanne Heringer; Santos, Thainá Altoe; Cintra, Terezinha Sarquis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic features and intellectual disability with normal conventional karyotype. Methods Retrospective study, carried out from January 2012 to February 2014, analyzing the CGH-array results of 39 patients. Results Twenty-six (66.7%) patients had normal results and 13 (33.3%) showed abnormal results - in that, 6 (15.4%) had pathogenic variants, 6 (15.4%) variants designated as uncertain and 1 (2.5%) non-pathogenic variants. Conclusion The characterization of the genetic profile by CGH-array in patients with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features enabled making etiologic diagnosis, followed by genetic counseling for families and specific treatment. PMID:27074231

  11. A comprehensive continuous-time model for the appearance of CGH signal due to chromosomal missegregations during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Desper, Richard; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas; Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2005-09-01

    Aneuploidy, the gain or loss of large regions of the genome, is a common feature in cancer cells. Irregularities in chromosomal copy number caused by missegregations of chromosomes during mitosis can be visualized by cytogenetic techniques including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), spectral karyotyping (SKY) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In the current work, we consider the propagation of irregular copy numbers throughout a cell population as the individual cells progress through ordinary mitotic cell cycles. We use an algebraic model to track the different copy numbers as states in a stochastic process, based on the model of chromosome instability of Gusev, Kagansky, and Dooley, and consider the average copy number of a particular chromosome within a cell population as a function of the cell division rate. We review a number of mathematical models for determining the length of the cell cycle, including the Smith-Martin transition probability model and the 'sloppy size' model of Wheals, Tyson and Diekmann. The program MITOSIM simulates the growth of a population of cells using the aforementioned models of the cell cycle. MITOSIM allows the cell population to grow, with occasional resampling, until the average copy number of a given chromosome in the population reaches a preset threshold signifying a positive copy number alteration in this region. MITOSIM calculates the relationship between the missegregation rate and the growth rate of the cell population. This allows the user to test hypotheses regarding the effect chromosomal aberrations have upon the cell cycle, cell growth rates, and time to population dominance.

  12. Numerical and structural aberrations in advanced neuroblastoma tumours by CGH analysis; survival correlates with chromosome 17 status

    PubMed Central

    Cunsolo, C Lo; Bicocchi, M P; Petti, A R; Tonini, G P

    2000-01-01

    Rapid tumour progression in neuroblastoma is associated with MYCN amplification, deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and gain of 17q. However, patients with advanced disease without MYCN amplification and/or 1p deletion have a very poor outcome too, which suggests other genetic defects may predict an unfavourable prognosis. We employed CGH to study 22 tumours of patients at stages 3 and 4 over one year of age (6 and 16 cases respectively). Patients were divided in groups (A) long-term survivors and (B) short-term survivors. CGH showed a total of 226 chromosome imbalances (110 in group A and 116 in group B). The neuroblastoma cells of long-term survivors showed a preponderance of numerical aberrations (54%vs 43%); particularly gains of entire chromosomes 1 (P< 0.03), 7 (P< 0.04) and 19 (P< 0.05). An extra copy of 17 was detected in 6/8 (75%) samples of group A and only 1/14 (7%) samples of group B (P< 0.002). Conversely, tumours of patients who died from disease progression displayed a higher frequency of structural abnormalities (43%vs 35%), including loss of 1p, 9p, 11q, 15q and 18q and gain of 12q, although the difference was not significant (P= 0.24). Unbalanced gain of 17q was detected in 8/14 (57%) tumours of group B and only 1/8 (13%) tumours of group A (P< 0.05). The peculiar genetic difference observed in the tumours of long and short-term survivors may have prognostic relevance. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044353

  13. A patient with constitutional ring 1 chromosome characterized by SNP array CGH.

    PubMed

    Saliganan, Sheila; Lee, Joanna; Wei, Sainan

    2016-04-01

    We present a male patient with constitutional ring 1 chromosome and subsequent 6 Mb deletion at 1q43q44. The patient displays overlapping clinical features with reported patients with ring 1 chromosome and 1q43q44 microdeletion syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with ring 1 chromosome characterized by comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:27099748

  14. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Down syndrome identified by array CGH in 30 cases of partial trisomy and partial monosomy chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Robert; Béna, Frédérique; Gagos, Sarantis; Gehrig, Corinne; Lopez, Gipsy; Schinzel, Albert; Lespinasse, James; Bottani, Armand; Dahoun, Sophie; Taine, Laurence; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Cornillet-Lefèbvre, Pascale; Pelet, Anna; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Toutain, Annick; Colleaux, Laurence; Horst, Jürgen; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Descartes, Maria; Franklin, Judy C; Florentin-Arar, Lina; Kitsiou, Sophia; Aït Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Costantine, Maher; Sinet, Pierre-Marie; Delabar, Jean M; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most frequent congenital birth defects, and the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. DS has a complex phenotype, and a major goal of DS research is to identify genotype–phenotype correlations. Cases of partial trisomy 21 and other HSA21 rearrangements associated with DS features could identify genomic regions associated with specific phenotypes. We have developed a BAC array spanning HSA21q and used array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to enable high-resolution mapping of pathogenic partial aneuploidies and unbalanced translocations involving HSA21. We report the identification and mapping of 30 pathogenic chromosomal aberrations of HSA21 consisting of 19 partial trisomies and 11 partial monosomies for different segments of HSA21. The breakpoints have been mapped to within ∼85 kb. The majority of the breakpoints (26 of 30) for the partial aneuploidies map within a 10-Mb region. Our data argue against a single DS critical region. We identify susceptibility regions for 25 phenotypes for DS and 27 regions for monosomy 21. However, most of these regions are still broad, and more cases are needed to narrow down the phenotypic maps to a reasonable number of candidate genomic elements per phenotype. PMID:19002211

  15. Discovery of common Asian copy number variants using integrated high-resolution array CGH and massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, Hansoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Ju, Young Seok; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E; Kim, Sheehyun; Lee, Seungbok; Suh, Dongwhan; Hong, Dongwan; Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Yoo, Yun Joo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Yavartanoo, Maryam; Chang, Young Wha; Ha, Jung-Sook; Chong, Wilson; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Darvishi, Katayoon; Kim, Hyeran; Yang, Song Ju; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Hurles, Matthew E; Scherer, Stephen W; Carter, Nigel P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Lee, Charles; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for the majority of human genomic diversity in terms of base coverage. Here, we have developed and applied a new method to combine high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data with whole-genome DNA sequencing data to obtain a comprehensive catalog of common CNVs in Asian individuals. The genomes of 30 individuals from three Asian populations (Korean, Chinese and Japanese) were interrogated with an ultra-high-resolution array CGH platform containing 24 million probes. Whole-genome sequencing data from a reference genome (NA10851, with 28.3x coverage) and two Asian genomes (AK1, with 27.8x coverage and AK2, with 32.0x coverage) were used to transform the relative copy number information obtained from array CGH experiments into absolute copy number values. We discovered 5,177 CNVs, of which 3,547 were putative Asian-specific CNVs. These common CNVs in Asian populations will be a useful resource for subsequent genetic studies in these populations, and the new method of calling absolute CNVs will be essential for applying CNV data to personalized medicine.

  16. True 3q Chromosomal Amplification in Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma by FISH and aCGH Molecular Analysis: Impact on Targeted Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Nottegar, Alessia; Cingarlini, Sara; Simionato, Francesca; Caliò, Anna; Eccher, Albino; Parolini, Claudia; Iannucci, Antonio; Gilioli, Eliana; Pedron, Serena; Massari, Francesco; Tortora, Giampaolo; Borze, Ioana; Knuutila, Sakari; Gobbo, Stefano; Santo, Antonio; Tondulli, Luca; Calabrò, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Chilosi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Squamous lung carcinoma lacks specific “ad hoc” therapies. Amplification of chromosome 3q is the most common genomic aberration and this region harbours genes having role as novel targets for therapeutics. There is no standard definition on how to score and report 3q amplification. False versus true 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma may have tremendous impact on trials involving drugs which target DNA zones mapping on 3q. Forty squamous lung carcinomas were analyzed by FISH to assess chromosome 3q amplification. aCGH was performed as gold-standard to avoid false positive amplifications. Three clustered patterns of fluorescent signals were observed. Eight cases out of 40 (20%) showed ≥8 3q signals. Twenty out of 40 (50%) showed from 3 to 7 signals. The remaining showed two fluorescent signals (30%). When corrected by whole chromosome 3 signals, only cases with ≥8 signals maintained a LSI 3q/CEP3 ratio >2. Only the cases showing 3q amplification by aCGH (+3q25.3−3q27.3) showed ≥8 fluorescent signals at FISH evidencing a 3q/3 ratio >2. The remaining cases showed flat genomic portrait at aCGH on chromosome 3. We concluded that: 1) absolute copy number of 3q chromosomal region may harbour false positive interpretation of 3q amplification in squamous cell carcinoma; 2) a case results truly “amplified for chromosome 3q” when showing ≥8 fluorescent 3q signals; 3) trials involving drugs targeting loci on chromosome 3q in squamous lung carcinoma therapy have to consider false versus true 3q chromosomal amplification. PMID:23236352

  17. Array CGH identifies distinct DNA copy number profiles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in chromosomal- and microsatellite-unstable sporadic colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Silke; Weis, Roland; Makowiec, Frank; Roth, Jasmine; Danciu, Mihai; Hopt, Ulrich; Werner, Martin

    2007-03-01

    DNA copy number changes represent molecular fingerprints of solid tumors and are as such relevant for better understanding of tumor development and progression. In this study, we applied genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify gene-specific DNA copy number changes in chromosomal (CIN)- and microsatellite (MIN)-unstable sporadic colorectal cancers (sCRC). Genomic DNA was extracted from microdissected, matching normal colorectal epithelium and invasive tumor cells of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of 22 cases with colorectal cancer (CIN = 11, MIN = 11). DNA copy number changes were determined by aCGH for 287 target sequences in tumor cell DNAs, using pooled normal DNAs as reference. aCGH data of tumor cell DNAs was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genes on serial tissues as those used for aCGH. aCGH revealed DNA copy number changes previously described by metaphase CGH (gains 7, 8q, 13q, and 20q; losses 8p, 15q, 18q, and 17p). However, chromosomal regions 20q, 13q, 7, and 17p were preferentially altered in CIN-type tumors and included DNA amplifications of eight genes on chromosome 20q (TOP1, AIB1, MYBL2, CAS, PTPN1, STK15, ZNF217, and CYP24), two genes on chromosome 13q (BRCA2 and D13S25), and three genes on chromosome 7 (IL6, CYLN2, and MET) as well as DNA deletions of two genes on chromosome 17p (HIC1 and LLGL1). Finally, additional CIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were identified for EXT1 (8q24.11) and MYC (8q24.12) as well as DNA deletions for MAP2K5 (15q23) and LAMA3 (18q11.2). In contrast, distinct MIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were detected for E2F5 (8p22-q21.3), GARP (11q13.5-q14), ATM (11q22.3), KAL (Xp22.3), and XIST (Xq13.2) as well as DNA deletions for RAF1 (3p25), DCC (18q21.3), and KEN (21q tel). aCGH revealed distinct DNA copy number changes of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CIN- and MIN-type sporadic colorectal carcinomas. The identified candidate

  18. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Christine; Qiao, Ying; Harvard, Chansonette; Liu, Xudong; Bernier, Francois P; McGillivray, Barbara; Farrell, Sandra A; Arbour, Laura; Chudley, Albert E; Clarke, Lorne; Gibson, William; Dyack, Sarah; McLeod, Ross; Costa, Teresa; VanAllen, Margot I; Yong, Siu-li; Graham, Gail E; MacLeod, Patrick; Patel, Millan S; Hurlburt, Jane; Holden, Jeanette JA; Lewis, Suzanne ME; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2008-01-01

    Background Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Results Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics), we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID) and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25–134.43 Mb) and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15–128.19 Mb), while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29–129.03 Mb). Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen) was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791). However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities). Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusion Two individuals with ID who

  19. Tiling resolution array CGH and high density expression profiling of urothelial carcinomas delineate genomic amplicons and candidate target genes specific for advanced tumors

    PubMed Central

    Heidenblad, Markus; Lindgren, David; Jonson, Tord; Liedberg, Fredrik; Veerla, Srinivas; Chebil, Gunilla; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Borg, Åke; Månsson, Wiking; Höglund, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is characterized by nonrandom chromosomal aberrations, varying from one or a few changes in early-stage and low-grade tumors, to highly rearranged karyotypes in muscle-invasive lesions. Recent array-CGH analyses have shed further light on the genomic changes underlying the neoplastic development of UC, and have facilitated the molecular delineation amplified and deleted regions to the level of specific candidate genes. In the present investigation we combine detailed genomic information with expression information to identify putative target genes for genomic amplifications. Methods We analyzed 38 urothelial carcinomas by whole-genome tiling resolution array-CGH and high density expression profiling to identify putative target genes in common genomic amplifications. When necessary expression profiling was complemented with Q-PCR of individual genes. Results Three genomic segments were frequently and exclusively amplified in high grade tumors; 1q23, 6p22 and 8q22, respectively. Detailed mapping of the 1q23 segment showed a heterogeneous amplification pattern and no obvious commonly amplified region. The 6p22 amplicon was defined by a 1.8 Mb core region present in all amplifications, flanked both distally and proximally by segments amplified to a lesser extent. By combining genomic profiles with expression profiles we could show that amplification of E2F3, CDKAL1, SOX4, and MBOAT1 as well as NUP153, AOF1, FAM8A1 and DEK in 6p22 was associated with increased gene expression. Amplification of the 8q22 segment was primarily associated with YWHAZ (14-3-3-zeta) and POLR2K over expression. The possible importance of the YWHA genes in the development of urothelial carcinomas was supported by another recurrent amplicon paralogous to 8q22, in 2p25, where increased copy numbers lead to enhanced expression of YWHAQ (14-3-3-theta). Homozygous deletions were identified at 10 different genomic locations, most frequently affecting CDKN2A/CDKN2B

  20. From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: A high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.N.; Gonsky, R.; Korenberg, J.R.; Knauf, J.A.; Fagin, J.A.; Chissoe, S.

    1998-08-01

    Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. The authors now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. They used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3--6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKC{epsilon}), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKC{epsilon} as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis.

  1. FISH and array CGH characterization of de novo derivative Y chromosome (Yq duplication and partial Yp deletion) in an azoospermic male

    PubMed Central

    Wiland, Ewa; Yatsenko, Alexander N; Kishore, Archana; Stanczak, Halina; Zdarta, Agata; Ligaj, Marcin; Olszewska, Marta; Wolski, Jan Karol; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a 28-year-old infertile male who was referred to the cytogenetic laboratory for chromosomal analysis after 4 years of regular unprotected intercourse in whom non-obstructive azoospermia was revealed. Standard cytogenetic G-banding was performed on metaphase spreads and a de-novo karyotype 46,X,der(Y)(q11.22;p11.3) was identified. This analysis was followed by flourescence in-situ hybridization(FISH) and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Finally, the patient’s karyotype was identified as 46,X,der(Y)(qter→q11.221∷p11.31→qter).ish der(Y)(qter+,pter−,SHOX+,SRY+,Ycen+,DYZ3+;DYZ1+,qter+).arrYq11.221q12 (14,448,863–59,288,511) x2, Yp11.32p11.31(104,062–266,388) x0. It is proposed that de-novo derivative monocentric Y chromosome with duplicated region Y qter→q11.221∷p11.31→qter with partial deletion of Yp PAR1 region most probably can perturb the conjugation of sex chromosomes during first meiotic division of spermatogenic arrested differentiation (development). PMID:26096031

  2. FISH and array CGH characterization of de novo derivative Y chromosome (Yq duplication and partial Yp deletion) in an azoospermic male.

    PubMed

    Wiland, Ewa; Yatsenko, Alexander N; Kishore, Archana; Stanczak, Halina; Zdarta, Agata; Ligaj, Marcin; Olszewska, Marta; Wolski, Jan Karol; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a 28-year-old infertile male who was referred to the cytogenetic laboratory for chromosomal analysis after 4 years of regular unprotected intercourse in whom non-obstructive azoospermia was revealed. Standard cytogenetic G-banding was performed on metaphase spreads and a de-novo karyotype 46,X,der(Y)(q11.22;p11.3) was identified. This analysis was followed by flourescence in-situ hybridization(FISH) and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Finally, the patient's karyotype was identified as 46,X,der(Y)(qter→q11.221::p11.31→qter).ish der(Y) (qter+,pter-,SHOX+,SRY+,Ycen+,DYZ3+;DYZ1+,qter+).arrYq11.221q12(14,448,863-59,288,511) x2, Yp11.32p11.31(104,062-266,388) x0. It is proposed that de-novo derivative monocentric Y chromosome with duplicated region Y qter→q11.221::p11.31→qter with partial deletion of Yp PAR1 region most probably can perturb the conjugation of sex chromosomes during first meiotic division of spermatogenic arrested differentiation (development).

  3. Somatic mosaicism detected by exon-targeted, high-resolution aCGH in 10 362 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Justin; Shaw, Chad; Pursley, Amber; Hixson, Patricia; Sampath, Srirangan; Roney, Erin; Gambin, Tomasz; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema; Bacino, Carlos; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Somatic chromosomal mosaicism arising from post-zygotic errors is known to cause several well-defined genetic syndromes as well as contribute to phenotypic variation in diseases. However, somatic mosaicism is often under-diagnosed due to challenges in detection. We evaluated 10 362 patients with a custom-designed, exon-targeted whole-genome oligonucleotide array and detected somatic mosaicism in a total of 57 cases (0.55%). The mosaicism was characterized and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or chromosome analysis. Different categories of abnormal cell lines were detected: (1) aneuploidy, including sex chromosome abnormalities and isochromosomes (22 cases), (2) ring or marker chromosomes (12 cases), (3) single deletion/duplication copy number variations (CNVs) (11 cases), (4) multiple deletion/duplication CNVs (5 cases), (5) exonic CNVs (4 cases), and (6) unbalanced translocations (3 cases). Levels of mosaicism calculated based on the array data were in good concordance with those observed by FISH (10–93%). Of the 14 cases evaluated concurrently by chromosome analysis, mosaicism was detected solely by the array in 4 cases (29%). In summary, our exon-targeted array further expands the diagnostic capability of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in detecting mosaicism for cytogenetic abnormalities as well as small CNVs in disease-causing genes. PMID:24398791

  4. Somatic mosaicism detected by exon-targeted, high-resolution aCGH in 10,362 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pham, Justin; Shaw, Chad; Pursley, Amber; Hixson, Patricia; Sampath, Srirangan; Roney, Erin; Gambin, Tomasz; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema; Bacino, Carlos; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau-Wai

    2014-08-01

    Somatic chromosomal mosaicism arising from post-zygotic errors is known to cause several well-defined genetic syndromes as well as contribute to phenotypic variation in diseases. However, somatic mosaicism is often under-diagnosed due to challenges in detection. We evaluated 10,362 patients with a custom-designed, exon-targeted whole-genome oligonucleotide array and detected somatic mosaicism in a total of 57 cases (0.55%). The mosaicism was characterized and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or chromosome analysis. Different categories of abnormal cell lines were detected: (1) aneuploidy, including sex chromosome abnormalities and isochromosomes (22 cases), (2) ring or marker chromosomes (12 cases), (3) single deletion/duplication copy number variations (CNVs) (11 cases), (4) multiple deletion/duplication CNVs (5 cases), (5) exonic CNVs (4 cases), and (6) unbalanced translocations (3 cases). Levels of mosaicism calculated based on the array data were in good concordance with those observed by FISH (10-93%). Of the 14 cases evaluated concurrently by chromosome analysis, mosaicism was detected solely by the array in 4 cases (29%). In summary, our exon-targeted array further expands the diagnostic capability of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in detecting mosaicism for cytogenetic abnormalities as well as small CNVs in disease-causing genes.

  5. Inherited Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication in a boy with recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia: Clinical, chromosomal and aCGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Valadares, Eugênia R; da Costa, Silvia S; Arantes, Rodrigo R; de Oliveira, Luiz Roberto; Rosenberg, Carla; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Svartman, Marta

    2016-09-01

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a maternally inherited ~ 18.3 Mb Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication delimited by aCGH. As previously described in patients with similar duplications, his clinical features included intellectual disability, developmental delay, speech delay, generalized hypotonia, infantile feeding difficulties, self-injurious behavior, short stature and endocrine problems. As additional findings, he presented recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia. His mother was phenotypically normal and had completely skewed inactivation of the duplicated X chromosome, as most female carriers of such duplications. Five previously reported patients with partial Xq duplications presented duplication breakpoints similar to those of our patient. One of them, a fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities, had the same cytogenetic duplication breakpoint. Three of the reported patients shared many features with our proband but the other had some clinical features of the Prader-Willi syndrome. It was suggested that ATRX overexpression could be involved in the major clinical features of patients with partial Xq duplications. We propose that this gene could also be involved with the obesity of the patient with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Additionally, we suggest that the PCDH11X gene could be a candidate for our patient's recurrent seizures. In males, the Xq13-q21 duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome, as previously suggested, and neuromuscular diseases, particularly mitochondriopathies. PMID:27617217

  6. Inherited Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication in a boy with recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia: Clinical, chromosomal and aCGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Valadares, Eugênia R; da Costa, Silvia S; Arantes, Rodrigo R; de Oliveira, Luiz Roberto; Rosenberg, Carla; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Svartman, Marta

    2016-09-01

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a maternally inherited ~ 18.3 Mb Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication delimited by aCGH. As previously described in patients with similar duplications, his clinical features included intellectual disability, developmental delay, speech delay, generalized hypotonia, infantile feeding difficulties, self-injurious behavior, short stature and endocrine problems. As additional findings, he presented recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia. His mother was phenotypically normal and had completely skewed inactivation of the duplicated X chromosome, as most female carriers of such duplications. Five previously reported patients with partial Xq duplications presented duplication breakpoints similar to those of our patient. One of them, a fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities, had the same cytogenetic duplication breakpoint. Three of the reported patients shared many features with our proband but the other had some clinical features of the Prader-Willi syndrome. It was suggested that ATRX overexpression could be involved in the major clinical features of patients with partial Xq duplications. We propose that this gene could also be involved with the obesity of the patient with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Additionally, we suggest that the PCDH11X gene could be a candidate for our patient's recurrent seizures. In males, the Xq13-q21 duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome, as previously suggested, and neuromuscular diseases, particularly mitochondriopathies.

  7. High-resolution copy number profiling by array CGH using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Hendrik F; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    We describe protocols to acquire high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for the use in array comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Formalin fixation combined with paraffin embedding is routine procedure for solid malignancies in the diagnostic practice of the pathologist. As a consequence, large archives of FFPE tissues are available in pathology institutes across the globe. This archival material is for many research questions an invaluable resource, with long-term clinical follow-up and survival data available. FFPE is, thus, highly attractive for large genomics studies, including experiments requiring samples for test/learning and validation. Most larger array CGH studies have, therefore, made use of FFPE material and show that CNAs have tumor- and tissue-specific traits (Chin et al. Cancer Cell 10: 529-541, 2006; Fridlyand et al. BMC Cancer 6: 96, 2006; Weiss et al. Oncogene 22: 1872-1879, 2003; Jong et al. Oncogene 26: 1499-1506, 2007). The protocols described are tailored to array CGH of FFPE solid malignancies: from sectioning FFPE blocks to specific cynosures for pathological revisions of sections, DNA isolation, quality testing, and amplification. The protocols are technical in character and elaborate up to the labeling of isolated DNA while further processes and interpretation and data analysis are beyond the scope.

  8. Construction and Application of a Zebrafish Array CGH Platform

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer L.; Ceol, Craig; Feng, Hui; Langenau, David M.; Belair, Cassandra; Stern, Howard M.; Song, Anhua; Paw, Barry H.; Look, A. Thomas; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Lee, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is emerging as a prominent model system for studying the genetics of human development and disease. Genetic alterations that underlie each mutant model can exist in the form of single base changes, balanced chromosomal rearrangements, or genetic imbalances. To detect genetic imbalances in an unbiased genome-wide fashion, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) can be used. We have developed a 5 Mb resolution array CGH platform specifically for the zebrafish. This platform contains 286 BAC clones, enriched for orthologous sequences of human oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Each BAC clone has been end-sequenced and cytogenetically assigned to a specific location within the zebrafish genome, allowing for ease of integration of array CGH data with the current version of the genome assembly. This platform has been applied to three zebrafish cancer models. Significant genomic imbalances were detected in each model, identifying different regions which may potentially play a role in tumorigenesis. Hence, this platform should be a useful resource for genetic dissection of additional zebrafish developmental and disease models as well as a benchmark for future array CGH platform development. PMID:18973135

  9. Whole-Genome Array CGH Evaluation for Replacing Prenatal Karyotyping in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Anita S. Y.; Lau, Elizabeth T.; Tang, W. F.; Chan, Sario S. Y.; Ding, Simon C. K.; Chan, Kelvin Y. K.; Lee, C. P.; Hui, Pui Wah; Chung, Brian H. Y.; Leung, K. Y.; Ma, Teresa; Leung, Wing C.; Tang, Mary H. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in prenatal diagnosis in Hong Kong. Methods Array CGH was performed on 220 samples recruited prospectively as the first-tier test study. In addition 150 prenatal samples with abnormal fetal ultrasound findings found to have normal karyotypes were analyzed as a ‘further-test’ study using NimbleGen CGX-135K oligonucleotide arrays. Results Array CGH findings were concordant with conventional cytogenetic results with the exception of one case of triploidy. It was found in the first-tier test study that aCGH detected 20% (44/220) clinically significant copy number variants (CNV), of which 21 were common aneuploidies and 23 had other chromosomal imbalances. There were 3.2% (7/220) samples with CNVs detected by aCGH but not by conventional cytogenetics. In the ‘further-test’ study, the additional diagnostic yield of detecting chromosome imbalance was 6% (9/150). The overall detection for CNVs of unclear clinical significance was 2.7% (10/370) with 0.9% found to be de novo. Eleven loci of common CNVs were found in the local population. Conclusion Whole-genome aCGH offered a higher resolution diagnostic capacity than conventional karyotyping for prenatal diagnosis either as a first-tier test or as a ‘further-test’ for pregnancies with fetal ultrasound anomalies. We propose replacing conventional cytogenetics with aCGH for all pregnancies undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures after excluding common aneuploidies and triploidies by quantitative fluorescent PCR. Conventional cytogenetics can be reserved for visualization of clinically significant CNVs. PMID:24505343

  10. High resolution ArrayCGH and expression profiling identifies PTPRD and PCDH17/PCH68 as tumor suppressor gene candidates in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Giefing, Maciej; Zemke, Natalia; Brauze, Damian; Kostrzewska-Poczekaj, Magdalena; Luczak, Magdalena; Szaumkessel, Marcin; Pelinska, Kinga; Kiwerska, Katarzyna; Tönnies, Holger; Grenman, Reidar; Figlerowicz, Marek; Siebert, Reiner; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Jarmuz, Malgorzata

    2011-03-01

    Many classical tumor suppressor genes (TSG) were identified by delineation of bi-allelic losses called homozygous deletions. To identify systematically homozygous deletions in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and to unravel novel putative tumor suppressor genes, we screened 10 LSCC cell lines using high resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and array based expression analysis. ArrayCGH identified altogether 113 regions harboring protein coding genes that showed strong reduction in copy number indicating a potential homozygous deletion. Out of the 113 candidate regions, 22 novel homozygous deletions that affected the coding sequences of 15 genes were confirmed by multiplexPCR. Three genes were homozygously lost in two cell lines: PCDH17/PCH68, PRR20, and PTPRD. For the 15 homozygously deleted genes, four showed statistically significant downregulation of expression in LSCC cell lines as compared with normal human laryngeal controls. These were ATG7 (1/10 cell line), ZMYND11 (BS69) (1/10 cell line), PCDH17/PCH68 (9/10 cell lines), and PTPRD (7/10 cell lines). Quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the downregulation of the candidate genes in 10 expression array-studied cell lines and an additional cohort of cell lines; statistical significant downregulation of PCDH17/PCH68 and PTPRD was observed. In line with this also Western blot analyses demonstrated a complete absence of the PCDH17 and PTPRD proteins. Thus, expression profiling confirmed recurrent alterations of two genes identified primarily by delineation of homozygous deletions. These were PCDH17/PCH68, the protocadherin gene, and the STAT3 inhibiting receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase gene PTPRD. These genes are good candidates for novel TSG in LSCC.

  11. Molecular karyotyping: array CGH quality criteria for constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vermeesch, Joris R; Melotte, Cindy; Froyen, Guy; Van Vooren, Steven; Dutta, Binita; Maas, Nicole; Vermeulen, Stefan; Menten, Björn; Speleman, Frank; De Moor, Bart; Van Hummelen, Paul; Marynen, Peter; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koen

    2005-03-01

    Array CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) enables the identification of chromosomal copy number changes. The availability of clone sets covering the human genome opens the possibility for the widespread use of array CGH for both research and diagnostic purposes. In this manuscript we report on the parameters that were critical for successful implementation of the technology, assess quality criteria, and discuss the potential benefits and pitfalls of the technology for improved pre- and postnatal constitutional genetic diagnosis. We propose to name the genome-wide array CGH "molecular karyotyping," in analogy with conventional karyotyping that uses staining methods to visualize chromosomes.

  12. aCGH-MAS: Analysis of aCGH by means of Multiagent System

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Rocío; Bajo, Javier; Rodríguez, Ana Eugenia; Abáigar, María

    2015-01-01

    There are currently different techniques, such as CGH arrays, to study genetic variations in patients. CGH arrays analyze gains and losses in different regions in the chromosome. Regions with gains or losses in pathologies are important for selecting relevant genes or CNVs (copy-number variations) associated with the variations detected within chromosomes. Information corresponding to mutations, genes, proteins, variations, CNVs, and diseases can be found in different databases and it would be of interest to incorporate information of different sources to extract relevant information. This work proposes a multiagent system to manage the information of aCGH arrays, with the aim of providing an intuitive and extensible system to analyze and interpret the results. The agent roles integrate statistical techniques to select relevant variations and visualization techniques for the interpretation of the final results and to extract relevant information from different sources of information by applying a CBR system. PMID:25874203

  13. [Familial presentation of microdeletion and inverted microduplication with array-CGH].

    PubMed

    Beseler-Soto, Beatriz; Jiménez-Candel, M Isabel; Pedrón-Marzal, Gema; Pérez-García, Begoña; Carpena-Lucas, Pedro J

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. Over the years the field of genetics has advanced significantly. Following the polymerase chain reaction and mass sequencing techniques, the array-CGH technique (comparative genomic hybridization) has helped to improve genetic procedures. A resolution of up to 200 kb is currently being accomplished in the human genome. CASE REPORTS. We report the case of two sisters with delays in developmental milestones and a characteristic phenotype with normal results from initial studies of the karyotype and subtelomeric regions. Array-CGH was later used to detect a deletion and duplication that were different in each of the sisters, this being the result of a balanced paternal translocation. In the two cases, despite being the result of the same translocation, the genetic and phenotype expression were different. CONCLUSIONS. The precision achieved by means of array-CGH is making it possible to establish a correlation between minimum gains or losses of the genome and the clinical features. Chromosome 3 codes for genes that play a fundamental role in neurological development (contactins, neurotransmitter modulator proteins, etc.) and chromosome 10 codes for proteins involved in apoptosis and proteins regulating transcription. In the literature there have been reports of chromosome 3 deletion syndrome and monosomy 10. Likewise, there are also descriptions of rearrangements between these chromosomes in individuals from the same family. Nevertheless, we describe two cases of a family with a micro-deletion and an inverted microduplication, detected by means of array-CGH, that have not been reported to date. This technique can provide a diagnostic and prognostic approximation as regards development and offer genetic counselling.

  14. Identification and characterization of a de novo partial trisomy 10p by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Benzacken, B; Lapierre, J M; Siffroi, J P; Chalvon, A; Tachdjian, G

    1998-10-01

    We report the characterization of a de novo unbalanced chromosome rearrangement by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a 15-day-old child with hypotonia and dysmorphia. We describe the combined use of CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify the origin of the additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 6. Investigation with FISH revealed that the excess material was not derived from chromosome 6. Identification of unknown unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified by traditional cytogenetics procedures is possible by CGH analysis. Visual analysis of digital images from CGH-metaphase spreads revealed a predominantly green signal on the telomeric region of chromosome 10p. After quantitative digital ratio imaging of 10 CGH-metaphase spreads, a region of gain was found in the chromosome band 10p14-pter. The CGH finding was confirmed by FISH analysis, using a whole chromosome 10 paint probe. These results show the usefulness of CGH for a rapid characterization of de novo unbalanced translocation, unidentifiable by karyotype alone.

  15. CGH arrays compared for DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material.

    PubMed

    Krijgsman, Oscar; Israeli, Danielle; Haan, Josien C; van Essen, Hendrik F; Smeets, Serge J; Eijk, Paul P; Steenbergen, Renske D M; Kok, Klaas; Tejpar, Sabine; Meijer, Gerrit A; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-04-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue is an important source of DNA material. The most commonly used technique to identify copy number aberrations from chromosomal DNA in tumorigenesis is array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Although copy number analysis using DNA from FFPE archival tissue is challenging, several research groups have reported high quality and reproducible DNA copy number results using aCGH. Aim of this study is to compare the commercially available aCGH platforms suitable for high-resolution copy number analysis using FFPE-derived DNA. Two dual channel aCGH platforms (Agilent and NimbleGen) and a single channel SNP-based platform (Affymetrix) were evaluated using seven FFPE colon cancer samples, and median absolute deviation (MAD), deflection, signal-to-noise ratio, and DNA input requirements were used as quality criteria. Large differences were observed between platforms; Agilent and NimbleGen showed better MAD values (0.13 for both) compared with Affymetrix (0.22). On the contrary, Affymetrix showed a better deflection of 0.94, followed by 0.71 for Agilent and 0.51 for NimbleGen. This resulted in signal-to-nose ratios that were comparable between the three commercially available platforms. Interestingly, DNA input amounts from FFPE material lower than recommended still yielded high quality profiles on all platforms. Copy number analysis using DNA derived from FFPE archival material is feasible using all three high-resolution copy number platforms and shows reproducible results, also with DNA input amounts lower than recommended.

  16. Comprehensive prediction of chromosome dimer resolution sites in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the replication process of bacteria with circular chromosomes, an odd number of homologous recombination events results in concatenated dimer chromosomes that cannot be partitioned into daughter cells. However, many bacteria harbor a conserved dimer resolution machinery consisting of one or two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, and their 28-bp target site, dif. Results To study the evolution of the dif/XerCD system and its relationship with replication termination, we report the comprehensive prediction of dif sequences in silico using a phylogenetic prediction approach based on iterated hidden Markov modeling. Using this method, dif sites were identified in 641 organisms among 16 phyla, with a 97.64% identification rate for single-chromosome strains. The dif sequence positions were shown to be strongly correlated with the GC skew shift-point that is induced by replicational mutation/selection pressures, but the difference in the positions of the predicted dif sites and the GC skew shift-points did not correlate with the degree of replicational mutation/selection pressures. Conclusions The sequence of dif sites is widely conserved among many bacterial phyla, and they can be computationally identified using our method. The lack of correlation between dif position and the degree of GC skew suggests that replication termination does not occur strictly at dif sites. PMID:21223577

  17. aCGHViewer: A Generic Visualization Tool For aCGH data

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh; Rossi, Michael R.; McQuaid, Devin E.; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Gaile, Daniel G.; Cowell, John K.; Nowak, Norma J.; Liang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful high throughput technology for detecting chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNAs) in cancer, aiming at identifying related critical genes from the affected genomic regions. However, advancing from a dataset with thousands of tabular lines to a few candidate genes can be an onerous and time-consuming process. To expedite the aCGH data analysis process, we have developed a user-friendly aCGH data viewer (aCGHViewer) as a conduit between the aCGH data tables and a genome browser. The data from a given aCGH analysis are displayed in a genomic view comprised of individual chromosome panels which can be rapidly scanned for interesting features. A chromosome panel containing a feature of interest can be selected to launch a detail window for that single chromosome. Selecting a data point of interest in the detail window launches a query to the UCSC or NCBI genome browser to allow the user to explore the gene content in the chromosomal region. Additionally, aCGHViewer can display aCGH and expression array data concurrently to visually correlate the two. aCGHViewer is a stand alone Java visualization application that should be used in conjunction with separate statistical programs. It operates on all major computer platforms and is freely available at http://falcon.roswellpark.org/aCGHview/. PMID:17404607

  18. A higher resolution radiation hybrid map of bovine chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Schläpfer, Jörg; Stahlberger-Saitbekova, Nasikhat; Comincini, Sergio; Gaillard, Claude; Hills, David; Meyer, Rudolf K; Williams, John L; Womack, Jim E; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Dolf, Gaudenz

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a radiation hybrid framework map of BTA13 composed of nine microsatellite loci, six genes and one EST. The map has been developed using a recently constructed 12'000 rad bovine-hamster whole-genome radiation hybrid panel. Moreover, we present a comprehensive map of BTA13 comprising 72 loci, of which 45 are microsatellites, 20 are genes and seven are ESTs. The map has an estimated length of 2694.7 cR12'000. The proposed order is in general agreement with published maps of BTA13. Our results only partially support previously published information of five blocks of conserved gene order between cattle and man. We found no evidence for the existence of an HSA20 homologous segment of coding DNA on BTA13 located centromeric of a confirmed HSA10 homologous region. The present map increases the marker density and the marker resolution on BTA13 and enables further insight into the evolutionary development of the chromosome as compared to man. PMID:12081811

  19. A web server for mining Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Ranka, Sanjay; Kahveci, Tamer

    2007-11-01

    Advances in cytogenetics and molecular biology has established that chromosomal alterations are critical in the pathogenesis of human cancer. Recurrent chromosomal alterations provide cytological and molecular markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. They also facilitate the identification of genes that are important in carcinogenesis, which in the future may help in the development of targeted therapy. A large amount of publicly available cancer genetic data is now available and it is growing. There is a need for public domain tools that allow users to analyze their data and visualize the results. This chapter describes a web based software tool that will allow researchers to analyze and visualize Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) datasets. It employs novel data mining methodologies for clustering and classification of CGH datasets as well as algorithms for identifying important markers (small set of genomic intervals with aberrations) that are potentially cancer signatures. The developed software will help in understanding the relationships between genomic aberrations and cancer types.

  20. Combined array CGH plus SNP genome analyses in a single assay for optimized clinical testing.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bi, Weimin; Shaw, Chad; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber N; Lalani, Seema; Hixson, Patricia; Gambin, Tomasz; Tsai, Chun-hui; Bock, Hans-Georg; Descartes, Maria; Probst, Frank J; Scaglia, Fernando; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lupski, James R; Eng, Christine; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bacino, Carlos; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, both array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping have proven to be powerful genomic technologies utilized for the evaluation of developmental delay, multiple congenital anomalies, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Differences in the ability to resolve genomic changes between these arrays may constitute an implementation challenge for clinicians: which platform (SNP vs array CGH) might best detect the underlying genetic cause for the disease in the patient? While only SNP arrays enable the detection of copy number neutral regions of absence of heterozygosity (AOH), they have limited ability to detect single-exon copy number variants (CNVs) due to the distribution of SNPs across the genome. To provide comprehensive clinical testing for both CNVs and copy-neutral AOH, we enhanced our custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array that has exon-targeted coverage of 1860 genes with 60,000 SNP probes, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis - Comprehensive (CMA-COMP). Of the 3240 cases evaluated by this array, clinically significant CNVs were detected in 445 cases including 21 cases with exonic events. In addition, 162 cases (5.0%) showed at least one AOH region >10 Mb. We demonstrate that even though this array has a lower density of SNP probes than other commercially available SNP arrays, it reliably detected AOH events >10 Mb as well as exonic CNVs beyond the detection limitations of SNP genotyping. Thus, combining SNP probes and exon-targeted array CGH into one platform provides clinically useful genetic screening in an efficient manner.

  1. Combined array CGH plus SNP genome analyses in a single assay for optimized clinical testing

    PubMed Central

    Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bi, Weimin; Shaw, Chad; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber N; Lalani, Seema; Hixson, Patricia; Gambin, Tomasz; Tsai, Chun-hui; Bock, Hans-Georg; Descartes, Maria; Probst, Frank J; Scaglia, Fernando; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lupski, James R; Eng, Christine; Wai Cheung, Sau; Bacino, Carlos; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, both array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping have proven to be powerful genomic technologies utilized for the evaluation of developmental delay, multiple congenital anomalies, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Differences in the ability to resolve genomic changes between these arrays may constitute an implementation challenge for clinicians: which platform (SNP vs array CGH) might best detect the underlying genetic cause for the disease in the patient? While only SNP arrays enable the detection of copy number neutral regions of absence of heterozygosity (AOH), they have limited ability to detect single-exon copy number variants (CNVs) due to the distribution of SNPs across the genome. To provide comprehensive clinical testing for both CNVs and copy-neutral AOH, we enhanced our custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array that has exon-targeted coverage of 1860 genes with 60 000 SNP probes, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis – Comprehensive (CMA-COMP). Of the 3240 cases evaluated by this array, clinically significant CNVs were detected in 445 cases including 21 cases with exonic events. In addition, 162 cases (5.0%) showed at least one AOH region >10 Mb. We demonstrate that even though this array has a lower density of SNP probes than other commercially available SNP arrays, it reliably detected AOH events >10 Mb as well as exonic CNVs beyond the detection limitations of SNP genotyping. Thus, combining SNP probes and exon-targeted array CGH into one platform provides clinically useful genetic screening in an efficient manner. PMID:23695279

  2. Flexible and accurate detection of genomic copy-number changes from aCGH.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Oscar M; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón

    2007-06-01

    Genomic DNA copy-number alterations (CNAs) are associated with complex diseases, including cancer: CNAs are indeed related to tumoral grade, metastasis, and patient survival. CNAs discovered from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data have been instrumental in identifying disease-related genes and potential therapeutic targets. To be immediately useful in both clinical and basic research scenarios, aCGH data analysis requires accurate methods that do not impose unrealistic biological assumptions and that provide direct answers to the key question, "What is the probability that this gene/region has CNAs?" Current approaches fail, however, to meet these requirements. Here, we introduce reversible jump aCGH (RJaCGH), a new method for identifying CNAs from aCGH; we use a nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model fitted via reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo; and we incorporate model uncertainty through Bayesian model averaging. RJaCGH provides an estimate of the probability that a gene/region has CNAs while incorporating interprobe distance and the capability to analyze data on a chromosome or genome-wide basis. RJaCGH outperforms alternative methods, and the performance difference is even larger with noisy data and highly variable interprobe distance, both commonly found features in aCGH data. Furthermore, our probabilistic method allows us to identify minimal common regions of CNAs among samples and can be extended to incorporate expression data. In summary, we provide a rigorous statistical framework for locating genes and chromosomal regions with CNAs with potential applications to cancer and other complex human diseases.

  3. [Genomic abnormalities in children with mental retardation and autism: the use of comparative genomic hybridization in situ (HRCGH) and molecular karyotyping with DNA-microchips (array CGH)].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Voinova, V Iu; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Genomic abnormalities occur with high frequency in children with mental retardation and autistic spectrum disorders (ADS). Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays is a new technology for diagnosis of genomic and chromosomal abnormalities in autism implemented in the fields of biological psychiatry and medical genetics. We carried out a comparative analysis of the frequency and spectrum of genome abnormalities in children with mental retardation and autism of unknown etiology using high-resolution comparative genomic methods for hybridization (HRCGH) and molecular karyotyping (array CGH). In a study of 100 children with autism, learning difficulties and congenital malformations by HRCGH, we identified genomic rearrangements in 46% of cases. Using array CGH we examined 50 children with autism. In 44 cases out of 50 (88%), different genomic abnormalities and genomic variations (CNV - copy number variations) were identified. Unbalanced genomic rearrangements, including deletions and duplications, were found in 23 cases out of 44 (52%). These data suggest that genomic abnormalities which are not detectable by common methods of chromosome analysis are often discovered by molecular cytogenetic techniques in children autism spectrum disorders. In addition, 54 children with idiopathic mental retardation and congenital malformations (31 boys and 23 girls) without autism spectrum disorders were examined using molecular karyotyping and microarray containing an increased number of DNA samples for genomic loci of chromosome X. Deletions and duplications affecting different regions of the chromosome X were detected in 11 out of 54 children (20.4%).

  4. Distinct molecular signatures in pediatric infratentorial glioblastomas defined by aCGH.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Free, A; Mei, Y; Peiper, S C; Wang, Z; Cowell, J K

    2010-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are rare in children, but reportedly have more varied outcome which suggests differences in tumor etiology compared to typical GBM of adults. To investigate this we performed high resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis on three pediatric infratentorial GBM, ages 3.5, 7 and 14 years. Two of these tumors occurred in the brainstem and one in the spinal cord. While histologically typical, one brainstem tumor showed mainly pleomorphic astrocytic cells, whereas the other brainstem and spinal tumors showed a GFAP positive small cell component. Whole chromosomal gains (#1 and #2) and loss (#20) were seen only in the pleomorphic brainstem GBM, which also showed a high level of segmental genomic copy number changes. Segmental loss involving chromosome 8 was seen in all three tumors (Chr8;133039446-136869494, Chr8;pter-3581577, and Chr8;pter-30480019 respectively), whereas loss involving chromosome 16 was seen in only 2 cases with small cell components (Chr16;31827239-qter and Chr16;pter-29754532). Segmental gain of chromosome 7 was shared only between the 2 brainstem cases (Chr7;17187166-qter and Chr7;69824947-qter). Chromosome 17 showed segmental gain of 17q in the backdrop of loss of 17p only in case 1. Segmental gain of chromosome 1q was seen only in case 2. The spinal GBM showed a relatively stable karyotype with a unique loss of Chr19;32848902-qter. None of the frequent losses, gains and amplifications known to occur in adult GBM were identified, suggesting that pediatric infratentorial glioblastomas show a molecular karyotype that was more characteristic of pediatric embryonal tumors than adult GBM.

  5. Mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 19 identified by comparative genomic hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, S R; Boyd, E; Connor, J M; Jones, A M; Tolmie, J L

    1998-01-01

    We report the use of comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) to define the origin of a supernumerary ring chromosome which conventional cytogenetic banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) methods had failed to identify. Targeted FISH using whole chromosome 19 library arm and site specific probes then confirmed the CGH results. This study shows the feasibility of using CGH for the identification of supernumerary marker chromosomes, even in fewer than 50% of cells, where no clinical or cytogenetic clues are present. Images PMID:9783708

  6. A new look towards BAC-based array CGH through a comprehensive comparison with oligo-based array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Nicolas; Carles, Annaïck; Mills, Ian G; Wolf, Maija; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Edgren, Henrik; Boileau, Fabrice; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Schalken, Jack A; Neal, David E; Kallioniemi, Olli; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Background Currently, two main technologies are used for screening of DNA copy number; the BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) and the recently developed oligonucleotide-based CGH (Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization) arrays which are capable of detecting small genomic regions with amplification or deletion. The correlation as well as the discriminative power of these platforms has never been compared statistically on a significant set of human patient samples. Results In this paper, we present an exhaustive comparison between the two CGH platforms, undertaken at two independent sites using the same batch of DNA from 19 advanced prostate cancers. The comparison was performed directly on the raw data and a significant correlation was found between the two platforms. The correlation was greatly improved when the data were averaged over large chromosomic regions using a segmentation algorithm. In addition, this analysis has enabled the development of a statistical model to discriminate BAC outliers that might indicate microevents. These microevents were validated by the oligo platform results. Conclusion This article presents a genome-wide statistical validation of the oligo array platform on a large set of patient samples and demonstrates statistically its superiority over the BAC platform for the Identification of chromosomic events. Taking advantage of a large set of human samples treated by the two technologies, a statistical model has been developed to show that the BAC platform could also detect microevents. PMID:17394638

  7. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth R.; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian K.; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; et al

    2016-02-05

    Here, we developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray's superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioningmore » it.« less

  8. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  9. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it. PMID:26846188

  10. Reliable Single Cell Array CGH for Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Zbigniew T.; Hoffmann, Martin; Schlimok, Günter; Polzer, Bernhard; Klein, Christoph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA) technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. Conclusions/Significance The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations. PMID:24465780

  11. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  12. High-resolution studies on late-replicating segments (G + C bands) in mammalian chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, L; Gustavsson, I; Di Meo, G P; Ferrara, L

    1989-01-01

    High resolution of late-replicating segments (G + C bands) in chromosomes of human, cattle and water buffalo was obtained by using 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation early in the cell cycle, simultaneous with methotrexate treatment combined with reduced colcemid treatment and addition of ethidium bromide, which increased the proportion of prometaphase cells. Giemsa counterstaining, following fluorescence microscopy observation and treatment with 2 x SSC, improved the resolution of the banding patterns, particularly in the pericentromeric regions. Acrocentric bovine and water buffalo chromosomes, which were seen to be C-positive by fluorescence microscopy observation and C-negative after counterstaining, showed the presence of subcentromeric G-positive bands within the heterochromatic blocks of several chromosomes.

  13. Unique genomic structure and distinct mitotic behavior of ring chromosome 21 in two unrelated cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Z; Xu, F; Seashore, M; Li, P

    2012-01-01

    A ring chromosome replacing a normal chromosome could involve variable structural rearrangements and mitotic instability. However, most previously reported cases lacked further genomic characterization. High-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization with single-nucleotide polymorphism typing (aCGH+SNP) was used to study 2 unrelated cases with a ring chromosome 21. Case 1 had severe myopia, hypotonia, joint hypermobility, speech delay, and dysmorphic features. aCGH detected a 1.275-Mb duplication of 21q22.12-q22.13 and a 6.731-Mb distal deletion at 21q22.2. Case 2 showed severe growth and developmental retardations, intractable seizures, and dysmorphic features. aCGH revealed a contiguous pattern of a 3.612- Mb deletion of 21q22.12-q22.2, a 4.568-Mb duplication of 21q22.2-q22.3, and a 2.243-Mb distal deletion at 21q22.3. Mitotic instability was noted in 13, 30, and 76% of in vitro cultured metaphase cells, interphase cells, and leukocyte DNA, respectively. The different phenotypes of these 2 cases are likely associated with the unique genomic structure and distinct mitotic behavior of their ring chromosome 21. These 2 cases represent a subtype of ring chromosome 21 probably involving somatic dicentric ring breakage and reunion. A cytogenomic approach is proposed for characterizing the genomic structure and mitotic instability of ring chromosome abnormalities.

  14. Detection of genomic copy number changes in patients with idiopathic mental retardation by high-resolution X-array-CGH: important role for increased gene dosage of XLMR genes.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Guy; Van Esch, Hilde; Bauters, Marijke; Hollanders, Karen; Frints, Suzanna G M; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koen; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter

    2007-10-01

    A tiling X-chromosome-specific genomic array with a theoretical resolution of 80 kb was developed to screen patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) for submicroscopic copy number differences. Four patients with aberrations previously detected at lower resolution were first analyzed. This facilitated delineation of the location and extent of the aberration at high resolution and subsequently, more precise genotype-phenotype analyses. A cohort of 108 patients was screened, 57 of which were suspected of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), 26 were probands of brother pairs, and 25 were sporadic cases. A total of 15 copy number changes in 14 patients (13%) were detected, which included two deletions and 13 duplications ranging from 0.1 to 2.7 Mb. The aberrations are associated with the phenotype in five patients (4.6%), based on the following criteria: de novo aberration; involvement of a known or candidate X-linked nonsyndromic(syndromic) MR (MRX(S)) gene; segregation with the disease in the family; absence in control individuals; and skewed X-inactivation in carrier females. These include deletions that contain the MRX(S) genes CDKL5, OPHN1, and CASK, and duplications harboring CDKL5, NXF5, MECP2, and GDI1. In addition, seven imbalances were apparent novel polymorphic regions because they do not fulfill the proposed criteria. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that not only deletions but also duplications on the X chromosome contribute to the phenotype more often than expected, supporting the increased gene dosage mechanism for deregulation of normal cognitive development.

  15. High resolution SIMS imaging of cations in mammalian cell mitosis, and in Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi-Setti, R.; Gavrilov, K. L.; Neilly, M. E.; Strick, R.; Strissel, P. L.

    2006-07-01

    The University of Chicago high resolution scanning ion microprobe (UC-SIM) was used to image, by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), the distribution of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ in the chromosomes of Indian muntjac (IM) deer mitotic fibroblasts. This is part of a systematic study of the cation composition of mammalian cells and chromosomes throughout the cell cycle, after having shown that Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ appear to be important for chromosome condensation and structure at metaphase. We focus here on a detailed description of the metaphase-anaphase transition at narrow time intervals beyond the G2/M border, made possible by controlled cell synchronization procedures. High-density distributions of chromosome spreads showed progressive stages of mitosis, identified by their morphology, within the same UC-SIM field of view. Subtle differences in cation contents between successive mitotic stages could thus be quantified in identical experimental conditions. Preliminary results indicate maximal chromosomal concentrations of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ at metaphase, and a progressive decrease of the same with advancing stages of anaphase. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ distributions were also imaged in the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, whose DNA distribution had been previously studied by BrdU labeling. These cations may play a common role in mitosis from lower eukaryotes to mammals.

  16. Array-CGH analysis and clinical description of 2q37.3 de novo subtelomeric deletion.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Sismani, Carolina; Ioannides, Marios; Bashiardes, Stavros; Ketoni, Andria; Touliatou, Vassiliki; Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Mavrou, Ariadni; Kanavakis, Emanuel; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    We report on a 13-year-old girl with normal karyotype and a de novo cryptic terminal deletion of chromosome 2q, detected by subtelomeric FISH analysis. Further investigation with array-CGH analysis using the 1Mb resolution Spectral Chip 2600 (Spectral Genomics) confirmed the deletion and also showed a deletion of four additional clones. No other abnormalities were detected by array-CGH. FISH studies using 8 BAC-probes were performed for fine mapping of the deletion and confirmed the array results. FISH analysis showed that the deletion breakpoint lies between clones RP11-84G18 and RP11-83N2 (physical distance between clones 0.36Mb) and extends to the telomere. The size of the deletion was estimated to be about 6.4-6.7Mb. Clinical findings include: developmental delay, severe behavioural disturbances, growth-pubertal retardation, congenital conductive mild hearing loss, growth hormone deficiency, compensate hypothyroidism, dysmorphic facial features, excessive joint hypermobility, brachymetaphalangy, abnormal dermatoglyphics and a history of neonatal laryngomalacia, hypotonia and umbilical hernia. The phenotype of our patient is in keeping with those of the literature, with the exception of cardiovascular, urogenital, neurological anomalies and eczema, which were not observed. The report of the clinical and molecular presentation of similar cases will allow accurate phenotype-genotype correlation and proper genetic counseling of the family.

  17. High-resolution comparative mapping of the proximal region of the mouse X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, H.J.; Boyd, Y.; Ho, M.; Monaco, A.P.

    1995-07-20

    The murine homologues of the loci for McLeod syndrome (XK), Dent`s disease (ClCN5), and synaptophysin (SYP) have been mapped to the proximal region of the mouse X chromosome and positioned with respect to other conserved loci in this region using a total of 948 progeny from two separate Mus musculus x Mus spretus backcrosses. In the mouse, the order of loci and evolutionary breakpoints (EB) has been established as centromere-(DXWas70, DXHXF34h)-EB-Clen5-(Syp, DXMit55, DXMit26)-Tfe3-Gata1-EB-Xk-Cybb-telomere. In the proximal region of the human X chromosome short arm, the position of evolutionary breakpoints with respect to key loci has been established as DMD-EB-XK-PFC-EB-GATA1-C1CN5-EB-DXS1272E-ALAS2-EB-DXF34-centromere. These data have enabled us to construct a high-resolution genetic map for the {approximately}3-cM interval between DXWas70 and Cybb on the mouse X chromosome, which encompasses 10 loci. This detailed map demonstrates the power of high-resolution genetic mapping in the mouse as a means of determining locus order in a small chromosomal region and of providing an accurate framework for the construction of physical maps. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Fryns syndrome phenotype caused by chromosome microdeletions at 15q26.2 and 8p23.1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, A; Lee, S; Davis, R; Shrit, A; Leppig, K; Rhim, J; Jasnosz, K; Albertson, D; Pinkel, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Fryns syndrome (FS) is the commonest autosomal recessive syndrome in which congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a cardinal feature. It has been estimated that 10% of patients with CDH have FS. The autosomal recessive inheritance in FS contrasts with the sporadic inheritance for the majority of patients with CDH and renders the correct diagnosis critical for accurate genetic counselling. The cause of FS is unknown. Methods: We have used array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) to screen patients who have CDH and additional phenotypic anomalies consistent with FS for cryptic chromosome aberrations. Results: We present three probands who were previously diagnosed with FS who had submicroscopic chromosome deletions detected by array CGH after normal karyotyping with G-banded chromosome analysis. Two female infants were found to have microdeletions involving chromosome band 15q26.2 and one male had a deletion of chromosome band 8p23.1. Conclusions: We conclude that phenotypes similar to FS can be caused by submicroscopic chromosome deletions and that high resolution karyotyping, including array CGH if possible, should be performed prior to the diagnosis of FS to provide an accurate recurrence risk in patients with CDH and physical anomalies consistent with FS. PMID:16141010

  19. High resolution comparative genomic hybridisation in clinical cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H.; Lundsteen, C.

    2001-01-01

    High resolution comparative genomic hybridisation (HR-CGH) is a diagnostic tool in our clinical cytogenetics laboratory. The present survey reports the results of 253 clinical cases in which 47 abnormalities were detected. Among 144 dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects with a normal conventional karyotype, 15 (10%) had small deletions or duplications, of which 11 were interstitial. In addition, a case of mosaic trisomy 9 was detected. Among 25 dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects carrying apparently balanced de novo translocations, four had deletions at translocation breakpoints and two had deletions elsewhere in the genome. Seventeen of 19 complex rearrangements were clarified by HR-CGH. A small supernumerary marker chromosome occurring with low frequency and the breakpoint of a mosaic r(18) case could not be clarified. Three of 19 other abnormalities could not be confirmed by HR-CGH. One was a Williams syndrome deletion and two were DiGeorge syndrome deletions, which were apparently below the resolution of HR-CGH. However, we were able to confirm Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome deletions, which are about 3-5 Mb. We conclude that HR-CGH should be used for the evaluation of (1) dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects where normal karyotyping has failed to show abnormalities, (2) dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects carrying apparently balanced de novo translocations, (3) apparently balanced de novo translocations detected prenatally, and (4) for clarification of complex structural rearrangements.


Keywords: comparative genomic hybridisation; chromosome analysis; chromosome aberrations; dysmorphism PMID:11694545

  20. Insertional translocation detected using FISH confirmation of array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) results.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Hae L; Shaw, Chad; Ou, Zhishuo; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Pursley, Amber N; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A; Chinault, A Craig; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-05-01

    Insertional translocations (ITs) are rare events that require at least three breaks in the chromosomes involved and thus qualify as complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). In the current study, we identified 40 ITs from approximately 18,000 clinical cases (1:500) using array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in conjunction with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmation of the aCGH findings, and parental follow-up studies. Both submicroscopic and microscopically visible IT events were detected. They were divided into three major categories: (1) simple intrachromosomal and interchromosomal IT resulting in pure segmental trisomy, (2) complex IT involving more than one abnormality, (3) deletion inherited from a parent with a balanced IT resulting in pure segmental monosomy. Of the cases in which follow-up parental studies were available, over half showed inheritance from an apparently unaffected parent carrying the same unbalanced rearrangement detected in the propositi, thus decreasing the likelihood that these IT events are clinically relevant. Nevertheless, we identified six cases in which small submicroscopic events were detected involving known disease-associated genes/genomic segments and are likely to be pathogenic. We recommend that copy number gains detected by clinical aCGH analysis should be confirmed using FISH analysis whenever possible in order to determine the physical location of the duplicated segment. We hypothesize that the increased use of aCGH in the clinic will demonstrate that IT occurs more frequently than previously considered but can identify genomic rearrangements with unclear clinical significance.

  1. Insertional Translocation Detected Using FISH Confirmation of Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) Results

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Shaw, Chad; Ou, Zhishuo; Eng, Patricia A.; Cooper, M. Lance; Pursley, Amber N.; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Chinault, A. Craig; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2013-01-01

    Insertional translocations (ITs) are rare events that require at least three breaks in the chromosomes involved and thus qualify as complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). In the current study, we identified 40 ITs from approximately 18,000 clinical cases (1:500) using array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in conjunction with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmation of the aCGH findings, and parental follow-up studies. Both submicroscopic and microscopically visible IT events were detected. They were divided into three major categories: (1) simple intrachromosomal and interchromosomal IT resulting in pure segmental trisomy, (2) complex IT involving more than one abnormality, (3) deletion inherited from a parent with a balanced IT resulting in pure segmental monosomy. Of the cases in which follow-up parental studies were available, over half showed inheritance from an apparently unaffected parent carrying the same unbalanced rearrangement detected in the propositi, thus decreasing the likelihood that these IT events are clinically relevant. Nevertheless, we identified six cases in which small submicroscopic events were detected involving known disease-associated genes/genomic segments and are likely to be pathogenic. We recommend that copy number gains detected by clinical aCGH analysis should be confirmed using FISH analysis whenever possible in order to determine the physical location of the duplicated segment. We hypothesize that the increased use of aCGH in the clinic will demonstrate that IT occurs more frequently than previously considered but can identify genomic rearrangements with unclear clinical significance. PMID:20340098

  2. High-resolution YAC-cosmid-STS map of human chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Cayanis, E; Russo, J J; Kalachikov, S; Ye, X; Park, S H; Sunjevaric, I; Bonaldo, M F; Lawton, L; Venkatraj, V S; Schon, E; Soares, M B; Rothstein, R; Warburton, D; Edelman, I S; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A; Fischer, S G

    1998-01-01

    We have assembled a high-resolution physical map of human chromosome 13 DNA (approximately 114 Mb) from hybridization, PCR, and FISH mapping data using a specifically designed set of computer programs. Although the mapping of 13p is limited, 13q (approximately 98 Mb) is covered by an almost continuous contig of 736 YACs aligned to 597 contigs of cosmids. Of a total of 10,789 cosmids initially selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library (16,896 colonies) using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs and probes for markers mapped to chromosome 13, 511 were assembled in contigs that were established from cross-hybridization relationships between the cosmids. The 13q YAC-cosmid map was annotated with 655 sequence tagged sites (STSs) with an average spacing of 1 STS per 150 kb. This set of STSs, each identified by a D number and cytogenetic location, includes database markers (198), expressed sequence tags (93), and STSs generated by sequencing of the ends of cosmid inserts (364). Additional annotation has been provided by positioning 197 cosmids mapped by FISH on 13q. The final (comprehensive) map, a list of STS primers, and raw data used in map assembly are available at our Web site (genome1.ccc.columbia.edu/ approximately genome/) and can serve as a resource to facilitate accurate localization of additional markers, provide substrates for sequencing, and assist in the discovery of chromosome 13 genes associated with hereditary diseases. PMID:9465293

  3. Molecular cytogenetic search for cryptic sex chromosomes in painted turtles Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole; Badenhorst, Daleen; Montiel, Eugenia E; Literman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination is triggered by factors ranging from genotypic (GSD) to environmental (ESD), or both GSD + EE (GSD susceptible to environmental effects), and its evolution remains enigmatic. The presence/absence of sex chromosomes purportedly separates species at the ESD end of the continuum from the rest (GSD and GSD + EE) because the evolutionary dynamics of sex chromosomes and autosomes differ. However, studies suggest that turtles with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) are cryptically GSD and possess sex chromosomes. Here, we test this hypothesis in painted turtles Chrysemys picta (TSD), using comparative-genome-hybridization (CGH), a technique known to detect morphologically indistinguishable sex chromosomes in other turtles and reptiles. Our results show no evidence for the existence of sex chromosomes in painted turtles. While it remains plausible that cryptic sex chromosomes may exist in TSD turtles that are characterized by minor genetic differences that cannot be detected at the resolution of CGH, previous attempts have failed to identify sex-specific markers. Genomic sequencing should prove useful in providing conclusive evidence in this regard. If such efforts uncover sex chromosomes in TSD turtles, it may reveal the existence of a fundamental constraint for the evolution of a full spectrum of sex determination (from pure GSD to pure TSD) that is predicted theoretically. Finding sex chromosomes in ESD organisms would question whether pure ESD mechanisms exist at all in nature, or whether those systems currently considered pure ESD simply await the characterization of an underlying GSD architecture.

  4. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be colocalized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study—XO, XX, XY and XXY—to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males (“forebrain cholinergic” and “cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical”), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA. PMID:25146308

  5. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Raznahan, Armin; Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be co-localized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study--XO, XX, XY and XXY--to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males ("forebrain cholinergic" and "cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical"), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA.

  6. Functional polarization of the Escherichia coli chromosome terminus: the dif site acts in chromosome dimer resolution only when located between long stretches of opposite polarity.

    PubMed

    Pérals, K; Cornet, F; Merlet, Y; Delon, I; Louarn, J M

    2000-04-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are generated by recombination between circular sister chromosomes. Dimers are lethal unless resolved by a system that involves the XerC, XerD and FtsK proteins acting at a site (dif) in the terminus region. Resolution fails if dif is moved from its normal position. To analyse this positional requirement, dif was transplaced to a variety of positions, and deletions and inversions of portions of the dif region were constructed. Resolution occurs only when dif is located at the convergence of multiple, oppositely polarized DNA sequence elements, inferred to lie in the terminus region. These polar elements may position dif at the cell septum and be general features of chromosome organization with a role in nucleoid dynamics.

  7. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis (CGH) maps to Xq26-q27

    SciTech Connect

    Figuera, L.E.; Dunne, P.W.; Pandolfo, M.

    1994-09-01

    CGH is a rare, X-linked dominant trait previously described by one of us in a large, five-generational Mexican family with 28 affected individuals. Family history and clinical examination reveal that excessive hair is present at the patient`s birth becoming more dense during the first year of life. In males the hair eventually covers the face and upper portion of the trunk. The affected women have transmitted the trait to both male and female offspring, while one affected male has transmitted the trait to all three female offspring but not to his nine sons. In addition, manifestations are more severe in males than females, who show an uneven pattern of excessive hair distribution, possibly due to the random nature of X-inactivation. The rarity of this trait and the apparently extremely low rate of mutation of the gene led the authors to hypothesize that this condition was the result of a {open_quotes}back{close_quotes} mutation, leading to reactivation of an {open_quotes}atavistic{close_quotes} gene. Clinical examination, blood collection, and establishment of lymphoblastoid cell lines have been completed for the majority of the members of the family available, including affected and unaffected males and females. Sixteen meioses were screened using several polymorphic microsatellite markers distributed along the X-chromosome. The locus DXS1211 did not show recombination events. Two-point linkage analysis yielded a maximum LOD score of 3.08 at theta of zero. An updated map of the X chromosome localizes this marker at Xq16-q27. The identification of the CGH gene will provide insight into development of hair and allow testing of the hypothesis of {open_quotes}atavism{close_quotes}.

  8. High-resolution molecular karyotyping uncovers pairing between ancestrally related Brassica chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S; Batley, Jacqueline; Bayer, Philipp Emanuel; Hayward, Alice; Cowling, Wallace A; Nelson, Matthew N

    2014-05-01

    How do chromosomal regions with differing degrees of homology and homeology interact at meiosis? We provide a novel analytical method based on simple genetics principles which can help to answer this important question. This method interrogates high-throughput molecular marker data in order to infer chromosome behavior at meiosis in interspecific hybrids. We validated this method using high-resolution molecular marker karyotyping in two experimental Brassica populations derived from interspecific crosses among B. juncea, B. napus and B. carinata, using a single nucleotide polymorphism chip. This method of analysis successfully identified meiotic interactions between chromosomes sharing different degrees of similarity: full-length homologs; full-length homeologs; large sections of primary homeologs; and small sections of secondary homeologs. This analytical method can be applied to any allopolyploid species or fertile interspecific hybrid in order to detect meiotic associations. This genetic information can then be used to identify which genomic regions share functional homeology (i.e., retain enough similarity to allow pairing and segregation at meiosis). When applied to interspecific hybrids for which reference genome sequences are available, the question of how differing degrees of homology and homeology affect meiotic interactions may finally be resolved. PMID:24471809

  9. Mapping nucleosome resolution chromosome folding in yeast by Micro-C

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han S.; Weiner, Assaf; Lajoie, Bryan; Dekker, Job; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a Hi-C based method, Micro-C, in which micrococcal nuclease is used instead of restriction enzymes to fragment chromatin, enabling nucleosome resolution chromosome folding maps. Analysis of Micro-C maps for budding yeast reveals abundant self-associating domains similar to those reported in other species, but not previously observed in yeast. These structures, far shorter than topologically-associating domains in mammals, typically encompass one to five genes in yeast. Strong boundaries between self-associating domains occur at promoters of highly transcribed genes and regions of rapid histone turnover that are typically bound by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex. Investigation of chromosome folding in mutants confirms roles for RSC, “gene looping” factor Ssu72, Mediator, H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109, and the N-terminal tail of H4 in folding of the yeast genome. This approach provides detailed structural maps of a eukaryotic genome, and our findings provide insights into the machinery underlying chromosome compaction. PMID:26119342

  10. Amplifications and deletions in clinical ovarian cancer detected by Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakunaga, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Kallioniemi, A.; Kallioniemi, O.; Sudar, D.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, I.W. ); Yang-Feng, T. )

    1993-01-01

    CGH is a new powerful method for surveying the whole genome for DNA sequence copy number changes in a single hybridization. The method is based on the competition between biotinylated total tumor DNA and a digoxigenin-labeled normal genomic reference DNA during hybridization to normal metaphase chromosomes. After immunofluorescent staining with avidin-FITC and antidigoxigenin Rhodamine, variation of DNA sequence copy numbers in the tumor are detected as variations in the ratios of green and red fluorescence along each chromosome. The authors applied CGH analysis to DNA extracted from surgically removed ovarian cancer specimens (27 cases). Seven amplified regions were identified by CGH analysis. Three loci, 1p32-p34 (most likely, MYCL), 8q23-q24 (MYC), 12q12 (KRAS2), were known to be amplified in solid tumors and four other loci (3q26, 6p22, 9q31-q33, 17q22) were previously unknown to be amplified. Many regions indicating physical deletions were also identified by the analysis. Chromosomal regions showing frequent deletion were 1p, 3p, 17p, 17q, 19p, 19q and Xp. There were also significant similarities of the regions with amplifications and deletions between bilateral ovarian tumors or among several different tumors form the same ovarian cancer cases, suggesting that the genetic changes observed might be relatively early events during the progression of ovarian cancer.

  11. Detection of gene amplification in non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Houldsworth, J.; Rao, P.H.

    1994-09-01

    Gene amplification characterized by distinct cytogenetic structures, such as homogeneously stained regions (hsrs), aberrantly banded marked chromosomes (abms), and double minutes (dmins) chromosomes is commonly found in tumor cells, and is considered as an important mechanism by which tumor cells gain increased levels of expression of critical genes. Very little is known about gene amplification in NHL. So far, no commonly amplified gene(s) have been identified in NHL. DNA in-gel renaturation assay provided evidence for the presence of amplified DNA fragments in NHL. In order to identify the gene(s) amplified in NHL we performed a modified form of CGH (hybridization and normal chromosomes with biotin labeled tumor DNA) to a panel of 10 NHL, which showed cytogenetic evidence for gene amplification in the form of hsrs and dmins. A number of chromosomal regions were found to be non-randomly amplified: 1p32-36(9/10), 1q32-44(6/10), 6p(9/10), 6q26-27(5/10), 16(8/10), 19(7/10) and 22q(7/10). Amplification of DNA from specific chromosomal bands was noted at 4p16(8/10), 11q13(10/10), and 12q24(8/10). Tumor L-10 showed specific amplification of 2p13. This study details the first CGH study performed on a panel of NHLs to identify gene amplification and chromosomal origin of hsrs and dmins identified by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The modified CGH employed in this study indicated that gene amplification is a frequent genetic alteration in NHL.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of a 12q22q23.2 interstitial deletion by array CGH in a malformed fetus.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Valérie; Girard, Françoise; Gasser, Bernard; Marcellin, Luc; Christmann, Dominique; Nisand, Israël; Schmitt, Evelyne; Florent, Sylvie; Flori, Elisabeth

    2012-04-01

    We report the prenatal diagnosis of a 12q22q23.2 de novo interstitial deletion performed by array based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) in a fetus with cystic hygroma colli, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly and micrognathism. Haploinsufficiency for insuline-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1), which is mapped in the deleted region, is suggested because of its implication in prenatal and postnatal growth and in neuronal maturation. This case demonstrates the contribution of array CGH in prenatal diagnosis for detecting small unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities in malformed fetuses and, subsequently, for genetic counselling. PMID:22425634

  13. Aneuploidy analysis of non-pronuclear embryos from IVF with use of array CGH: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lixin, Deng; Zhifeng, Xiang; Cong, He; Jinzhou, Zhang; Hongbin, Xie

    2014-06-01

    By using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), to analyze the aneuploidy of the single blastomeres from non-pronuclear embryos on cleavage-stage in IVF cycle. Four non-pronuclear embryos were got from an IVF cycle, and the each single cell was biopsied from the four cleavage-stage embryos on the third day after the insemination which was investigated by using array CGH. After the biopsy, all the embryos continued to cleave, and lately entered the morula stage on the fifth day, just one embryo 3 was developed to early blastocyst stage on the sixth day. The four blastomere 24 chromosomes showed one X monomer and three normal XY diploids; the autosome chromosomes of blastomeres were abnormally gained or lost at different chromosome from four embryos, such as Embryo 1 : 49,X (-1, -5, -11, -19, -20, -21, -Y, +3, +6, +7, +8, +10, +13, +14, +16, +17, +18); Embryo 2 : 44,XY (-12, -15); Embryo 3: 47,XY (-3, -8, -9, -21, +7, +17, +18, +19, +20); Embryo 4 : 54,XY (+4, +7, +10, +12, +13, +16, +17, +22). With the use of the array CGH, the aneuploidy analysis could review the abnormal chromosomes of single blastomere from the non-pronuclear embryos, which can harbor the risk of abnormal sex chromosome and autosome chromosomes.

  14. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  15. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  16. High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation of currently recognized genes for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; Rafi, Syed K; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-03-20

    Recently, autism-related research has focused on the identification of various genes and disturbed pathways causing the genetically heterogeneous group of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The list of autism-related genes has significantly increased due to better awareness with advances in genetic technology and expanding searchable genomic databases. We compiled a master list of known and clinically relevant autism spectrum disorder genes identified with supporting evidence from peer-reviewed medical literature sources by searching key words related to autism and genetics and from authoritative autism-related public access websites, such as the Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute autism genomic database dedicated to gene discovery and characterization. Our list consists of 792 genes arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms, thereby enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists and genetic counsellors to access convenient visual images of the location and distribution of ASD genes. Meaningful correlations of the observed phenotype in patients with suspected/confirmed ASD gene(s) at the chromosome region or breakpoint band site can be made to inform diagnosis and gene-based personalized care and provide genetic counselling for families.

  17. Sex-specific differences in meiotic chromosome segregation revealed by dicentric bridge resolution in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kara E; Millie, Elise A; Cherry, Jonathan P; Burgoyne, Paul S; Evans, Edward P; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    The meiotic properties of paracentric inversion heterozygotes have been well studied in insects and plants, but not in mammalian species. In essence, a single meiotic recombination event within the inverted region results in the formation of a dicentric chromatid, which usually breaks or is stretched between the two daughter nuclei during the first meiotic anaphase. Here, we provide evidence that this is not the predominant mode of exchange resolution in female mice. In sharp contrast to previous observations in other organisms, we find that attempts to segregate the dicentric chromatid frequently result not in breakage, stretching, or loss, but instead in precocious separation of the sister centromeres of at least one homolog. This often further results in intact segregation of the dicentric into one of the meiotic products, where it can persist into the first few embryonic divisions. These novel observations point to an unusual mechanism for the processing of dicentric chromosomes in mammalian oogenesis. Furthermore, this mechanism is rare or nonexistent in mammalian spermatogenesis. Thus, our results provide additional evidence of sexual dimorphism in mammalian meiotic chromosome behavior; in "stressful" situations, meiotic sister chromatid cohesion is apparently handled differently in males than in females. PMID:12454080

  18. High-Resolution Chromosome Ideogram Representation of Currently Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Rafi, Syed K.; Manzardo, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, autism-related research has focused on the identification of various genes and disturbed pathways causing the genetically heterogeneous group of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The list of autism-related genes has significantly increased due to better awareness with advances in genetic technology and expanding searchable genomic databases. We compiled a master list of known and clinically relevant autism spectrum disorder genes identified with supporting evidence from peer-reviewed medical literature sources by searching key words related to autism and genetics and from authoritative autism-related public access websites, such as the Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute autism genomic database dedicated to gene discovery and characterization. Our list consists of 792 genes arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms, thereby enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists and genetic counsellors to access convenient visual images of the location and distribution of ASD genes. Meaningful correlations of the observed phenotype in patients with suspected/confirmed ASD gene(s) at the chromosome region or breakpoint band site can be made to inform diagnosis and gene-based personalized care and provide genetic counselling for families. PMID:25803107

  19. High-Resolution BAC-Based Map of the Central Portion of Mouse Chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Jonathan; Wiltshire, Tim; Brunk, Brian; Zhao, Shaying; Schug, Jonathan; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Bucan, Maja

    2001-01-01

    The current strategy for sequencing the mouse genome involves the combination of a whole-genome shotgun approach with clone-based sequencing. High-resolution physical maps will provide a foundation for assembling contiguous segments of sequence. We have established a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based map of a 5-Mb region on mouse Chromosome 5, encompassing three gene families: receptor tyrosine kinases (PdgfraKit-Kdr), nonreceptor protein-tyrosine type kinases (Tec–Txk), and type-A receptors for the neurotransmitter GABA (Gabra2, Gabrb1, Gabrg1, and Gabra4). The construction of a BAC contig was initiated by hybridization screening the C57BL/6J (RPCI-23) BAC library, using known genes and sequence tagged sites (STSs). Additional overlapping clones were identified by searching the database of available restriction fingerprints for the RPCI-23 and RPCI-24 libraries. This effort resulted in the selection of >600 BAC clones, 251 kb of BAC-end sequences, and the placement of 40 known and/or predicted genes within this 5-Mb region. We use this high-resolution map to illustrate the integration of the BAC fingerprint map with a radiation-hybrid map via assembled expressed sequence tags (ESTs). From annotation of three representative BAC clones we demonstrate that up to 98% of the draft sequence for each contig could be ordered and oriented using known genes, BAC ends, consensus sequences for transcript assemblies, and comparisons with orthologous human sequence. For functional studies, annotation of sequence fragments as they are assembled into 50–200-kb stretches will be remarkably valuable. PMID:11591652

  20. High-resolution physical mapping in Pennisetum squamulatum reveals extensive chromosomal heteromorphism of the genomic region associated with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yukio; Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2004-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is asexual reproduction as a consequence of parthenogenetic development of a chromosomally unreduced egg. The trait leads to the production of embryos with a maternal genotype, i.e. progeny are clones of the maternal plant. The application of the trait in agriculture could be a tremendous tool for crop improvement through conventional and nonconventional breeding methods. Unfortunately, there are no major crops that reproduce by apomixis, and interspecific hybridization with wild relatives has not yet resulted in commercially viable germplasm. Pennisetum squamulatum is an aposporous apomict from which the gene(s) for apomixis has been transferred to sexual pearl millet by backcrossing. Twelve molecular markers that are linked with apomixis coexist in a tight linkage block called the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), and several of these markers have been shown to be hemizygous in the polyploid genome of P. squamulatum. High resolution genetic mapping of these markers has not been possible because of low recombination in this region of the genome. We now show the physical arrangement of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing apomixis-linked molecular markers by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization on pachytene chromosomes. The size of the ASGR, currently defined as the entire hemizygous region that hybridizes with apomixis-linked bacterial artificial chromosomes, was estimated on pachytene and mitotic chromosomes to be approximately 50 Mbp (a quarter of the chromosome). The ASGR includes highly repetitive sequences from an Opie-2-like retrotransposon family that are particularly abundant in this region of the genome.

  1. High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation of recognized genes for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Lindsay N; McGuire, Austen B; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-07-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is genetically heterogeneous with a growing list of BPD associated genes reported in recent years resulting from increased genetic testing using advanced genetic technology, expanded genomic databases, and better awareness of the disorder. We compiled a master list of recognized susceptibility and genes associated with BPD identified from peer-reviewed medical literature sources using PubMed and by searching online databases, such as OMIM. Searched keywords were related to bipolar disorder and genetics. Our compiled list consisted of 290 genes with gene names arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with source documents and their chromosome location and gene symbols plotted on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. The identified genes impacted a broad range of biological pathways and processes including cellular signaling pathways particularly cAMP and calcium (e.g., CACNA1C, CAMK2A, CAMK2D, ADCY1, ADCY2); glutamatergic (e.g., GRIK1, GRM3, GRM7), dopaminergic (e.g., DRD2, DRD4, COMT, MAOA) and serotonergic (e.g., HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR3B) neurotransmission; molecular transporters (e.g., SLC39A3, SLC6A3, SLC8A1); and neuronal growth (e.g., BDNF, IGFBP1, NRG1, NRG3). The increasing prevalence of BPD calls for better understanding of the genetic etiology of this disorder and associations between the observed BPD phenotype and genes. Visual representation of genes for bipolar disorder becomes a tool enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health care providers and researchers easy access to the location and distribution of currently recognized BPD associated genes. Our study may also help inform diagnosis and advance treatment developments for those affected with this disorder and improve genetic counseling for families. PMID:27063557

  2. High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation of recognized genes for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Lindsay N; McGuire, Austen B; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-07-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is genetically heterogeneous with a growing list of BPD associated genes reported in recent years resulting from increased genetic testing using advanced genetic technology, expanded genomic databases, and better awareness of the disorder. We compiled a master list of recognized susceptibility and genes associated with BPD identified from peer-reviewed medical literature sources using PubMed and by searching online databases, such as OMIM. Searched keywords were related to bipolar disorder and genetics. Our compiled list consisted of 290 genes with gene names arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with source documents and their chromosome location and gene symbols plotted on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. The identified genes impacted a broad range of biological pathways and processes including cellular signaling pathways particularly cAMP and calcium (e.g., CACNA1C, CAMK2A, CAMK2D, ADCY1, ADCY2); glutamatergic (e.g., GRIK1, GRM3, GRM7), dopaminergic (e.g., DRD2, DRD4, COMT, MAOA) and serotonergic (e.g., HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR3B) neurotransmission; molecular transporters (e.g., SLC39A3, SLC6A3, SLC8A1); and neuronal growth (e.g., BDNF, IGFBP1, NRG1, NRG3). The increasing prevalence of BPD calls for better understanding of the genetic etiology of this disorder and associations between the observed BPD phenotype and genes. Visual representation of genes for bipolar disorder becomes a tool enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health care providers and researchers easy access to the location and distribution of currently recognized BPD associated genes. Our study may also help inform diagnosis and advance treatment developments for those affected with this disorder and improve genetic counseling for families.

  3. Gene dosage methods as diagnostic tools for the identification of chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gouas, L; Goumy, C; Véronèse, L; Tchirkov, A; Vago, P

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetics is the part of genetics that deals with chromosomes, particularly with numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, and their implications in congenital or acquired genetic disorders. Standard karyotyping, successfully used for the last 50 years in investigating the chromosome etiology in patients with infertility, fetal abnormalities and congenital disorders, is constrained by the limits of microscopic resolution and is not suited for the detection of subtle chromosome abnormalities. The ability to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements that lead to copy-number changes has escalated progressively in recent years with the advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we review various gene dosage methods such as FISH, PCR-based approaches (MLPA, QF-PCR, QMPSF and real time PCR), CGH and array-CGH, that can be used for the identification and delineation of copy-number changes for diagnostic purposes. Besides comparing their relative strength and weakness, we will discuss the impact that these detection methods have on our understanding of copy number variations in the human genome and their implications in genetic counseling. PMID:18513889

  4. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  5. Tissue-specific mosaicism for tetrasomy 9p uncovered by array CGH.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Marwa I; Mazen, Inas; Bint, Susan

    2011-10-01

    We report on a patient with a mild clinical phenotype, including genital anomalies, with mosaic tetrasomy 9p. Karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes detected a supernumerary isochromosome 9p present in every cell, with the initial result being reported as tetrasomy 9p in non-mosaic form. However,array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) studies on DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes and saliva showed that the patient had tissue-specific mosaicism, with a lower level of abnormal cells in the saliva. These results correlate with the patient's clinical features as non-mosaic cases of tetrasomy 9p have a more severe, often lethal, clinical phenotype. If non-mosaic tetrasomy 9p is identified in a peripheral blood culture then examination of a different tissue type should be undertaken. Array CGH may be used as an alternative to karyotype analysis to estimate the level of mosaicism, and may eliminate the need for invasive skin biopsy as samples such as buccal smear and saliva can be used. Array CGH is able to detect mosaicism, establish the euchromatic content of supernumerary marker chromosomes, and identify imbalances elsewhere in the genome allowing more accurate counselling and prognosis for patients. PMID:21998854

  6. Mulibrey nanism: Two novel mutations in a child identified by Array CGH and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Cozzolino, Carla; Genesio, Rita; Melis, Daniela; Frisso, Giulia; Orrico, Ada; Lombardo, Barbara; Fattorusso, Valentina; Discepolo, Valentina; Della Casa, Roberto; Simonelli, Francesca; Nitsch, Lucio; Salvatore, Francesco; Franzese, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    In childhood, several rare genetic diseases have overlapping symptoms and signs, including those regarding growth alterations, thus the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The proband, aged 3 years, was suspected to have Silver-Russel syndrome because of intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, typical facial dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, body asymmetry, and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. Other features were left atrial and ventricular enlargement and patent foramen ovale. Total X-ray skeleton showed hypoplasia of the twelfth rib bilaterally and of the coccyx, slender long bones with thick cortex, and narrow medullary channels. The genetic investigation did not confirm Silver-Russel syndrome. At the age of 5 the patient developed an additional sign: hepatomegaly. Array CGH revealed a 147 kb deletion (involving TRIM 37 and SKA2 genes) on one allele of chromosome 17, inherited from his mother. These results suggested Mulibrey nanism. The clinical features were found to fit this hypothesis. Sequencing of the TRIM 37 gene showed a single base change at a splicing locus, inherited from his father that provoked a truncated protein. The combined use of Array CGH and DNA sequencing confirmed diagnosis of Mulibrey nanism. The large deletion involving the SKA2 gene, along with the increased frequency of malignant tumours in mulibrey patients, suggests closed monitoring for cancer of our patient and his mother. Array CGH should be performed as first tier test in all infants with multiple anomalies. The clinician should reconsider the clinical features when the genetics suggests this. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Intragenic rearrangements in X-linked intellectual deficiency: results of a-CGH in a series of 54 patients and identification of TRPC5 and KLHL15 as potential XLID genes.

    PubMed

    Mignon-Ravix, Cécile; Cacciagli, Pierre; Choucair, Nancy; Popovici, Cornel; Missirian, Chantal; Milh, Mathieu; Mégarbané, André; Busa, Tiffany; Julia, Sophie; Girard, Nadine; Badens, Catherine; Sigaudy, Sabine; Philip, Nicole; Villard, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) enables the detection of intragenic rearrangements, such as single exon deletion or duplication. This approach can lead to the identification of new disease genes. We report on the analysis of 54 male patients presenting with intellectual deficiency (ID) and a family history suggesting X-linked (XL) inheritance or maternal skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), using a home-made X-chromosome-specific microarray covering the whole human X-chromosome at high resolution. The majority of patients had whole genome array-CGH prior to the selection and we did not include large rearrangements such as MECP2 and FMR1 duplications. We identified four rearrangements considered as causative or potentially pathogenic, corresponding to a detection rate of 8%. Two CNVs affected known XLID genes and were therefore considered as causative (IL1RAPL1 and OPHN1 intragenic deletions). Two new CNVs were considered as potentially pathogenic as they affected interesting candidates for ID. The first CNV is a deletion of the first exon of the TRPC5 gene, encoding a cation channel implicated in dendrite growth and patterning, in a child presenting with ID and an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The second CNV is a partial deletion of KLHL15, in a patient with severe ID, epilepsy, and anomalies of cortical development. In both cases, in spite of strong arguments for clinical relevance, we were not able at this stage to confirm pathogenicity of the mutations, and the causality of the variants identified in XLID remains to be confirmed.

  8. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Resolution of six chromosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis and conservation of size and number among isolates.

    PubMed

    Lehker, M W; Alderete, J F

    1999-10-01

    The electrophoretic karyotype of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates was determined by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. Six chromosomal bands ranging between 50 kbp and 6 Mbp were reliably resolved by our separation method. Trichomonad chromosomes fell into 3 distinct size classes. The 3 maxichromosomes were approximately 5,700, 4,700, and 3,500 kbp. Two intermediate-sized chromosomes were approximately 1,200 kbp and 1,100 kbp. A minichromosome was approximately 75 kbp. The same size and number of chromosomes were present in 15 T. vaginalis isolates obtained from different geographic regions, reinforcing the idea of a highly conserved karyotype among trichomonal isolates worldwide. PMID:10577741

  10. Combined Use of Molecular Markers and High-Resolution Melting (HRM) to Assess Chromosome Dosage in Potato Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Villano, Clizia; Miraglia, Valeria; Iorizzo, Massimo; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    In plants, the most widely used cytological techniques to assess parental genome contributions are based on in situ hybridization (FISH and GISH), but they are time-consuming and need specific expertise and equipment. Recent advances in genomics and molecular biology have made PCR-based markers a straightforward, affordable technique for chromosome typing. Here, we describe the development of a molecular assay that uses single-copy conserved ortholog set II (COSII)-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the high-resolution melting (HRM) technique to assess the chromosome dosage of interspecific hybrids between a Solanum phureja-S. tuberosum diploid (2n = 2x = 24) hybrid and its wild relative S. commersonii. Screening and analysis of 45 COSII marker sequences allowed S. commersonii-specific SNPs to be identified for all 12 chromosomes. Combining the HRM technique with the establishment of synthetic DNA hybrids, SNP markers were successfully used to predict the expected parental chromosome ratio of 5 interspecific triploid hybrids. These results demonstrate the ability of this strategy to distinguish diverged genomes from each other, and to estimate chromosome dosage. The method could potentially be applied to any species as a tool to assess paternal to maternal ratios in the framework of a breeding program or following transformation techniques. PMID:26663623

  11. New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree

    PubMed Central

    Karafet, Tatiana M.; Mendez, Fernando L.; Meilerman, Monica B.; Underhill, Peter A.; Zegura, Stephen L.; Hammer, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Markers on the non-recombining portion of the human Y chromosome continue to have applications in many fields including evolutionary biology, forensics, medical genetics, and genealogical reconstruction. In 2002, the Y Chromosome Consortium published a single parsimony tree showing the relationships among 153 haplogroups based on 243 binary markers and devised a standardized nomenclature system to name lineages nested within this tree. Here we present an extensively revised Y chromosome tree containing 311 distinct haplogroups, including two new major haplogroups (S and T), and incorporating approximately 600 binary markers. We describe major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree and provide names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002. Several changes in the tree topology have important implications for studies of human ancestry. We also present demography-independent age estimates for 11 of the major clades in the new Y chromosome tree. PMID:18385274

  12. New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree.

    PubMed

    Karafet, Tatiana M; Mendez, Fernando L; Meilerman, Monica B; Underhill, Peter A; Zegura, Stephen L; Hammer, Michael F

    2008-05-01

    Markers on the non-recombining portion of the human Y chromosome continue to have applications in many fields including evolutionary biology, forensics, medical genetics, and genealogical reconstruction. In 2002, the Y Chromosome Consortium published a single parsimony tree showing the relationships among 153 haplogroups based on 243 binary markers and devised a standardized nomenclature system to name lineages nested within this tree. Here we present an extensively revised Y chromosome tree containing 311 distinct haplogroups, including two new major haplogroups (S and T), and incorporating approximately 600 binary markers. We describe major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree and provide names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002. Several changes in the tree topology have important implications for studies of human ancestry. We also present demography-independent age estimates for 11 of the major clades in the new Y chromosome tree.

  13. Currently recognized genes for schizophrenia: High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen B; Masoud, Humaira; Manzardo, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    A large body of genetic data from schizophrenia-related research has identified an assortment of genes and disturbed pathways supporting involvement of complex genetic components for schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders. Advances in genetic technology and expanding studies with searchable genomic databases have led to multiple published reports, allowing us to compile a master list of known, clinically relevant, or susceptibility genes contributing to schizophrenia. We searched key words related to schizophrenia and genetics from peer-reviewed medical literature sources, authoritative public access psychiatric websites and genomic databases dedicated to gene discovery and characterization of schizophrenia. Our list of 560 genes were arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. Genome wide pathway analysis using GeneAnalytics was carried out on the resulting list of genes to assess the underlying genetic architecture for schizophrenia. Recognized genes of clinical relevance, susceptibility or causation impact a broad range of biological pathways and mechanisms including ion channels (e.g., CACNA1B, CACNA1C, CACNA1H), metabolism (e.g., CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6), multiple targets of neurotransmitter pathways impacting dopamine, GABA, glutamate, and serotonin function, brain development (e.g., NRG1, RELN), signaling peptides (e.g., PIK3CA, PIK4CA) and immune function (e.g., HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1) and interleukins (e.g., IL1A, IL10, IL6). This summary will enable clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other clinicians to access convenient pictorial images of the distribution and location of contributing genes to inform diagnosis and gene-based treatment as well as provide risk estimates for genetic counseling of families with affected relatives. PMID:26462458

  14. Currently recognized genes for schizophrenia: High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen B; Masoud, Humaira; Manzardo, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    A large body of genetic data from schizophrenia-related research has identified an assortment of genes and disturbed pathways supporting involvement of complex genetic components for schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders. Advances in genetic technology and expanding studies with searchable genomic databases have led to multiple published reports, allowing us to compile a master list of known, clinically relevant, or susceptibility genes contributing to schizophrenia. We searched key words related to schizophrenia and genetics from peer-reviewed medical literature sources, authoritative public access psychiatric websites and genomic databases dedicated to gene discovery and characterization of schizophrenia. Our list of 560 genes were arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. Genome wide pathway analysis using GeneAnalytics was carried out on the resulting list of genes to assess the underlying genetic architecture for schizophrenia. Recognized genes of clinical relevance, susceptibility or causation impact a broad range of biological pathways and mechanisms including ion channels (e.g., CACNA1B, CACNA1C, CACNA1H), metabolism (e.g., CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6), multiple targets of neurotransmitter pathways impacting dopamine, GABA, glutamate, and serotonin function, brain development (e.g., NRG1, RELN), signaling peptides (e.g., PIK3CA, PIK4CA) and immune function (e.g., HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1) and interleukins (e.g., IL1A, IL10, IL6). This summary will enable clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other clinicians to access convenient pictorial images of the distribution and location of contributing genes to inform diagnosis and gene-based treatment as well as provide risk estimates for genetic counseling of families with affected relatives.

  15. High-resolution analysis of chromosomal breakpoints and genomic instability identifies PTPRD as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Raymond L; Nair, Prakash; Maris, John M; Catchpoole, Daniel; McDermott, Michael; O'Meara, Anne; Breatnach, Fin

    2006-04-01

    Although neuroblastoma is characterized by numerous recurrent, large-scale chromosomal imbalances, the genes targeted by such imbalances have remained elusive. We have applied whole-genome oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (median probe spacing 6 kb) to 56 neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines to identify genes involved with disease pathogenesis. This set of tumors was selected for having either 11q loss or MYCN amplification, abnormalities that define the two most common genetic subtypes of metastatic neuroblastoma. Our analyses have permitted us to map large-scale chromosomal imbalances and high-level amplifications at exon-level resolution and to identify novel microdeletions and duplications. Chromosomal breakpoints (n = 467) generating imbalances >2 Mb were mapped to intervals ranging between 6 and 50 kb in size, providing substantial information on each abnormality. For example, breakpoints leading to large-scale hemizygous loss of chromosome 11q were highly clustered and preferentially associated with segmental duplications. High-level amplifications of MYCN were extremely complex, often resulting in a series of discontinuous regions of amplification. Imbalances (n = 540) <2 Mb long were also detected. Although the majority (78%) of these imbalances mapped to segmentally duplicated regions and primarily reflect constitutional copy number polymorphisms, many subtle imbalances were detected that are likely somatically acquired alterations and include genes involved with tumorigenesis, apoptosis, or neural cell differentiation. The most frequent microdeletion involved the PTPRD locus, indicating a possible tumor suppressor function for this gene.

  16. Familial X;Y translocation with distinct phenotypic consequences: Characterization using FISH and array CGH.

    PubMed

    Bukvic, N; Carri, V Delli; Di Cosola, M L; Pustorino, G; Cesarano, C; Chetta, M; Santacroce, R; Sarno, M; Sessa, F; Longo, V; Novelli, A; Gentile, M; Margaglione, M

    2010-07-01

    X;Y translocation is a relatively rare event in humans. Analyzed cytogenetically, the majority of these aberrations have breakpoints at Xp22 and Yq11. Females with t(X;Y)(p22;q11) are phenotypically normal except for short stature, while the males may have abnormalities. Aberrations that lead to nullisomy of the deleted region and complete loss of the respective genes have been recognized as a cause of variable contiguous gene syndromes in males. The phenotype depends on the extent and position of the deletion showing the variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as ichthyosis, chondrodysplasia punctata, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia, ocular albinism, short stature, and mental retardation. In addition, some patients have been reported with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The extent of terminal Xp deletions is limited by the presence of male lethal genes in Xp22.2 at about 10-11 Mb from the telomere. The deletions in the majority of viable reported male patients extend to the STS ( approximately 7.0 Mb) or to the KAL1 ( approximately 8.5 Mb) loci. We present a clinical, cytogenetic, FISH, and array CGH study of a family with an Xp;Yq translocation. The chromosomal status is also discussed in the light of their phenotypic traits. The final karyotypes of the patients were designated as: Patient 1: 46,Y,der(X),t(X;Y)(p22;q12).ish der(X)(Xpter-,DXZ1+,Xqter+)mat.arr cgh Xp22.31p22.33(RP11-60P14 --> RP13-391G2)x0;arr cgh Yq11.221qter (RP11-235I1 --> RP11-270H4)x2.Patient 2: 46,X,der(X),t(X;Y)(p22;q12).ish der(X)(Xpter-,DXZ1+,Xqter+)mat.arr cgh Xp22.31p22.33(RP11-60P14 --> RP13-391G2)x1;arr cgh Yq11.221qter (RP11-235I1 --> RP11-270H4)x1. PMID:20578256

  17. Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI coordina actividades de investigación y trabaja con socios nacionales e internacionales para comprender y enfrentar la carga que representa el cáncer a nivel mundial.

  18. A very rare case of trisomy 4q32.3-4q35.2 and trisomy 21q11.2-21q22.11 in a patient with recombinant chromosomes 4 and 21.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Sha; Xue, Dan; Xi, Zuo-Ming; Liu, Dan-Na; Zou, Peng-Shu; Ma, Ming; Xia, Ying; Chen, Xia-Hui; Qiu, Guang-Bin; Cao, Dong-Hua

    2015-05-25

    We report the case of a patient with a clinical phenotype consistent with Down Syndrome (DS) who has a novel karyotypic abnormality. Karyotypic analyses were performed to investigate the cause of two spontaneous abortions. A balanced translocation between chromosomes 4 and 21 was identified, along with an additional abnormal chromosome 21. We performed high-resolution banding, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and FISH studies in both the patient and her mother to define the abnormality and determine its origin. CGH revealed a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 4, spanning at least 24.4 Mb, and a gain in copy number on the long arm of chromosome 21, spanning at least 16.2 Mb. FISH analysis using a chromosome 21 centromere probe and chromosome 4 long arm telomere (4pter) probe confirmed the origin of the marker chromosome. It has been confirmed by the State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics of China that this is the first reported instance of the karyotype 47,XX,t(4;21)(q31.3;q11.2),+der(21)t(4;21)mat reported in the world. PMID:25752286

  19. High-resolution comprehensive radiation hybrid maps of the porcine chromosomes 2p and 9p compared with the human chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Liu, W-S; Yasue, H; Eyer, K; Hiraiwa, H; Shimogiri, T; Roelofs, B; Landrito, E; Ekstrand, J; Treat, M; Paes, N; Lemos, M; Griffith, A C; Davis, M L; Meyers, S N; Yerle, M; Milan, D; Beever, J E; Schook, L B; Beattie, C W

    2008-01-01

    We are constructing high-resolution, chromosomal 'test' maps for the entire pig genome using a 12,000-rad WG-RH panel (IMNpRH2(12,000-rad))to provide a scaffold for the rapid assembly of the porcine genome sequence. Here we present an initial, comparative map of human chromosome (HSA) 11 with pig chromosomes (SSC) 2p and 9p. Two sets of RH mapping vectors were used to construct the RH framework (FW) maps for SSC2p and SSC9p. One set of 590 markers, including 131 microsatellites (MSs), 364 genes/ESTs, and 95 BAC end sequences (BESs) was typed on the IMNpRH2(12,000-rad) panel. A second set of 271 markers (28 MSs, 138 genes/ESTs, and 105 BESs) was typed on the IMpRH(7,000-rad) panel. The two data sets were merged into a single data-set of 655 markers of which 206 markers were typed on both panels. Two large linkage groups of 72 and 194 markers were assigned to SSC2p, and two linkage groups of 84 and 168 markers to SSC9p at a two-point LOD score of 10. A total of 126 and 114 FW markers were ordered with a likelihood ratio of 1000:1 to the SSC2p and SSC9p RH(12,000-rad) FW maps, respectively, with an accumulated map distance of 4046.5 cR(12,000 )and 1355.2 cR(7,000 )for SSC2p, and 4244.1 cR(12,000) and 1802.5 cR(7,000) for SSC9p. The kb/cR ratio in the IMNpRH2(12,000-rad) FW maps was 15.8 for SSC2p, and 15.4 for SSC9p, while the ratio in the IMpRH(7,000-rad) FW maps was 47.1 and 36.3, respectively, or an approximately 3.0-fold increase in map resolution in the IMNpRH(12,000-rad) panel over the IMpRH(7,000-rad) panel. The integrated IMNpRH(12,000-rad) andIMpRH(7,000-rad) maps as well as the genetic and BAC FPC maps provide an inclusive comparative map between SSC2p, SSC9p and HSA11 to close potential gaps between contigs prior to sequencing, and to identify regions where potential problems may arise in sequence assembly. PMID:18467842

  20. Applications of comparative genomic hybridisation in constitutional chromosome studies.

    PubMed

    Breen, C J; Barton, L; Carey, A; Dunlop, A; Glancy, M; Hall, K; Hegarty, A M; Khokhar, M T; Power, M; Ryan, K; Green, A J; Stallings, R L

    1999-07-01

    G band cytogenetic analysis often leads to the discovery of unbalanced karyotypes that require further characterisation by molecular cytogenetic studies. In particular, G band analysis usually does not show the chromosomal origin of small marker chromosomes or of a small amount of extra material detected on otherwise normal chromosomes. Comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) is one of several molecular approaches that can be applied to ascertain the origin of extra chromosomal material. CGH is also capable of detecting loss of material and thus is also applicable to confirming or further characterising subtle deletions. We have used comparative genomic hybridisation to analyse 19 constitutional chromosome abnormalities detected by G band analysis, including seven deletions, five supernumerary marker chromosomes, two interstitial duplications, and five chromosomes presenting with abnormal terminal banding patterns. CGH was successful in elucidating the origin of extra chromosomal material in 10 out of 11 non-mosaic cases, and permitted further characterisation of all of the deletions that could be detected by GTG banding. CGH appears to be a useful adjunct tool for either confirming deletions or defining their breakpoints and for determining the origin of extra chromosomal material, even in cases where abnormalities are judged to be subtle. We discuss internal quality control measures, such as the mismatching of test and reference DNA in order to assess the quality of the competitive hybridisation effect on the X chromosome.

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21) translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains) were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%), 12p (12%) and 9p (8%), and duplication 4q (6%) and Xq (4%). Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL. PMID:23151340

  2. Focused ion beam (FIB) combined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy: a promising tool for 3D analysis of chromosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Pérez-Willard, Fabián; Zeile, Ulrike; Wanner, Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling in combination with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was applied to investigations of metaphase barley chromosomes, providing new insight into the chromatin packaging in the chromosome interior and 3D distribution of histone variants in the centromeric region. Whole mount chromosomes were sectioned with FIB with thicknesses in the range of 7-20nm, resulting in up to 2000 sections, which allow high resolution three-dimensional reconstruction. For the first time, it could be shown that the chromosome interior is characterized by a network of interconnected cavities, with openings to the chromosome surface. In combination with immunogold labeling, the centromere-correlated distribution of histone variants (phosphorylated histone H3, CENH3) could be investigated with FIB in three dimensions. Limitations of classical SEM analysis of whole mount chromosomes with back-scattered electrons requiring higher accelerating voltages, e.g. faint and blurred interior signals, could be overcome with FIB milling: from within the chromosome even very small labels in the range of 10nm could be precisely visualized. This allowed direct quantification of marker molecules in a three-dimensional context. Distribution of DNA in the chromosome interior could be directly analyzed after staining with a DNA-specific platinorganic compound Platinum Blue. Higher resolution visualization of DNA distribution could be performed by preparation of FIB lamellae with the in situ lift-out technique followed by investigation in dark field with a scanning transmission electron detector (STEM) at 30kV. PMID:19059341

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy of main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids (Vernazza+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; DeMeo, F. E.; Dumas, C.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-09-01

    We conducted an extensive spectroscopic survey in the near-infrared range of 70 main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids and 4 Ch/Cgh-type families and combined these measurements with available visible wavelength spectra. New data presented here are near-infrared asteroid spectral measurements for Ch- and Cgh-type asteroids from 0.7-2.5μm obtained using SpeX, the low- to medium-resolution near-IR spectrograph and imager on the 3m NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) located on Mauna Kea, HI. Observing runs were conducted remotely primarily from the Observatory of Paris-Meudon, France between 2010 April and 2012 January. The spectrograph SpeX, combined with a 0.8*15arcsec slit, was used in the low-resolution prism mode for acquisition of the spectra in the 0.7-2.5μm wavelength range. In order to monitor the high luminosity and variability of the sky in the near-IR, the telescope was moved along the slit during the acquisition of the data so as to obtain a sequence of spectra located at two different positions (A and B) on the array. In addition, we complemented our data set with additional near-infrared spectra retrieved from the Small Main-Belt Asteroid Spectroscopic Survey (SMASS) database (http://smass.mit.edu/). Combining these near-infrared measurements with available visible wavelength spectra (Bus, 1999PhDT........50B; Lazzaro et al., 2004Icar..172..179L) allows for the first time an extensive visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral database of main-belt Ch and Cgh types with D>45km (78% or 49/63 of all Ch and Cgh types listed in SMASS; see Table1). (1 data file).

  4. Correlative super-resolution imaging of RNA polymerase distribution and dynamics, bacterial membrane and chromosomal structure in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Christoph; Cella-Zannacchi, Francesca; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate correlative super-resolution PALM, PAINT and dSTORM imaging of RNA polymerase, membrane and chromosomal DNA in fixed E. coli. This protocol allows the combination of precise structural information of the nucleoid (dSTORM) with quantitative super-resolution imaging (PALM) of interacting proteins. The spatial distribution and organization of RNA polymerase and DNA are visualized in bacterial cells grown at doubling times of 25 or 44 min. We observe that RNA polymerase is concentrated at the edge of the highly structured nucleoid during fast growth, whereas it is found more evenly distributed during medium-fast growth. In both conditions, the nucleoid shows densely packed areas which appear to be inaccessible to RNA polymerase. This finding is confirmed by live-cell tracking of RNA polymerase and subsequent imaging of the respective nucleoids using a protocol for fast fixation on-the-slide.

  5. Array based characterization of a terminal deletion involving chromosome subband 15q26.2: an emerging syndrome associated with growth retardation, cardiac defects and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Josef; Collin, Anna; Björkhem, Gudrun; Soller, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background Subtelomeric regions are gene rich and deletions in these chromosomal segments have been demonstrated to account for approximately 2.5% of patients displaying mental retardation with or without association of dysmorphic features. However, cases that report de novo terminal deletions on chromosome arm 15q are rare. Methods In this study we present the first example of a detailed molecular genetic mapping of a de novo deletion in involving 15q26.2-qter, caused by the formation of a dicentric chromosome 15, using metaphase FISH and tiling resolution (32 k) genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Results After an initial characterization of the dicentric chromosome by metaphase FISH, array CGH analysis mapped the terminal deletion to encompass a 6.48 megabase (Mb) region, ranging from 93.86–100.34 Mb on chromosome 15. Conclusion In conclusion, we present an additional case to the growing family of reported cases with 15q26-deletion, thoroughly characterized at the molecular cytogenetic level. In the deleted regions, four candidate genes responsible for the phenotype of the patient could be delineated: IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3. Further characterization of additional patients harboring similar 15q-aberrations might hopefully in the future lead to the description of a clear cut clinically recognizable syndrome. PMID:18194513

  6. Mulibrey nanism: Two novel mutations in a child identified by Array CGH and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Cozzolino, Carla; Genesio, Rita; Melis, Daniela; Frisso, Giulia; Orrico, Ada; Lombardo, Barbara; Fattorusso, Valentina; Discepolo, Valentina; Della Casa, Roberto; Simonelli, Francesca; Nitsch, Lucio; Salvatore, Francesco; Franzese, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    In childhood, several rare genetic diseases have overlapping symptoms and signs, including those regarding growth alterations, thus the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The proband, aged 3 years, was suspected to have Silver-Russel syndrome because of intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, typical facial dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, body asymmetry, and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. Other features were left atrial and ventricular enlargement and patent foramen ovale. Total X-ray skeleton showed hypoplasia of the twelfth rib bilaterally and of the coccyx, slender long bones with thick cortex, and narrow medullary channels. The genetic investigation did not confirm Silver-Russel syndrome. At the age of 5 the patient developed an additional sign: hepatomegaly. Array CGH revealed a 147 kb deletion (involving TRIM 37 and SKA2 genes) on one allele of chromosome 17, inherited from his mother. These results suggested Mulibrey nanism. The clinical features were found to fit this hypothesis. Sequencing of the TRIM 37 gene showed a single base change at a splicing locus, inherited from his father that provoked a truncated protein. The combined use of Array CGH and DNA sequencing confirmed diagnosis of Mulibrey nanism. The large deletion involving the SKA2 gene, along with the increased frequency of malignant tumours in mulibrey patients, suggests closed monitoring for cancer of our patient and his mother. Array CGH should be performed as first tier test in all infants with multiple anomalies. The clinician should reconsider the clinical features when the genetics suggests this. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27256967

  7. CGH analysis of secondary genetic changes in Ewing tumors: correlation with metastatic disease in a series of 43 cases.

    PubMed

    Brisset, S; Schleiermacher, G; Peter, M; Mairal, A; Oberlin, O; Delattre, O; Aurias, A

    2001-10-01

    The occurrence of secondary chromosome changes is frequent in Ewing tumors, in particular trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 12, and unbalanced (1;16) translocations leading to gains of 1q and losses of 16q. The prognostic value of these secondary aberrations has not been statistically demonstrated. We report here a CGH analysis of a series of 43 primary tumors corresponding to 21 localized and 22 metastatic tumors. For five of them, a sufficient amount of DNA for the CGH analysis was available from the frozen samples. For 19 samples, a preliminary step of DOP-PCR amplification of the DNA was necessary. For the last 19 tumors, DNA was obtained after DOP-PCR amplification of small amount of DNA contaminating the RNA. As a whole, the main chromosome imbalances previously described, such as trisomies for 1q, 8, and 12, were observed. It is noteworthy that the mean number of imbalances was more frequent in localized versus metastatic tumors. Gain of 1q was more frequent in metastatic than in localized tumors. Nevertheless, these two results do not reach statistical significance. Conversely, a statistically significant excess of copy number of chromosome 2 was observed in non-metastatic tumors, suggesting that this imbalance, which has never been previously reported, could be associated with more favorable tumor behavior. PMID:11672775

  8. High-resolution mapping of YACs and the single-copy gene Hs1(pro-1) on Beta vulgaris chromosomes by multi-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Desel, C; Jung, C; Cai, D; Kleine, M; Schmidt, T

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful approach for physical mapping of DNA sequences along plant chromosomes. Nematode-resistant sugar beets (Beta vulgaris) carrying a Beta procumbens translocation were investigated by FISH with two differentially labelled YACs originating from the translocation. At mitotic metaphases, the translocation was identified with both YACs in the terminal region on a pair of chromosomes. Meiotic chromosomes, representing a far more extended hybridization target, were used to determine the orientation of YACs with respect to chromosomal domains in combination with chromosomal landmark probes for telomeres and centromeres. The in situ detection of plant single-copy sequences is technically difficult, and the wild beet translocation was used to explore the potential resolution of the FISH approach and to introduce the chromosomal mapping of single-copy genes into genome analysis of Beta species. An internal fragment of the nematode resistance gene Hs1(pro-1), 684 bp long, was detected on both chromatids of different Beta chromosomes and represents one of the shortest unique DNA sequences localized on mitotic plant chromosomes so far. Comparative chromosomal mapping of the 684 bp Hs1(pro-1) probe in the translocation line, a monosomic addition line and in B. procumbens revealed the origin of the wild beet translocation leading to nematode-resistant sugar beets.

  9. CGH calculation with the ray tracing method for the Fourier transform optical system.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Yoneyama, Takuo; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2013-12-30

    Computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are usually displayed on electronic devices. However, the resolution of current output devices is not high enough to display CGHs, so the visual field is very narrow. A method using a Fourier transform optical system has been proposed, to enlarge the size of reconstructed images. This paper describes a method of CGH calculations for the Fourier transform optical system to enlarge the visual field and reconstruct realistic images by using the ray tracing method. This method reconstructs images at arbitrary depths and also eliminates unnecessary light including zero-th order light.

  10. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression. PMID:26227242

  11. Comparison of high resolution chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the laboratory evaluation of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delach, J.A.; Rosengren, S.S.; Kaplan, L.; Greenstein, R.M.; Cassidy, S.B.; Benn, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    The development of probes containing segments of DNA from chromosome region 15q11-q13 provides the opportunity to confirm the diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have evaluated FISH studies and high resolution chromosome banding studies in 14 patients referred to confirm or rule out AS. In four patients (three from the PWS category and 1 from the AS group) chromosome analysis suggested that a deletion was present but FISH failed to confirm the finding. In one AS group patient, FISH identified a deletion not detectable by high resolution banding. Review of the clinical findings in the discrepant cases suggested that FISH results were correct and high resolution findings were erroneous. Studies with a chromosome 15 alpha satellite probe (D15Z) on both normal and abnormal individuals suggested that incorrect interpretation of chromosome banding may occasionally be attributable to alpha satellite polymorphism but other variation of 15q11-q13 chromosome bands also contributes to misinterpretation. We conclude that patients who have been reported to have a cytogenetic deletion of 15q11-q13 and who have clinical findings inconsistent with PWS and AS should be re-evaluated by molecular genetic techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qunfeng; He, Yuhua; Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber.

  13. Array-CGH analyses of murine malignant lymphomas: genomic clues to understanding the effects of chronic exposure to low-dose-rate gamma rays on lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Takabatake, Takashi; Fujikawa, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirouchi, Tokuhisa; Nakamura, Masako; Nakamura, Shingo; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Saitou, Mikio; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Oghiso, Yoichi; Tanaka, Kimio

    2006-07-01

    We previously reported that mice chronically irradiated with low-dose-rate gamma rays had significantly shorter mean life spans than nonirradiated controls. This life shortening appeared to be due primarily to earlier death due to malignant lymphomas in the irradiated groups (Tanaka et al., Radiat. Res. 160, 376-379, 2003). To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of murine lymphomas after low-dose-rate irradiation, chromosomal aberrations in 82 malignant lymphomas from mice irradiated at a dose rate of 21 mGy/day and from nonirradiated mice were compared precisely by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The array carried 667 BAC clones densely selected for the genomic regions not only of lymphoma-related loci but also of surface antigen receptors, enabling immunogenotyping. Frequent detection of the apparent loss of the Igh region on chromosome 12 suggested that most lymphomas in both groups were of B-cell origin. Array-CGH profiles showed a frequent gain of whole chromosome 15 in lymphomas predominantly from the irradiated group. The profiles also demonstrated copy-number imbalances of partial chromosomal regions. Partial gains on chromosomes 12, 14 and X were found in tumors from nonirradiated mice, whereas losses on chromosomes 4 and 14 were significantly associated with the irradiated group. These findings suggest that lymphomagenesis under the effects of continuous low-dose-rate irradiation is accelerated by a mechanism different from spontaneous lymphomagenesis that is characterized by the unique spectrum of chromosomal aberrations. PMID:16808621

  14. Nonrandom chromosomal imbalances in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma detected by arbitrarily primed PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, A; Taruscio, D; Scardoni, M; Iosi, F; Paradisi, S; Ennas, M G; Rigaud, G; Moore, P S; Menestrina, F

    1999-11-01

    We used arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) fingerprinting to identify chromosomal imbalances in six primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas (PMBLs). Seventy-four chromosomal imbalances were detected, consisting of 49 sequence gains and 25 losses. Amplifications on chromosome X were seen in five cases, four of which involved the same chromosomal locus. Nonrandom gains at the same locus were also identified on chromosomes 2 and 7 in four cases and on chromosomes 5, 9, and 12 in three cases. Five PMBLs were also analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), which found chromosome arm 9p amplification as the only nonrandom imbalance. Our data demonstrate that chromosomal amplifications outnumber losses in PMBL. These mainly involve chromosomes 9 and X and may reflect more complex phenomena, such as translocations or other chromosomal rearrangements, as AP-PCR found coexistent gains and losses on these chromosomes. Comparison between AP-PCR and CGH suggests that anomalies affecting the same chromosomal regions may occur at much higher frequencies than expected by CGH, suggesting that genomic amplifications are usually confined to DNA segments smaller than the megabase long segments required for detection in CGH. Modest increases in genetic material may be as effective as higher-level amplifications when affecting sites where a proto-oncogene resides.

  15. High-resolution G-banding and nucleolus-organizer regions of chromosomes of vole Microtus kirgisorum

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurok, N.A.; Rubtsov, N.B.; Ovechkina, Y.Y.

    1995-08-01

    The use of G-banding of chromosomes in combination with the pipette method of chromosome preparation at the early metaphase made it possible to distinguish about 520 segments in the haploid chromosome set of vole Microtus kirgisorum. The idiogram of M. kirgisorum chromosomes was obtained on the basis of detailed investigation of chromosomes at different condensation levels. Data of the localization and the number of nucleolus-organizer regions are given. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  16. [Middle ear salivary gland choristoma related to branchio-oto-renal syndrome diagnosed by array-CGH].

    PubMed

    Amrhein, P; Sittel, C; Spaich, C; Kohlhase, J; Boppert, R; Kohlhof, P; Koitschev, A

    2014-05-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is characterized by ear malformations associated with sensorineural or mixed hearing loss. In addition, preauricular tags, preauricular pits, branchial cleft fistulas and cysts, as well as renal dysplasia are seen. A genetic mutation on chromosome 8, either autosomal dominantly inherited or occuring as a spontaneous mutation, is the cause in the majority of cases. Using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), it is possible to detect even the smallest genetic changes. Salivary gland choristoma in the middle ear is very rare. Surgical removal and histological clarification are required.

  17. High-resolution linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 in the vicinity of the host resistance locus Lgn1

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Diez, E.

    1997-02-01

    Natural resistance of inbred mouse strains to infection with Legionella pneumophila is controlled by the expression of a single dominant gene on chromosome 13, designated Lgn1. The genetic difference at Lgn1 is phenotypically expressed as the presence or absence of intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in host macrophages. In our effort to identify the Lgn1 gene by positional cloning, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map of the Lgn1 chromosomal region. For this, we have carried out extensive segregation analysis in a total of 1270 (A/J x C57BL/6J) X A/J informative backcross mice segregating the resistance allele of C57BL/6J and the susceptibility allele of A/J. Additional segregation analyses were carried out in three preexisting panels of C57BL/6J X Mus spretus interspecific backcross mice. A total of 39 DNA markers were mapped within an interval of approximately 30 cM overlapping the Lgn1 region. Combined pedigree analyses for the 5.4-cM segment overlapping Lgn1 indicated the locus order and the interlocus distances (in cM): D13Mit128-(1.4)-D13Mit194-(0.1)-D13Mit147-(0.9)-Dl3Mit36-(0.9)-D13Mit146-(0.2)-Lgn1/D 13Mit37-(1.0)-D13Mit70. Additional genetic linkage studies of markers not informative in the A/J X C57BL/6J cross positioned D13Mit30, -72, -195, and -203, D13Gor4, D13Hun35, and Mtap5 in the immediate vicinity of the Lgn1 locus. The marker density and resolution of this genetic linkage map should allow the construction of a physical map of the region and the isolation of YAC clones overlapping the gene. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Detection of clinically relevant exonic copy-number changes by array CGH.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Eng, Patricia A; Hixson, Patricia M; Pursley, Amber N; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A; del Gaudio, Daniela; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L; Gibson, James B; Tsai, Anne C-H; Bowers, Jennifer A; Reimschisel, Tyler E; Schaaf, Christian P; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R; Probst, Frank J; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2010-12-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications--those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene--have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes.

  19. Detection of Clinically Relevant Exonic Copy-Number Changes by Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Eng, Patricia A.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A.; Gaudio, Daniela del; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L.; Gibson, James B.; Tsai, Anne C.-H.; Bowers, Jennifer A.; Reimschisel, Tyler E.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R.; Probst, Frank J.; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications—those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene—have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes. PMID:20848651

  20. Identification of gene copy number variations in patients with mental retardation using array-CGH: Novel syndromes in a large French series.

    PubMed

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Drunat, Séverine; Bendavid, Claude; Aboura, Azzedine; Etcheverry, Amandine; Journel, Hubert; Delahaye, Andrée; Pasquier, Laurent; Bonneau, Dominique; Toutain, Annick; Burglen, Lydie; Guichet, Agnès; Pipiras, Eva; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Benzacken, Brigitte; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Henry, Catherine; David, Albert; Lucas, Josette; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique; Odent, Sylvie; Verloes, Alain; Dubourg, Christèle

    2010-01-01

    Array-CGH has revealed a large number of copy number variations (CNVs) in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or mental retardation (MCA/MR). According to criteria recently listed, pathogenicity was clearly suspected for some CNVs but benign CNVs, considered as polymorphisms, have complicated the interpretation of the results. In this study, genomic DNAs from 132 French patients with unexplained mental retardation were analysed by genome wide high-resolution Agilent 44K oligonucleotide arrays. The results were in accordance with those observed in previous studies: the detection rate of pathogenic CNVs was 14.4%. A non-random involvement of several chromosomal regions was observed. Some of the microimbalances recurrently involved regions (1q21.1, 2q23.1, 2q32q33, 7p13, 17p13.3, 17p11.2, 17q21.31) corresponding to known or novel syndromes. For all the pathogenic CNVs, further cases are needed to allow more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations underscoring the importance of databases to group patients with similar molecular data.

  1. A high-resolution map of the chromosomal region surrounding the nude gene

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.C.; Griffith, J.; Morahan, G.

    1995-03-20

    The nude mutation produces the apparently disparate phenotypes of hairlessness and congenital thymic aplasia. These pleiotropic defects are the result of a single, autosomal recessive mutation that was previously mapped to a 9-cM region of murine chromosome 11 bounded by loci encoding the acetylcholine receptor P subunit and myeloperoxidase. In this study, exclusion mapping of a panel of congenic nude strains was used to place the nude locus between the microsatellite loci D11Nds1 and D11Mit8. The relative distance from nude to each of these loci was determined by analyzing a large segregating cross. Thus, nude lies 1.4 cM distal to D11Nds1 and is 0.5 cM proximal to D11Mit8. Mice that carried recombinational breakpoints between D11Nds1 and D11Mit8 were further analyzed at the loci Evi-2 and D11Mit34, which placed nu 0.2 cM proximal to these markers. D11Nds1 and Evi-2/D11Mit34 thus define the new proximal and distal boundaries, respectively, for the nu interval. We also report the typing of the above microsatellite markers in the AKXD, AKXL, BXD, CXB, and BXH recombinant inbred strains, which confirmed the relative order and separation of loci in this region. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A high-resolution map in the chromosomal region surrounding the Lps locus

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.T.; Lariviere, L.; Gros, P.

    1996-02-01

    The Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4 controls host responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The C3H/HeJ inbred mouse strain is characterized by a mutant Lps allele (Lps{sup d}) that renders it hyporesponsive to LPS and naturally tolerant of its lethal effects. To identify the Lps gene by a positional cloning strategy, we have analyzed a total of 1604 backcross mice from a preexisting interspecific backcross panel of 259 (Mus spretus x C57BL/6J)F1 x C57BL/6J and two novel panels of 597 (DBA/2J x C3H/HeJ)F1 x C3H/HeJ and 748 (C57BL/6J x C3H/HeJ)F1 x C3H/HeJ segregating at Lps. A total of 50 DNA markers have been mapped in a 11.8-cM span overlapping the Lps locus. This positions the Lps locus within a 1.1-cM interval, flanked proximally by a large cluster of markers, including three known genes (Cd30l, Hxb, and Ambp), and distally by two microsatellite markers (D4Mit7/D4Mit178). The localization of the Lps locus is several centimorgans proximal to that previously assigned. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Detection of divergent genes in microbial aCGH experiments

    PubMed Central

    Snipen, Lars; Repsilber, Dirk; Nyquist, Ludvig; Ziegler, Andreas; Aakra, Ågot; Aastveit, Are

    2006-01-01

    Background Array-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) is a tool for rapid comparison of genomes from different bacterial strains. The purpose of such analysis is to detect highly divergent or absent genes in a sample strain compared to an index strain. Development of methods for analyzing aCGH data has primarily focused on copy number abberations in cancer research. In microbial aCGH analyses, genes are typically ranked by log-ratios, and classification into divergent or present is done by choosing a cutoff log-ratio, either manually or by statistics calculated from the log-ratio distribution. As experimental settings vary considerably, it is not possible to develop a classical discriminant or statistical learning approach. Methods We introduce a more efficient method for analyzing microbial aCGH data using a finite mixture model and a data rotation scheme. Using the average posterior probabilities from the model fitted to log-ratios before and after rotation, we get a score for each gene, and demonstrate its advantages for ranking and detecting divergent genes with enlarged specificity and sensitivity. Results The procedure is tested and compared to other approaches on simulated data sets, as well as on four experimental validation data sets for aCGH analysis on fully sequenced strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conclusion When tested on simulated data as well as on four different experimental validation data sets from experiments with only fully sequenced strains, our procedure out-competes the standard procedures of using a simple log-ratio cutoff for classification into present and divergent genes. PMID:16573812

  4. ADaCGH: A Parallelized Web-Based Application and R Package for the Analysis of aCGH Data

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Rueda, Oscar M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic DNA have been associated with complex human diseases, including cancer. One of the most common techniques to detect CNAs is array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The availability of aCGH platforms and the need for identification of CNAs has resulted in a wealth of methodological studies. Methodology/Principal Findings ADaCGH is an R package and a web-based application for the analysis of aCGH data. It implements eight methods for detection of CNAs, gains and losses of genomic DNA, including all of the best performing ones from two recent reviews (CBS, GLAD, CGHseg, HMM). For improved speed, we use parallel computing (via MPI). Additional information (GO terms, PubMed citations, KEGG and Reactome pathways) is available for individual genes, and for sets of genes with altered copy numbers. Conclusions/Significance ADaCGH represents a qualitative increase in the standards of these types of applications: a) all of the best performing algorithms are included, not just one or two; b) we do not limit ourselves to providing a thin layer of CGI on top of existing BioConductor packages, but instead carefully use parallelization, examining different schemes, and are able to achieve significant decreases in user waiting time (factors up to 45×); c) we have added functionality not currently available in some methods, to adapt to recent recommendations (e.g., merging of segmentation results in wavelet-based and CGHseg algorithms); d) we incorporate redundancy, fault-tolerance and checkpointing, which are unique among web-based, parallelized applications; e) all of the code is available under open source licenses, allowing to build upon, copy, and adapt our code for other software projects. PMID:17710137

  5. Chromosomal imbalances in meningeal solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Summersgill, Brenda M; Fisher, Cyril; Shipley, Janet M; Dean, Andrew F

    2002-06-01

    We present the results of a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of three meningeal solitary fibrous tumors (SFT). One case showed loss of chromosome 3 and two tumors had deletions of the region 3p21-p26. Other chromosomal losses included 4p15, 8q22-q24, 10, 11q14-q25, 17q11- q23, 20, and 21 in one case each. In addition, there were gains of 18p11-p13 in one case, and 1p11-p36 and 20q11-q13 in another. To our knowledge, there are no previous CGH or cytogenetic data on meningeal SFT, and loss of material on chromosome 3 has not been described in SFT at other sites. Our findings are discussed in relation to published molecular genetic and cytogenetic data on meningioma and hemangiopericytoma, the two lesions with which meningeal SFT are most likely to be confused.

  6. CGH Figure Testing of Aspherical Mirrors in Cold Vacuums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Victor John; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mink, Ronald G.; Arnold, Steven

    2009-01-01

    An established method of room-temperature interferometric null testing of mirrors having simple shapes (e.g., flat, spherical, or spheroidal) has been augmented to enable measurement of errors in the surface figures of off-axis, non-axisymmetric, aspherical mirrors when the mirrors are located inside cryogenic vacuum chambers. The established method involves the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH), functionally equivalent to a traditional null lens, to modify the laser beam of an imaging interferometer to obtain a reference wavefront that matches the ideal surface figure of a mirror under test. The CGH is inserted at the appropriate position and orientation in the optical path of the imaging interferometer, which, in turn, is appropriately positioned and oriented with respect to the mirror under test. Deviations of the surface figure of the mirror from the ideal surface figure manifest themselves as interference fringes. Interferograms are recorded and analyzed to deduce figure errors.

  7. High-resolution microarray analysis unravels complex Xq28 aberrations in patients and carriers affected by X-linked blue cone monochromacy.

    PubMed

    Yatsenko, S A; Bakos, H A; Vitullo, K; Kedrov, M; Kishore, A; Jennings, B J; Surti, U; Wood-Trageser, M A; Cercone, S; Yatsenko, A N; Rajkovic, A; Iannaccone, A

    2016-01-01

    The human X chromosome contains ∼ 1600 genes, about 15% of which have been associated with a specific genetic condition, mainly affecting males. Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition caused by a loss-of-function of both the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes. The cone opsin gene cluster is composed of 2-9 paralogs with 99.8% sequence homology and is susceptible to deletions, duplications, and mutations. Current diagnostic tests employ polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies; however, alterations remain undetermined in 10% of patients. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is limited or unavailable. High-resolution X chromosome-targeted CGH microarray was applied to test for rearrangements in males with BCM and female carriers from three unrelated families. Pathogenic alterations were revealed in all probands, characterized by sequencing of the breakpoint junctions and quantitative real-time PCR. In two families, we identified a novel founder mutation that consisted of a complex 3-kb deletion that embraced the cis-regulatory locus control region and insertion of an additional aberrant OPN1MW gene. The application of high-resolution X-chromosome microarray in clinical diagnosis brings significant advantages in detection of small aberrations that are beyond the resolution of clinically available aCGH analysis and which can improve molecular diagnosis of the known conditions and unravel previously unrecognized X-linked diseases.

  8. High-resolution microarray analysis unravels complex Xq28 aberrations in patients and carriers affected by X-linked blue cone monochromacy

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, S.A.; Bakos, H.A.; Vitullo, K.; Kedrov, M.; Kishore, A.; Jennings, B.J.; Surti, U.; Wood-Trageser, M.A.; Cercone, S.; Yatsenko, A.N.; Rajkovic, A.; Iannaccone, A.

    2016-01-01

    The human X chromosome contains ~1600 genes, about 15% of which have been associated with a specific genetic condition, mainly affecting males. Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition caused by a loss-of-function of both the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes. The cone opsin gene cluster is composed of 2–9 paralogs with 99.8% sequence homology and is susceptible to deletions, duplications, and mutations. Current diagnostic tests employ polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies; however, alterations remain undetermined in 10% of patients. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is limited or unavailable. High-resolution X chromosome-targeted CGH microarray was applied to test for rearrangements in males with BCM and female carriers from three unrelated families. Pathogenic alterations were revealed in all probands, characterized by sequencing of the breakpoint junctions and quantitative real-time PCR. In two families, we identified a novel founder mutation that consisted of a complex 3-kb deletion that embraced the cis-regulatory locus control region and insertion of an additional aberrant OPN1MW gene. The application of high-resolution X-chromosome microarray in clinical diagnosis brings significant advantages in detection of small aberrations that are beyond the resolution of clinically available aCGH analysis and which can improve molecular diagnosis of the known conditions and unravel previously unrecognized X-linked diseases. PMID:26153062

  9. Improved phylogenetic resolution and rapid diversification of Y-chromosome haplogroup K-M526 in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Karafet, Tatiana M; Mendez, Fernando L; Sudoyo, Herawati; Lansing, J Stephen; Hammer, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The highly structured distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroups suggests that current patterns of variation may be informative of past population processes. However, limited phylogenetic resolution, particularly of subclades within haplogroup K, has obscured the relationships of lineages that are common across Eurasia. Here we genotype 13 new highly informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a worldwide sample of 4413 males that carry the derived allele at M526, and reconstruct an NRY haplogroup tree with significantly higher resolution for the major clade within haplogroup K, K-M526. Although K-M526 was previously characterized by a single polytomy of eight major branches, the phylogenetic structure of haplogroup K-M526 is now resolved into four major subclades (K2a–d). The largest of these subclades, K2b, is divided into two clusters: K2b1 and K2b2. K2b1 combines the previously known haplogroups M, S, K-P60 and K-P79, whereas K2b2 comprises haplogroups P and its subhaplogroups Q and R. Interestingly, the monophyletic group formed by haplogroups R and Q, which make up the majority of paternal lineages in Europe, Central Asia and the Americas, represents the only subclade with K2b that is not geographically restricted to Southeast Asia and Oceania. Estimates of the interval times for the branching events between M9 and P295 point to an initial rapid diversification process of K-M526 that likely occurred in Southeast Asia, with subsequent westward expansions of the ancestors of haplogroups R and Q. PMID:24896152

  10. A high-resolution linkage map of the achondroplasia critical region on human chromosome 4q16.3

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common nonlethal skeletal dysplasia, with an incidence of greater than 1/40,000 births. Recently, a random search of the genome using highly polymorphic autosomal markers has localized the gene for achondroplasia to the distal portion of human chromosome 4p. We report here the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the critical region including the achondroplasia locus. The CEPH panel of pedigrees was genotyped at several loci using highly polymorphic markers, including the Huntington locus (IT15), D4S43, D4S115, and the gene for the {beta}-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). These data were incorporated into the CEPH v.6.6 database and a multipoint map was generated using the LINKAGE programs v.5.1. Based on reported recombination events in achondroplasia pedigrees, the gene for achondroplasia lies distal to the anonymous marker D4S43, in the 8 cM region defined as follows: cen-IT15-D4S43-D4S98-[D4S115-D4S111]-D4S90-PDEB. The disparity between the genetic distance and the physical distance (2 mB) among these markers likely reflects the high rate of recombination within the region. Extension of this linkage map further toward the telomere and identification of distal recombinant markers should expedite efforts directed toward isolation of the gene for achondroplasia.

  11. Identification of amplified and highly expressed genes in amplicons of the T-cell line huT78 detected by cDNA microarray CGH

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez, Bárbara; Martínez-Delgado, Beatriz; Cuadros, Marta; Fernández, Victoria; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Benítez, Javier

    2005-01-01

    Background Conventional Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) has been widely used for detecting copy number alterations in cancer and for identifying regions containing candidate tumor responsible genes. Recently, several studies have shown the utility of cDNA microarray CGH for studing gene copy changes in various types of tumors. However, no such studies on T-cell lymphomas have been performed. To date T-cell lymphomas analyzed by the use of chromosome CGH have revealed only slight copy number alterations and not gene amplifications. Results In the present study, we describe the characterization of three amplicons of the T-cell line huT78 located at 2q34-q37, 8q23-q24 and 20p, where new amplified and overexpressed genes are found. The use of a cDNA microarray containing 7.657 transcripts allowed the identification of certain genes, such as BCLX, PCNA, FKBP1A, IGFBP2 and cMYC, that are amplified, highly expressed, and also contained in the amplicons on 20p and 2q. The expresion of these genes was analyzed in 39 T-cell lymphomas and 3 other T-cell lines. Conclusion By the use of conventional CGH and CGH and expression cDNA microarrays we defined three amplicons in the T-cell line huT78 and identified several novel gene amplifications (BCLX, PCNA, FKBP1A, IGFBP2 and cMYC). We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage. We speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development of T-cell lymphomas and/or in the maintenance of T-cell lines. PMID:15656903

  12. Tumor genome wide DNA alterations assessed by array CGH in patients with poor and excellent survival following operation for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagerstedt, Kristina K; Staaf, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Hansson, Elisabeth; Lönnroth, Christina; Kressner, Ulf; Lindström, Lars; Nordgren, Svante; Borg, Ake; Lundholm, Kent

    2007-10-12

    Genome wide DNA alterations were evaluated by array CGH in addition to RNA expression profiling in colorectal cancer from patients with excellent and poor survival following primary operations. DNA was used for CGH in BAC and cDNA arrays. Global RNA expression was determined by 44K arrays. DNA and RNA from tumor and normal colon were used from cancer patients grouped according to death, survival or Dukes A, B, C and D tumor stage. Confirmed DNA alterations in all Dukes A - D were judged relevant for carcinogenesis, while changes in Dukes C and D only were regarded relevant for tumor progression. Copy number gain was more common than loss in tumor tissue (p < 0.01). Major tumor DNA alterations occurred in chromosome 8, 13, 18 and 20, where short survival included gain in 8q and loss in 8p. Copy number gains related to tumor progression were most common on chromosome 7, 8, 19, 20, while corresponding major losses appeared in chromosome 8. Losses at chromosome 18 occurred in all Dukes stages. Normal colon tissue from cancer patients displayed gains in chromosome 19 and 20. Mathematical Vector analysis implied a number of BAC-clones in tumor DNA with genes of potential importance for death or survival. The genomic variation in colorectal cancer cells is tremendous and emphasizes that BAC array CGH is presently more powerful than available statistical models to discriminate DNA sequence information related to outcome. Present results suggest that a majority of DNA alterations observed in colorectal cancer are secondary to tumor progression. Therefore, it would require an immense work to distinguish primary from secondary DNA alterations behind colorectal cancer.

  13. Unexpected structural complexity of supernumerary marker chromosomes characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Karen D; Opheim, Kent E; Hannibal, Mark C; Hing, Anne V; Glass, Ian A; Raff, Michael L; Norwood, Thomas; Torchia, Beth A

    2008-01-01

    Background Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are structurally abnormal extra chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding techniques. In the past, SMCs have been characterized using a variety of different molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although these techniques can sometimes identify the chromosome of origin of SMCs, they are cumbersome to perform and are not available in many clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Furthermore, they cannot precisely determine the region or breakpoints of the chromosome(s) involved. In this study, we describe four patients who possess one or more SMCs (a total of eight SMCs in all four patients) that were characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Results In at least one SMC from all four patients, array CGH uncovered unexpected complexity, in the form of complex rearrangements, that could have gone undetected using other molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although array CGH accurately defined the chromosome content of all but two minute SMCs, fluorescence in situ hybridization was necessary to determine the structure of the markers. Conclusion The increasing use of array CGH in clinical cytogenetic laboratories will provide an efficient method for more comprehensive characterization of SMCs. Improved SMC characterization, facilitated by array CGH, will allow for more accurate SMC/phenotype correlation. PMID:18471320

  14. A case report of 22q11 deletion syndrome confirmed by array-CGH method

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Nouri, Narges; Abdali, Hossein; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nouri, Nayereh

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 and affects approximately 1 in 4000 persons, making it the second most prevalent genetic syndrome after Down syndrome and the most common genetic syndrome associated with cleft palate. Most of the 22q11.2 deletion cases are new occurrences or sporadic; however, in about 10 % of families, the deletion is inherited and other family members are affected or at risk for passing this deletion to their children. This report describes a 1.5 years-old male child with clinical signs of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) presented with heart defect, soft cleft palate, developmental delay, acrocephaly, seizure, MRI abnormalities and descriptive facial feature, such as hypertelorism. Array-CGH test was done to confirm the diagnosis; the result revealed a 2.6 Mbp deletion in 22q11.2 chromosome that containing TBX1 and COMT genes. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of TBX1 gene is probably a major contributor to some of the syndrome characteristic signs, such as heart defect. Because of developmental delay and dysmorphic facial feature were observed in the index's mother and relatives, inherited autosomal dominant form of VCF is probable, and MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) test should be performed for parents to estimate the recurrent risk in next pregnancy. PMID:23267387

  15. Chromosomal imbalances in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor detected by metaphase and microarray comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuko; Yoshida, Aki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Wai, Daniel; Ohata, Norihide; Takeda, Ken; Kawai, Akira; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly malignant tumors affecting adolescents and adults. There have been a few reports on chromosomal aberrations of MPNSTs; however, the tumor-specific alteration remains unknown. We characterized the genomic alterations in 8 MPNSTs and 8 schwannomas by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In 5 of 8 MPNSTs, microarray CGH was added for more detailed analyses. Frequent gains were identified on 3q13-26, 5p13-14, and 12q11-23 and frequent losses were at 1p31, 10p, 11q24-qter, 16, and 17. Microarray CGH revealed frequent gains of EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, KCNK12, DDX15, CDK6, and LAMA3, and losses of CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, and SULT2A1. These genes seem to be responsible for developing MPNSTs. The concordance rate between metaphase CGH and microarray CGH was 66%. Metaphase CGH was useful for identifying chromosomal alterations before applying microarray CGH. PMID:16391845

  16. Genomic and clinical characteristics of microduplications in chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Cheung, S W; Lupski, J R

    2010-05-01

    Genomic disorders have been increasingly recognized as a significant source of clinically relevant phenotypes largely fostered by advances in technologies for genome-wide analyses. Molecular and clinical studies of copy number variants involving chromosome 17 began with locus-specific studies of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A, OMIM #118220) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP, OMIM #162500), which laid the foundation for the paradigm of duplication/deletion and gene-dosage for our understanding of genomic disorders. With the clinical introduction of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) the number of recognized genomic disorders including microduplications has been increasing rapidly. A relatively high proportion of disease-associated copy number variants map to chromosome 17. This may result from its unique structural features, such as relative abundance of segmental duplications and interspersed repetitive elements, high gene content, and the presence of dosage-sensitive genes. These genomic rearrangements are mediated by diverse mechanisms including Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination (NAHR), Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ), and Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS). We provide specific examples of chromosome 17 microduplications with the emphasis on their phenotype, specific clinical features aiding in their diagnosis, and counseling. PMID:20425816

  17. Multiplex genotyping assays for fine-resolution subtyping of the major human Y-chromosome haplogroups E, G, I, J, and R in anthropological, genealogical, and forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    van Oven, Mannis; Toscani, Kimberley; van den Tempel, Nathalie; Ralf, Arwin; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-11-01

    Inherited DNA polymorphisms located within the nonrecombing portion of the human Y chromosome provide a powerful means of tracking the patrilineal ancestry of male individuals. Recently, we introduced an efficient genotyping method for the detection of the basal Y-chromosome haplogroups A to T, as well as an additional method for the dissection of haplogroup O into its sublineages. To further extend the use of the Y chromosome as an evolutionary marker, we here introduce a set of genotyping assays for fine-resolution subtyping of haplogroups E, G, I, J, and R, which make up the bulk of Western Eurasian and African Y chromosomes. The marker selection includes a total of 107 carefully selected bi-allelic polymorphisms that were divided into eight hierarchically organized multiplex assays (two for haplogroup E, one for I, one for J, one for G, and three for R) based on the single-base primer extension (SNaPshot) technology. Not only does our method allow for enhanced Y-chromosome lineage discrimination, the more restricted geographic distribution of the subhaplogroups covered also enables more fine-scaled estimations of patrilineal bio-geographic origin. Supplementing our previous method for basal Y-haplogroup detection, the currently introduced assays are thus expected to be of major relevance for future DNA studies targeting male-specific ancestry for forensic, anthropological, and genealogical purposes.

  18. High-resolution physical mapping of a 250-kb region of human chromosome 11q24 by genomic sequence sampling (GSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Smith, M.W.; Holmsen, A.L.

    1995-04-10

    A physical map of the region of human chromosome 11q24 containing the FLI1 gene, disrupted by the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, was analyzed by genomic sequence sampling. Using a 4- to 5-fold coverage chromosome 11-specific library, 22 region-specific cosmid clones were identified by phenol emulsion reassociation hybridization, with a 245-kb yeast artificial chromosome clone containing the FLI1 gene, and by directed {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} techniques. Cosmid contigs were constructed by individual clone fingerprinting using restriction enzyme digestion and assembly with the Genome Reconstruction and AsseMbly (GRAM) computer algorithm. The relative orientation and spacing of cosmid contigs with respect to the chromosome were determined by the structural analysis of cosmid clones and by direct visual in situ hybridization mapping. Each cosmid clone in the contig was subjected to {open_quotes}one-pass{close_quotes} end sequencing, and the resulting ordered sequence fragments represent {approximately}5% of the complete DNA sequence, making the entire region accessible by PCR amplification. The sequence samples were analyzed for putative exons, repetitive DNAs, and simple sequence repeats using a variety of computer algorithms. Based upon the computer predictions, Southern and Northern blot experiments led to the independent identification and localization of the FLI1 gene as well as a previously unknown gene located in this region of chromosome 11q24. This approach to high-resolution physical analysis of human chromosomes allows the assembly of detailed sequence-based maps. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Detection of chromosomal imbalances in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Voorter, C.; Joos, S.; Bringuier, P. P.; Vallinga, M.; Poddighe, P.; Schalken, J.; du Manoir, S.; Ramaekers, F.; Lichter, P.; Hopman, A.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied for a comprehensive screening of chromosomal aberrations in 14 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder of different grade and stage. The results were compared in a number of selected cases with those obtained by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization. Distinct amplifications, found with CGH, were located on 3p22-24, 10p13-14, 12q13-15, 17q22-23, 18p11, and 22q11-13. These high copy number amplifications and the frequency of imbalances involving chromosome 5, occurring in 4 of 14 cases, have not yet been identified in transitional cell carcinomas. Apart from these new aberrations, imbalances were detected in 3 or more cases for chromosomes 9 and 11, as already described previously in the literature. In four tumors, the copy number of specific chromosomal regions was also analyzed by interphase cytogenetics. Although in most instances the CGH data were confirmed, in one tumor, distinct differences were observed, possibly a result of heterogeneity of the tumor cell population. Furthermore, the CGH data were compared with loss of heterozygosity as revealed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the same tumors. In 80% of informative cases, no loss was detected by restriction fragment length polymorphism or by CGH. Of the 15 cases of loss of heterozygosity, 7 showed a loss also with CGH, whereas in 8 cases no loss was observed. In summary, CGH is a fast method to obtain a comprehensive picture of chromosomal imbalances in transitional cell carcinomas, including a number of previously unknown genomic alterations such as high level amplifications. Images Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7778674

  20. RecFOR is not required for pneumococcal transformation but together with XerS for resolution of chromosome dimers frequently formed in the process.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Mortier-Barrière, Isabelle; Granadel, Chantal; Polard, Patrice; Martin, Bernard; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for both genome maintenance and generation of diversity in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. This process initiates from single-stranded (ss) DNA and is driven by a universal recombinase, which promotes strand exchange between homologous sequences. The bacterial recombinase, RecA, is loaded onto ssDNA by recombinase loaders, RecBCD and RecFOR for genome maintenance. DprA was recently proposed as a third loader dedicated to genetic transformation. Here we assessed the role of RecFOR in transformation of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We firstly established that RecFOR proteins are not required for plasmid transformation, strongly suggesting that DprA ensures annealing of plasmid single-strands internalized in the process. We then observed no reduction in chromosomal transformation using a PCR fragment as donor, contrasting with the 10,000-fold drop in dprA- cells and demonstrating that RecFOR play no role in transformation. However, a ∼1.45-fold drop in transformation was observed with total chromosomal DNA in recFOR mutants. To account for this limited deficit, we hypothesized that transformation with chromosomal DNA stimulated unexpectedly high frequency (>30% of cells) formation of chromosome dimers as an intermediate in the generation of tandem duplications, and that RecFOR were crucial for dimer resolution. We validated this hypothesis, showing that the site-specific recombinase XerS was also crucial for dimer resolution. An even higher frequency of dimer formation (>80% of cells) was promoted by interspecies transformation with Streptococcus mitis chromosomal DNA, which contains numerous inversions compared to pneumococcal chromosome, each potentially promoting dimerization. In the absence of RecFOR and XerS, dimers persist, as confirmed by DAPI staining, and can limit the efficiency of transformation, since resulting in loss of transformant chromosome. These findings strengthen the view that different HR

  1. RecFOR Is Not Required for Pneumococcal Transformation but Together with XerS for Resolution of Chromosome Dimers Frequently Formed in the Process

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Calum; Mortier-Barrière, Isabelle; Granadel, Chantal; Polard, Patrice; Martin, Bernard; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for both genome maintenance and generation of diversity in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. This process initiates from single-stranded (ss) DNA and is driven by a universal recombinase, which promotes strand exchange between homologous sequences. The bacterial recombinase, RecA, is loaded onto ssDNA by recombinase loaders, RecBCD and RecFOR for genome maintenance. DprA was recently proposed as a third loader dedicated to genetic transformation. Here we assessed the role of RecFOR in transformation of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We firstly established that RecFOR proteins are not required for plasmid transformation, strongly suggesting that DprA ensures annealing of plasmid single-strands internalized in the process. We then observed no reduction in chromosomal transformation using a PCR fragment as donor, contrasting with the 10,000-fold drop in dprA - cells and demonstrating that RecFOR play no role in transformation. However, a ∼1.45-fold drop in transformation was observed with total chromosomal DNA in recFOR mutants. To account for this limited deficit, we hypothesized that transformation with chromosomal DNA stimulated unexpectedly high frequency (>30% of cells) formation of chromosome dimers as an intermediate in the generation of tandem duplications, and that RecFOR were crucial for dimer resolution. We validated this hypothesis, showing that the site-specific recombinase XerS was also crucial for dimer resolution. An even higher frequency of dimer formation (>80% of cells) was promoted by interspecies transformation with Streptococcus mitis chromosomal DNA, which contains numerous inversions compared to pneumococcal chromosome, each potentially promoting dimerization. In the absence of RecFOR and XerS, dimers persist, as confirmed by DAPI staining, and can limit the efficiency of transformation, since resulting in loss of transformant chromosome. These findings strengthen the view that different HR

  2. High-resolution comparative chromosome painting in the Arizona collared peccary (Pecari tajacu, Tayassuidae): a comparison with the karyotype of pig and sheep.

    PubMed

    Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel; Kofler, Andrea; Krausman, Paul R; Masabanda, Julio; Wienberg, Johannes; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2006-01-01

    We used chromosome painting with chromosome-specific probes derived from domestic sheep and pig for a high-resolution cytogenetic comparison with the karyotype of collared peccary (Pecari tajacu sonoriensis). A reorganization of the karyotype involving at least 62-66 conserved segments were observed between the sheep and collared peccary. This is an extremely high number compared with other members of the same mammalian order (Cetartiodactyla). The comparison between pig and collared peccary, both belonging to the Suiformes, however, revealed various changes in the gross organization of both karyotypes that may have already occurred in a common ancestor of both species suggesting a monophyletic origin of Suidae/Tayassuidae. The sheep probes, however, also revealed several rearrangements between the two Suidae/Tayassuidae, indicating that these probes represent a useful tool for a more detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of Suiformes. Our sample of the collared peccary from North America (Arizona, USA) showed distinct differences to those already described from South America. The chromosome painting results defined a complex translocation that involves chromosomes including about one-quarter of the entire collared peccary karyotype. This considerable rearrangement indicates subspecies or even species status of both peccary populations, as it should present a significant barrier for their hybridization.

  3. Molecular isoforms of chicken growth hormone (cGH): different bioactivities of cGH charge variants.

    PubMed

    Arámburo, C; Montiel, J L; Perera, G; Navarrete, S; Sánchez, R

    1990-10-01

    It has been suggested that the functional diversity of growth hormone (GH) is related to its molecular complexity. Here we report a characterization of charge and mass variants of chicken growth hormone (cGH) through a variety of electrophoretic systems [nondenaturing (ND-PAGE), denaturing (SDS-PAGE), under reducing and nonreducing conditions, isoelectrofocusing (IEF), and bidimensional electrophoresis] followed by Western blot and immunostaining with a specific antibody directed against pure cGH. We also report the biological properties of two charge variants on two homologous assays. The studies were carried out with purified cGH and with fresh chicken pituitary extracts. Three charge variants were obtained by ND-PAGE (Rf = 0.23, 0.30, and 0.35), which showed the same molecular weight (26 kDa), while in IEF eight isoforms were observed, the most conspicuous being those with pI = 6.86, 7.5, 7.9, 8.05, and 8.18. In SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions four immunoreactive bands were observed: the monomer (26 kDa), a dimer (52 kDa), a fragment (16 kDa), and a minor band at 22 kDa. Higher MW variants were found under nonreducing conditions. Bidimensional analysis also showed several charge variants for the monomer and the dimer. Bioactivity of two charge variants (0.23 and 0.3) was evaluated with a lipolytic and an antilipolytic assay on chicken adipose tissue explants. It was shown that variant 0.23 was mainly lipolytic, in a dose-dependent response, but lacked antilipolytic effect. On the other hand, variant 0.30 did not show lipolytic effect but presented a clear antilipolytic activity.

  4. Estimation of tumor heterogeneity using CGH array data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Li, Jian; Li, Shengting; Bolund, Lars; Wiuf, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a commonly-used approach to detect DNA copy number variation in whole genome-wide screens. Several statistical methods have been proposed to define genomic segments with different copy numbers in cancer tumors. However, most tumors are heterogeneous and show variation in DNA copy numbers across tumor cells. The challenge is to reveal the copy number profiles of the subpopulations in a tumor and to estimate the percentage of each subpopulation. Results We describe a relation between experimental data and exact DNA copy number and develop a statistical method to reveal the heterogeneity of tumors containing a mixture of different-stage cells. Furthermore, we validate the method on simulated data and apply the method to 29 pairs of breast primary tumors and their matched lymph node metastases. Conclusion We demonstrate a new method for CGH array analysis that allows a tumor sample to be classified according to its heterogeneity. The method gives an interpretable series of copy number profiles, one for each major subpopulation in a tumor. The profiles facilitate identification of copy number alterations in cancer development. PMID:19134174

  5. A high-resolution linkage map for the Z chromosome in chicken reveals hot spots for recombination.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, P; Strömstedt, L; Tordoir, X; Foglio, M; Heath, S; Lechner, D; Hellström, A R; Tixier-Boichard, M; Lathrop, M; Gut, I G; Andersson, L

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive linkage map for chicken chromosome Z was constructed as the result of a large-scale screening of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A total of 308 SNPs were assigned to Z based on the genotype distribution among 182 birds representing several populations. A linkage map comprising 210 markers and spanning 200.9 cM was established by analyzing a small Red junglefowl/White Leghorn intercross. There was excellent agreement between the linkage map for Z and a recently released assembly of the chicken genome (May 2006). Almost all SNPs assigned to chromosome Z in the present study are on Z in the new genome assembly. The remaining 12 loci are all found on unassigned contigs that can now be assigned to Z. The average recombination rate was estimated at 2.7 cM/Mb but there was a very uneven distribution of recombination events with both cold and hot spots of recombination. The existence of one of the major hot spots of recombination, located around position 39.4 Mb, was supported by the observed pattern of linkage disequilibrium. Thirteen markers from unassigned contigs were shown to be located on chromosome W. Three of these contigs included genes that have homologues on chromosome Z. The preliminary assignment of three more genes to the gene-poor W chromosome may be important for studies on the mechanism of sex determination and dosage compensation in birds. PMID:17675841

  6. High-resolution linkage mapping for susceptibility genes in human polygenic disease: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and chromosome 11q

    PubMed Central

    Hyer, R. N.; Julier, C.; Buckley, J. D.; Trucco, M.; Rotter, J.; Spielman, R.; Barnett, A.; Bain, S.; Boitard, C.; Deschamps, I.; Todd, J. A.; Bell, J. I.; Lathrop, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) has a complex pattern of genetic inheritance. In addition to genes mapping to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), several lines of evidence point to the existence of other genetic susceptibility factors. Recent studies of the nonobese diabetic mouse (NOD) model of IDDM have suggested the presence, on mouse chromosome 9, of a susceptibility gene linked to the locus encoding the T-cell antigen, Thy-1. A region on human chromosome 11q is syntenic to this region on mouse chromosome 9. We have used a set of polymorphic DNA markers from chromosome 11q to investigate this region for linkage to a susceptibility gene in 81 multiplex diabetic pedigrees. The data were investigated by maximization of lod scores over genetic models and by multiple-locus affected-sib-pair analysis. We were able to exclude the presence of a susceptibility gene (location scores < −2) throughout >90% of the chromosome 11q homology region, under the assumption that the susceptibility factor would cause >50% of affected sib pairs to share two alleles identical by descent. Theoretical estimates of the power to map susceptibility genes with a high-resolution map of linked markers in a candidate region were made, using HLA as a model locus. This result illustrates the feasibility that IDDM linkage studies using mapped sets of polymorphic DNA markers have, both for other areas of the genome in IDDM and for other polygenic diseases. The analytic approaches introduced here will be useful for affected-sib-pair studies of other complex phenotypes. PMID:1990836

  7. Array CGH Analysis of Paired Blood and Tumor Samples from Patients with Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Crespo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Palomares-Bralo, María; Martin-Arenas, Rubén; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; Silvestre de Faria, Paulo Antonio; García-Miguel, Purificación; Lapunzina, Pablo; Regla Vargas, Fernando; Seuanez, Hector N.; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT), the most common cancer of the kidney in infants and children, has a complex etiology that is still poorly understood. Identification of genomic copy number variants (CNV) in tumor genomes provides a better understanding of cancer development which may be useful for diagnosis and therapeutic targets. In paired blood and tumor DNA samples from 14 patients with sporadic WT, analyzed by aCGH, 22% of chromosome abnormalities were novel. All constitutional alterations identified in blood were segmental (in 28.6% of patients) and were also present in the paired tumor samples. Two segmental gains (2p21 and 20q13.3) and one loss (19q13.31) present in blood had not been previously described in WT. We also describe, for the first time, a small, constitutive partial gain of 3p22.1 comprising 2 exons of CTNNB1, a gene associated to WT. Among somatic alterations, novel structural chromosomal abnormalities were found, like gain of 19p13.3 and 20p12.3, and losses of 2p16.1-p15, 4q32.5-q35.1, 4q35.2-q28.1 and 19p13.3. Candidate genes included in these regions might be constitutively (SIX3, SALL4) or somatically (NEK1, PIAS4, BMP2) operational in the development and progression of WT. To our knowledge this is the first report of CNV in paired blood and tumor samples in sporadic WT. PMID:26317783

  8. Novel microdeletion syndromes detected by chromosome microarrays.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne M

    2008-08-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has revolutionized the cytogenetic testing available for patients with learning disabilities who have "chromosomal" phenotypes with dysmorphic features and multiple anomalies. Screening large patient cohorts with mental retardation by array CGH has recently lead to the characterization of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, initially according to the shared cytogenetic aberrations, with secondary characterization of the corresponding phenotypes. This review provides a detailed clinical and molecular cytogenetic description of several of the most common of these aberrations. We have chosen to focus on patients in whom the cytogenetic abnormalities were principally described by array CGH, rather than by G-banded karyotyping or fluorescence in-situ hybridization. The syndromes that we have chosen include the 17q21.31 deletion and 17q21.31 duplication syndromes, 15q13.3 deletion syndrome, 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, 15q24 deletion syndrome, 1q41q42 deletion syndrome, 2p15p16.1 deletion syndrome and 9q22.3 deletion syndrome. In time, we hypothesize that at least some of these will become as clinically well characterized and recognizable to the clinician as the commoner microdeletion syndromes today. Although the full extent of the phenotypes is still evolving for many of these novel microdeletions, it is clear that array CGH has heralded an unparalleled era of discovery for clinical cytogenetics. PMID:18512078

  9. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    PubMed

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  10. [Microarray CGH: principle and use for constitutional disorders].

    PubMed

    Sanlaville, D; Lapierre, J M; Coquin, A; Turleau, C; Vermeesch, J; Colleaux, L; Borck, G; Vekemans, M; Aurias, A; Romana, S P

    2005-10-01

    Chips technology has allowed to miniaturize process making possible to realize in one step and using the same device a lot of chemical reactions. The application of this technology to molecular cytogenetics resulted in the development of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on microarrays technique. Using this technique it is possible to detect very small genetic imbalances anywhere in the genome. Its usefulness has been well documented in cancer and more recently in constitutional disorders. In particular it has been used to detect interstitial and subtelomeric submicroscopic imbalances, to characterize their size at the molecular level or to define the breakpoints of translocation. The challenge today is to transfer this technology in laboratory medicine. Nevertheless this technology remains expensive and the existence of numerous sequence polymorphisms makes its interpretation difficult. Finally its is unlikely that it will make karyotyping obsolete as it does not allow to detect balanced rearrangements which after meiotic segregation might result in genome imbalance in the progeny. PMID:16153813

  11. The design method of CGH for testing the Φ404, F2 primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Nian; Duan, Xueting; Li, Hua

    2014-09-01

    In order to accurately test shape quality of the large diameter aspherical mirror, a kind of binary optical element called Computer generated holograms (CGHs) are widely used .The primary role of the CGHs is to generate any desired wavefronts to realize phase compensation. In this paper, the CGH design principle and design process are reviewed at first. Then an optical testing system for testing the aspheric mirror includes a computer generated hologram (CGH) and an imaging element (IE) is disposed. And an optical testing system only concludes a CGH is proposed too. The CGH is designed for measurement of an aspheric mirror (diameter=404mm, F-number=2). Interferometric simulation test results of the aspheric mirror show that the whole test system obtains the demanded high accuracy. When combined the CGH with an imaging element in the Aspheric Compensator, the smallest feature in the CGH should be decreased. The CGH can also be used to test freeform surface with high precision, it is of great significance to the development of the freeform surface.

  12. Polarity and Temporality of High-Resolution Y-Chromosome Distributions in India Identify Both Indigenous and Exogenous Expansions and Reveal Minor Genetic Influence of Central Asian Pastoralists

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; King, Roy; Mehdi, S. Q.; Edmonds, Christopher A.; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Lin, Alice A.; Mitra, Mitashree; Sil, Samir K.; Ramesh, A.; Usha Rani, M. V.; Thakur, Chitra M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Majumder, Partha P.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Although considerable cultural impact on social hierarchy and language in South Asia is attributable to the arrival of nomadic Central Asian pastoralists, genetic data (mitochondrial and Y chromosomal) have yielded dramatically conflicting inferences on the genetic origins of tribes and castes of South Asia. We sought to resolve this conflict, using high-resolution data on 69 informative Y-chromosome binary markers and 10 microsatellite markers from a large set of geographically, socially, and linguistically representative ethnic groups of South Asia. We found that the influence of Central Asia on the pre-existing gene pool was minor. The ages of accumulated microsatellite variation in the majority of Indian haplogroups exceed 10,000–15,000 years, which attests to the antiquity of regional differentiation. Therefore, our data do not support models that invoke a pronounced recent genetic input from Central Asia to explain the observed genetic variation in South Asia. R1a1 and R2 haplogroups indicate demographic complexity that is inconsistent with a recent single history. Associated microsatellite analyses of the high-frequency R1a1 haplogroup chromosomes indicate independent recent histories of the Indus Valley and the peninsular Indian region. Our data are also more consistent with a peninsular origin of Dravidian speakers than a source with proximity to the Indus and with significant genetic input resulting from demic diffusion associated with agriculture. Our results underscore the importance of marker ascertainment for distinguishing phylogenetic terminal branches from basal nodes when attributing ancestral composition and temporality to either indigenous or exogenous sources. Our reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era—not Indo-European—expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape. PMID:16400607

  13. Array CGH data modeling and smoothing in Stationary Wavelet Packet Transform domain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Heng; Nguyen, Nha; Oraintara, Soontorn; Vo, An

    2008-01-01

    Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. Characterization of these DNA copy number changes is important for both the basic understanding of cancer and its diagnosis. In order to develop effective methods to identify aberration regions from array CGH data, many recent research work focus on both smoothing-based and segmentation-based data processing. In this paper, we propose stationary packet wavelet transform based approach to smooth array CGH data. Our purpose is to remove CGH noise in whole frequency while keeping true signal by using bivariate model. Results In both synthetic and real CGH data, Stationary Wavelet Packet Transform (SWPT) is the best wavelet transform to analyze CGH signal in whole frequency. We also introduce a new bivariate shrinkage model which shows the relationship of CGH noisy coefficients of two scales in SWPT. Before smoothing, the symmetric extension is considered as a preprocessing step to save information at the border. Conclusion We have designed the SWTP and the SWPT-Bi which are using the stationary wavelet packet transform with the hard thresholding and the new bivariate shrinkage estimator respectively to smooth the array CGH data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through theoretical and experimental exploration of a set of array CGH data, including both synthetic data and real data. The comparison results show that our method outperforms the previous approaches. PMID:18831782

  14. Age dependence of tumor genetics in unfavorable neuroblastoma: arrayCGH profiles of 34 consecutive cases, using a Swedish 25-year neuroblastoma cohort for validation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aggressive neuroblastoma remains a significant cause of childhood cancer death despite current intensive multimodal treatment protocols. The purpose of the present work was to characterize the genetic and clinical diversity of such tumors by high resolution arrayCGH profiling. Methods Based on a 32K BAC whole-genome tiling path array and using 50-250K Affymetrix SNP array platforms for verification, DNA copy number profiles were generated for 34 consecutive high-risk or lethal outcome neuroblastomas. In addition, age and MYCN amplification (MNA) status were retrieved for 112 unfavorable neuroblastomas of the Swedish Childhood Cancer Registry, representing a 25-year neuroblastoma cohort of Sweden, here used for validation of the findings. Statistical tests used were: Fisher’s exact test, Bayes moderated t-test, independent samples t-test, and correlation analysis. Results MNA or segmental 11q loss (11q-) was found in 28/34 tumors. With two exceptions, these aberrations were mutually exclusive. Children with MNA tumors were diagnosed at significantly younger ages than those with 11q- tumors (mean: 27.4 vs. 69.5 months; p=0.008; n=14/12), and MNA tumors had significantly fewer segmental chromosomal aberrations (mean: 5.5 vs. 12.0; p<0.001). Furthermore, in the 11q- tumor group a positive correlation was seen between the number of segmental aberrations and the age at diagnosis (Pearson Correlation 0.606; p=0.037). Among nonMNA/non11q- tumors (n=6), one tumor displayed amplicons on 11q and 12q and three others bore evidence of progression from low-risk tumors due to retrospective evidence of disease six years before diagnosis, or due to tumor profiles with high proportions of numerical chromosomal aberrations. An early age at diagnosis of MNA neuroblastomas was verified by registry data, with an average of 29.2 months for 43 cases that were not included in the present study. Conclusion MNA and segmental 11q loss define two major genetic variants of

  15. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. PMID:26116136

  16. High-resolution linkage map and chromosome-scale genome assembly for cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from 10 populations.

    PubMed

    2014-12-11

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major staple crop in Africa, Asia, and South America, and its starchy roots provide nourishment for 800 million people worldwide. Although native to South America, cassava was brought to Africa 400-500 years ago and is now widely cultivated across sub-Saharan Africa, but it is subject to biotic and abiotic stresses. To assist in the rapid identification of markers for pathogen resistance and crop traits, and to accelerate breeding programs, we generated a framework map for M. esculenta Crantz from reduced representation sequencing [genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)]. The composite 2412-cM map integrates 10 biparental maps (comprising 3480 meioses) and organizes 22,403 genetic markers on 18 chromosomes, in agreement with the observed karyotype. We used the map to anchor 71.9% of the draft genome assembly and 90.7% of the predicted protein-coding genes. The chromosome-anchored genome sequence will be useful for breeding improvement by assisting in the rapid identification of markers linked to important traits, and in providing a framework for genomic selection-enhanced breeding of this important crop.

  17. High-Resolution Linkage Map and Chromosome-Scale Genome Assembly for Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from 10 Populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major staple crop in Africa, Asia, and South America, and its starchy roots provide nourishment for 800 million people worldwide. Although native to South America, cassava was brought to Africa 400–500 years ago and is now widely cultivated across sub-Saharan Africa, but it is subject to biotic and abiotic stresses. To assist in the rapid identification of markers for pathogen resistance and crop traits, and to accelerate breeding programs, we generated a framework map for M. esculenta Crantz from reduced representation sequencing [genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)]. The composite 2412-cM map integrates 10 biparental maps (comprising 3480 meioses) and organizes 22,403 genetic markers on 18 chromosomes, in agreement with the observed karyotype. We used the map to anchor 71.9% of the draft genome assembly and 90.7% of the predicted protein-coding genes. The chromosome-anchored genome sequence will be useful for breeding improvement by assisting in the rapid identification of markers linked to important traits, and in providing a framework for genomic selection-enhanced breeding of this important crop. PMID:25504737

  18. Array CGH analysis of the rare laryngeal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma - a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ecsedi, Szilvia; Tóth, László; Balázs, Margit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define copy number alterations in a rare laryngeal type basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (laryngeal BSCC) using high throughput array comparative genomic hybridization. This is the first genome wide screening of a laryngeal BSCC describing the unique events of DNA copy number changes. By Nimble-Gen Whole Genome Tiling Array CGH (consisting of 72,000 probes) we were able to identify 3,777 genes altered by copy number changes (1,726 genes with copy number gains and 2,051 genes with copy number with losses). The resolution of the array allowed us to identify a new alteration at the 17q21.31 region covering the DUSP3 gene which encodes the dual-specific protein phosphatase. Functional studies of the altered genes (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery v6.7 analysis) highlighted molecular pathways including chemokine signaling, cell cycle, adherent junction-, VEGF- and TGF-beta signaling pathways that might be disrupted by copy number alterations in laryngeal BSCC. PMID:23071866

  19. Homozygous deletions of a copy number change detected by array CGH: a new cause for mental retardation?

    PubMed

    Curry, Cynthia J; Mao, Rong; Aston, Emily; Mongia, Shella K; Treisman, Tamara; Procter, Melinda; Chou, Bob; Whitby, Heidi; South, Sarah T; Brothman, Arthur R

    2008-08-01

    We describe two unrelated patients with mental retardation and normal karyotypes found to have relatively large homozygous deletions (>150 kb) of different regions detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Patient 1 showed a 157-214 kb deletion at 8q24.2, containing BAC clone RP11-17M8. This patient was born to phenotypically normal parents and has microcephaly, distinctive craniofacial features, brachymetacarpia, brachymetatarsia and severe mental retardation. This BAC clone is listed as a copy number variant on the Database of Genomic Variants (http://projects.tcag.ca/variation/). Heterozygosity for the deletion was found in the mother (father is deceased) and uniparental disomy of chromosome 8 was excluded. Patient 2 showed a 812-902 kb deletion at 12q21.1, containing BAC clone RP11-89P15. This region was not listed in any public database as a known variant. This patient has mild craniofacial dysmorphic features, bifid uvula, peripheral pulmonic stenosis and developmental delay. Heterozygosity for this deletion was confirmed in the phenotypically normal parents and two normal siblings, but surprisingly, homozygosity for the deletion in an apparently normal younger sibling brings into question whether this large homozygous copy number change (CNC) is causal. Homozygous deletions of CNCs have not previously been reported in association with a phenotype or mental retardation. These cases represent homozygosity for presumably benign CNCs, and while causality for the phenotypes cannot be confirmed, similar deletions are bound to be identified more frequently as aCGH is used with increasing regularity. Such homozygous deletions should be viewed as potentially clinically relevant. PMID:18627067

  20. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80 % of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68 % of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways. PMID:25511566

  1. High-resolution genetic and physical mapping of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and pseudoachondroplasia mutations at chromosome 19p13.1-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, R.G.; Cekleniak, J.A.; Cohn, D.H.

    1995-08-10

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) are autosomal dominant chondrodysplasias that have similar phenotypes at both clinical and cytological levels. With the recent mapping of PSACH and one form of MED (EDM1) to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19, it is likely that the disease mutations are allelic. D19S212 and D19S215, genetic markers flanking the EDM1/PSACH locus, have been localized in a chromosome 19 physical map consisting of cosmid contigs ordered by high-resolution FISH. These two markers define an interval of approximately 3.1 Mb at the 19p13.1-p12 boundary. With as many as five informative crossovers within the D19S212-D19S215 interval, four new dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms have been identified. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes in the two families has narrowed the possible location of the EDM1/PSACH gene to an interval of approximately 600 kb. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. High-resolution cytogenetic mapping of the short arm of chromosome 1 with newly isolated 411 cosmid markers by fluorescence in situ hybridization: The precise order of 18 markers on 1p36.1 on prophase chromosomes and {open_quotes}stretched{close_quotes} DNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyama, Takeshi; Inazawa, Johji; Abe, Toshihiko

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution cytogenetic map of the short arm of chromosome 1 with newly isolated 411 cosmid markers was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These markers were scattered throughout chromosome 1p, but they were preferentially concentrated on R-band dominant regions such as 1p36, 1p34, 1p32, 1p22, and 1p13. Among these markers, 197 were localized on chromosome band 1p36, a region frequently deleted in neuroblastoma. Of these, 18 were precisely ordered on 1p36.1 by multicolor FISH of prophase chromosomes and {open_quotes}stretched{close_quotes} DNAs as follows: 1pter-163-41-11-1-226-586-568-614-631-665-451-199-190-561-241-74-176-652-1cen. The high-density map of chromosome 1p constructed here can provide useful landmarks for constructing a contig map of the short arm of chromosome 1 with YACs and cosmid clones and will expedite the identification of breakpoints and/or tumor suppressor gene(s) associated with several types of malignant tumors that frequently exhibit chromosomal aberrations or deletions of chromosome 1p. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. High-resolution meiotic and physical mapping of the Best`s vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) locus to pericentromeric chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.H.F.; Vogt, G.; Walker, D.

    1994-09-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy, also known as Best`s disease, is a juvenile-onset macular degeneration with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by well-demarcated accumulation of lipofuscin-like material within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and classically results in an egg yolk-like appearance of the macula. Typically, carriers of the disease gene show a specific electrophysiological sign which can be detected by electrooculography (EOG). The EOG measures a standing potential between the cornea and the retina which is primarily generated by the RPE. The histopathological findings as well as the EOG abnormalities suggest that Best`s disease is a generalized disorder of the RPE. The basic biochemical defect is still unknown. As a first step in the positional cloning of the defective gene, the Best`s disease locus was mapped to chromosome 11 between markers at D11S871 and INT2. Subsequently, his region was refined to a 3.7 cM interval flanked by loci D11S903 and PYGM. To further narrow the D11S903-PYGM interval and to obtain an estimate of the physical size of the minimal candidate region, we used a combination of high-resolution PCR hybrid mapping and analysis of recombinant Best`s disease chromosomes. We identified six markers from within the D11S903-PYGM interval that show no recombination with the defective gene in three multigeneration Best`s disease pedigrees. Our hybrid panel localizes these markers on either side of the centromere on chromosome 11. The closest markers flanking the disease gene are at D11S986 in band p12-11.22 and at D11S480 in band q13.2-13.3. Our study demonstrates that the physical size of the Best`s disease region is exceedingly larger than was previously estimated from the genetic data due to the proximity of the defective gene to the centromere of chromosome 11.

  4. Separate effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function revealed by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and spatial navigation assessment of the Four Core Genotype mouse model.

    PubMed

    Corre, Christina; Friedel, Miriam; Vousden, Dulcie A; Metcalf, Ariane; Spring, Shoshana; Qiu, Lily R; Lerch, Jason P; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Males and females exhibit several differences in brain structure and function. To examine the basis for these sex differences, we investigated the influences of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function in mice. We used the Four Core Genotype (4CG) mice, which can generate both male and female mice with XX or XY sex chromosome complement, allowing the decoupling of sex chromosomes from hormonal milieu. To examine whole brain structure, high-resolution ex vivo MRI was performed, and to assess differences in cognitive function, mice were trained on a radial arm maze. Voxel-wise and volumetric analyses of MRI data uncovered a striking independence of hormonal versus chromosomal influences in 30 sexually dimorphic brain regions. For example, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the parieto-temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex displayed steroid-dependence while the cerebellar cortex, corpus callosum, and olfactory bulbs were influenced by sex chromosomes. Spatial learning and memory demonstrated strict hormone-dependency with no apparent influence of sex chromosomes. Understanding the influences of chromosomes and hormones on brain structure and function is important for understanding sex differences in brain structure and function, an endeavor that has eventual implications for understanding sex biases observed in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders.

  5. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism…

  6. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Li, Shanru; Neira, Mauricio; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Azen, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine ‘taster’ (Soaa), ‘nontaster’ (Soab), and ‘demitaster’ (Soac) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soab, B6.SW-Soaa, and C3.SW-Soaa/c and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in a ~1-cM (3.3–4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus. PMID:11641717

  7. Determination of High-Resolution 3D Chromatin Organization Using Circular Chromosome Conformation Capture (4C-seq).

    PubMed

    Matelot, Mélody; Noordermeer, Daan

    2016-01-01

    3D chromatin organization is essential for many aspects of transcriptional regulation. Circular Chromosome Conformation Capture followed by Illumina sequencing (4C-seq) is among the most powerful techniques to determine 3D chromatin organization. 4C-seq, like other modifications of the original 3C technique, uses the principle of "proximity ligation" to identify and quantify ten thousands of genomic interactions at a kilobase scale in a single experiment for predefined loci in the genome.In this chapter we focus on the experimental steps in the 4C-seq protocol, providing detailed descriptions on the preparation of cells, the construction of the circularized 3C library and the generation of the Illumina high throughput sequencing library. This protocol is particularly suited for the use of mammalian tissue samples, but can be used with minimal changes on circulating cells and cell lines from other sources as well. In the final section of this chapter, we provide a brief overview of data analysis approaches, accompanied by links to publicly available analysis tools. PMID:27659989

  8. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  9. HAPPY mapping in a plant genome: reconstruction and analysis of a high-resolution physical map of a 1.9 Mbp region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Madan; James, Allan B; Bankier, Alan; Bryan, Glenn J; Dear, Paul H; Waugh, Robbie

    2003-01-01

    HAPPY mapping is an in vitro approach for defining the order and spacing of DNA markers directly on native genomic DNA. This cloning-free technique is based on analysing the segregation of markers amplified from high molecular weight genomic DNA which has been broken randomly and 'segregated' by limiting dilution into subhaploid samples. It is a uniquely versatile tool, allowing for the construction of genome maps with flexible ranges and resolutions. Moreover, it is applicable to plant genomes, for which many of the techniques pioneered in animal genomes are inapplicable or inappropriate. We report here its demonstration in a plant genome by reconstructing the physical map of a 1.9 Mbp region around the FCA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana. The resulting map, spanning around 10% of chromosome 4, is in excellent agreement with the DNA sequence and has a mean marker spacing of 16 kbp. We argue that HAPPY maps of any required resolution can be made immediately and with relatively little effort for most plant species and, furthermore, that such maps can greatly aid the construction of regional or genome-wide physical maps.

  10. Shared language, diverging genetic histories: high-resolution analysis of Y-chromosome variability in Calabrian and Sicilian Arbereshe

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Tofanelli, Sergio; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Bortolini, Eugenio; Ferri, Gianmarco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Sineo, Luca; Luiselli, Donata; Boattini, Alessio; Pettener, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between genetic and linguistic diversification in human populations has been often explored to interpret some specific issues in human history. The Albanian-speaking minorities of Sicily and Southern Italy (Arbereshe) constitute an important portion of the ethnolinguistic variability of Italy. Their linguistic isolation from neighboring Italian populations and their documented migration history, make such minorities particularly effective for investigating the interplay between cultural, geographic and historical factors. Nevertheless, the extent of Arbereshe genetic relationships with the Balkan homeland and the Italian recipient populations has been only partially investigated. In the present study we address the genetic history of Arbereshe people by combining highly resolved analyses of Y-chromosome lineages and extensive computer simulations. A large set of slow- and fast-evolving molecular markers was typed in different Arbereshe communities from Sicily and Southern Italy (Calabria), as well as in both the putative Balkan source and Italian sink populations. Our results revealed that the considered Arbereshe groups, despite speaking closely related languages and sharing common cultural features, actually experienced diverging genetic histories. The estimated proportions of genetic admixture confirm the tight relationship of Calabrian Arbereshe with modern Albanian populations, in accordance with linguistic hypotheses. On the other hand, population stratification and/or an increased permeability of linguistic and geographic barriers may be hypothesized for Sicilian groups, to account for their partial similarity with Greek populations and their higher levels of local admixture. These processes ultimately resulted in the differential acquisition or preservation of specific paternal lineages by the present-day Arbereshe communities. PMID:26130483

  11. Shared language, diverging genetic histories: high-resolution analysis of Y-chromosome variability in Calabrian and Sicilian Arbereshe.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Stefania; Tofanelli, Sergio; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Bortolini, Eugenio; Ferri, Gianmarco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Sineo, Luca; Luiselli, Donata; Boattini, Alessio; Pettener, Davide

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between genetic and linguistic diversification in human populations has been often explored to interpret some specific issues in human history. The Albanian-speaking minorities of Sicily and Southern Italy (Arbereshe) constitute an important portion of the ethnolinguistic variability of Italy. Their linguistic isolation from neighboring Italian populations and their documented migration history, make such minorities particularly effective for investigating the interplay between cultural, geographic and historical factors. Nevertheless, the extent of Arbereshe genetic relationships with the Balkan homeland and the Italian recipient populations has been only partially investigated. In the present study we address the genetic history of Arbereshe people by combining highly resolved analyses of Y-chromosome lineages and extensive computer simulations. A large set of slow- and fast-evolving molecular markers was typed in different Arbereshe communities from Sicily and Southern Italy (Calabria), as well as in both the putative Balkan source and Italian sink populations. Our results revealed that the considered Arbereshe groups, despite speaking closely related languages and sharing common cultural features, actually experienced diverging genetic histories. The estimated proportions of genetic admixture confirm the tight relationship of Calabrian Arbereshe with modern Albanian populations, in accordance with linguistic hypotheses. On the other hand, population stratification and/or an increased permeability of linguistic and geographic barriers may be hypothesized for Sicilian groups, to account for their partial similarity with Greek populations and their higher levels of local admixture. These processes ultimately resulted in the differential acquisition or preservation of specific paternal lineages by the present-day Arbereshe communities.

  12. Shared language, diverging genetic histories: high-resolution analysis of Y-chromosome variability in Calabrian and Sicilian Arbereshe.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Stefania; Tofanelli, Sergio; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Bortolini, Eugenio; Ferri, Gianmarco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Sineo, Luca; Luiselli, Donata; Boattini, Alessio; Pettener, Davide

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between genetic and linguistic diversification in human populations has been often explored to interpret some specific issues in human history. The Albanian-speaking minorities of Sicily and Southern Italy (Arbereshe) constitute an important portion of the ethnolinguistic variability of Italy. Their linguistic isolation from neighboring Italian populations and their documented migration history, make such minorities particularly effective for investigating the interplay between cultural, geographic and historical factors. Nevertheless, the extent of Arbereshe genetic relationships with the Balkan homeland and the Italian recipient populations has been only partially investigated. In the present study we address the genetic history of Arbereshe people by combining highly resolved analyses of Y-chromosome lineages and extensive computer simulations. A large set of slow- and fast-evolving molecular markers was typed in different Arbereshe communities from Sicily and Southern Italy (Calabria), as well as in both the putative Balkan source and Italian sink populations. Our results revealed that the considered Arbereshe groups, despite speaking closely related languages and sharing common cultural features, actually experienced diverging genetic histories. The estimated proportions of genetic admixture confirm the tight relationship of Calabrian Arbereshe with modern Albanian populations, in accordance with linguistic hypotheses. On the other hand, population stratification and/or an increased permeability of linguistic and geographic barriers may be hypothesized for Sicilian groups, to account for their partial similarity with Greek populations and their higher levels of local admixture. These processes ultimately resulted in the differential acquisition or preservation of specific paternal lineages by the present-day Arbereshe communities. PMID:26130483

  13. Molecular characterisation of a mosaicism with a complex chromosome rearrangement: evidence for coincident chromosome healing by telomere capture and neo‐telomere formation

    PubMed Central

    Chabchoub, Elyes; Rodríguez, Laura; Galán, Enrique; Mansilla, Elena; Martínez‐Fernandez, Maria Luisa; Martínez‐Frías, Maria Luisa; Fryns, Jean‐Pierre; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Broken chromosomes must acquire new telomeric “caps” to be structurally stable. Chromosome healing can be mediated either by telomerase through neo‐telomere synthesis or by telomere capture. Aim To unravel the mechanism(s) generating complex chromosomal mosaicisms and healing broken chromosomes. Methods G banding, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), fluorescence in‐situ hybridisation (FISH) and short tandem repeat analysis (STR) was performed on a girl presenting with mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, urogenital malformations and limb anomalies carrying a complex chromosomal mosaicism. Results & discussion The karyotype showed a de novo chromosome rearrangement with two cell lines: one cell line with a deletion 9pter and one cell line carrying an inverted duplication 9p and a non‐reciprocal translocation 5pter fragment. aCGH, FISH and STR analysis enabled the deduction of the most likely sequence of events generating this complex mosaic. During embryogenesis, a double‐strand break occurred on the paternal chromosome 9. Following mitotic separation of both broken sister chromatids, one acquired a telomere vianeo‐telomere formation, while the other generated a dicentric chromosome which underwent breakage during anaphase, giving rise to the del inv dup(9) that was subsequently healed by chromosome 5 telomere capture. Conclusion Broken chromosomes can coincidently be rescued by both telomere capture and neo‐telomere synthesis. PMID:17172463

  14. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  15. A Chromosome 7 Pericentric Inversion Defined at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Diagnostic Whole Genome Sequencing in a Patient with Hand-Foot-Genital Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Harrison, Sally M; Lascelles, Carolina; Antanaviciute, Agne; Carr, Ian M; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing methodologies are facilitating the rapid characterisation of novel structural variants at nucleotide resolution. These approaches are particularly applicable to variants initially identified using alternative molecular methods. We report a child born with bilateral postaxial syndactyly of the feet and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. This was presumed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome, due to the family history of consanguinity. Karyotype analysis revealed a homozygous pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(p15q21)x2) which was confirmed to be heterozygous in both unaffected parents. Since the resolution of the karyotype was insufficient to identify any putatively causative gene, we undertook medium-coverage whole genome sequencing using paired-end reads, in order to elucidate the molecular breakpoints. In a two-step analysis, we first narrowed down the region by identifying discordant read-pairs, and then determined the precise molecular breakpoint by analysing the mapping locations of "soft-clipped" breakpoint-spanning reads. PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed the identified breakpoints, both of which were located in intergenic regions. Significantly, the 7p15 breakpoint was located 523 kb upstream of HOXA13, the locus for hand-foot-genital syndrome. By inference from studies of HOXA locus control in the mouse, we suggest that the inversion has delocalised a HOXA13 enhancer to produce the phenotype observed in our patient. This study demonstrates how modern genetic diagnostic approach can characterise structural variants at nucleotide resolution and provide potential insights into functional regulation. PMID:27272187

  16. A Chromosome 7 Pericentric Inversion Defined at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Diagnostic Whole Genome Sequencing in a Patient with Hand-Foot-Genital Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crinnion, Laura A.; Harrison, Sally M.; Lascelles, Carolina; Antanaviciute, Agne; Carr, Ian M.; Bonthron, David T.; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing methodologies are facilitating the rapid characterisation of novel structural variants at nucleotide resolution. These approaches are particularly applicable to variants initially identified using alternative molecular methods. We report a child born with bilateral postaxial syndactyly of the feet and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. This was presumed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome, due to the family history of consanguinity. Karyotype analysis revealed a homozygous pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(p15q21)x2) which was confirmed to be heterozygous in both unaffected parents. Since the resolution of the karyotype was insufficient to identify any putatively causative gene, we undertook medium-coverage whole genome sequencing using paired-end reads, in order to elucidate the molecular breakpoints. In a two-step analysis, we first narrowed down the region by identifying discordant read-pairs, and then determined the precise molecular breakpoint by analysing the mapping locations of “soft-clipped” breakpoint-spanning reads. PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed the identified breakpoints, both of which were located in intergenic regions. Significantly, the 7p15 breakpoint was located 523 kb upstream of HOXA13, the locus for hand-foot-genital syndrome. By inference from studies of HOXA locus control in the mouse, we suggest that the inversion has delocalised a HOXA13 enhancer to produce the phenotype observed in our patient. This study demonstrates how modern genetic diagnostic approach can characterise structural variants at nucleotide resolution and provide potential insights into functional regulation. PMID:27272187

  17. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  18. A prenatally ascertained, maternally inherited 14.8 Mb duplication of chromosomal bands Xq13.2-q21.31 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a male fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, C; Donoghue, J; Alexandrou, A; Karkaletsi, M; Christopoulou, S; Konstantinidou, A E; Livanos, P; Patsalis, P C; Velissariou, V

    2013-11-01

    Duplications of the X chromosome are rare cytogenetic findings, and have been associated with an abnormal phenotype in the male offspring of apparently normal or near normal female carriers. We report on the prenatal diagnosis of a duplication on the long arm of chromosome X from chromosomal band Xq13.2 to q21.31 in a male fetus with increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester and polyhydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation. Amniocentesis was undertaken and cytogenetic analysis revealed additional chromosomal material in the long arm of chromosome X at position Xq13. Analysis with high resolution array CGH revealed the additional material is in fact a duplication of the region Xq13.2-q21.13. The duplication is 14.8 Mb in size and includes fourteen genes: SLC16A2, KIAA2022, ABCB7, ZDHHC15, ATRX, MAGT1, ATP7A, PGK1, TBX22, BRWD3, POU3F4, ZNF711, POF1B and CHM. Analysis of the parents revealed the mother to be a carrier of the same duplication. After elected termination of the pregnancy at 28 weeks a detailed autopsy of the fetus allowed for genotype-phenotype correlations.

  19. Genetic Counseling for a Prenatal Diagnosis of Structural Chromosomal Abnormality with High-Resolution Analysis Using a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akiko; Takeshita, Naoki; Kinoshita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year old pregnant woman underwent amniocentesis to conduct a conventional karyotyping analysis; the analysis reported an abnormal karyotype: 46, XY, add(9)(p24). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is utilized in prenatal diagnoses. A single nucleotide polymorphism microarray revealed a male fetus with balanced chromosomal translocations on 9p and balanced chromosomal rearrangements, but another chromosomal abnormality was detected. The fetus had microduplication. The child was born as a phenotypically normal male. CMA is a simple and informative procedure for prenatal genetic diagnosis. CMA is the detection of chromosomal variants of unknown clinical significance; therefore, genetic counseling is important during prenatal genetic testing. PMID:27777709

  20. Analysis of a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q by high resolution banding and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) shows two different unbalanced karyotypes in sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, D; Engels, H; Viersbach, R; Henke, B; Schwanitz, G; Passarge, E

    1998-01-01

    We report on a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3, 6, and 15 identified by prometaphase banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Two mentally retarded sibs with different phenotypic abnormalities, their phenotypically normal sister and mother, and two fetuses of the phenotypically normal sister were analysed. The terminal regions of chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q were involved in a reciprocal translocation, in addition to a paracentric inversion of the derivative chromosome 15. Conventional cytogenetic studies with high resolution GTG banding did not resolve this rearrangement. FISH using whole chromosome paints (WCPs) identified the chromosomal regions involved, except the aberrant region of 3q, which was undetectable with these probes. Investigation of this region with the subtelomeric FISH probe D3S1445/D3S1446 showed a balanced karyotype, 46,XX,t(3;15;6) (q29;q26.1;q26), inv der(15) (q15.1q26.1) in two adult females and one fetus. It was unbalanced in two sibs, showing two different types of unbalanced translocation resulting in partial trisomy 3q in combination with partial monosomy 6q in one patient and partial trisomy 15q with partial monosomy 6q in the other patient and one fetus. These represent apparently new chromosomal phenotypes. Images PMID:9678698

  1. Accurate compressed look up table method for CGH in 3D holographic display.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Xue, Gaolei; Jia, Jia; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-12-28

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) should be obtained with high accuracy and high speed in 3D holographic display, and most researches focus on the high speed. In this paper, a simple and effective computation method for CGH is proposed based on Fresnel diffraction theory and look up table. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed to demonstrate its feasibility. The proposed method can obtain more accurate reconstructed images with lower memory usage compared with split look up table method and compressed look up table method without sacrificing the computational speed in holograms generation, so it is called accurate compressed look up table method (AC-LUT). It is believed that AC-LUT method is an effective method to calculate the CGH of 3D objects for real-time 3D holographic display where the huge information data is required, and it could provide fast and accurate digital transmission in various dynamic optical fields in the future.

  2. Accurate compressed look up table method for CGH in 3D holographic display.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Xue, Gaolei; Jia, Jia; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-12-28

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) should be obtained with high accuracy and high speed in 3D holographic display, and most researches focus on the high speed. In this paper, a simple and effective computation method for CGH is proposed based on Fresnel diffraction theory and look up table. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed to demonstrate its feasibility. The proposed method can obtain more accurate reconstructed images with lower memory usage compared with split look up table method and compressed look up table method without sacrificing the computational speed in holograms generation, so it is called accurate compressed look up table method (AC-LUT). It is believed that AC-LUT method is an effective method to calculate the CGH of 3D objects for real-time 3D holographic display where the huge information data is required, and it could provide fast and accurate digital transmission in various dynamic optical fields in the future. PMID:26831987

  3. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosomes 6 and 20 in a woman with recurrent spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Nouchy, Marc; Lecerf, Laure; Cornet, Dominique; Brisset, Sophie; Goossens, Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe a case of multiple small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) presenting with recurrent abortions. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of a young, healthy and non-consanguineous couple who asked for genetic evaluation after two spontaneous miscarriages were obtained for karyotypes. Lymphocytes of the woman were analyzed by FISH techniques and DNA was extracted and used for array CGH investigation. Karyotyping revealed 48,XX,+2mar[24]/47,XX,+mar[5]/46,XX[3] for the woman and 46,XY for her husband. FISH analysis showed that the two sSMC consisted of chromosomes 6 and 20. Array CGH analysis showed gains of the 6p11.2q12 (9 Mb) and 20 p11.21 (3.3 Mb) chromosomal regions with a total of 42 genes present on both sSMC. Our findings support also the hypothesis that the modification of the expression of some genes involved in embryo implantation, like THBD gene, could be responsible in the recurrent abortions. This report underpins the necessity of array CGH for characterizing precisely sSMC and helping in genotype-phenotype correlations. Furthermore, a literature review on sSMC is included.

  4. Recombinant chromosome 4 from a familial pericentric inversion: prenatal and adulthood wolf-hirschhorn phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Malvestiti, Francesca; Benedicenti, Francesco; De Toffol, Simona; Chinetti, Sara; Höller, Adelheid; Grimi, Beatrice; Fichtel, Gertrud; Braghetto, Monica; Agrati, Cristina; Bonaparte, Eleonora; Maggi, Federico; Simoni, Giuseppe; Grati, Francesca Romana

    2013-01-01

    Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  5. Further delineation of novel 1p36 rearrangements by array-CGH analysis: narrowing the breakpoints and clarifying the "extended" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Giannikou, Krinio; Fryssira, Helen; Oikonomakis, Vasilis; Syrmou, Areti; Kosma, Konstantina; Tzetis, Maria; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel

    2012-09-15

    High resolution oligonucleotide array Comparative Genome Hybridization technology (array-CGH) has greatly assisted the recognition of the 1p36 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. The 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered to be one of the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndromes and has an incidence of ~1 in 5000 live births, while respectively the "pure" 1p36 microduplication has not been reported so far. We present seven new patients who were referred for genetic evaluation due to Developmental Delay (DD), Mental Retardation (MR), and distinct dysmorphic features. They all had a wide phenotypic spectrum. In all cases previous standard karyotypes were negative. Array-CGH analysis revealed five patients with interstitial 1p36 microdeletion (four de novo and one maternal) and two patients with de novo reciprocal duplication of different sizes. These were the first reported "pure" 1p36 microduplication cases so far. Three of our patients carrying the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome were also found to have additional pathogenetic aberrations. These findings (del 3q27.1; del 4q21.22-q22.1; del 16p13.3; dup 21q21.2-q21.3; del Xp22.12) might contribute to the patients' severe phenotype, acting as additional modifiers of their clinical manifestations. We review and compare the clinical and array-CGH findings of our patients to previously reported cases with the aim of clearly delineating more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations for the 1p36 syndrome that could allow for a more precise prognosis.

  6. Application of array CGH on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues including small numbers of microdissected cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicola A; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Ichimura, Koichi; Liu, Lu; Pearson, Danita M; Collins, V Peter; Du, Ming-Qing

    2006-09-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) has diverse applications in cancer gene discovery and translational research. Currently, aCGH is performed primarily using high molecular weight DNA samples and its application to formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues remains to be established. To explore how aCGH can be reliably applied to archival FFPE tissues and whether it is possible to apply aCGH to small numbers of cells microdissected from FFPE tissue sections, we have systematically performed aCGH on 15 pairs of matched frozen and FFPE astrocytic tumour tissues using a well-established in-house human 1 Mb BAC/PAC genomic array. By spiking tumour DNA with normal DNA, we demonstrated that at least 70% of tumour DNA was required for reliable aCGH analysis. Using aCGH data from frozen tissue as a reference, it was found that only FFPE astrocytic tumour tissues that supported PCR amplification of >300 bp DNA fragment provided high quality, reproducible aCGH data. The presence of necrosis in a tissue specimen had an adverse effect on the quality of aCGH, while fixation in formalin for up to 96 h of fresh tissue did not appear to affect the quality of the result. As little as 10-20 ng DNA from frozen or FFPE tissues could be readily used for aCGH analysis following whole genome amplification (WGA). Furthermore, as few as 2000 microdissected cells from haematoxylin-stained slides of archival FFPE tissues could be successfully used for aCGH investigations when WGA was used. By careful assessment of DNA integrity and review of histology, to exclude necrosis and select specimens with a high proportion of tumour cells, it is feasible to preselect archival FFPE tissues adequate for aCGH analysis. With the help of microdissection and WGA, it is also possible to apply aCGH to histologically defined lesions, such as carcinoma in situ.

  7. Design and validation of a pericentromeric BAC clone set aimed at improving diagnosis and phenotype prediction of supernumerary marker chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) are additional, structurally abnormal chromosomes, generally smaller than chromosome 20 of the same metaphase spread. Due to their small size, they are difficult to characterize by conventional cytogenetics alone. In regard to their clinical effects, sSMCs are a heterogeneous group: in particular, sSMCs containing pericentromeric euchromatin are likely to be associated with abnormal outcomes, although exceptions have been reported. To improve characterization of the genetic content of sSMCs, several approaches might be applied based on different molecular and molecular-cytogenetic assays, e.g., fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). To provide a complementary tool for the characterization of sSMCs, we constructed and validated a new, FISH-based, pericentromeric Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clone set that with a high resolution spans the most proximal euchromatic sequences of all human chromosome arms, excluding the acrocentric short arms. Results By FISH analysis, we assayed 561 pericentromeric BAC probes and excluded 75 that showed a wrong chromosomal localization. The remaining 486 probes were used to establish 43 BAC-based pericentromeric panels. Each panel consists of a core, which with a high resolution covers the most proximal euchromatic ~0.7 Mb (on average) of each chromosome arm and generally bridges the heterochromatin/euchromatin junction, as well as clones located proximally and distally to the core. The pericentromeric clone set was subsequently validated by the characterization of 19 sSMCs. Using the core probes, we could rapidly distinguish between heterochromatic (1/19) and euchromatic (11/19) sSMCs, and estimate the euchromatic DNA content, which ranged from approximately 0.13 to more than 10 Mb. The characterization was not completed for seven sSMCs due to a

  8. Resolution of sex chromosome constitution by genomic in situ hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization with (TTAGG)( n ) telomeric probe in some species of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Yoshido, Atsuo; Marec, Frantisek; Sahara, Ken

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a simple method to resolve the sex chromosome constitution in females of Lepidoptera by using a combination of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization with (TTAGG)( n ) telomeric probe (telomere-FISH). In pachytene configurations of sex chromosomes, GISH differentiated W heterochromatin and telomere-FISH detected the chromosome ends. With this method we showed that Antheraea yamamai has a standard system with a fully differentiated W-Z sex chromosome pair. In Orgyia antiqua, we confirmed the presence of neo-W and neo-Z chromosomes, which most probably originated by fusion of the ancestral W and Z with an autosome pair. In contrast to earlier data, Orgyia thyellina females displayed a neo-ZW(1)W(2) sex chromosome constitution. A neo-WZ(1)Z(2) trivalent was found in females of Samia cynthia subsp. indet., originating from a population in Nagano, Japan. Whereas another subspecies collected in Sapporo, Japan, and determined as S. cynthia walkeri, showed a neo-W/neo-Z bivalent similar to O. antiqua, and the subspecies S. cynthia ricini showed a Z univalent (a Z/ZZ system). The combination of GISH and telomere-FISH enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about sex chromosome constitution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Lepidoptera.

  9. Influence of radiation quality on mouse chromosome 2 deletions in radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Manning, Grainne; Bouffler, Simon; Badie, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Leukaemia is the prevailing neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic system. Epidemiological analyses of the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombings show that exposure to ionising radiation (IR) can cause leukaemia. Although a clear association between radiation exposure and leukaemia development is acknowledged, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A hemizygous deletion on mouse chromosome 2 (del2) is a common feature in several mouse strains susceptible to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). The deletion is an early event detectable 24h after exposure in bone marrow cells. Ultimately, 15-25% of exposed animals develop AML with 80-90% of cases carrying del2. Molecular mapping of leukaemic cell genomes identified a minimal deleted region (MDR) on chromosome 2 (chr2) in which a tumour suppressor gene, Sfpi1 is located, encoding the transcription factor PU.1, essential in haematopoiesis. The remaining copy of Sfpi1 has a point mutation in the coding sequence for the DNA-binding domain of the protein in 70% of rAML, which alters a single CpG sequence in the codon for arginine residue R235. In order to identify chr2 deletions and Sfpi.1/PU.1 loss, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a unique panel of 79rAMLs. Using a custom made CGH array specifically designed for mouse chr2, we analysed at unprecedentedly high resolution (1.4M array- 148bp resolution) the size of the MDR in low LET and high-LET induced rAMLs (32 X-ray- and 47 neutron-induced). Sequencing of Sfpi1/PU.1DNA binding domain identified the presence of R235 point mutations, showing no influence of radiation quality on R235 type or frequency. We identified for the first time rAML cases with complex del2 in a subset of neutron-induced AMLs. This study allowed us to re-define the MDR to a much smaller 5.5Mb region (still including Sfpi1/PU.1), identical regardless of radiation quality.

  10. A prenatally ascertained de novo terminal deletion of chromosomal bands 1q43q44 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a female fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, Carolina; Christopoulou, Georgia; Alexandrou, Angelos; Evangelidou, Paola; Donoghue, Jacqueline; Konstantinidou, Anastasia E; Velissariou, Voula

    2015-01-01

    Terminal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 1 result in a postnatally recognizable disorder described as 1q43q44 deletion syndrome. The size of the deletions and the resulting phenotype varies among patients. However, some features are common among patients as the chromosomal regions included in the deletions. In the present case, ultrasonography at 22 weeks of gestation revealed choroid plexus cysts (CPCs) and a single umbilical artery (SUA) and therefore amniocentesis was performed. Chromosomal analysis revealed a possible terminal deletion in 1q and high resolution array CGH confirmed the terminal 1q43q44 deletion and estimated the size to be approximately 8 Mb. Following termination of pregnancy, performance of fetopsy allowed further clinical characterization. We report here a prenatal case with the smallest pure terminal 1q43q44 deletion, that has been molecularly and phenotypically characterized. In addition, to our knowledge this is the first prenatal case reported with 1q13q44 terminal deletion and Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS). Our findings combined with review data from the literature show the complexity of the genetic basis of the associated syndrome.

  11. A Familial Cri-du-Chat/5p Deletion Syndrome Resulted from Rare Maternal Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements (CCRs) and/or Possible Chromosome 5p Chromothripsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-nan; Dong, Xing-sheng; Huang, Yang-yu; Son, Xin-ming; Lu, Xinyan; Chen, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome (MIM 123450) is a chromosomal syndrome characterized by the characteristic features, including cat-like cry and chromosome 5p deletions. We report a family with five individuals showing chromosomal rearrangements involving 5p, resulting from rare maternal complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs), diagnosed post- and pre-natally by comprehensive molecular and cytogenetic analyses. Two probands, including a 4½-year-old brother and his 2½-year- old sister, showed no diagnostic cat cry during infancy, but presented with developmental delay, dysmorphic and autistic features. Both patients had an interstitial deletion del(5)(p13.3p15.33) spanning ∼26.22 Mb. The phenotypically normal mother had de novo CCRs involving 11 breakpoints and three chromosomes: ins(11;5) (q23;p14.1p15.31),ins(21;5)(q21;p13.3p14.1),ins(21;5)(q21;p15.31p15.33),inv(7)(p22q32)dn. In addition to these two children, she had three first-trimester miscarriages, two terminations due to the identification of the 5p deletion and one delivery of a phenotypically normal daughter. The unaffected daughter had the maternal ins(11;5) identified prenatally and an identical maternal allele haplotype of 5p. Array CGH did not detect any copy number changes in the mother, and revealed three interstitial deletions within 5p15.33-p13.3, in the unaffected daughter, likely products of the maternal insertions ins(21;5). Chromothripsis has been recently reported as a mechanism drives germline CCRs in pediatric patients with congenital defects. We postulate that the unique CCRs in the phenotypically normal mother could resulted from chromosome 5p chromothripsis, that further resulted in the interstitial 5p deletions in the unaffected daughter. Further high resolution sequencing based analysis is needed to determine whether chromothripsis is also present as a germline structural variation in phenotypically normal individuals in this family. PMID:24143197

  12. A familial Cri-du-Chat/5p deletion syndrome resulted from rare maternal complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) and/or possible chromosome 5p chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Heng; Jiang, Jian-hui; Li, Jian-ying; Zhang, Ya-nan; Dong, Xing-sheng; Huang, Yang-yu; Son, Xin-ming; Lu, Xinyan; Chen, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome (MIM 123450) is a chromosomal syndrome characterized by the characteristic features, including cat-like cry and chromosome 5p deletions. We report a family with five individuals showing chromosomal rearrangements involving 5p, resulting from rare maternal complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs), diagnosed post- and pre-natally by comprehensive molecular and cytogenetic analyses. Two probands, including a 4½-year-old brother and his 2½-year- old sister, showed no diagnostic cat cry during infancy, but presented with developmental delay, dysmorphic and autistic features. Both patients had an interstitial deletion del(5)(p13.3p15.33) spanning ≈ 26.22 Mb. The phenotypically normal mother had de novo CCRs involving 11 breakpoints and three chromosomes: ins(11;5) (q23;p14.1p15.31),ins(21;5)(q21;p13.3p14.1),ins(21;5)(q21;p15.31p15.33),inv(7)(p22q32)dn. In addition to these two children, she had three first-trimester miscarriages, two terminations due to the identification of the 5p deletion and one delivery of a phenotypically normal daughter. The unaffected daughter had the maternal ins(11;5) identified prenatally and an identical maternal allele haplotype of 5p. Array CGH did not detect any copy number changes in the mother, and revealed three interstitial deletions within 5p15.33-p13.3, in the unaffected daughter, likely products of the maternal insertions ins(21;5). Chromothripsis has been recently reported as a mechanism drives germline CCRs in pediatric patients with congenital defects. We postulate that the unique CCRs in the phenotypically normal mother could resulted from chromosome 5p chromothripsis, that further resulted in the interstitial 5p deletions in the unaffected daughter. Further high resolution sequencing based analysis is needed to determine whether chromothripsis is also present as a germline structural variation in phenotypically normal individuals in this family. PMID:24143197

  13. High-resolution mapping of D16led-1, Gart, Gas-4, Cbr, Pcp-4, and Erg on distal mouse chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Mjaatvedt, A E; Citron, M P; Reeves, R H

    1993-08-01

    More than 500 backcross progeny from four intersubspecific backcrosses were typed for six markers on distal mouse chromosome 16. Five of these represented genes that mapped within the Sod-1 to Ets-2 interval, which was shown previously to contain the weaver (wv) gene. The map order, including previously mapped reference markers, is (cen)-D16H21S16-D16Led-1-App-Sod-1-Gart-Gas-4-Cbr++ +-wv-Pcp-4-Erg-Ets-2. This gene order recapitulates the order of the genes on human chromosome 21 where known. Two of these markers further define the region containing the weaver gene to a 3.9-cM segment between Cbr and Pcp-4. In addition, Pcp-4 was localized to human chromosome 21 by the presence of a human-specific restriction fragment in WAV-17, a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid with human chromosome 21 as the only human contribution.

  14. Three-dimensional super-resolution microscopy of the inactive X chromosome territory reveals a collapse of its active nuclear compartment harboring distinct Xist RNA foci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A Xist RNA decorated Barr body is the structural hallmark of the compacted inactive X territory in female mammals. Using super-resolution three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and quantitative image analysis, we compared its ultrastructure with active chromosome territories (CTs) in human and mouse somatic cells, and explored the spatio-temporal process of Barr body formation at onset of inactivation in early differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Results We demonstrate that all CTs are composed of structurally linked chromatin domain clusters (CDCs). In active CTs the periphery of CDCs harbors low-density chromatin enriched with transcriptionally competent markers, called the perichromatin region (PR). The PR borders on a contiguous channel system, the interchromatin compartment (IC), which starts at nuclear pores and pervades CTs. We propose that the PR and macromolecular complexes in IC channels together form the transcriptionally permissive active nuclear compartment (ANC). The Barr body differs from active CTs by a partially collapsed ANC with CDCs coming significantly closer together, although a rudimentary IC channel system connected to nuclear pores is maintained. Distinct Xist RNA foci, closely adjacent to the nuclear matrix scaffold attachment factor-A (SAF-A) localize throughout Xi along the rudimentary ANC. In early differentiating ESCs initial Xist RNA spreading precedes Barr body formation, which occurs concurrent with the subsequent exclusion of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Induction of a transgenic autosomal Xist RNA in a male ESC triggers the formation of an ‘autosomal Barr body’ with less compacted chromatin and incomplete RNAP II exclusion. Conclusions 3D-SIM provides experimental evidence for profound differences between the functional architecture of transcriptionally active CTs and the Barr body. Basic structural features of CT organization such as CDCs and IC channels are however still

  15. Array CGH analysis of a cohort of Russian patients with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Kashevarova, Anna A; Nazarenko, Lyudmila P; Skryabin, Nikolay A; Salyukova, Olga A; Chechetkina, Nataliya N; Tolmacheva, Ekaterina N; Sazhenova, Elena A; Magini, Pamela; Graziano, Claudio; Romeo, Giovanni; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lebedev, Igor N

    2014-02-15

    The use of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) as a diagnostic tool in molecular genetics has facilitated the identification of many new microdeletion/microduplication syndromes (MMSs). Furthermore, this method has allowed for the identification of copy number variations (CNVs) whose pathogenic role has yet to be uncovered. Here, we report on our application of array CGH for the identification of pathogenic CNVs in 79 Russian children with intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-six pathogenic or likely pathogenic changes in copy number were detected in 22 patients (28%): 8 CNVs corresponded to known MMSs, and 17 were not associated with previously described syndromes. In this report, we describe our findings and comment on genes potentially associated with ID that are located within the CNV regions. PMID:24291026

  16. Selection of competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening: a prospective study with sibling oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in time-lapse monitoring in IVF treatment have provided new morphokinetic markers for embryonic competence. However, there is still very limited information about the relationship between morphokinetic parameters, chromosomal compositions and implantation potential. Accordingly, this study aimed at investigating the effects of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing on pregnancy and implantation outcomes for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Methods A total of 1163 metaphase II (MII) oocytes were retrieved from 138 PGS patients at a mean age of 36.6 ± 2.4 years. These sibling MII oocytes were then randomized into two groups after ICSI: 1) Group A, oocytes (n = 582) were cultured in the time-lapse system and 2) Group B, oocytes (n = 581) were cultured in the conventional incubator. For both groups, whole genomic amplification and array CGH testing were performed after trophectoderm biopsy on day 5. One to two euploid blastocysts within the most predictive morphokinetic parameters (Group A) or with the best morphological grade available (Group B) were selected for transfer to individual patients on day 6. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two groups. Results There were significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates between Group A and Group B (71.1% vs. 45.9%, respectively, p = 0.037). The observed implantation rate per embryo transfer significantly increased in Group A compared to Group B (66.2% vs. 42.4%, respectively, p = 0.011). Moreover, a significant increase in ongoing pregnancy rates was also observed in Group A compared to Group B (68.9% vs. 40.5%. respectively, p = 0.019). However, there was no significant difference in miscarriage rate between the time-lapse system and the conventional incubator (3.1% vs. 11.8%, respectively, p = 0.273). Conclusions This is the first prospective investigation using

  17. Investigation of error compensation in CGH-based form testing of aspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerwald, S.; Brill, N.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-05-01

    Interferometric form testing using computer generated holograms is one of the main full-field measurement techniques. Till now, various modified measurement setups for optical form testing interferometry have been presented. Currently, typical form deviations in the region of several tens of nanometers occur in case of the widely used computer generated hologram (CGH) based interferometric form testing. Deviations occur due to a non-perfect alignment of the computer generated hologram (CGH) relative to the transmission sphere (Fizeau objective) and also of the asphere relative to the testing wavefront. Thus, measurement results are user and setup dependent which results in an unsatisfactory reproducibility of the form errors. In case of aligning a CGH, this usually requires a minimization of the spatial frequency of the fringe pattern by an operator. Finding the ideal position however often cannot be performed with sufficient accuracy by the operator as the position of minimum spatial fringe density is usually not unique. Therefore, the scientific and technical objectives of this paper comprise the development of a simulation based approach to explain and quantify the experimental errors due to misalignment of the specimen towards a computer generated hologram in an optical form testing measurement system. A further step is the programming of an iterative method to realize a virtual optimised realignment of the system on the basis of Zernike polynomial decomposition which should allow the calculation of the measured form for an ideal alignment and thus the subtraction of the alignment based form error. Different analysis approaches are investigated with regard to the final accuracy and reproducibility. To validate the theoretical models a series of systematic experiments is performed with hexapod-positioning systems in order to allow an exact and reproducible positioning of the optical CGH-based setup.

  18. Frequency, molecular pathology and potential clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 aberrations in uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Christopher, Benjamin N; Faramawi, Mohammed F; Said-Ahmed, Khaled; Cole, Carol; McFaddin, Andrew; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Heerema, Nyla; Davidorf, Frederick H

    2011-07-01

    The clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 alteration in uveal melanoma is still not clear. Also, the reported frequencies vary considerably in the published literature from 0 to 48%. The aims of the following study were to identify the frequency, molecular pathology and potential clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 alteration in uveal melanoma. We studied 47 uveal melanomas with an average follow-up of 36 months. Of these, 14 had confirmed metastasis. Allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity was studied using microsatellite markers on chromosome 3 enriched in markers located in the previously reported smallest regions of deletion overlap. Chromosomal alterations were assessed by conventional cytogenetics or comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a subset of patients. Utilizing genotyping, partial chromosome 3 alteration was detected in 14/47 tumors (30%). In the 23 tumors with available cytogenetic/CGH, partial chromosome 3 alteration was detected in 8/23 (38%) and was caused by both gains (4/8) and losses (4/8) of chromosome 3 with high frequency of complex chromosome 3 aberrations detected by cytogenetics. Out of the 14 tumors with confirmed metastasis, only 1 showed partial chromosome 3 alteration and the remaining showed monosomy 3. By limiting the aggressive disease marker to monosomy 3, genotyping showed 93% sensitivity and 67% specificity for detection of aggressive uveal melanoma. In conclusion, partial chromosome 3 alterations are common in uveal melanoma and mostly caused by complex cytogenetic changes leading to partial gains and/or partial losses of chromosome 3. Partial chromosome 3 alteration is not likely to be associated with highly aggressive uveal melanoma that metastasizes within the first 3 years after treatment. Microsatellite-based genotyping of chromosome 3 is highly sensitive for detection of aggressive uveal melanoma.

  19. Analysis of copy number variation using whole genome exon-focused array CGH in Korean patients with primary congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jung; Suh, Wool; Lee, Seung-Tae; Kim, Jong-Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is an autosomal recessive form of glaucoma that manifests within the first year of life and if left untreated, leads to irreversible blindness. Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is the major gene known to be associated with PCG. The role of the CYP1B1 gene in disease pathogenesis and the relatively low detection rate of CYP1B1 mutations in some populations, especially Asians, remain unexplained. We hypothesized that altered gene dosage of CYP1B1 or anterior segmental dysgenesis causative genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of PCG. Methods We performed whole genome exon-focused array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to identify copy number variation (CNV) in 20 Korean PCG patients and their parents. Results We identified 12 patients with at least one rare gene-containing copy number variation each, corresponding to 25 CNVs (5 deletions and 20 duplications) at frequencies of 5-30% in PCG patients and 0% in controls. The 25 CNVs were not located at known chromosomal loci for PCG, namely GLC3A, which harbors CYP1B1 (2p21), GLC3B (1p36.2-p36.1), or GLC3C (14q23), and did not include any target genes associated with PCG or anterior segmental dysgenesis. Conclusions Further genetic studies with larger cohorts of patients are necessary to validate our results and to elucidate other genetic mechanisms underlying PCG, because the identified CNVs might be PCG-specific pathogenic variants and may explain the disease pathogenesis of PCG. PMID:22219654

  20. Analysis of gains and losses of DNA sequences along all human chromosomes by comparative genomic hybridization implicates 6q and several other chromosomal sites as putative tumor suppressor gene loci in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Visakorpi, T.; Karhu, R.; Kallioniemi, A.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic changes associated with the development of prostate cancer are poorly known. We sought to identify regions that contain important genes for the development of prostate cancer by using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for genome-wide screening of gains and losses of DNA sequences. In CGH, differentially labeled tumor and normal DNAs are co-hybridized to normal metaphase spreads to visualize chromosomal regions with losses and gains of DNA sequences. Analysis of 31 uncultured primary prostate cancers showed that deletions predominated over gains with a ratio of 5:1. The most commonly deleted regions were 8p; 32% (minimal common region p12-pter), 13q; 32% (q21-q31), 6q; 22% (cen-q21), 16q; 19% (cen-q23), 18q; 19% (q22-qter) and 9p; 16%(p23-pter). Gain of the entire long arm of chromosome 8 was found in 6% of cases but no high-level amplifications were found in any of the specimens. Of the aberrations found by CGH, 6q represents a previously unreported, major site for deletion in prostate cancer. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was used to confirm the presence of 6q and other deletions found by CGH. LOH and CGH data showed an about 75% concordance. The significance of genetic aberrations in prostate cancer are being evaluated by correlating CGH findings with clinical outcome as well as by comparing genetic changes observed in the primary tumor with those found in recurrent lesions and metastases of the same patient.

  1. Benign solitary fibrous tumour of the thigh: morphological, chromosomal and differential diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Krismann, M; Adams, H; Jaworska, M; Müller, K M; Johnen, G

    2000-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare and usually benign neoplasms of mesenchymal origin that are often found in the visceral pleura (fibrous pleural tumour, FPT) or other serosal surfaces. They have also been found in soft tissues. We report the case of an SFT localised in the thigh of an 86-year-old woman. The tumour specimen was examined morphologically, immunohistochemically and molecular genetically, using comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH). The latter detects unbalanced chromosomal alterations in human neoplasms by competitive nucleic acid hybridisation and consecutive computer image analysis. The tumour consists of fibroblast-like cells, arranged in a typical "patternless pattern". Immunohistochemically, the tumour stained positively for vimentin, CD34, CD99, and focally for actin and desmin. No reaction occurred with keratin or S100 protein antibodies. CGH detected a single loss on chromosome 13q.

  2. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  3. An update of preimplantation genetic diagnosis in gene diseases, chromosomal translocation, and aneuploidy screening.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Jung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Tsai, Yi-Yi; Hung, Chia-Cheng; Fang, Mei-Ya; Su, Yi-Ning; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2011-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is gradually widely used in prevention of gene diseases and chromosomal abnormalities. Much improvement has been achieved in biopsy technique and molecular diagnosis. Blastocyst biopsy can increase diagnostic accuracy and reduce allele dropout. It is cost-effective and currently plays an important role. Whole genome amplification permits subsequent individual detection of multiple gene loci and screening all 23 pairs of chromosomes. For PGD of chromosomal translocation, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) is traditionally used, but with technical difficulty. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) can detect translocation and 23 pairs of chromosomes that may replace FISH. Single nucleotide polymorphisms array with haplotyping can further distinguish between normal chromosomes and balanced translocation. PGD may shorten time to conceive and reduce miscarriage for patients with chromosomal translocation. PGD has a potential value for mitochondrial diseases. Preimplantation genetic haplotyping has been applied for unknown mutation sites of single gene disease. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) using limited FISH probes in the cleavage-stage embryo did not increase live birth rates for patients with advanced maternal age, unexplained recurrent abortions, and repeated implantation failure. Polar body and blastocyst biopsy may circumvent the problem of mosaicism. PGS using blastocyst biopsy and array CGH is encouraging and merit further studies. Cryopreservation of biopsied blastocysts instead of fresh transfer permits sufficient time for transportation and genetic analysis. Cryopreservation of embryos may avoid ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and possible suboptimal endometrium. PMID:22384431

  4. A continuous high-resolution physical map spanning 17 megabases of the q12, q13.1, and q13.2 cytogenetic bands of human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.; Elliott, J.; Gorvad, A.

    1995-05-01

    The authors report the construction of a high-resolution physical map of a 17-Mb region that encompasses the entire q12, q13.1, and q13.2 bands of human chromosome 19. The continuous map extends from a region approximately 400 kb centromeric of the D1j9S7 marker to the excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1) locus. The ordered clone map has been obtained starting from a foundation of cosmid contigs assembled by automated fingerprinting and localized to the cytogenetic map by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Clonal continuity of the map has been achieved by binning and linking the premapped cosmid contigs by means of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The map consists of a single contig composed of 169 YAC members (minimal spanning path of 18 YACs) linking 165 cosmid contigs. Eighty percent, or about 13.2 Mb of the entire regions spanned by the map, has been resolved to the EcoRI restriction map level. Twenty-nine sequence-tagged sites associated with genetic markers or derived from FISH-mapped cosmids have been placed on the map. In addition to the ERCC1 gene area, the map includes the location of the creatine kinase muscle locus (CKM), imidazoledipeptidase (PEPD), glucophosphate isomerase (GPI), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), the apolipoprotein E and C (APOE and APOC) genes, and the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene. This type of map provides a source of continuously overlapping DNA segments at a level of resolution two orders of magnitude higher than that obtained using YACs alone. In addition, it provides ready-to-use reagents for detailed analyses at the gene level, FISH studies of chromosomal aberrations, and DNA sequencing. 53 refs., 5 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Validation of next-generation sequencing for comprehensive chromosome screening of embryos.

    PubMed

    Kung, Allen; Munné, Santiago; Bankowski, Brandon; Coates, Alison; Wells, Dagan

    2015-12-01

    Massively parallel genome sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), is the latest approach for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether NGS can accurately detect aneuploidy in human embryos. Low coverage genome sequencing was applied to trophectoderm biopsies of embryos at the blastocyst stage of development. Sensitivity and specificity of NGS was determined by comparison of results with a previously validated platform, array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). In total, 156 samples (116 were blindly assessed) were tested: 40 samples were re-biopsies of blastocysts where the original biopsy specimen was previously tested for aCGH; four samples were re-biopsies of single blastomeres from embryos previously biopsied at the cleavage stage and tested using aCGH; 18 samples were single cells derived from well-characterized cell lines; 94 samples were whole-genome amplification products from embryo biopsies taken from previous preimplantation genetic screening cycles analysed using aCGH. Per embryo, NGS sensitivity was 100% (no false negatives), and 100% specificity (no false positives). Per chromosome, NGS concordance was 99.20%. With more improvement, NGS will allow the simultaneous diagnosis of single gene disorders and aneuploidy, and may have the potential to provide more detailed insight into other aspects of embryo viability. PMID:26520420

  6. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Guijun; Yi, Meisheng; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hong, Yunhan; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system), the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes. PMID:25506037

  7. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  8. Clinical Implementation of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis: Summary of 2513 Postnatal Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyan; Shaw, Chad A.; Patel, Ankita; Li, Jiangzhen; Cooper, M. Lance; Wells, William R.; Sullivan, Cathy M.; Sahoo, Trilochan; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Ou, Zhishu; Chinault, A. Craig; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.; Ward, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (a-CGH) is a powerful molecular cytogenetic tool to detect genomic imbalances and study disease mechanism and pathogenesis. We report our experience with the clinical implementation of this high resolution human genome analysis, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). Methods and Findings CMA was performed clinically on 2513 postnatal samples from patients referred with a variety of clinical phenotypes. The initial 775 samples were studied using CMA array version 4 and the remaining 1738 samples were analyzed with CMA version 5 containing expanded genomic coverage. Overall, CMA identified clinically relevant genomic imbalances in 8.5% of patients: 7.6% using V4 and 8.9% using V5. Among 117 cases referred for additional investigation of a known cytogenetically detectable rearrangement, CMA identified the majority (92.5%) of the genomic imbalances. Importantly, abnormal CMA findings were observed in 5.2% of patients (98/1872) with normal karyotypes/FISH results, and V5, with expanded genomic coverage, enabled a higher detection rate in this category than V4. For cases without cytogenetic results available, 8.0% (42/524) abnormal CMA results were detected; again, V5 demonstrated an increased ability to detect abnormality. Improved diagnostic potential of CMA is illustrated by 90 cases identified with 51 cryptic microdeletions and 39 predicted apparent reciprocal microduplications in 13 specific chromosomal regions associated with 11 known genomic disorders. In addition, CMA identified copy number variations (CNVs) of uncertain significance in 262 probands; however, parental studies usually facilitated clinical interpretation. Of these, 217 were interpreted as familial variants and 11 were determined to be de novo; the remaining 34 await parental studies to resolve the clinical significance. Conclusions This large set of clinical results demonstrates the significantly improved sensitivity of CMA for the

  9. Oligonucleotide array-CGH identifies genomic subgroups and prognostic markers for tumor stage mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rocío; Servitje, Octavio; Gallardo, Fernando; Vermeer, Maarten H; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Karpova, Maria B; Zipser, Marie C; Muniesa, Cristina; García-Muret, María P; Estrach, Teresa; Salido, Marta; Sánchez-Schmidt, Júlia; Herrera, Marta; Romagosa, Vicenç; Suela, Javier; Ferreira, Bibiana I; Cigudosa, Juan C; Barranco, Carlos; Serrano, Sergio; Dummer, Reinhard; Tensen, Cornelis P; Solé, Francesc; Pujol, Ramon M; Espinet, Blanca

    2010-04-01

    Mycosis fungoide (MF) patients who develop tumors or extracutaneous involvement usually have a poor prognosis with no curative therapy available so far. In the present European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) multicenter study, the genomic profile of 41 skin biopsies from tumor stage MF (MFt) was analyzed using a high-resolution oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization platform. Seventy-six percent of cases showed genomic aberrations. The most common imbalances were gains of 7q33.3q35 followed by 17q21.1, 8q24.21, 9q34qter, and 10p14 and losses of 9p21.3 followed by 9q31.2, 17p13.1, 13q14.11, 6q21.3, 10p11.22, 16q23.2, and 16q24.3. Three specific chromosomal regions, 9p21.3, 8q24.21, and 10q26qter, were defined as prognostic markers showing a significant correlation with overall survival (OS) (P=0.042, 0.017, and 0.022, respectively). Moreover, we have established two MFt genomic subgroups distinguishing a stable group (0-5 DNA aberrations) and an unstable group (>5 DNA aberrations), showing that the genomic unstable group had a shorter OS (P=0.05). We therefore conclude that specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as gains of 8q24.21 (MYC) and losses of 9p21.3 (CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP) and 10q26qter (MGMT and EBF3) may have an important role in prognosis. In addition, we describe the MFt genomic instability profile, which, to our knowledge, has not been reported earlier.

  10. High Resolution Consensus Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Fiber Strength, Length and Micronaire on Chromosome 25 of the Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Junwen; Muhammad, Jamshed; Cai, Juan; Jia, Fei; Shi, Yuzhen; Gong, Juwu; Shang, Haihong; Liu, Aiying; Chen, Tingting; Ge, Qun; Palanga, Koffi Kibalou; Lu, Quanwei; Deng, Xiaoying; Tan, Yunna; Li, Wei; Sun, Linyang; Gong, Wankui; Yuan, Youlu

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important agricultural crop that provides renewable natural fiber resources for the global textile industry. Technological developments in the textile industry and improvements in human living standards have increased the requirement for supplies and better quality cotton. Upland cotton 0-153 is an elite cultivar harboring strong fiber strength genes. To conduct quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for fiber quality in 0-153, we developed a population of 196 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between 0-153 and sGK9708. The fiber quality traits in 11 environments were measured and a genetic linkage map of chromosome 25 comprising 210 loci was constructed using this RIL population, mainly using simple sequence repeat markers and single nucleotide polymorphism markers. QTLs were identified across diverse environments using the composite interval mapping method. A total of 37 QTLs for fiber quality traits were identified on chromosome 25, of which 17 were stably expressed in at least in two environments. A stable fiber strength QTL, qFS-chr25-4, which was detected in seven environments and was located in the marker interval between CRI-SNP120491 and BNL2572, could explain 6.53%-11.83% of the observed phenotypic variations. Meta-analysis also confirmed the above QTLs with previous reports. Application of these QTLs could contribute to improving fiber quality and provide information for marker-assisted selection.

  11. A Back Migration from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa Is Supported by High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y-Chromosome Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Fulvio; Santolamazza, Piero; Shen, Peidong; Macaulay, Vincent; Moral, Pedro; Olckers, Antonel; Modiano, David; Holmes, Susan; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Coia, Valentina; Wallace, Douglas C.; Oefner, Peter J.; Torroni, Antonio; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Scozzari, Rosaria; Underhill, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The variation of 77 biallelic sites located in the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was examined in 608 male subjects from 22 African populations. This survey revealed a total of 37 binary haplotypes, which were combined with microsatellite polymorphism data to evaluate internal diversities and to estimate coalescence ages of the binary haplotypes. The majority of binary haplotypes showed a nonuniform distribution across the continent. Analysis of molecular variance detected a high level of interpopulation diversity (ΦST=0.342), which appears to be partially related to the geography (ΦCT=0.230). In sub-Saharan Africa, the recent spread of a set of haplotypes partially erased pre-existing diversity, but a high level of population (ΦST=0.332) and geographic (ΦCT=0.179) structuring persists. Correspondence analysis shows that three main clusters of populations can be identified: northern, eastern, and sub-Saharan Africans. Among the latter, the Khoisan, the Pygmies, and the northern Cameroonians are clearly distinct from a tight cluster formed by the Niger-Congo–speaking populations from western, central western, and southern Africa. Phylogeographic analyses suggest that a large component of the present Khoisan gene pool is eastern African in origin and that Asia was the source of a back migration to sub-Saharan Africa. Haplogroup IX Y chromosomes appear to have been involved in such a migration, the traces of which can now be observed mostly in northern Cameroon. PMID:11910562

  12. Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlation in subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions using high resolution clinical chromosomal microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Khalifa, Mohamed; Probst, Frank J; Stein, Jennifer; Harris, Leslie L; Kearney, Debra L; Vance, Gail H; Bull, Marilyn J; Grange, Dorothy K; Scharer, Gunter H; Kang, Sue-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita

    2013-12-01

    Structural rearrangements of chromosome 19p are rare, and their resulting phenotypic consequences are not well defined. This is the first study to report a cohort of eight patients with subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions, identified using clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). The deletion sizes ranged from 0.1 to 0.86 Mb. Detailed analysis of the patients' clinical features has enabled us to define a constellation of clinical abnormalities that include growth delay, multiple congenital anomalies, global developmental delay, learning difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features. There are eight genes in the 19p13.3 region that may potentially contribute to the clinical phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Moreover, in silico genomic analysis of 19p13.3 microdeletion breakpoints revealed numerous highly repetitive sequences, suggesting LINEs/SINEs-mediated events in generating these microdeletions. Thus, subtelomeric 19p13.3 appears important for normal embryonic and childhood development. The clinical description of patients with deletions in this genomic interval will assist clinicians to identify and treat individuals with similar deletions.

  13. An Xq22.3 duplication detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH) defines a new locus (FGS5) for FG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi-Santos, Ana Cristina; Kok, Fernando; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Froyen, Guy; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Opitz, John M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2005-12-15

    FG syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) syndrome. It has been mapped to four distinct loci FGS1-4, through linkage analysis (Xq13, Xp22.3, and Xp11.4-p11.3) and based on the breakpoints of an X chromosome inversion (Xq11:Xq28), but so far no gene has been identified. We describe a boy with FG syndrome who has an inherited duplication at band Xq22.3 detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH). These duplication maps outside all four loci described so far for FG syndrome, representing therefore a new locus, which we propose to be called FGS5. MID2, a gene closely related to MID1, which is known to be mutated in Opitz G/BBB syndrome, maps within the duplicated segment of our patient. Since FG and Opitz G/BBB syndromes share many manifestations we considered MID2 a candidate gene for FG syndrome. We also discuss the involvement of other potential genes within the duplicated segment and its relationship with clinical symptoms of our patient, as well as the laboratory abnormalities found in his mother, a carrier of the duplication.

  14. MECP2 duplications in six patients with complex sex chromosome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Amy M; Ramocki, Melissa B; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Williams, Misti; Freedenberg, Debra; Patel, Ankita; Bader, Patricia I; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2011-01-01

    Duplications of the Xq28 chromosome region resulting in functional disomy are associated with a distinct clinical phenotype characterized by infantile hypotonia, severe developmental delay, progressive neurological impairment, absent speech, and proneness to infections. Increased expression of the dosage-sensitive MECP2 gene is considered responsible for the severe neurological impairments observed in affected individuals. Although cytogenetically visible duplications of Xq28 are well documented in the published literature, recent advances using array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) led to the detection of an increasing number of microduplications spanning MECP2. In rare cases, duplication results from intrachromosomal rearrangement between the X and Y chromosomes. We report six cases with sex chromosome rearrangements involving duplication of MECP2. Cases 1–4 are unbalanced rearrangements between X and Y, resulting in MECP2 duplication. The additional Xq material was translocated to Yp in three cases (cases 1–3), and to the heterochromatic region of Yq12 in one case (case 4). Cases 5 and 6 were identified by array CGH to have a loss in copy number at Xp and a gain in copy number at Xq28 involving the MECP2 gene. In both cases, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed a recombinant X chromosome containing the duplicated material from Xq28 on Xp, resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion. These cases add to a growing number of MECP2 duplications that have been detected by array CGH, while demonstrating the value of confirmatory chromosome and FISH studies for the localization of the duplicated material and the identification of complex rearrangements. PMID:21119712

  15. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  16. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  17. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  18. Trisomy of chromosome 16p13.3 due to an unbalanced insertional translocation into chromosome 22p13.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Thomy; Aerssens, Peter; Vermeesch, Joris R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    A dysmorphic boy with severe mental retardation was found on array CGH to have an insertional translocation of chromosome 16p13.3 into the short arm of chromosome 22, karyotype 46,XY,.ish der(22),ins(22;16)(p13;p13.3p13.3) de novo. His clinical features overlap with the reported cases of 'duplication 16p' syndrome, namely a round face, hypertelorism, a long philtrum, micrognathia, a thin upper lip, a posterior cleft palate and low set, simple ears, clubbed feet, severe developmental delay, psychomotor retardation and seizures. This 4-year boy with trisomy 16p13.3 has the smallest duplication reported of this critical region, which could not be detected without array CGH. The maximal duplicated region is gene rich and contains about 80 genes and/or candidate genes. Assignment of the genes that contribute to the observed phenotype awaits the characterisation of other patients with small duplications in this region.

  19. High-contrast pattern reconstructions using a phase-seeded point CGH method.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Richard; Williams, Gavin L; Cowling, Joshua J; Seed, Nicholas L; Purvis, Alan

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge encountered in digital holography applications is the need to synthesize computer-generated holograms (CGHs) that are realizable as phase-only elements while also delivering high quality reconstruction. This trade-off is particularly acute in high-precision applications such as photolithography where contrast typically must exceed 0.6. A seeded-phase point method is proposed to address this challenge, whereby patterns composed of fine lines that intersect and form closed shapes are reconstructed with high contrast while maintaining a phase-only CGH. The method achieves superior contrast to that obtained by uniform or random seeded-phase methods while maintaining computational efficiency for large area exposures. It is also shown that binary phase modulation achieves similar contrast performance with benefits for the fabrication of simpler diffractive optical elements. PMID:26974633

  20. Study of improved ray tracing parallel algorithm for CGH of 3D objects on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Bin; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Kai

    2014-11-01

    An improved parallel algorithm for holograms of three-dimensional objects was presented. According to the physical characteristics and mathematical properties of the original ray tracing algorithm for computer generated holograms (CGH), using transform approximation and numerical analysis methods, we extract parts of ray tracing algorithm which satisfy parallelization features and implement them on graphics processing unit (GPU). Meanwhile, through proper design of parallel numerical procedure, we did parallel programming to the two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional object with CUDA. According to the experiments, an effective method of dealing with occlusion problem in ray tracing is proposed, as well as generating the holograms of 3D objects with additive property. Our results indicate that the improved algorithm can effectively shorten the computing time. Due to the different sizes of spatial object points and hologram pixels, the speed has increased 20 to 70 times comparing with original ray tracing algorithm.

  1. High-resolution restriction map for a 240-kilobase region spanning 91 to 96 minutes on the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K K; Wong, R M; Rudd, K E; McClelland, M

    1994-01-01

    A hierarchical approach allows the completion of contiguous sets of overlapping clones for small regions of a genome, one at a time rather than tackling the whole genome at once. On the basis of the BlnI restriction map for Salmonella typhimurium LT2, we dissected the chromosome into 21 different fragments by using a Tn5 transposon carrying a BlnI site. Dissected chromosomal fragments were purified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and used as probes for sorting a lambda DASHII genomic library of 2,304 primary clones. A total of 129 clones identified as spanning the region from 91 min to 98 min were partly ordered on the basis of the intensity of hybridization with mitomycin-induced Mud-P22 phage DNAs from insertions with pac sites in opposite orientations at 93 min used as probes. Decreased signal intensity with the Mud-P22 probes corresponded to the increased distance of the clone from the site of Mud-P22 insertion and allowed the clones to be placed in two groups from 91 min to 93 min and from 93 min to 98 min and into four intensity categories within the two groups. A member of each category was used to generate a riboprobe from the T3 promoter flanking the insert. This probe identified overlapping clones among the 129 clones. This subchromosomal library was then screened again with riboprobes from nonoverlapping clones. After four cycles of this strategy, a minimal contiguous sequence of 19 partly overlapping clones was selected for restriction mapping. A detailed map of 378 sites for eight restriction enzymes is presented for a region of about 240 kb. Working clockwise, the following genes were placed on this physical map on the basis of their restriction maps: malFEK, lamB, malM, lexA, qor, dnaB, alr, uvrA, proP, pmrB, pmrA, melA, melB, phoN, amiB, mutL, and miaA. Images PMID:8083165

  2. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  3. A high-resolution whole genome radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 17q22-q25.3 across the genes for GH and TK

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.W.; Schafer, A.J.; Critcher, R.

    1996-04-15

    We have constructed a whole genome radiation hybrid (WG-RH) map across a region of human chromosome 17q, from growth hormone (GH) to thymidine kinase (TK). A panel of 128 WG-RH hybrid cell lines generated by X-irradiation and fusion has been tested for the retention of 39 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers by the polymerase chain reaction. This genome mapping technique has allowed the integration of existing VNTR and microsatellite markers with additional new markers and existing STS markers previously mapped to this region by other means. The WG-RH map includes eight expressed sequence tag (EST) and three anonymous markers developed for this study, together with 23 anonymous microsatellites and five existing ESTs. Analysis of these data resulted in a high-density comprehensive map across this region of the genome. A subset of these markers has been used to produce a framework map consisting of 20 loci ordered with odds greater than 1000:1. The markers are of sufficient density to build a YAC contig across this region based on marker content. We have developed sequence tags for both ends of a 2.1-Mb YAC and mapped these using the WG-RH panel, allowing a direct comparison of cRay{sub 6000} to physical distance. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in human infertility.

    PubMed

    Guediche, N; Tosca, L; Kara Terki, A; Bas, C; Lecerf, L; Young, J; Briand-Suleau, A; Tou, B; Bouligand, J; Brisset, S; Misrahi, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Goossens, M; Tachdjian, G

    2012-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding cytogenetics. This study describes four patients with sSMC in relation with infertility. Patient 1 had primary infertility. His brother, fertile, carried the same sSMC (patient 2). Patient 3 presented polycystic ovary syndrome and patient 4 primary ovarian insufficiency. Cytogenetic studies, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and sperm analyses were compared with cases previously reported. sSMC corresponded to the 15q11.2 region (patients 1 and 2), the centromeric chromosome 15 region (patient 3) and the 21p11.2 region (patient 4). Array CGH showed 3.6-Mb gain for patients 1 and 2 and 0.266-Mb gain for patient 4. Sperm fluorescent in-situ hybridization analyses found ratios of 0.37 and 0.30 of sperm nuclei with sSMC(15) for patients 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). An increase of sperm nuclei with disomy X, Y and 18 was noted for patient 1 compared with control and patient 2 (P < 0.001). Among the genes mapped in the unbalanced chromosomal regions, POTE B and BAGE are related to the testis and ovary, respectively. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to duplication, but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis.

  5. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  6. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  7. Mechanisms of chromosome behaviour during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Claire E.; Cai, Shang; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have strived to understand the mechanisms that govern the accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. The most intriguing feature of this process, which is particularly prominent in higher eukaryotes, is the complex behaviour exhibited by the chromosomes. This behaviour is based on specific and highly regulated interactions between the chromosomes and spindle microtubules. Recent discoveries, enabled by high-resolution imaging combined with the various genetic, molecular, cell biological and chemical tools, support the idea that establishing and controlling the dynamic interaction between chromosomes and microtubules is a major factor in genomic fidelity. PMID:20068571

  8. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  9. New Advances in Chromosome Architecture.

    PubMed

    Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the "architecture" of chromosomes has grown enormously in the past decade. This new insight has been enabled largely through advances in interdisciplinary research methods at the cutting-edge interface of the life and physical sciences. Importantly this has involved several state-of-the-art biophysical tools used in conjunction with molecular biology approaches which enable investigation of chromosome structure and function in living cells. Also, there are new and emerging interfacial science tools which enable significant improvements to the spatial and temporal resolution of quantitative measurements, such as in vivo super-resolution and powerful new single-molecule biophysics methods, which facilitate probing of dynamic chromosome processes hitherto impossible. And there are also important advances in the methods of theoretical biophysics which have enabled advances in predictive modeling of this high quality experimental data from molecular and physical biology to generate new understanding of the modes of operation of chromosomes, both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here, I discuss these advances, and take stock on the current state of our knowledge of chromosome architecture and speculate where future advances may lead. PMID:27283297

  10. An Unbalanced Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4:20 is Associated with Childhood Osteoporosis and Reduced Caspase-3 Levels.

    PubMed

    Kinning, Esther; McMillan, Martin; Shepherd, Sheila; Helfrich, Miep; Hof, Rob Vant; Adams, Christopher; Read, Heather; Wall, Daniel M; Ahmed, S Faisal

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of a chromosome 4:20 imbalance with osteoporosis in three related children. Bone biochemistry, bone turnover markers, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning were performed in all three cases and bone biopsy and histomorphometry in one. The chromosome imbalance was delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and analyzed for candidate genes. A potential candidate gene within the deleted region is caspase-3, previously linked to low bone mineral density (BMD) in heterozygous mice thus caspase-3 activity was measured in cases and controls. Routine bone biochemistry and markers of bone turnover did not reveal any abnormality. DXA showed reduced total and lumbar spine bone mineral content. aCGH showed an 8 megabase (Mb) deletion of terminal chromosome 4q incorporating a region previously linked to low BMD and a 15 Mb duplication of terminal chromosome 20p. Bone biopsy showed a high bone turnover state, trabecularisation of cortical bone and numerous small osteoclasts coupled with normal bone formation. Basal serum caspase-3 activity was lower in cases compared with controls. We conclude that the early-onset osteoporosis with low basal levels of caspase-3 and abnormal osteoclasts is a feature of this chromosomal translocation. Further investigation of the role of the deleted and duplicated genes and especially caspase-3 is required. PMID:27617159

  11. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains. PMID:26384347

  12. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tissues show spurious copy number changes in array-CGH profiles.

    PubMed

    Mc Sherry, E A; Mc Goldrick, A; Kay, E W; Hopkins, A M; Gallagher, W M; Dervan, P A

    2007-11-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival clinical specimens are invaluable in discovery of prognostic and therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer. However, the suitability of FFPE-derived genetic material for array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies is underexplored. In this study, genetic profiles of matched FFPE and fresh-frozen specimens were examined to investigate DNA integrity differences between these sample types and determine the impact this may have on genetic profiles. Genomic DNA was extracted from three patient-matched FFPE and fresh-frozen clinical tissue samples. T47D breast cancer control cells were also grown in culture and processed to yield a fresh T47D sample, a fresh-frozen T47D sample and a FFPE T47D sample. DNA was extracted from all the samples; array-CGH conducted and genetic profiles of matched samples were then compared. A loss of high molecular weight DNA was observed in the FFPE clinical tissues and FFPE T47D samples. A dramatic increase in absolute number of genetic alterations was observed in all FFPE tissues relative to matched fresh-frozen counterparts. In future, alternative fixation and tissue-processing procedures, and/or new DNA extraction and CGH profiling protocols, may be implemented, enabling identification of changes involved in disease progression using stored clinical specimens.

  13. Genetic counselling difficulties and ethical implications of incidental findings from array-CGH: a 7-year national survey.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, M; Sanlaville, D; Marle, N; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Gautier, E; Chehadeh, S E; Mosca-Boidron, A-L; Thevenon, J; Edery, P; Alex-Cordier, M-P; Till, M; Lyonnet, S; Cormier-Daire, V; Amiel, J; Philippe, A; Romana, S; Malan, V; Afenjar, A; Marlin, S; Chantot-Bastaraud, S; Bitoun, P; Heron, B; Piparas, E; Morice-Picard, F; Moutton, S; Chassaing, N; Vigouroux-Castera, A; Lespinasse, J; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Boute-Benejean, O; Vincent-Delorme, C; Petit, F; Meur, N L; Marti-Dramard, M; Guerrot, A-M; Goldenberg, A; Redon, S; Ferrec, C; Odent, S; Caignec, C L; Mercier, S; Gilbert-Dussardier, B; Toutain, A; Arpin, S; Blesson, S; Mortemousque, I; Schaefer, E; Martin, D; Philip, N; Sigaudy, S; Busa, T; Missirian, C; Giuliano, F; Benailly, H K; Kien, P K V; Leheup, B; Benneteau, C; Lambert, L; Caumes, R; Kuentz, P; François, I; Heron, D; Keren, B; Cretin, E; Callier, P; Julia, S; Faivre, L

    2016-05-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is commonly used in diagnosing patients with intellectual disability (ID) with or without congenital malformation. Because aCGH interrogates with the whole genome, there is a risk of being confronted with incidental findings (IF). In order to anticipate the ethical issues of IF with the generalization of new genome-wide analysis technologies, we questioned French clinicians and cytogeneticists about the situations they have faced regarding IF from aCGH. Sixty-five IF were reported. Forty corresponded to autosomal dominant diseases with incomplete penetrance, 7 to autosomal dominant diseases with complete penetrance, 14 to X-linked diseases, and 4 were heterozygotes for autosomal recessive diseases with a high prevalence of heterozygotes in the population. Therapeutic/preventive measures or genetic counselling could be argued for all cases except four. These four IF were intentionally not returned to the patients. Clinicians reported difficulties in returning the results in 29% of the cases, mainly when the question of IF had not been anticipated. Indeed, at the time of the investigation, only 48% of the clinicians used consents mentioning the risk of IF. With the emergence of new technologies, there is a need to report such national experiences; they show the importance of pre-test information on IF. PMID:26582393

  14. Massively parallel sequencing, aCGH, and RNA-Seq technologies provide a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Lach, Francis P; Kimble, Danielle C; Kamat, Aparna; Teer, Jamie K; Donovan, Frank X; Flynn, Elizabeth; Sen, Shurjo K; Thongthip, Supawat; Sanborn, Erica; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-05-30

    Current methods for detecting mutations in Fanconi anemia (FA)-suspected patients are inefficient and often miss mutations. We have applied recent advances in DNA sequencing and genomic capture to the diagnosis of FA. Specifically, we used custom molecular inversion probes or TruSeq-enrichment oligos to capture and sequence FA and related genes, including introns, from 27 samples from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at The Rockefeller University. DNA sequencing was complemented with custom array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. aCGH identified deletions/duplications in 4 different FA genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed lack of allele specific expression associated with a deletion and splicing defects caused by missense, synonymous, and deep-in-intron variants. The combination of TruSeq-targeted capture, aCGH, and RNA-seq enabled us to identify the complementation group and biallelic germline mutations in all 27 families: FANCA (7), FANCB (3), FANCC (3), FANCD1 (1), FANCD2 (3), FANCF (2), FANCG (2), FANCI (1), FANCJ (2), and FANCL (3). FANCC mutations are often the cause of FA in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) ancestry, and we identified 2 novel FANCC mutations in 2 patients of AJ ancestry. We describe here a strategy for efficient molecular diagnosis of FA.

  15. Massively parallel sequencing, aCGH, and RNA-Seq technologies provide a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lach, Francis P.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Kamat, Aparna; Teer, Jamie K.; Donovan, Frank X.; Flynn, Elizabeth; Sen, Shurjo K.; Thongthip, Supawat; Sanborn, Erica; Smogorzewska, Agata; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for detecting mutations in Fanconi anemia (FA)–suspected patients are inefficient and often miss mutations. We have applied recent advances in DNA sequencing and genomic capture to the diagnosis of FA. Specifically, we used custom molecular inversion probes or TruSeq-enrichment oligos to capture and sequence FA and related genes, including introns, from 27 samples from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at The Rockefeller University. DNA sequencing was complemented with custom array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. aCGH identified deletions/duplications in 4 different FA genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed lack of allele specific expression associated with a deletion and splicing defects caused by missense, synonymous, and deep-in-intron variants. The combination of TruSeq-targeted capture, aCGH, and RNA-seq enabled us to identify the complementation group and biallelic germline mutations in all 27 families: FANCA (7), FANCB (3), FANCC (3), FANCD1 (1), FANCD2 (3), FANCF (2), FANCG (2), FANCI (1), FANCJ (2), and FANCL (3). FANCC mutations are often the cause of FA in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) ancestry, and we identified 2 novel FANCC mutations in 2 patients of AJ ancestry. We describe here a strategy for efficient molecular diagnosis of FA. PMID:23613520

  16. Sex determination in Madagascar geckos of the genus Paroedura (Squamata: Gekkonidae): are differentiated sex chromosomes indeed so evolutionary stable?

    PubMed

    Koubová, Martina; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, Michail; Farkačová, Klára; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-12-01

    Among amniote vertebrates, geckos represent a clade with exceptional variability in sex determination; however, only a minority of species of this highly diverse group has been studied in this respect. Here, we describe for the first time a female heterogamety in the genus Paroedura, the group radiated in Madagascar and adjacent islands. We identified homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome in Paroedura masobe, Paroedura oviceps, Paroedura karstophila, Paroedura stumpffi, and Paroedura lohatsara. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that female-specific sequences are greatly amplified in the W chromosome of P. lohatsara and that P. gracilis seems to possess a derived system of multiple sex chromosomes. Contrastingly, neither CGH nor heterochromatin visualization revealed differentiated sex chromosomes in the members of the Paroedura picta-Paroedura bastardi-Paroedura ibityensis clade, which is phylogenetically nested within lineages with a heterochromatic W chromosome. As a sex ratio consistent with genotypic sex determination has been reported in P. picta, it appears that the members of the P. picta-P. bastardi-P. ibityensis clade possess homomorphic, poorly differentiated sex chromosomes and may represent a rare example of evolutionary loss of highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a telomeric probe revealed a telomere-typical pattern in all species and an accumulation of telomeric sequences in the centromeric region of autosomes in P. stumpffi and P. bastardi. Our study adds important information for the greater understanding of the variability and evolution of sex determination in geckos and demonstrates how the geckos of the genus Paroedura provide an interesting model for studying the evolution of the sex chromosomes.

  17. Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Suppression of Repetitive Sequences in Whole Chromosome Painting Probes for FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L C; Pattee, M; Williams, J; Eklund, M; Bedford, J S; Christian, A T

    2004-04-21

    We have developed a method to suppress the PCR amplification of repetitive sequences in whole chromosome painting probes by adding Cot-1 DNA to the amplification mixture. The repetitive sequences in the Cot-1 DNA bind to their homologous sequences in the probe library, prevent the binding of primers, and interfere with extension of the probe sequences, greatly decreasing PCR efficiency selectively across these blocked regions. A second labeling reaction is then done and this product is resuspended in FISH hybridization mixture without further addition of blocking DNA. The hybridization produces little if any non-specific binding on any other chromosomes. We have been able to successfully use this procedure with both human and rat chromosome probes. This technique should be applicable in producing probes for CGH, M-FISH and SKY, as well as reducing the presence of repetitive DNA in genomic libraries.

  18. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espirito Santo, Layla Damasceno; Moreira, Lília Maria Azevedo; Riegel, Mariluce

    2016-01-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients' cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8)(p23) (3.5 Mb), considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ = 0.13) calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27144168

  19. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, Layla Damasceno; Moreira, Lília Maria Azevedo; Riegel, Mariluce

    2016-01-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients' cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8)(p23) (3.5 Mb), considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ = 0.13) calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27144168

  20. X-chromosome tiling path array detection of copy number variants in patients with chromosome X-linked mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, I; Rodríguez-Revenga, L; Armengol, L; González, E; Rodriguez, B; Badenas, C; Sánchez, A; Martínez, F; Guitart, M; Fernández, I; Arranz, JA; Tejada, MI; Pérez-Jurado, LA; Estivill, X; Milà, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Aproximately 5–10% of cases of mental retardation in males are due to copy number variations (CNV) on the X chromosome. Novel technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), may help to uncover cryptic rearrangements in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) patients. We have constructed an X-chromosome tiling path array using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and validated it using samples with cytogenetically defined copy number changes. We have studied 54 patients with idiopathic mental retardation and 20 controls subjects. Results Known genomic aberrations were reliably detected on the array and eight novel submicroscopic imbalances, likely causative for the mental retardation (MR) phenotype, were detected. Putatively pathogenic rearrangements included three deletions and five duplications (ranging between 82 kb to one Mb), all but two affecting genes previously known to be responsible for XLMR. Additionally, we describe different CNV regions with significant different frequencies in XLMR and control subjects (44% vs. 20%). Conclusion This tiling path array of the human X chromosome has proven successful for the detection and characterization of known rearrangements and novel CNVs in XLMR patients. PMID:18047645

  1. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  2. AB086. Chromosomal microarray analysis—detection of both duplication and deletion in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Ee, Hui Jing; Yon, Hui Yi; Tan, Mui Li; Roch, Robin; Brett, Maggie; Yong, Min Hwee; Law, Hai Yang; Lai, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is recommended as first-tier genetic testing for patients with multiple congenital anomalies, developmental delay/intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder. It detects chromosomal imbalance at a higher resolution than conventional chromosomal analysis. CMA diagnostic service was launched in our hospital in February 2014. The aim of this report is to review the incidence of detecting both duplication and deletion in patients referred for this test. Methods DNA was extracted using Gentra Puregene Blood Kit. CMA was performed using the Agilent 4×180 K CGH + SNP array and analysed with Agilent CytoGenomics. G-banding analysis was carried out on stimulated lymphocytes culture. Targeted fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using locus specific probes. Results From 1 February 2014 to 31 May 2015, a total of 205 patients were tested. Seven (3.4%) were identified to have both duplication and deletion of chromosomal segments that were pathogenic [5] or of uncertain clinical significance [2]. We present a case of a 1-day-old Chinese girl with oligohydramnios, prematurity (35+5 weeks) and multiple congenital anomalies including heart defect, cleft palate, ear anomalies, microcephaly, vaginal skin tag, bilateral clinodactyly and wide anterior fontanelle. Karyotyping and FISH analysis for 22q11 deletion were normal. CMA revealed a pathogenic gain of 2.143 Mb at 16p13.3 and a pathogenic loss of 0.271 Mb at 16q24.2q24.3. The gain at 16p13.3 affects 67 genes including CREBBP. The 16p13.3 duplication syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome characterized by normal to moderate intellectual disability, normal growth, mild arthrogryposis, frequently small and proximally implanted thumbs, characteristic facial features and occasionally, developmental defects of the heart, genitalia, palate or eyes. The 0.271 Mb deletion at 16q24.3 affects four genes including ANKRD11 and CDH15. The clinical

  3. Chromosomal alterations in the clonal evolution to the metastatic stage of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S; Aninat-Meyer, M; Schlüns, K; Gellert, K; Dietel, M; Petersen, I

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the lung to define chromosomal imbalances that are associated with the metastatic phenotype. In total, 64 lung SCC from 50 patients were investigated, 25 each with or without evidence of metastasis formation. The chromosomal imbalances summarized by a CGH histogram of the 50 cases revealed deletions most frequently on chromosomes 1p21-p31, 2q34-q36, 3p, 4p, 4q, 5q, 6q14-q24, 8p, 9p, 10q, 11p12-p14, 13q13-qter, 18q12-qter and 21q21. DNA over-representations were most pronounced for chromosomes 1q11-q25, 1q32-q41, 3q, 5p, 8q22-qter, 11q13, 12p, 17q21-q22, 17q24-q25, 19, 20q and 22q. In ten cases, paired samples of primaries and at least one metastasis were analysed. The comparison revealed a considerable chromosomal instability and genetic heterogeneity; however, the CGH pattern indicated a clonal relationship in each case. The difference in histograms from the metastatic and non-metastatic tumour groups was most useful in pinpointing chromosomal imbalances associated with the metastatic phenotype, indicating that the deletions at 3p12-p14, 3p21, 4p15-p16, 6q24-qter, 8p22-p23, 10q21-qter and 21q22, as well as the over-representations at 1q21-q25, 8q, 9q34, 14q12 and 15q12-q15, occurred significantly more often in the metastatic tumour group. The comparison of the paired samples confirmed these findings in individual cases and suggested distinct genetic changes, in particular the extension of small interstitial deletions, during tumour progression. Importantly, metastasis-associated lesions were frequently detectable in the primary tumour providing a method of identifying patients at risk for tumour dissemination. Individual profiles and histograms are accessible at our web site http://amba.charite.de/cgh.

  4. Genome-wide detection of copy number variations among diverse horse breeds by array CGH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shenyuan; Hou, Chenglin; Xing, Yanping; Cao, Junwei; Wu, Kaifeng; Liu, Chunxia; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yanru; Zhou, Huanmin

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that copy number variations (CNVs) are widespread in human and animal genomes. CNVs are a significant source of genetic variation, and have been shown to be associated with phenotypic diversity. However, the effect of CNVs on genetic variation in horses is not well understood. In the present study, CNVs in 6 different breeds of mare horses, Mongolia horse, Abaga horse, Hequ horse and Kazakh horse (all plateau breeds) and Debao pony and Thoroughbred, were determined using aCGH. In total, seven hundred CNVs were identified ranging in size from 6.1 Kb to 0.57 Mb across all autosomes, with an average size of 43.08 Kb and a median size of 15.11 Kb. By merging overlapping CNVs, we found a total of three hundred and fifty-three CNV regions (CNVRs). The length of the CNVRs ranged from 6.1 Kb to 1.45 Mb with average and median sizes of 38.49 Kb and 13.1 Kb. Collectively, 13.59 Mb of copy number variation was identified among the horses investigated and accounted for approximately 0.61% of the horse genome sequence. Five hundred and eighteen annotated genes were affected by CNVs, which corresponded to about 2.26% of all horse genes. Through the gene ontology (GO), genetic pathway analysis and comparison of CNV genes among different breeds, we found evidence that CNVs involving 7 genes may be related to the adaptation to severe environment of these plateau horses. This study is the first report of copy number variations in Chinese horses, which indicates that CNVs are ubiquitous in the horse genome and influence many biological processes of the horse. These results will be helpful not only in mapping the horse whole-genome CNVs, but also to further research for the adaption to the high altitude severe environment for plateau horses.

  5. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    PubMed Central

    Kartapradja, Hannie; Marzuki, Nanis Sacharina; Pertile, Mark D.; Francis, David; Suciati, Lita Putri; Anggaratri, Helena Woro; Ambarwati, Debby Dwi; Idris, Firman Prathama; Lesmana, Harry; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Paramayuda, Chrysantine; Harahap, Alida Roswita

    2015-01-01

    We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband's mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP) FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband's mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother's and grandmother's CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations. PMID:25722897

  6. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients.

    PubMed

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-09-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient's karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases. PMID:27625853

  7. High-resolution mapping of a novel rat blood pressure locus on chromosome 9 to a region containing the Spp2 gene and colocalization of a QTL for bone mass.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ying; Kumarasamy, Sivarajan; Waghulde, Harshal; Cheng, Xi; Mell, Blair; Czernik, Piotr J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Joe, Bina

    2016-06-01

    Through linkage analysis of the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait locus (QTL) was previously located on rat chromosome 9. Subsequent substitution mapping studies of this QTL revealed multiple BP QTLs within the originally identified logarithm of odds plot by linkage analysis. The focus of this study was on a 14.39 Mb region, the distal portion of which remained unmapped in our previous studies. High-resolution substitution mapping for a BP QTL in the setting of a high-salt diet indicated that an SHR-derived congenic segment of 787.9 kb containing the gene secreted phosphoprotein-2 (Spp2) lowered BP and urinary protein excretion. A nonsynonymous G/T polymorphism in the Spp2 gene was detected between the S and S.SHR congenic rats. A survey of 45 strains showed that the T allele was rare, being detected only in some substrains of SHR and WKY. Protein modeling prediction through SWISSPROT indicated that the predicted protein product of this variant was significantly altered. Importantly, in addition to improved cardiovascular and renal function, high salt-fed congenic animals carrying the SHR T variant of Spp2 had significantly lower bone mass and altered bone microarchitecture. Total bone volume and volume of trabecular bone, cortical thickness, and degree of mineralization of cortical bone were all significantly reduced in congenic rats. Our study points to opposing effects of a congenic segment containing the prioritized candidate gene Spp2 on BP and bone mass. PMID:27113531

  8. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  9. A recurrent copy number variation of the NEB triplicate region: only revealed by the targeted nemaline myopathy CGH array.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Kirsi; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Löytynoja, Ari; Ahlstén, Liina; Laitila, Jenni; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Pelin, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    Recently, new large variants have been identified in the nebulin gene (NEB) causing nemaline myopathy (NM). NM constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders among the congenital myopathies, and disease-causing variants in NEB are a main cause of the recessively inherited form of NM. NEB consists of 183 exons and it includes homologous sequences such as a 32-kb triplicate region (TRI), where eight exons are repeated three times (exons 82-89, 90-97, 98-105). In human, the normal copy number of NEB TRI is six (three copies in each allele). Recently, we described a custom NM-CGH microarray designed to detect copy number variations (CNVs) in the known NM genes. The array has now been updated to include all the currently known 10 NM genes. The NM-CGH array is superior in detecting CNVs, especially of the NEB TRI, that is not included in the exome capture kits. To date, we have studied 266 samples from 196 NM families using the NM-CGH microarray, and identified a novel recurrent NEB TRI variation in 13% (26/196) of the families and in 10% of the controls (6/60). An analysis of the breakpoints revealed adjacent repeat elements, which are known to predispose for rearrangements such as CNVs. The control CNV samples deviate only one copy from the normal six copies, whereas the NM samples include CNVs of up to four additional copies. Based on this study, NEB seems to tolerate deviations of one TRI copy, whereas addition of two or more copies might be pathogenic. PMID:26197980

  10. [Accidental finding of a cri du chat syndrome in an adult patient by means of array-CGH].

    PubMed

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; López-Manzanares, Lydia; Alonso-Cerezo, Concepción

    2014-07-16

    Introduccion. El sindrome cri du chat (SCDC) tiene su origen en una delecion parcial o total del brazo corto del cromosoma 5, y es uno de los sindromes de delecion cromosomica mas frecuentes en humanos. La mayoria de los pacientes se diagnostica entre el primer mes y el primer año de vida, si bien aqui se describe el hallazgo de un SCDC en una mujer con sospecha de ataxia espinocerebelar y antecedentes familiares de trastorno bipolar y ataxia, con especial atencion a las caracteristicas clinicas y las tecnicas diagnosticas que permitieron su identificacion. Caso clinico. Mujer de 46 años que presentaba una inteligencia limite, intervenida a los 43 años de faquectomia bilateral. El inicio de la sintomatologia fue durante la infancia, e incluia hipoacusia, ataxia, disartria, disfagia, depresion, deterioro cognitivo y trastorno bipolar. La exploracion fisica revelo microcefalia, micrognatia, pies equinos y ataxia. Se realizo cariotipo y array-CGH en sangre periferica. La paciente presentaba una traslocacion que involucraba los cromosomas 5 y 15, y una inversion del cromosoma 9: 45,XX,inv9(p11q13);t(5,15)(p15.33;q11.2). El array-CGH mostro una delecion de 2,91 Mb en 5p15.33, formula genomica arr 5p15.33 (151537-3057771)x1, que involucraba 20 genes, incluyendo el gen TERT. Conclusiones. La delecion de multiples genes confirmo el diagnostico de SCDC y es la responsable del fenotipo de la paciente. Se pone de manifiesto la importancia de utilizar tecnicas adecuadas de diagnostico (array-CGH, cariotipo en sangre periferica) y la correcta eleccion de estas.

  11. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25–45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18–33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes. PMID:23695274

  12. Characterization of chromosome 14 abnormalities by interphase in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization in 124 meningiomas: correlation with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic features.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, María Dolores; Espinosa, Ana Belén; Maíllo, Angel; Sayagués, José María; Alguero, María del Carmen; Lumbreras, Eva; Díaz, Pedro; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Onzain, Ignacio; Merino, Marta; Morales, Francisco; Orfao, Alberto

    2005-05-01

    We analyzed quantitative chromosome 14 abnormalities in 124 meningiomas by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and confirmed the nature of abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). We correlated the abnormalities with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic factors. Of 124 cases, 50 (40.3%) showed loss (14.5%) or gain (25.8%) of the 14q32 chromosome region by iFISH. Most corresponded to numeric abnormalities: monosomy (12.9%), trisomy (1.6%), or tetrasomy (24.2%); in only 2 cases (1.6%), chromosome 14 loss did not involve the whole chromosome and was restricted to the 14q31-q32 region (confirmed by CGH). Cases with gain or monosomy corresponded more frequently to histologically malignant tumors (P = .009). Patients with monosomy 14/14q-, but not those with gain, more often were male (P = .04) and had a greater incidence of recurrence (P = .003) and shorter relapse-free survival (P = .03). The 2 patients with loss limited to 14q31-q32 had histologically benign tumors and no relapse after more than 5 years' follow-up. Most meningiomas with chromosome 14 abnormalities have numeric changes, with interstitial deletions of 14q31-q32 present in few cases. Of the abnormalities detected, only monosomy 14 showed an adverse prognostic impact. PMID:15981814

  13. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  14. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction.

  15. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  16. Unraveling the Sex Chromosome Heteromorphism of the Paradoxical Frog Pseudis tocantins

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Kaleb Pretto; Busin, Carmen Silvia; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2016-01-01

    The paradoxical frog Pseudis tocantins is the only species in the Hylidae family with known heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes. The Z chromosome is metacentric and presents an interstitial nucleolar organizer region (NOR) on the long arm that is adjacent to a pericentromeric heterochromatic band. In contrast, the submetacentric W chromosome carries a pericentromeric NOR on the long arm, which is adjacent to a clearly evident heterochromatic band that is larger than the band found on the Z chromosome and justify the size difference observed between these chromosomes. Here, we provide evidence that the non-centromeric heterochromatic bands in Zq and Wq differ not only in size and location but also in composition, based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and an analysis of the anuran PcP190 satellite DNA. The finding of PcP190 sequences in P. tocantins extends the presence of this satellite DNA, which was previously detected among Leptodactylidae and Hylodidae, suggesting that this family of repetitive DNA is even older than it was formerly considered. Seven groups of PcP190 sequences were recognized in the genome of P. tocantins. PcP190 probes mapped to the heterochromatic band in Wq, and a Southern blot analysis indicated the accumulation of PcP190 in the female genome of P. tocantins, which suggests the involvement of this satellite DNA in the evolution of the sex chromosomes of this species. PMID:27214234

  17. The Landscape of Somatic Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations in GEM Models of Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Frias, Daniella; Hernandez, Susana A.; Coleman, Roger; Wu, Hong; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is known to harbor recurrent genomic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains, rearrangements and mutations that involve oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models have been constructed to assess the causal role of these putative oncogenic events and provide molecular insight into disease pathogenesis. While GEM models generally initiate neoplasia by manipulating a single gene, expression profiles of GEM tumors typically comprise hundreds of transcript alterations. It is unclear whether these transcriptional changes represent the pleiotropic effects of single oncogenes, and/or cooperating genomic or epigenomic events. Therefore, it was determined if structural chromosomal alterations occur in GEM models of PCa and whether the changes are concordant with human carcinomas. Whole genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to identify somatic chromosomal copy number aberrations (SCNAs) in the widely used TRAMP, Hi-Myc, Pten-null and LADY GEM models. Interestingly, very few SCNAs were identified and the genomic architecture of Hi-Myc, Pten-null and LADY tumors were essentially identical to the germline. TRAMP neuroendocrine carcinomas contained SCNAs, which comprised three recurrent aberrations including a single copy loss of chromosome 19 (encoding Pten). In contrast, cell lines derived from the TRAMP, Hi-Myc, and Pten-null tumors were notable for numerous SCNAs that included copy gains of chromosome 15 (encoding Myc) and losses of chromosome 11 (encoding p53). PMID:25298407

  18. Characterization of Genomic Alterations in Radiation-Associated Breast Cancer among Childhood Cancer Survivors, Using Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Killian, J. Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S.; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R.; Strong, Louise C.; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D.; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an “amplifier” genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25764003

  19. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Killian, J Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R; Strong, Louise C; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E; Robison, Leslie L; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25764003

  20. Preimplantation genetic screening for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization significantly increases implantation rates and clinical pregnancy rates in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Gaurav; Majumdar, Abha; Lall, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C.; Upadhyaya, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: A majority of human embryos produced in vitro are aneuploid, especially in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with poor prognosis. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) for all 24 chromosomes has the potential to select the most euploid embryos for transfer in such cases. AIM: To study the efficacy of PGS for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) in Indian couples undergoing IVF cycles with poor prognosis. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective, case–control study was undertaken in an institution-based tertiary care IVF center to compare the clinical outcomes of twenty patients, who underwent 21 PGS cycles with poor prognosis, with 128 non-PGS patients in the control group, with the same inclusion criterion as for the PGS group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single cells were obtained by laser-assisted embryo biopsy from day 3 embryos and subsequently analyzed by array CGH for all 24 chromosomes. Once the array CGH results were available on the morning of day 5, only chromosomally normal embryos that had progressed to blastocyst stage were transferred. RESULTS: The implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate (PR) per transfer were found to be significantly higher in the PGS group than in the control group (63.2% vs. 26.2%, P = 0.001 and 73.3% vs. 36.7%, P = 0.006, respectively), while the multiple PRs sharply declined from 31.9% to 9.1% in the PGS group. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, we have shown that PGS by array CGH can improve the clinical outcome in patients undergoing IVF with poor prognosis. PMID:27382234

  1. Shifts in rDNA levels act as a genome buffer promoting chromosome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Gurgul, Artur; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Szmatola, Tomasz; Jasielczuk, Igor; Magda, Michal; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Panek, Anita; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is considered to be a stress sensor and rDNA-based regulation of cellular senescence and longevity has been proposed. However, the role of rDNA in the maintenance of genome integrity has not been investigated in detail. Using genomically diverse industrial yeasts as a model and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we show that chromosome level may be balanced during passages and as a response to alcohol stress that may be associated with changes in rDNA pools. Generation- and ethanol-mediated changes in genes responsible for protein and DNA/RNA metabolism were revealed using next-generation sequencing. Links between redox homeostasis, DNA stability, and telomere and nucleolus states were also established. These results suggest that yeast genome is dynamic and chromosome homeostasis may be controlled by rDNA. PMID:26566866

  2. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    MedlinePlus

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  3. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  5. An array CGH based genomic instability index (G2I) is predictive of clinical outcome in breast cancer and reveals a subset of tumors without lymph node involvement but with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite entering complete remission after primary treatment, a substantial proportion of patients with early stage breast cancer will develop metastases. Prediction of such an outcome remains challenging despite the clinical use of several prognostic parameters. Several reports indicate that genomic instability, as reflected in specific chromosomal aneuploidies and variations in DNA content, influences clinical outcome but no precise definition of this parameter has yet been clearly established. Methods To explore the prognostic value of genomic alterations present in primary tumors, we performed a comparative genomic hybridization study on BAC arrays with a panel of breast carcinomas from 45 patients with metastatic relapse and 95 others, matched for age and axillary node involvement, without any recurrence after at least 11 years of follow-up. Array-CGH data was used to establish a two-parameter index representative of the global level of aneusomy by chromosomal arm, and of the number of breakpoints throughout the genome. Results Application of appropriate thresholds allowed us to distinguish three classes of tumors highly associated with metastatic relapse. This index used with the same thresholds on a published set of tumors confirms its prognostic significance with a hazard ratio of 3.24 [95CI: 1.76-5.96] p = 6.7x10-5 for the bad prognostic group with respect to the intermediate group. The high prognostic value of this genomic index is related to its ability to individualize a specific group of breast cancers, mainly luminal type and axillary node negative, showing very high genetic instability and poor outcome. Indirect transcriptomic validation was obtained on independent data sets. Conclusion Accurate evaluation of genetic instability in breast cancers by a genomic instability index (G2I) helps individualizing specific tumors with previously unexpected very poor prognosis. PMID:23186559

  6. Medulloblastoma outcome is adversely associated with overexpression of EEF1D, RPL30, and RPS20 on the long arm of chromosome 8

    PubMed Central

    De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Castellino, Robert C; Lu, Xin-Yan; Deyo, Jeffrey; Sturla, Lisa Marie; Adesina, Adekunle M; Perlaky, Laszlo; Pomeroy, Scott L; Lau, Ching C; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Kim, John YH

    2006-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Improvements in clinical outcome require a better understanding of the genetic alterations to identify clinically significant biological factors and to stratify patients accordingly. In the present study, we applied cytogenetic characterization to guide the identification of biologically significant genes from gene expression microarray profiles of medulloblastoma. Methods We analyzed 71 primary medulloblastomas for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNAs) using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Among 64 tumors that we previously analyzed by gene expression microarrays, 27 were included in our CGH series. We analyzed clinical outcome with respect to CNAs and microarray results. We filtered microarray data using specific CNAs to detect differentially expressed candidate genes associated with survival. Results The most frequent lesions detected in our series involved chromosome 17; loss of 16q, 10q, or 8p; and gain of 7q or 2p. Recurrent amplifications at 2p23-p24, 2q14, 7q34, and 12p13 were also observed. Gain of 8q is associated with worse overall survival (p = 0.0141), which is not entirely attributable to MYC amplification or overexpression. By applying CGH results to gene expression analysis of medulloblastoma, we identified three 8q-mapped genes that are associated with overall survival in the larger group of 64 patients (p < 0.05): eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1D (EEF1D), ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30), and ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20). Conclusion The complementary use of CGH and expression profiles can facilitate the identification of clinically significant candidate genes involved in medulloblastoma growth. We demonstrate that gain of 8q and expression levels of three 8q-mapped candidate genes (EEF1D, RPL30, RPS20) are associated with adverse outcome in medulloblastoma. PMID:16968546

  7. Exome sequencing and arrayCGH detection of gene sequence and copy number variation between ILS and ISS mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Laura; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Davis, Jonathan; Bennett, Beth; Radcliffe, Richard A; Sikela, James M

    2014-06-01

    It has been well documented that genetic factors can influence predisposition to develop alcoholism. While the underlying genomic changes may be of several types, two of the most common and disease associated are copy number variations (CNVs) and sequence alterations of protein coding regions. The goal of this study was to identify CNVs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in gene coding regions that may play a role in influencing the risk of an individual developing alcoholism. Toward this end, two mouse strains were used that have been selectively bred based on their differential sensitivity to alcohol: the Inbred long sleep (ILS) and Inbred short sleep (ISS) mouse strains. Differences in initial response to alcohol have been linked to risk for alcoholism, and the ILS/ISS strains are used to investigate the genetics of initial sensitivity to alcohol. Array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and exome sequencing were conducted to identify CNVs and gene coding sequence differences, respectively, between ILS and ISS mice. Mouse arrayCGH was performed using catalog Agilent 1 × 244 k mouse arrays. Subsequently, exome sequencing was carried out using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. ArrayCGH detected 74 CNVs that were strain-specific (38 ILS/36 ISS), including several ISS-specific deletions that contained genes implicated in brain function and neurotransmitter release. Among several interesting coding variations detected by exome sequencing was the gain of a premature stop codon in the alpha-amylase 2B (AMY2B) gene specifically in the ILS strain. In total, exome sequencing detected 2,597 and 1,768 strain-specific exonic gene variants in the ILS and ISS mice, respectively. This study represents the most comprehensive and detailed genomic comparison of ILS and ISS mouse strains to date. The two complementary genome-wide approaches identified strain-specific CNVs and gene coding sequence variations that should provide strong candidates to

  8. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  9. Characterization of apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements from the developmental genome anatomy project.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Anne W; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Bosco, Amy F; Brown, Kerry K; Bruns, Gail A P; Donovan, Diana J; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G; Ferguson, Heather L; Gusella, James F; Harris, David J; Herrick, Steven R; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Moore, Steven D P; Peters, Roxanna E; Quade, Bradley J; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2008-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation.

  10. Genome-wide microarray expression and genomic alterations by array-CGH analysis in neuroblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Raquel; Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Martínez-Soto, Soledad; Legarra, Sheila; Pata-Merci, Noémie; Guegan, Justine; Danglot, Giselle; Bernheim, Alain; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Castresana, Javier S

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma has a very diverse clinical behaviour: from spontaneous regression to a very aggressive malignant progression and resistance to chemotherapy. This heterogeneous clinical behaviour might be due to the existence of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC), a subpopulation within the tumor with stem-like cell properties: a significant proliferation capacity, a unique self-renewal capacity, and therefore, a higher ability to form new tumors. We enriched the CSC-like cell population content of two commercial neuroblastoma cell lines by the use of conditioned cell culture media for neurospheres, and compared genomic gains and losses and genome expression by array-CGH and microarray analysis, respectively (in CSC-like versus standard tumor cells culture). Despite the array-CGH did not show significant differences between standard and CSC-like in both analyzed cell lines, the microarray expression analysis highlighted some of the most relevant biological processes and molecular functions that might be responsible for the CSC-like phenotype. Some signalling pathways detected seem to be involved in self-renewal of normal tissues (Wnt, Notch, Hh and TGF-β) and contribute to CSC phenotype. We focused on the aberrant activation of TGF-β and Hh signalling pathways, confirming the inhibition of repressors of TGF-β pathway, as SMAD6 and SMAD7 by RT-qPCR. The analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway showed overexpression of PTCH1, GLI1 and SMO. We found overexpression of CD133 and CD15 in SIMA neurospheres, confirming that this cell line was particularly enriched in stem-like cells. This work shows a cross-talk among different pathways in neuroblastoma and its importance in CSC-like cells. PMID:25392930

  11. A French multicenter study of over 700 patients with 22q11 deletions diagnosed using FISH or aCGH.

    PubMed

    Poirsier, Céline; Besseau-Ayasse, Justine; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Toutain, Jérôme; Missirian, Chantal; Le Caignec, Cédric; Bazin, Anne; de Blois, Marie Christine; Kuentz, Paul; Catty, Marie; Choiset, Agnès; Plessis, Ghislaine; Basinko, Audrey; Letard, Pascaline; Flori, Elisabeth; Jimenez, Mélanie; Valduga, Mylène; Landais, Emilie; Lallaoui, Hakima; Cartault, François; Lespinasse, James; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Callier, Patrick; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Portnoi, Marie-France; Busa, Tiffany; Receveur, Aline; Amblard, Florence; Yardin, Catherine; Harbuz, Radu; Prieur, Fabienne; Le Meur, Nathalie; Pipiras, Eva; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Vialard, François; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2016-06-01

    Although 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most recurrent human microdeletion syndrome associated with a highly variable phenotype, little is known about the condition's true incidence and the phenotype at diagnosis. We performed a multicenter, retrospective analysis of postnatally diagnosed patients recruited by members of the Association des Cytogénéticiens de Langue Française (the French-Speaking Cytogeneticists Association). Clinical and cytogenetic data on 749 cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2013 were collected by 31 French cytogenetics laboratories. The most frequent reasons for referral of postnatally diagnosed cases were a congenital heart defect (CHD, 48.6%), facial dysmorphism (49.7%) and developmental delay (40.7%). Since 2007 (the year in which array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was introduced for the routine screening of patients with intellectual disability), almost all cases have been diagnosed using FISH (96.1%). Only 15 cases (all with an atypical phenotype) were diagnosed with aCGH; the deletion size ranged from 745 to 2904 kb. The deletion was inherited in 15.0% of cases and was of maternal origin in 85.5% of the latter. This is the largest yet documented cohort of patients with 22q11.2DS (the most commonly diagnosed microdeletion) from the same population. French cytogenetics laboratories diagnosed at least 108 affected patients (including fetuses) per year from among a national population of ∼66 million. As observed for prenatal diagnoses, CHDs were the most frequently detected malformation in postnatal diagnoses. The most common CHD in postnatal diagnoses was an isolated septal defect.

  12. Frequent chromosomal gains in recurrent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Brieger, Jürgen; Gosepath, Jan; Wierzbicka, Magorzata; Sokolov, Maxim; Roth, Yehudah; Szyfter, Witold; Bittinger, Fernando; Mann, Wolf J

    2007-06-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor, mostly affecting adolescent males. Some patients develop recurrences after surgery independently of completeness of removal. Only very limited data concerning underlying chromosomal changes are available. We therefore analyzed samples of 22 JNAs, including six recurrences, with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Additionally, quantitative image cytometry was used for measurement of DNA aneuploidy in representative samples. Of the 13 primary JNAs without later recurrence, DNA gains were identified on autosomes in only two samples. Four patients with one or two recurrences were included in the study; for one of these, no material of the primary tumor was available for analysis. Looking at autosomes, two of the three available primaries displayed multiple gains; in one of those, two additional losses were observed. Multiple gains were detected in two of the four first recurrences, but none in the two second recurrences. Across all 22 samples, gains occurred in more than one sample on chromosomes arms 1p, 9q, 10q, 12q, 16p, 16q, 17q, 19p, 19q, 20q, and 22q. Losses were found in a single case exclusively on chromosome 4. Sex chromosomes were frequently affected in both primary tumors and recurrences. There was no correlation among tumor staging, age, and DNA amplification. No DNA aneuploidy was detected, a finding in accordance with the generally benign characteristics of JNAs. Our observations suggest that in JNA the activation of oncogenes is more likely than the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Autosomal gains in the primary tumor should be further evaluated as markers for a potentially increased risk of recurrence after surgical removal in this entity.

  13. Balanced chromosomal rearrangement in recurrent spontaneous abortions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Farhoodi, Zeinab; Amel, Roya; Mirzaee, Salmeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    One of the major causes of spontaneous abortion before the fourth month of pregnancy is chromosomal abnormalities. We report an unusual case of a familial balanced chromosomal translocation in a consanguineous couple who experienced 4 spontaneous abortions. Chromosomal studies were performed on the basis of G-banding technique at high resolution and revealed 46, XX, t (16; 6) (p12; q26) and 46, XY, t (16; 6) (p12; q26) in both partners, which induced such pregnancy complications. Chromosomal balanced translocation is one of the most common causes of recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA). In such cases prenatal diagnosis (PND) during the 16(th) week of gestation is strongly recommended.

  14. Mechanisms and consequences of small supernumerary marker chromosomes: from Barbara McClintock to modern genetic-counseling issues.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Erin L; May, Lorraine F; Justice, April N; Martin, Christa L; Ledbetter, David H

    2008-02-01

    Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are common, but their molecular content and mechanism of origin are often not precisely characterized. We analyzed all centromere regions to identify the junction between the unique chromosome arm and the pericentromeric repeats. A molecular-ruler clone panel for each chromosome arm was developed and used for the design of a custom oligonucleotide array. Of 27 nonsatellited SMCs analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), seven (approximately 26%) were shown to be unique sequence negative. Of the 20 unique-sequence-positive SMCs, the average unique DNA content was approximately 6.5 Mb (range 0.3-22.2 Mb) and 33 known genes (range 0-149). Of the 14 informative nonacrocentric SMCs, five (approximately 36%) contained unique DNA from both the p and q arms, whereas nine (approximately 64%) contained unique DNA from only one arm. The latter cases are consistent with ring-chromosome formation by centromere misdivision, as first described by McClintock in maize. In one case, a r(4) containing approximately 4.4 Mb of unique DNA from 4p was also present in the proband's mother. However, FISH revealed a cryptic deletion in one chromosome 4 and reduced alpha satellite in the del(4) and r(4), indicating that the mother was a balanced ring and deletion carrier. Our data, and recent reports in the literature, suggest that this "McClintock mechanism" of small-ring formation might be the predominant mechanism of origin. Comprehensive analysis of SMCs by aCGH and FISH can distinguish unique-negative from unique-positive cases, determine the precise gene content, and provide information on mechanism of origin, inheritance, and recurrence risk. PMID:18252220

  15. Mechanisms and consequences of small supernumerary marker chromosomes: from Barbara McClintock to modern genetic-counseling issues.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Erin L; May, Lorraine F; Justice, April N; Martin, Christa L; Ledbetter, David H

    2008-02-01

    Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are common, but their molecular content and mechanism of origin are often not precisely characterized. We analyzed all centromere regions to identify the junction between the unique chromosome arm and the pericentromeric repeats. A molecular-ruler clone panel for each chromosome arm was developed and used for the design of a custom oligonucleotide array. Of 27 nonsatellited SMCs analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), seven (approximately 26%) were shown to be unique sequence negative. Of the 20 unique-sequence-positive SMCs, the average unique DNA content was approximately 6.5 Mb (range 0.3-22.2 Mb) and 33 known genes (range 0-149). Of the 14 informative nonacrocentric SMCs, five (approximately 36%) contained unique DNA from both the p and q arms, whereas nine (approximately 64%) contained unique DNA from only one arm. The latter cases are consistent with ring-chromosome formation by centromere misdivision, as first described by McClintock in maize. In one case, a r(4) containing approximately 4.4 Mb of unique DNA from 4p was also present in the proband's mother. However, FISH revealed a cryptic deletion in one chromosome 4 and reduced alpha satellite in the del(4) and r(4), indicating that the mother was a balanced ring and deletion carrier. Our data, and recent reports in the literature, suggest that this "McClintock mechanism" of small-ring formation might be the predominant mechanism of origin. Comprehensive analysis of SMCs by aCGH and FISH can distinguish unique-negative from unique-positive cases, determine the precise gene content, and provide information on mechanism of origin, inheritance, and recurrence risk.

  16. Loss of heterozygosity at E-cadherin and other loci on chromosome 16 in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.; Chen, S.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Our study of genome-wide screening and mapping of genetic aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that the copy number of DNA sequences on chromosome 16q was reduced in a significant number of ovarian tumors. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 16q has only been reported in ovarian tumors from the Japanese population; this arm has not been thoroughly studied in most LOH analyses of ovarian cancers. We have investigated LOH status at four chromosome 16q loci in 74 common epithelial ovarian tumors (benign and borderline 16, grade I 5, GII 6 and GIII 47). LOH frequencies of .27 (9/33), .19 (10/54), .23 (8/35) and .24 (10/42) were found at HP, D16S408, D16S421 and E-cadherin (E-cad) loci, respectively. Considering overall LOH on chromosome 16q, 26 out of 62 cases (41.9%) heterozygous for one or more loci showed LOH at a minimum of one locus. Our results are consistent with the observation made by CGH and also imply that most LOH in 16q is associated with physical deletion of at least a portion of 16q. E-cad is an intercellular adhesion molecule of epithelial tissues, and reduced E-cad expression is associated with invasiveness of several cancers (breast, bladder, lung, etc.). Thus E-cad may function as a tumor suppressor gene. In addition, the cell matrix adhesion regulator gene (CMAR), which is located distal to E-cad, may be a second candidate. This possibility is currently being investigated by additional LOH analysis. Southern analysis of DNA from tumors with LOH using a full-length E-cad cDNA probe detected only Pvull and MspI polymorphisms but no gross alterations in the remaining alleles. Further studies by SSCP, which explore the possible inactivating mutations in the remaining E-cad alleles, are in progress.

  17. Comparative chromosome painting in Carnivora and Pholidota.

    PubMed

    Perelman, P L; Beklemisheva, V R; Yudkin, D V; Petrina, T N; Rozhnov, V V; Nie, W; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    The order of Carnivora has been very well characterized with over 50 species analyzed by chromosome painting and with painting probe sets made for 9 Carnivora species. Representatives of almost all families have been studied with few exceptions (Otariidae, Odobenidae, Nandiniidae, Prionodontidae). The patterns of chromosome evolution in Carnivora are discussed here. Overall, many Carnivora species retained karyotypes that only slightly differ from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. However, there are at least 3 families in which the ancestral carnivore karyotype has been severely rearranged - Canidae, Ursidae and Mephitidae. Here we report chromosome painting of yet another Carnivora species with a highly rearranged karyotype, Genetta pardina. Recurrent rearrangements make it difficult to define the ancestral chromosomal arrangement in several instances. Only 2 species of pangolins (Pholidota), a sister order of Carnivora, have been studied by chromosome painting. Future use of whole-genome sequencing data is discussed in the context of solving the questions that are beyond resolution of conventional banding techniques and chromosome painting. PMID:22889959

  18. Comparative chromosome painting in Carnivora and Pholidota.

    PubMed

    Perelman, P L; Beklemisheva, V R; Yudkin, D V; Petrina, T N; Rozhnov, V V; Nie, W; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    The order of Carnivora has been very well characterized with over 50 species analyzed by chromosome painting and with painting probe sets made for 9 Carnivora species. Representatives of almost all families have been studied with few exceptions (Otariidae, Odobenidae, Nandiniidae, Prionodontidae). The patterns of chromosome evolution in Carnivora are discussed here. Overall, many Carnivora species retained karyotypes that only slightly differ from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. However, there are at least 3 families in which the ancestral carnivore karyotype has been severely rearranged - Canidae, Ursidae and Mephitidae. Here we report chromosome painting of yet another Carnivora species with a highly rearranged karyotype, Genetta pardina. Recurrent rearrangements make it difficult to define the ancestral chromosomal arrangement in several instances. Only 2 species of pangolins (Pholidota), a sister order of Carnivora, have been studied by chromosome painting. Future use of whole-genome sequencing data is discussed in the context of solving the questions that are beyond resolution of conventional banding techniques and chromosome painting.

  19. Development of a sequential multicolor-FISH approach with 13 chromosome-specific painting probes for the rapid identification of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50) chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Perucatti, Angela; Iannuzzi, Alessandra; Incarnato, Domenico; Genualdo, Viviana; Di Berardino, Dino; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo

    2014-08-01

    The development of new molecular techniques (array CGH, M-FISH, SKY-FISH, etc.) has led to great advancements in the entire field of molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of these methods is still very limited in farm animals. In the present study, we report, for the first time, the production of 13 river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50) chromosome-specific painting probes, generated via chromosome microdissection and the DOP-PCR procedure. A sequential multicolor-FISH approach is also proposed on the same slide for the rapid identification of river buffalo chromosome/arms, namely, 1p-1q, 2p-2q, 3p-3q, 4p-4q, 5p-5q, 18, X, and Y, using both conventional and late-replicating banded chromosome preparations counterstained by DAPI. The provided 'bank' of chromosome-specific painting probes is useful for any further cytogenetic investigation not only for the buffalo breeds, but also for other species of the family Bovidae, such as cattle, sheep, and goats, for chromosome abnormality diagnosis, and, more generally, for evolutionary studies.

  20. On the spot: very local chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Helsmoortel, Céline; Vandeweyer, Geert

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, the detection of chromosomal abnormalities has shifted from conventional karyotyping under a light microscope to molecular detection using microarrays. The latter technology identified copy number variation as a major source of variation in the human genome; moreover, copy number variants were found responsible for 10-20% of cases of intellectual disability. Recent technological advances in microarray technology have also enabled the detection of very small local chromosomal rearrangements, sometimes affecting the function of only a single gene. Here, we illustrate how high resolution microarray analysis has led to increased insights into the contribution of specific genes in disease. PMID:23189093

  1. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L.; Lau, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  2. Successful PGD for late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis achieved by combined chromosome and TPP1 gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiandong; Cram, David Stephen; Wu, Wei; Cai, Lingbo; Yang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xueping; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2013-08-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL-2) is a severe debilitating autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in TPP1. There are no effective treatments, resulting in early childhood death. A couple with two affected children presented for reproductive genetic counselling and chose to undertake IVF and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to avoid the possibility of another affected child. However, DNA testing revealed only one mutation in the proband inherited from mother. Linkage analysis identified five informative linked short tandem repeat markers to aid the genetic diagnosis. Following IVF, five cleavage-stage embryos were biopsied and blastomeres were first subjected to whole-genome amplification, then a series of down-stream molecular genetic analyses to diagnose TPP1 genotype and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to assess the chromosomal ploidy of each embryo. Two unaffected euploid embryos were identified for transfer. One was transferred on day 5 resulting in an ongoing pregnancy. Confirmatory prenatal diagnosis by amniocentesis showed concordance of the embryo and fetal diagnosis. As far as is known, this is the first successful report of PGD for NCL-2 using double-factor PGD with simultaneous single-gene testing and array CGH to identify an unaffected and chromosomally normal embryo for transfer.

  3. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  4. New tools for embryo selection: comprehensive chromosome screening by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Lorena; Mateu, Emilia; Mercader, Amparo; Cobo, Ana Cristina; Peinado, Vanessa; Milán, Miguel; Al-Asmar, Nasser; Campos-Galindo, Inmaculada; García-Herrero, Sandra; Mir, Pere; Simón, Carlos; Rubio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n = 203); repetitive implantation failure (n = 188); severe male factor (n = 116); previous trisomic pregnancy (n = 33); and advanced maternal age (n = 880). CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n = 774); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n = 320); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n = 235); and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n = 91). Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5-54.2%) and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0-62.9%) were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1%) due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3%) and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%). We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  5. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Ana Cristina; Milán, Miguel; Al-Asmar, Nasser; García-Herrero, Sandra; Mir, Pere; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n = 203); repetitive implantation failure (n = 188); severe male factor (n = 116); previous trisomic pregnancy (n = 33); and advanced maternal age (n = 880). CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n = 774); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n = 320); mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n = 235); and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n = 91). Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2%) and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9%) were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1%) due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3%) and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%). We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation. PMID:24877108

  6. 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22): A Unique Aneuploidy Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome due to an Extra Derivative X Chromosome Inherited Maternally.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ruixue; Liang, Zuowen; Yue, Jiaming; Liu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    A derivative X chromosome formed by translocation involving an X chromosome and a chromosome 18 in a Klinefelter syndrome (KS) patient with a 47,XXY karyotype has not been reported before. In this study, we present the clinical and molecular cytogenetic characteristics. The patient presented with small testes and azoospermia. G-banding analysis identified the karyotype as 47,XY,del(X)(p?11.4). Array CGH detected a 10.36-Mb duplication of chromosome region 18p11.22p11.32 (14,316-10,377,516) and a 111.18-Mb duplication of chromosome region Xp11.4q28 (61,931, 689-155,111,583), in addition to the normal chromosome 18 and an X chromosome. FISH results further revealed the extra 18p located at the end of the short arm of a deleted X chromosome, forming a derivative X chromosome. Finally, we identified the karyotype of the patient as 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22). The derivative X chromosome was maternally inherited. To our knowledge, this rare karyotype has not yet been reported in the literature. The present study may suggest a novel karyotype associated with KS. PMID:26430900

  7. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B.; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient’s karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases. PMID:27625853

  8. A Fetus with Hb Bart's Disease Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy for Chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Au, Patrick K C; Kan, Anita S Y; Tang, Mary H Y; Leung, Kwok Y; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Tang, Tommy W F; Lau, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    We here report an unusual case of Hb Bart's (γ4) disease. Thalassemia screening of a couple showed that the wife was an α(0)-thalassemia (α(0)-thal) carrier and her husband's mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was normal. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed at 13 weeks' gestation for positive Down syndrome screening and chromosomal study of the cultured CVS showed a normal karyotype. Ultrasound examination at 22 weeks' gestation showed fetal cardiomegaly and raised middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity. Cordocentesis confirmed fetal anemia and showed Hb Bart's disease. Multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) for α-thal deletions on DNA extracted from the CVS showed the presence of a homozygous α(0)-thal - -(SEA) (Southeast Asian) deletion. The husband was found to be a carrier of the α(+)-thal -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion. Non paternity was excluded by fluorescent PCR using short tandem repeat (STR) markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. A de novo terminal deletion of chromosome 16 was excluded by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Detection of uniparental disomy (UPD), using STR markers on chromosome 16 showed maternal uniparental isodisomy from 16pter to 16p13.2, and uniparental heterodisomy from 16p13.13 to 16qter. PMID:26574185

  9. Recombinant chromosome 7 in a mosaic 45,X/47,XXX patient.

    PubMed

    Tirado, Carlos A; Gotway, Garrett; Torgbe, Emmanuel; Iyer, Santha; Dallaire, Stephanie; Appleberry, Taylor; Suterwala, Mohamed; Garcia, Rolando; Valdez, Federico; Patel, Sangeeta; Koduru, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with pericentric inversions are at risk for producing offspring with chromosomal gains and losses, while those carrying paracentric inversions usually produce unviable gametes [Madan, 1995]. In this current study, we present a newborn with dysmorphic features and malformations, whose karyotype showed an abnormal copy of chromomosome 7 described at first as add(7)(q32) as well as mos 45,X/47,XXX. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed an interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 7 involving bands q35 to q36.3 but retaining the 7q subtelomere. The patient's deletion is believed to be due to meiotic recombination in the inversion loop in the phenotypically normal father who seems to carry two paracentric inversions in the long arm of chromosome 7, which was described as rec(7)(7pter- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter)pat. The abnormal copy of chromosome 7 in the father has been described as: der(7)(7pter- > q22.1::q36.3- > q35::q22.1- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter). This is a unique karyotype that to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature and predisposes to meiotic recombination that can result in deletions or duplications of 7q35-36.

  10. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  11. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  12. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  13. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  14. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Array-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent’s 180 K microarray platform. Results Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. Conclusion This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. PMID:25016475

  16. Enhancing Genome-Wide Copy Number Variation Identification by High Density Array CGH Using Diverse Resources of Pig Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiying; Jiang, Jicai; Wang, Haifei; Kang, Huimin; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are important forms of genomic variation, and have attracted extensive attentions in humans as well as domestic animals. In the study, using a custom-designed 2.1 M array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), genome-wide CNVs were identified among 12 individuals from diverse pig breeds, including one Asian wild population, six Chinese indigenous breeds and two modern commercial breeds (Yorkshire and Landrace), with one individual of the other modern commercial breed, Duroc, as the reference. A total of 1,344 CNV regions (CNVRs) were identified, covering 47.79 Mb (∼1.70%) of the pig genome. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 3.37 Kb to 1,319.0 Kb with a mean of 35.56 Kb and a median of 11.11 Kb. Compared with similar studies reported, most of the CNVRs (74.18%) were firstly identified in present study. In order to confirm these CNVRs, 21 CNVRs were randomly chosen to be validated by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and a high rate (85.71%) of confirmation was obtained. Functional annotation of CNVRs suggested that the identified CNVRs have important function, and may play an important role in phenotypic and production traits difference among various breeds. Our results are essential complementary to the CNV map in the pig genome, which will provide abundant genetic markers to investigate association studies between various phenotypes and CNVs in pigs. PMID:24475311

  17. Individual information beam broadcasting system using a PAL-SLM based CGH beam former for the location based information services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Shunichi; Itoh, Hideo; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuichi; Lin, Xin; Tokuda, Masamitsu

    2006-01-01

    As an implementation of ubiquitous information service environments, we have been researching location-based information service systems at indoor and short distance area. The system should provide adequate information services, which fit the user's attributes, such as language, knowledge level and the volume of information, what is so-called "Right now, Here, and for Me" information services. Keeping privacy and security of the user is an important issue. Spatial optical communication technique is used for the system because the technique is easy to implement a location- and direction-based communication system. Information broadcasting in an area can be realized by an omnidirectional modulated light emission. However, the omnidirectional beam causes spill out of secure information to others, and has lower energy conservation than a focused beam communication. In this paper, a new spatial optical information broadcasting system, which can focus modulated beams only to intended users. CGH (Computer Generated Hologram) technique on a SLM (Spatial Light Modulator) is proposed and demonstrated. The system is composed of a PAL-SLM (Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator), an eye-safe semiconductor laser or a semiconductor laser pumped YAG laser for the beam emitter, and an infrared video camera with an infrared LED illuminator for user locator. Experimental results of beam deflecting characteristics are described on beam uniformity, deflecting angle and the enhancement, communication characteristics, and real time tracking of user with a corner-reflecting sheet.

  18. Human chromosome 22.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J C; Aurias, A; Julier, C; Prieur, M; Szajnert, M F

    1987-01-01

    The acrocentric chromosome 22, one of the shortest human chromosomes, carries about 52 000 kb of DNA. The short arm is made up essentially of heterochromatin and, as in other acrocentric chromosomes, it contains ribosomal RNA genes. Ten identified genes have been assigned to the long arm, of which four have already been cloned and documented (the cluster of lambda immunoglobulin genes, myoglobin, the proto-oncogene c-sis, bcr). In addition, about 10 anonymous DNA segments have been cloned from chromosome 22 specific DNA libraries. About a dozen diseases, including at least four different malignancies, are related to an inherited or acquired pathology of chromosome 22. They have been characterised at the phenotypic or chromosome level or both. In chronic myelogenous leukaemia, with the Ph1 chromosome, and Burkitt's lymphoma, with the t(8;22) variant translocation, the molecular pathology is being studied at the DNA level, bridging for the first time the gap between cytogenetics and molecular genetics. PMID:3550088

  19. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  20. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  1. Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) detects a large X chromosome deletion including FMR1, FMR2, and IDS in a female patient with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Probst, Frank J; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Enciso, Victoria B; Ou, Zhishuo; Cooper, M Lance; Eng, Patricia; Li, Jiangzhen; Gu, Yanghong; Stratton, Robert F; Chinault, A Craig; Shaw, Chad A; Sutton, V Reid; Cheung, Sau Wai; Nelson, David L

    2007-06-15

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new clinical test for the detection of well-characterized genomic disorders caused by chromosomal deletions and duplications that result in gene copy number variation (CNV). This powerful assay detects an abnormality in approximately 7-9% of patients with various clinical phenotypes, including mental retardation. We report here on the results found in a 6-year-old girl with mildly dysmorphic facies, obesity, and marked developmental delay. CMA was requested and showed a heterozygous loss in copy number with clones derived from the genomic region cytogenetically defined as Xq27.3-Xq28. This loss was not cytogenetically visible but was seen on FISH analysis with clones from the region. Further studies confirmed a loss of one copy each of the FMR1, FMR2, and IDS genes (which are mutated in Fragile X syndrome, FRAXE syndrome, and Hunter syndrome, respectively). Skewed X-inactivation has been previously reported in girls with deletions in this region and can lead to a combined Fragile X/Hunter syndrome phenotype in affected females. X-inactivation and iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme activity were therefore examined. X-inactivation was found to be random in the child's peripheral leukocytes, and IDS enzyme activity was approximately half of the normal value. This case demonstrates the utility of CMA both for detecting a submicroscopic chromosomal deletion and for suggesting further testing that could possibly lead to therapeutic options for patients with developmental delay.

  2. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  3. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    PubMed

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  4. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  5. Quantitative analysis of chromosome condensation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Boryana; Dehler, Sascha; Kruitwagen, Tom; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Haering, Christian H

    2013-03-01

    Chromosomes undergo extensive conformational rearrangements in preparation for their segregation during cell divisions. Insights into the molecular mechanisms behind this still poorly understood condensation process require the development of new approaches to quantitatively assess chromosome formation in vivo. In this study, we present a live-cell microscopy-based chromosome condensation assay in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By automatically tracking the three-dimensional distance changes between fluorescently marked chromosome loci at high temporal and spatial resolution, we analyze chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis and deduct defined parameters to describe condensation dynamics. We demonstrate that this method can determine the contributions of condensin, topoisomerase II, and Aurora kinase to mitotic chromosome condensation. We furthermore show that the assay can identify proteins required for mitotic chromosome formation de novo by isolating mutants in condensin, DNA polymerase ε, and F-box DNA helicase I that are specifically defective in pro-/metaphase condensation. Thus, the chromosome condensation assay provides a direct and sensitive system for the discovery and characterization of components of the chromosome condensation machinery in a genetically tractable eukaryote.

  6. The unique sex chromosome system in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Smith, M A; Rens, W

    2010-10-01

    A striking example of the power of chromosome painting has been the resolution of the male platypus karyotype and the pairing relationships of the chain often sex chromosomes. We have extended our analysis to the nine sex chromosomes of the male echidna. Cross-species painting with platypus shows that the first five chromosomes in the chain are identical in both, but the order of the remainder are different and, in each species, a different autosome replaces one of the five X chromosomes. As the therian X is homologous mainly to platypus autosome 6 and echidna 16, and as SRY is absent in both, the sex determination mechanism in monotremes is currently unknown. Several of the X and Y chromosomes contain genes orthologous to those in the avian Z but the significance of this is also unknown. It seems likely that a novel testis determinant is carried by a Y chromosome common to platypus and echidna. We have searched for candidates for this determinant among the many genes known to be involved in vertebrate sex differentiation. So far fourteen such genes have been mapped, eleven are autosomal in platypus, two map to the differential regions of X chromosomes, and one maps to a pairing segment and is likewise excluded. Search for the platypus testis-determining gene continues, and the extension of comparative mapping between platypus and birds and reptiles may shed light on the ancestral origin of monotreme sex chromosomes. PMID:21250543

  7. Association of heteromorphism of chromosome 9 and recurrent abortion (ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Mirzaee, Salmeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal disorders are the most common cause of first trimester spontaneous abortion. Among the human chromosomes, chromosome no.9 was the most common structural chromosomal variant and it is not thought to be of any functional importance, which often considers as a normal variation in structural polymorphisms, nevertheless there are some studies which claim that there is an association between heteromorphism of chromosome no.9 and some pregnancy complication. Case: To postulate any correlation between chromosome no. 9 heteromorphism and recurrent abortion, chromosomal analysis was performed on the basis of G-banding technique at high resolution for a couple with the history of 4 ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum and Chromosome constitution appeared with chromosome no.9 heteromorphism in all 30 metaphases screened for both partners (9p11-q13). Conclusion: Observation of reproductive failure in couples with heteromorohic pattern of chromosome no.9 suggests that, although the heteromorphism of chromosome no.9 is not a rare condition which often consider as a normal variation with no evidence of any phenotypic effect of patient, nevertheless it seems as if the location of heteromorphic region maybe interfere with meiotic events like the phenomenon of crossing over or miotic segregation of fertilized egg that eventually lead to the development of fertilized eggs with chromosomal abnormalities leading to the possibility of anemberyonic pregnancy, therefore chromosomal analysis for detecting of chromosome no.9 heteromorphism for couples with the history of ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum will be strongly suggested. PMID:25031581

  8. Progress towards complete genetic and physical maps of chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, S.L.; Munoz, C.; Badura, M.

    1994-09-01

    Human chromosome 3 contains 210 million base pairs and approximately 7,000 genes. Our center is directed towards making genetic and physical maps of chromosome 3 with the goal of a YAC contig of the chromosome and 2500 STSs. Markers are first binned into 23 regions of chromosome 3 using framework somatic cell hybrids. To date, STSs for 259 microsatellite and 63 genes have been placed into bins. 125 polymorphic simple sequences repeat (SSR) markers were genetically mapped to chromosome 3 using PCR-based genotyping of the CEPH reference families. This genetic map spans 271 cM (sex averaged). A chromosome 3-specific radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid panels has been constructed to obtain higher resolution map order information. With the map locations of these markers as a guide, 226 loci were screened using PCR-based hierarchial screening of the CEPH Mark I and Mark IV-VII yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries. YAC contigs which are ordered on the chromosome consist of 33 multi-locus contigs covering 80 cM and single locus contigs accounting for 62 cM. We have isolated approximately 1000 YACs by this method covering 65% of chromosome 3. IRS-PCR screening of the CEPH YAC library has yielded several thousand more chromosome 3 YACs which are being screened with the STSs to integrate them into contigs. FISH analysis on a random sampling of 60 YACs from the long arm was performed to assess the degree of chimerism. 40% of the YACs hybridized to the map locations predicted by the STSs used in their isolation. 30% were obviously chimeric while 40% hybridized uniquely to the predicted region as well as nonspecifically to centromeres and telomeres. This integrated approach to constructing a map of chromosome 3 will result in a reliably ordered YAC contig for this chromosome.

  9. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  10. Monosomy of chromosome 17 in breast cancer during interpretation of HER2 gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Nottegar, Alessia; Bogina, Giuseppe; Caliò, Anna; Cima, Luca; Eccher, Albino; Vicentini, Caterina; Marcolini, Lisa; Scarpa, Aldo; Pedron, Serena; Brunello, Eleonora; Knuutila, Sakari; Sapino, Anna; Marchiò, Caterina; Bria, Emilio; Molino, Annamaria; Carbognin, Luisa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Jasani, Bharat; Miller, Keith; Merdol, Ibrahim; Zanatta, Lucia; Laurino, Licia; Wirtanen, Tiina; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Marconi, Marcella; Chilosi, Marco; Manfrin, Erminia; Martignoni, Guido; Bonetti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Monosomy of chromosome 17 may affect the assessment of HER2 amplification. Notably, the prevalence ranges from 1% up to 49% due to lack of consensus in recognition. We sought to investigate the impact of monosomy of chromosome 17 to interpretation of HER2 gene status. 201 breast carcinoma were reviewed for HER2 gene amplification and chromosome 17 status. FISH analysis was performed by using double probes (LSI/CEP). Absolute gene copy number was also scored per each probe. HER2 FISH test was repeated on serial tissue sections, ranging in thickness from 3 to 20 µm. Ratio was scored and subsequently corrected by monosomy after gold control test using the aCGH method to overcome false interpretation due to artefactual nuclear truncation. HER2 immunotests was performed on all cases. 26/201 cases were amplified (13%). Single signals per CEP17 were revealed in 7/201 (3.5%) cases. Five out of 7 cases appeared monosomic with aCGH (overall, 5/201, 2.5%) and evidenced single signals in >60% of nuclei after second-look on FISH when matching both techniques. Among 5, one case showed amplification with a pattern 7/1 (HER2/CEP17>2) of copies (3+ at immunotest); three cases revealed single signals per both probes (LSI/CEP=1) and one case revealed a 3:1 ratio; all last 4 cases showed 0/1+ immunoscore. We concluded that: 1) monosomy of chromosome 17 may be observed in 2.5% of breast carcinoma; 2) monosomy of chromosome 17 due to biological reasons rather than nuclear truncation was observed when using the cut-off of 60% of nuclei harboring single signals; 3) the skewing of the ratio due to single centromeric 17 probe may lead to false positive evaluation; 4) breast carcinomas showing a 3:1 ratio (HER2/CEP17) usually show negative 0/1+ immunoscore and <6 gene copy number at FISH. PMID:26328251

  11. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  12. Method and apparatus for fringe-scanning chromosome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Norgren, R.M.; Gray, J.W.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1983-08-31

    Apparatus and method are provided for analyzing sub-micron-sized features of microscopic particles. Two central features of the invention are (1) constraining microscopic particles to flow with substantially constant orientation through a predetermined interference fringe pattern, and (2) estimating particle structure by analyzing its fringe profile. The invention allows nearly an order of magnitude higher resolution of chromosome structure than possible with currently available flow system techniques. The invention allows rapid and accurate flow karyotyping of chromosomes.

  13. Method and apparatus for fringe-scanning chromosome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Norgren, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method are provided for analyzing sub-micron-sized features of microscopic particles. Two central features of the invention are (1) constraining microscopic particles to flow with substantially constant orientation through a predetermined interference fringe pattern, and (2) estimating particle structure by analyzing its fringe profile. The invention allows nearly an order of magnitude higher resolution of chromosome structure than possible with currently available flow system techniques. The invention allows rapid and accurate flow karyotyping of chromosomes.

  14. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  15. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D.

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  16. Y chromosome azoospermia factor region microdeletions and transmission characteristics in azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Wei, Zhen-Tong; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Song-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential reproductive process that is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are located in a specific region known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF) in the long arm of the human Y chromosome. AZF microdeletions are recognized as the most frequent structural chromosomal abnormalities and are the major cause of male infertility. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) can overcome natural fertilization barriers and help a proportion of infertile couples produce children; however, these techniques increase the transmission risk of genetic defects. AZF microdeletions and their associated phenotypes in infertile males have been extensively studied, and different AZF microdeletion types have been identified by sequence-tagged site polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR), suspension array technology (SAT) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); however, each of these approaches has limitations that need to be overcome. Even though the transmission of AZF microdeletions has been reported worldwide, arguments correlating ART and the incidence of AZF microdeletions and explaining the occurrence of de novo deletions and expansion have not been resolved. Using the newest findings in the field, this review presents a systematic update concerning progress in understanding the functions of AZF regions and their associated genes, AZF microdeletions and their phenotypes and novel approaches for screening AZF microdeletions. Moreover, the transmission characteristics of AZF microdeletions and the future direction of research in the field will be specifically discussed. PMID:26628946

  17. Mapping pachytene chromosomes of coffee using a modified protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Iacia, Ana Amélia Sanchez; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most direct method for physically mapping DNA sequences on chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of meiotic chromosomes during the pachytene stage is an important tool in plant cytogenetics, because it provides high-resolution measurements of physical distances. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of coffee pachytene chromosomes offers significant advantages compared with FISH mapping of somatic chromosomes, because pachytene chromosomes are 30 times longer and provide additional cytological markers. However, the application of this technique to pachytene chromosomes has been complicated by problems in making preparations of meiotic chromosomes and by difficulties in the application of standard FISH protocols. We have been able to overcome most of these obstacles in applying the FISH technique to the pachytene chromosomes of coffee plants. Digesting the external callose layer surrounding the pollen mother cells (PMCs) in conjunction with other procedures permitted suitable pachytene chromosomes to be obtained by increasing cell permeability, which allowed the probe sequences to enter the cells. For the first time, hybridization signals were registered on coffee pachytene chromosomes using the FISH technique with a repetitive sequence as a probe. We obtained slides on which 80 % of the PMCs had hybridization signals, resulting in FISH labelling with high efficiency. The procedure does not seem to be dependent on the genotype, because hybridization signals were detected in genetically different coffee plants. These findings enhance the possibilities for high-resolution physical mapping of coffee chromosomes. PMID:24244840

  18. Two siblings with alternate unbalanced recombinants derived from a large cryptic maternal pericentric inversion of chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Descipio, Cheryl; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Conlin, Laura K; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Coplan, James; Riethman, Harold; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2010-02-01

    Two brothers, with dissimilar clinical features, were each found to have different abnormalities of chromosome 20 by subtelomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The proband had deletion of 20p subtelomere and duplication of 20q subtelomere, while his brother was found to have a duplication of 20p subtelomere and deletion of 20q subtelomere. Parental cytogenetic studies were initially thought to be normal, both by G-banding and by subtelomere FISH analysis. Since chromosome 20 is a metacentric chromosome and an inversion was suspected, we used anchored FISH to assist in identifying a possible inversion. This approach employed concomitant hybridization of a FISH probe to the short (p) arm of chromosome 20 with the 20q subtelomere probe. We identified a cytogenetically non-visible, mosaic pericentric inversion of one of the maternal chromosome 20 homologs, providing a mechanistic explanation for the chromosomal abnormalities present in these brothers. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with both a custom-made BAC and cosmid-based subtelomere specific array (TEL array) and a commercially available SNP-based array confirmed and further characterized these rearrangements, identifying this as the largest pericentric inversion of chromosome 20 described to date. TEL array data indicate that the 20p breakpoint is defined by BAC RP11-978M13, approximately 900 kb from the pter; SNP array data reveal this breakpoint to occur within BAC RP11-978M13. The 20q breakpoint is defined by BAC RP11-93B14, approximately 1.7 Mb from the qter, by TEL array; SNP array data refine this breakpoint to within a gap between BACs on the TEL array (i.e., between RP11-93B14 and proximal BAC RP11-765G16).

  19. An interstitial, apparently-balanced chromosomal insertion in the etiology of Langer-Giedion syndrome in an Asian family.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Joo; Ko, Jung Min; Seo, Myung-Eui; Choi, Jin-Sun; Oh, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jane; Kim, Eunhyun; Moon, Jennifer E; Choi, In Ho; Lee, Charles; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Park, Woong-Yang

    2013-10-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS; MIM 150230), also called trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II (TRPS2), is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a one-copy deletion in the chromosome 8q23-q24 region, spanning the genes TRPS1 and EXT1. We identified an LGS family with two affected and two unaffected siblings from unaffected parents. To investigate the etiology of recurrence of LGS in this family, array CGH was performed on all family members. We identified a 7.29 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome region 8q23-q24 in the two affected siblings, but no such deletion in the unaffected family members. However, the mother and one of the two unaffected siblings carried a 1.29 Mb deletion at chromosome region 8q24.1, sharing the distal breakpoint with the larger deleted segment found in the affected siblings. Another unaffected sibling had a 6.0 Mb duplication, sharing the proximal breakpoint of the deletion in the affected siblings. Karyotypic and FISH analyses in the unaffected mother revealed an insertional translocation of 8q23-q24 genomic material into chromosome 13: 46,XX,ins(13;8)(q33;q23q24). This insertional translocation in the mother results in the recurrence of LGS in this family, highlighting the importance of submicroscopic rearrangements in the genetic counseling for LGS.

  20. Microarray delineation of familial chromosomal imbalance with deletion 5q35 and duplication 10q25 in a child showing multiple anomalies and dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Masri, Amira; Gimelli, Stefania; Hamamy, Hanan; Sloan-Béna, Frédérique

    2014-05-01

    We describe a 6-month-old female with developmental delay, hypotonia, supernumerary nipples, and distinct craniofacial features. Postnatal chromosome analysis revealed an unbalanced karyotype involving a der (5) and array-CGH defined two unbalanced regions with partial 2.3 Mb deletion of 5q35.3 in combination with a large 19.5 Mb duplication of chromosome 10 from q25.3 to q26.3. Parental karyotyping analysis showed that the father was carrier of a balanced t(5;10)(q35;q25). Two cousins of the proband with similar facial features had the same unbalanced karyotype with presence of the der (5) inherited from the malsegregation of the familial translocation. Additionally, three siblings (two deceased and one abortion) manifested a more severe phenotype including congenital heart defect, cleft palate, and agenesis of the corpus callosum and were diagnosed with unbalanced karyotypes inherited from the familial balanced translocation. PMID:24478242

  1. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a 4p15.1-pter duplication and a 4q35.1-qter deletion in a recombinant of chromosome 4 pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Maurin, M-L; Labrune, P; Brisset, S; Le Lorc'h, M; Pineau, D; Castel, C; Romana, S; Tachdjian, G

    2009-02-01

    To date, 10 cases of recombinant of chromosome 4 pericentric inversion involving sub-bands p14p15 and q35 have been described. We report on the first case analyzed using array-CGH in a female infant presenting psychomotor and growth retardation, facial anomalies, axial hypotonia, short neck, wide spaced nipples and cardiac defects. Conventional karyotype associated to FISH revealed a recombinant chromosome 4 with partial 4p duplication and 4q deletion derived from a paternal pericentric inversion. Array-CGH allowed us to precise rec4 breakpoints: the proposita carried a small 4.82-4.97 Mb 4q35.1 terminal deletion and a large 35.3-36.7 Mb 4p15.1 terminal duplication. Duplications of the distal 2/3 of short arm of chromosome 4 give rise to recognizable craniofacial features but no specific visceral malformation. A contrario small terminal 4q deletions are associated with cardiac defects. This case and review of literature suggest that two genes ArgBP2 and PDLIM3, located at 4q35.1 and both involved in cardiac and muscle development, could be responsible for cardiac defects observed in terminal 4q35.1 deletions.

  2. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  3. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  4. 2013 CGH Awardees

    Cancer.gov

    The National cancer institute, CENTER FOR GLOBAL HEALTH, in collaboration with the OFFICE OF CANCER CENTERS, is pleased to announce the 2013 awardees of the Request for Proposals for Pilot Collaborations with Low- and Mid-Income Countries (LMICs) in Global Cancer Research or Global Health Research at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers.  In 2013, the Center for Global Health and the Office of Cancer Centers developed a funding opportunity to promote research collaborations between NCI-Designated Cancer Centers with institutions in LMICs.

  5. Mitotic chromosome structure and condensation.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Andrew S

    2006-12-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure has been the cell biology equivalent of a 'riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma'. Observations that genetic knockout or knockdown of condensin subunits or topoisomerase II cause only minimal perturbation in overall chromosome condensation, together with analysis of early stages of chromosome condensation and effects produced by histone H1 depletion, suggest a need to reconsider textbook models of mitotic chromosome condensation and organization. PMID:17046228

  6. Chromosome Banding in Amphibia. XXXII. The Genus Xenopus (Anura, Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes of 16 species of the frog genus Xenopus were prepared from kidney and lung cell cultures. In the chromosomes of 7 species, high-resolution replication banding patterns could be induced by treating the cultures with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT) in succession, and in 6 of these species the BrdU/dT-banded chromosomes could be arranged into karyotypes. In the 3 species of the clade with 2n = 20 and 4n = 40 chromosomes (X. tropicalis, X. epitropicalis, X. new tetraploid 1), as well as in the 3 species with 4n = 36 chromosomes (X. laevis, X. borealis, X. muelleri), the BrdU/dT-banded karyotypes show a high degree of homoeology, though differences were detected between these groups. Translocations, inversions, insertions or sex-specific replication bands were not observed. Minor replication asynchronies found between chromosomes probably involve heterochromatic regions. BrdU/dT replication banding of Xenopus chromosomes provides the landmarks necessary for the exact physical mapping of genes and repetitive sequences. FISH with an X. laevis 5S rDNA probe detected multiple hybridization sites at or near the long-arm telomeric regions in most chromosomes of X. laevis and X. borealis, whereas in X. muelleri, the 5S rDNA sequences are located exclusively at the long-arm telomeres of a single chromosome pair. Staining with the AT base pair-specific fluorochrome quinacrine mustard revealed brightly fluorescing heterochromatic regions in the majority of X. borealis chromosomes which are absent in other Xenopus species. PMID:26112092

  7. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  8. Karyotyping Human Chromosomes by Optical and X-Ray Ptychography Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shemilt, Laura; Verbanis, Ephanielle; Schwenke, Joerg; Estandarte, Ana K.; Xiong, Gang; Harder, Ross; Parmar, Neha; Yusuf, Mohammed; Zhang, Fucai; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-01-01

    Sorting and identifying chromosomes, a process known as karyotyping, is widely used to detect changes in chromosome shapes and gene positions. In a karyotype the chromosomes are identified by their size and therefore this process can be performed by measuring macroscopic structural variables. Chromosomes contain a specific number of basepairs that linearly correlate with their size; therefore, it is possible to perform a karyotype on chromosomes using their mass as an identifying factor. Here, we obtain the first images, to our knowledge, of chromosomes using the novel imaging method of ptychography. We can use the images to measure the mass of chromosomes and perform a partial karyotype from the results. We also obtain high spatial resolution using this technique with synchrotron source x-rays. PMID:25650937

  9. Casein kinase II promotes target silencing by miRISC through direct phosphorylation of the DEAD-box RNA helicase CGH-1

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Amelia F.; Khivansara, Vishal; Han, Ting; Freeberg, Mallory A.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Montoye, Eric; Yates, John R.; Karp, Xantha; Kim, John K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential, conserved roles in diverse developmental processes through association with the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). Whereas fundamental insights into the mechanistic framework of miRNA biogenesis and target gene silencing have been established, posttranslational modifications that affect miRISC function are less well understood. Here we report that the conserved serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II (CK2), promotes miRISC function in Caenorhabditis elegans. CK2 inactivation results in developmental defects that phenocopy loss of miRISC cofactors and enhances the loss of miRNA function in diverse cellular contexts. Whereas CK2 is dispensable for miRNA biogenesis and the stability of miRISC cofactors, it is required for efficient miRISC target mRNA binding and silencing. Importantly, we identify the conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase, CGH-1/DDX6, as a key CK2 substrate within miRISC and demonstrate phosphorylation of a conserved N-terminal serine is required for CGH-1 function in the miRNA pathway. PMID:26669440

  10. Random DNA fragmentation allows detection of single-copy, single-exon alterations of copy number by oligonucleotide array CGH in clinical FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Galen; Kim, Su Young; Savage, Stephanie; Gooden, Gerald C; Barrett, Michael; Zhang, Jian; Alla, Lalitamba; Watanabe, April; Einspahr, Janine; Prasad, Anil; Nickoloff, Brian J; Carpten, John; Trent, Jeffrey; Alberts, David; Bittner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Genomic technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), increasingly offer definitive gene dosage profiles in clinical samples. Historically, copy number profiling was limited to large fresh-frozen tumors where intact DNA could be readily extracted. Genomic analyses of pre-neoplastic tumors and diagnostic biopsies are often limited to DNA processed by formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedding (FFPE). We present specialized protocols for DNA extraction and processing from FFPE tissues utilizing DNase processing to generate randomly fragmented DNA. The protocols are applied to FFPE clinical samples of varied tumor types, from multiple institutions and of varied block age. Direct comparative analyses with regression coefficient were calculated on split-sample (portion fresh/portion FFPE) of colorectal tumor samples. We show equal detection of a homozygous loss of SMAD4 at the exon-level in the SW480 cell line and gene-specific alterations in the split tumor samples. aCGH application to a set of archival FFPE samples of skin squamous cell carcinomas detected a novel hemizygous deletion in INPP5A on 10q26.3. Finally we present data on derivative of log ratio, a particular sensitive detector of measurement variance, for 216 sequential hybridizations to assess protocol reliability over a wide range of FFPE samples.

  11. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    PubMed

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in a recombinant chromosome.

    PubMed

    Berend, Sue Ann; Bodamer, Olaf A F; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bacino, Carlos A

    2002-05-15

    Familial complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare and tend to involve fewer breakpoints and fewer chromosomes than CCRs that are de novo in origin. We report on a CCR identified in a child with congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Initially, the child's karyotype was thought to involve a straightforward three-way translocation between chromosomes 3, 8, and 16. However, after analyzing the mother's chromosomes, the mother was found to have a more complex rearrangement that resulted in a recombinant chromosome in the child. The mother's karyotype included an inverted chromosome 2 and multiple translocations involving chromosomes 3, 5, 8, and 16. No evidence of deletion or duplication that could account for the clinical findings in the child was identified.

  13. Microgravitational effects on chromosome behavior (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, Carlo

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the two major space-related conditions, microgravity and radiation, on the maintenance and transmission of genetic information have been partially documented in many organisms. Specifically, microgravity acts at the chromosomal level, primarily on the structure and segregation of chromosomes, in producing major abberations such as deletions, breaks, nondisjunction, and chromosome loss, and to a lesser degree, cosmic radiation appears to affect the genic level, producing point mutations and DNA damage. To distinguish between the effects from microgravity and from radiation, it is necessary to monitor both mitotic and meiotic genetic damage in the same organism. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used to monitor at high resolution the frequency of chromosome loss, nondisjunction, intergenic recombination, and gene mutation in mitotic and meiotic cells, to a degree impossible in other organisms. Because the yeast chromosomes are small, sensitive measurements can be made that can be extrapolated to higher organisms and man. The objectives of the research are: (1) to quantitate the effects of microgravity and its synergism with cosmic radiation on chromosomal integrity and transmission during mitosis and meiosis; (2) to discriminate between chromosomal processes sensitive to microgravity and/or radiation during mitosis and meiosis; and (3) to relate these findings to anomalous mitotic mating type switching and ascosporogenesis following meiosis.

  14. Balanced Chromosomal Rearrangement in Recurrent Spontaneous Abortions: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Farhoodi, Zeinab; Amel, Roya; Mirzaee, Salmeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    One of the major causes of spontaneous abortion before the fourth month of pregnancy is chromosomal abnormalities. We report an unusual case of a familial balanced chromosomal translocation in a consanguineous couple who experienced 4 spontaneous abortions. Chromosomal studies were performed on the basis of G-banding technique at high resolution and revealed 46, XX, t (16; 6) (p12; q26) and 46, XY, t (16; 6) (p12; q26) in both partners, which induced such pregnancy complications. Chromosomal balanced translocation is one of the most common causes of recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA). In such cases prenatal diagnosis (PND) during the 16th week of gestation is strongly recommended. PMID:24551782

  15. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  16. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the 'chromosome cycle'. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice 'progressive' chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are 'segregation forks' in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the 'nucleoid administration' system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle.

  17. Chromosomal localization of genes by scanning electron microscopy using in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes: Y chromosome repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, D J; Burns, J; Harrison, D; Jonasson, J A; McGee, J O

    1986-05-01

    The feasibility of using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to identify the position of specific DNA sequences was examined using a Y chromosome 'specific' probe (pHY2.1). Tests were carried out on chromosome spreads hybridized in situ with biotinylated pHY2.1. Chromosomal sites of hybridization of the probe were localized by an indirect immunohistochemical procedure which resulted in a gold product which could be amplified by silver precipitation. In the SEM, the specific location of the probe was easily identified due to the enhanced signal produced by the gold-silver complex. The probe was localized both on the long arm of the Y chromosome and within interphase nuclei. It was found that SEM was more sensitive than light microscopy since the probe could be identified without silver amplification. With refinements to the technique, SEM could provide a useful method for high resolution localizing of unique DNA sequences (i.e. single copy genes). PMID:3528066

  18. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  19. Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution.

  20. Construction of human chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M K; Shero, J H; Cheung, M C; Kan, Y W; Hieter, P A; Antonarakis, S E

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) have been constructed by a method that performs all steps in agarose, allowing size selection by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the use of nanogram to microgram quantities of DNA. The DNA sources used were hybrid cell line WAV-17, containing chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome and flow-sorted chromosome 21. The transformation efficiency of ligation products was similar to that obtained in aqueous transformations and yielded YACs with sizes ranging from 100 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1 megabase when polyamines were included in the transformation procedure. Twenty-five YACs containing human DNA have been obtained from a mouse-human hybrid, ranging in size from 200 to greater than 1000 kb, with an average size of 410 kb. Ten of these YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 21 by hybridization of RNA probes (corresponding to the YAC ends recovered in Escherichia coli) to a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNA. Twenty-one human YACs, ranging in size from 100 to 500 kb, with an average size of 150 kb, were obtained from approximately equal to 50 ng of flow-sorted chromosome 21 DNA. Three were localized to subregions of chromosome 21. YACs will aid the construction of a physical map of human chromosome 21 and the study of disorders associated with chromosome 21 such as Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

  1. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  2. The potential of 3D-FISH and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for studies of 3D nuclear architecture: 3D structured illumination microscopy of defined chromosomal structures visualized by 3D (immuno)-FISH opens new perspectives for studies of nuclear architecture.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Fiedler, Susanne; Schmid, Volker J; Schermelleh, Lothar; Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) has opened up new possibilities to study nuclear architecture at the ultrastructural level down to the ~100 nm range. We present first results and assess the potential using 3D-SIM in combination with 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) for the topographical analysis of defined nuclear targets. Our study also deals with the concern that artifacts produced by FISH may counteract the gain in resolution. We address the topography of DAPI-stained DNA in nuclei before and after 3D-FISH, nuclear pores and the lamina, chromosome territories, chromatin domains, and individual gene loci. We also look at the replication patterns of chromocenters and the topographical relationship of Xist-RNA within the inactive X-territory. These examples demonstrate that an appropriately adapted 3D-FISH/3D-SIM approach preserves key characteristics of the nuclear ultrastructure and that the gain in information obtained by 3D-SIM yields new insights into the functional nuclear organization. PMID:22508100

  3. Association of structural and numerical anomalies of chromosome 22 in a patient with syndromic intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Naoufal, Rania; Legendre, Marine; Couet, Dominique; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kitzis, Alain; Bilan, Frederic; Harbuz, Radu

    2016-09-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is now widely adopted as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test for patients with developmental delay (DD)/intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorders, and multiple congenital anomalies. Nevertheless, classic karyotyping still has its impact in diagnosing genetic diseases, particularly mosaic cases. We report on a 30 year old patient with syndromic intellectual disability, a 22q13.2 microdeletion and mosaic trisomy 22. The patient had the following clinical features: intrauterine growth retardation at birth, hypotonia, cryptorchidism, facial asymmetry, enophthalmus, mild prognathism, bifid uvula, hypoplastic upper limb phalanges, DD including speech delay, and ID. Whole genome aCGH showed a de novo 1 Mb interstitial heterozygous deletion in 22q13.2, confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in all cells examined. Moreover, 18% cells had an extra chromosome 22 suggesting a trisomy 22 mosaicism. Almost all 22q13 deletions published so far have been terminal deletions with variable sizes (100 kb to over 9 Mb). Very few cases of interstitial 22q13.2 deletions were reported. In its mosaic form, trisomy 22 is compatible with life, and there are about 20 reports in the literature. It has a variable clinical presentation: growth restriction, dysmorphic features, cardiovascular abnormalities, hemihyperplasia, genitourinary tract anomalies and ID. Neurodevelopmental outcome ranges from normal to severe DD. The patient presents clinical features that are common to both the interstitial 22q13 deletion and the mosaic trisomy 22; characteristics related to the interstitial deletion alone and others explained solely by the mosaic trisomy. Our case points out the role of conventional cytogenetic tools in mosaic cases that could be missed by microarray technology. We therefore suggest the combination of both conventional and molecular karyotyping in the investigation of certain genetic diseases. PMID:27452446

  4. Radiation hybrid map of barley chromosome 3H

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assembly of the barley genome is complicated by its large size (5.1 Gb) and proportion of repetitive elements (84%). This process is facilitated by high resolution maps for aligning BAC contigs along chromosomes. Available genetic maps; however, do not provide accurate information on the physical po...

  5. Identification and molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel complex Y chromosome rearrangement in a boy with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Goud, Ch Venkateshwar; Hoefers, Christiane; Hagemann, Monika; Dalal, Ashwin

    2013-05-01

    Ambiguous genitalia or disorder of the sexual development is a birth defect where the external genitals do not have the typical appearance of either a male or female. Here we report a boy with ambiguous genitalia and short stature. The cytogenetic analysis by G-banding revealed a small Y chromosome and an additional material on the 15p arm. Further, molecular cytogenetic analysis by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome paint probes showed the presence of Y sequences on the 15p arm, confirming that it is a Y;15 translocation. Subsequent, FISH with centromere probe Y showed two signals depicting the presence of two centromeres and differing with a balanced translocation. The dicentric nature of the derivative 15 chromosome was confirmed by FISH with both 15 and Y centromeric probes. Further, the delineation of the Y chromosomal DNA was also done by quantitative real time PCR. Additional Y-short tandem repeat typing was performed to find out the extent of deletion on small Y chromosome. Fine mapping was carried out with 8 Y specific BAC clones which helped in defining the breakpoint regions. MLPA was performed to check the presence or absence of subtelomeric regions and SHOX regions on Y. Finally array CGH helped us in confirming the breakpoint regions. In our study we identified and characterized a novel complex Y chromosomal rearrangement with a complete deletion of the Yq region and duplication of the Yp region with one copy being translocated onto the15p arm. This is the first report of novel and unique Y complex rearrangement showing a deletion, duplication and a translocation in the same patient. The possible mechanism of the rearrangement and the phenotype-genotype correlation are discussed.

  6. Formation of Nup98-containing nuclear bodies in HeLa sublines is linked to genomic rearrangements affecting chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Romana, Serge; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Doye, Valérie; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude

    2016-09-01

    Nup98 is an important component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and also a rare but recurrent target for chromosomal translocation in leukaemogenesis. Nup98 contains multiple cohesive Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly (GLFG) repeats that are critical notably for the formation of intranuclear GLFG bodies. Previous studies have reported the existence of GLFG bodies in cells overexpressing exogenous Nup98 or in a HeLa subline (HeLa-C) expressing an unusual elevated amount of endogenous Nup98. Here, we have analysed the presence of Nup98-containing bodies in several human cell lines. We found that HEp-2, another HeLa subline, contains GLFG bodies that are distinct from those identified in HeLa-C. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) revealed that HEp-2 cells express additional truncated forms of Nup98 fused to a non-coding region of chromosome 11q22.1. Cytogenetic analyses using FISH and array-CGH further revealed chromosomal rearrangements that were distinct from those observed in leukaemic cells. Indeed, HEp-2 cells feature a massive amplification of juxtaposed NUP98 and 11q22.1 loci on a chromosome marker derived from chromosome 3. Unexpectedly, minor co-amplifications of NUP98 and 11q22.1 loci were also observed in other HeLa sublines, but on rearranged chromosomes 11. Altogether, this study reveals that distinct genomic rearrangements affecting NUP98 are associated with the formation of GLFG bodies in specific HeLa sublines.

  7. Identification of Chromosome Abnormalities in Subtelomeric Regions by Microarray Analysis: A Study of 5,380 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lina; Shaw, Chad A.; Lu, Xin-Yan; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Li, Yinfeng; Neill, Sarah; Pursley, Amber N.; Chinault, A. Craig; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.

    2009-01-01

    Subtelomeric imbalances are a significant cause of congenital disorders. Screening for these abnormalities has traditionally utilized GTG-banding analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a relatively new technology that can identify microscopic and submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. It has been proposed that an array with extended coverage at subtelomeric regions could characterize subtelomeric aberrations more efficiently in a single experiment. The targeted arrays for chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), developed by Baylor College of Medicine, have on average 12 BAC/PAC clones covering 10 Mb of each of the 41 subtelomeric regions. We screened 5,380 consecutive clinical patients using CMA. The most common reasons for referral included developmental delay (DD), and/or mental retardation (MR), dysmorphic features (DF), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), seizure disorders (SD), and autistic, or other behavioral abnormalities. We found pathogenic rearrangements at subtelomeric regions in 236 patients (4.4%). Among these patients, 103 had a deletion, 58 had a duplication, 44 had an unbalanced translocation, and 31 had a complex rearrangement. The detection rates varied among patients with a normal karyotype analysis (2.98%), with an abnormal karyotype analysis (43.4%), and with an unavailable or no karyotype analysis (3.16%). Six patients out of 278 with a prior normal subtelomere-FISH analysis showed an abnormality including an interstitial deletion, two terminal deletions, two interstitial duplications, and a terminal duplication. In conclusion, genomic imbalances at subtelomeric regions contribute significantly to congenital disorders. Targeted array-CGH with extended coverage (up to 10 Mb) of subtelomeric regions will enhance the detection of subtelomeric imbalances, especially for submicroscopic imbalances. PMID

  8. Stretching the Rules: Monocentric Chromosomes with Multiple Centromere Domains

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum) chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3–5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel “meta-polycentric” functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function. PMID:22737088

  9. Sporadic male patients with intellectual disability: contribution of X-chromosome copy number variants.

    PubMed

    Isrie, M; Froyen, G; Devriendt, K; de Ravel, T; Fryns, J P; Vermeesch, J R; Van Esch, H

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization has become the first in line diagnostic tool in the clinical work-up of patients presenting with intellectual disability. As a result, chromosome X-copy number variations are frequently being detected in routine diagnostics. We retrospectively reviewed genome wide array-CGH data in order to determine the frequency and nature of chromosome X-copy number variations (X-CNV) in a cohort of 2222 sporadic male patients with intellectual disability (ID) referred to us for diagnosis. In this cohort, 68 males were found to have at least one X-CNV (3.1%). However, correct interpretation of causality remains a challenging task, and is essential for proper counseling, especially when the CNV is inherited. On the basis of these data, earlier experience and literature data we designed and propose an algorithm that can be used to evaluate the clinical relevance of X-CNVs detected in sporadic male ID patients. Applied to our cohort, 19 male ID patients (0.85%) were found to carry a (likely) pathogenic X-CNV.

  10. Chromosome assortment in Saccharum.

    PubMed

    Al-Janabi, S M; Honeycutt, R J; Sobral, B W

    1994-12-01

    Recent work has revealed random chromosome pairing and assortment in Saccharum spontaneum L., the most widely distributed, and morphologically and cytologically variable of the species of Saccharum. This conclusion was based on the analysis of a segregating population from across between S. spontaneum 'SES 208' and a spontaneously-doubled haploid of itself, derived from anther culture. To determine whether polysomic inheritance is common in Saccharum and whether it is observed in a typical biparental cross, we studied chromosome pairing and assortment in 44 progeny of a cross between euploid, meiotically regular, 2n=80 forms of Saccharum officinarum 'LA Purple' and Saccharum robustum ' Mol 5829'. Papuan 2n=80 forms of S. robustum have been suggested as the immediate progenitor species for cultivated sugarcane (S. officinarum). A total of 738 loci in LA Purple and 720 loci in Mol 5829 were amplified and typed in the progeny by arbitrarily primed PCR using 45 primers. Fifty and 33 single-dose polymorphisms were identified in the S. officinarum and S. robustum genomes, respectively (χ 2 at 98%). Linkage analysis of single-dose polymorphisms in both genomes revealed linkages in repulsion and coupling phases. In the S. officinarum genome, a map hypothesis gave 7 linkage groups with 17 linked and 33 unlinked markers. Four of 13 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase and 9 were in coupling phase. In the S. robustum genome, a map hypothesis gave 5 linkage groups, defined by 12 markers, with 21 markers unlinked, and 2 of 9 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase. Therefore, complete polysomic inheritance was not observed in either species, suggesting that chromosomal behavior is different from that observed by linkage analysis of over 500 markers in the S. spontaneum map. Implications of this finding for evolution and breeding are discussed.

  11. High Precision Metrology on the Ultra-Lightweight W 50.8 cm f/1.25 Parabolic SHARPI Primary Mirror using a CGH Null Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott

    2004-01-01

    For potential use on the SHARPI mission, Eastman Kodak has delivered a 50.8cm CA f/1.25 ultra-lightweight UV parabolic mirror with a surface figure error requirement of 6nm RMS. We address the challenges involved in verifying and mapping the surface error of this large lightweight mirror to +/-3nm using a diffractive CGH null lens. Of main concern is removal of large systematic errors resulting from surface deflections of the mirror due to gravity as well as smaller contributions from system misalignment and reference optic errors. We present our efforts to characterize these errors and remove their wavefront error contribution in post-processing as well as minimizing the uncertainty these calculations introduce. Data from Kodak and preliminary measurements from NASA Goddard will be included.

  12. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II)

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. Interestingly, we encountered variable minor malformations in his parents, confirming the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. There were no microdeletions or microduplications after performing array-CGH-analysis. We report what might be a constellation of unreported skeletal abnormalities in a child with OFD type II (Mohr syndrome). PMID:26566416

  13. Complex rearranged small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC), three new cases; evidence for an underestimated entity?

    PubMed Central

    Trifonov, Vladimir; Fluri, Simon; Binkert, Franz; Nandini, Adayapalam; Anderson, Jasen; Rodriguez, Laura; Gross, Madeleine; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Ewers, Elisabeth; Reich, Daniela; Weise, Anja; Liehr, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are present ~2.6 × 106 human worldwide. sSMC are a heterogeneous group of derivative chromosomes concerning their clinical consequences as well as their chromosomal origin and shape. Besides the sSMC present in Emanuel syndrome, i.e. der(22)t(11;22)(q23;q11), only few so-called complex sSMC are reported. Results Here we report three new cases of unique complex sSMC. One was a de novo case with a dic(13 or 21;22) and two were maternally derived: a der(18)t(8;18) and a der(13 or 21)t(13 or 21;18). Thus, in summary, now 22 cases of unique complex sSMC are available in the literature. However, this special kind of sSMC might be under-diagnosed among sSMC-carriers. Conclusion More comprehensive characterization of sSMC and approaches like reverse fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or array based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) might identify them to be more frequent than only ~0.9% among all sSMC. PMID:18471318

  14. Frequent deletion of the CDKN2A locus in chordoma: analysis of chromosomal imbalances using array comparative genomic hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Hallor, K H; Staaf, J; Jönsson, G; Heidenblad, M; Vult von Steyern, F; Bauer, H C F; IJszenga, M; Hogendoorn, P C W; Mandahl, N; Szuhai, K; Mertens, F

    2007-01-01

    The initiating somatic genetic events in chordoma development have not yet been identified. Most cytogenetically investigated chordomas have displayed near-diploid or moderately hypodiploid karyotypes, with several numerical and structural rearrangements. However, no consistent structural chromosome aberration has been reported. This is the first array-based study characterising DNA copy number changes in chordoma. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) identified copy number alterations in all samples and imbalances affecting 5 or more out of the 21 investigated tumours were seen on all chromosomes. In general, deletions were more common than gains and no high-level amplification was found, supporting previous findings of primarily losses of large chromosomal regions as an important mechanism in chordoma development. Although small imbalances were commonly found, the vast majority of these were detected in single cases; no small deletion affecting all tumours could be discerned. However, the CDKN2A and CDKN2B loci in 9p21 were homo- or heterozygously lost in 70% of the tumours, a finding corroborated by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, suggesting that inactivation of these genes constitute an important step in chordoma development. PMID:18071362

  15. Masculinization of the x chromosome in the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Jaquiéry, Julie; Rispe, Claude; Roze, Denis; Legeai, Fabrice; Le Trionnaire, Gaël; Stoeckel, Solenn; Mieuzet, Lucie; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Prunier-Leterme, Nathalie; Ségurens, Béatrice; Tagu, Denis; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations accumulate differentially on the X chromosome and autosomes in species with an XY sex-determination system, with effects (masculinization or feminization of the X) depending on the dominance of mutations. Organisms with alternative modes of inheritance of sex chromosomes offer interesting opportunities for studying sexual conflicts and their resolution, because expectations for the preferred genomic location of sexually antagonistic alleles may differ from standard systems. Aphids display an XX/X0 system and combine an unusual inheritance of the X chromosome with the alternation of sexual and asexual reproduction. In this study, we first investigated theoretically the accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on the aphid X chromosome. Our results show that i) the X is always more favourable to the spread of male-beneficial alleles than autosomes, and should thus be enriched in sexually antagonistic alleles beneficial for males, ii) sexually antagonistic mutations beneficial for asexual females accumulate preferentially on autosomes, iii) in contrast to predictions for standard systems, these qualitative results are not affected by the dominance of mutations. Under the assumption that sex-biased gene expression evolves to solve conflicts raised by the spread of sexually antagonistic alleles, one expects that male-biased genes should be enriched on the X while asexual female-biased genes should be enriched on autosomes. Using gene expression data (RNA-Seq) in males, sexual females and asexual females of the pea aphid, we confirm these theoretical predictions. Although other mechanisms than the resolution of sexual antagonism may lead to sex-biased gene expression, we argue that they could hardly explain the observed difference between X and autosomes. On top of reporting a strong masculinization of the aphid X chromosome, our study highlights the relevance of organisms displaying an alternative

  16. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  17. Reorganization of chromosome architecture in replicative cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, Steven W.; De Cecco, Marco; Siranosian, Benjamin; Zhang, Yue; Kreiling, Jill A.; Sedivy, John M.; Neretti, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Replicative cellular senescence is a fundamental biological process characterized by an irreversible arrest of proliferation. Senescent cells accumulate a variety of epigenetic changes, but the three-dimensional (3D) organization of their chromatin is not known. We applied a combination of whole-genome chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C), fluorescence in situ hybridization, and in silico modeling methods to characterize the 3D architecture of interphase chromosomes in proliferating, quiescent, and senescent cells. Although the overall organization of the chromatin into active (A) and repressive (B) compartments and topologically associated domains (TADs) is conserved between the three conditions, a subset of TADs switches between compartments. On a global level, the Hi-C interaction matrices of senescent cells are characterized by a relative loss of long-range and gain of short-range interactions within chromosomes. Direct measurements of distances between genetic loci, chromosome volumes, and chromatin accessibility suggest that the Hi-C interaction changes are caused by a significant reduction of the volumes occupied by individual chromosome arms. In contrast, centromeres oppose this overall compaction trend and increase in volume. The structural model arising from our study provides a unique high-resolution view of the complex chromosomal architecture in senescent cells. PMID:26989773

  18. Reorganization of chromosome architecture in replicative cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Steven W; De Cecco, Marco; Siranosian, Benjamin; Zhang, Yue; Kreiling, Jill A; Sedivy, John M; Neretti, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Replicative cellular senescence is a fundamental biological process characterized by an irreversible arrest of proliferation. Senescent cells accumulate a variety of epigenetic changes, but the three-dimensional (3D) organization of their chromatin is not known. We applied a combination of whole-genome chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C), fluorescence in situ hybridization, and in silico modeling methods to characterize the 3D architecture of interphase chromosomes in proliferating, quiescent, and senescent cells. Although the overall organization of the chromatin into active (A) and repressive (B) compartments and topologically associated domains (TADs) is conserved between the three conditions, a subset of TADs switches between compartments. On a global level, the Hi-C interaction matrices of senescent cells are characterized by a relative loss of long-range and gain of short-range interactions within chromosomes. Direct measurements of distances between genetic loci, chromosome volumes, and chromatin accessibility suggest that the Hi-C interaction changes are caused by a significant reduction of the volumes occupied by individual chromosome arms. In contrast, centromeres oppose this overall compaction trend and increase in volume. The structural model arising from our study provides a unique high-resolution view of the complex chromosomal architecture in senescent cells. PMID:26989773

  19. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  20. X chromosome and suicide.

    PubMed

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers. PMID:20010893

  1. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  2. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Haering, Christian H.; Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  3. Massively Parallel Sequencing Reveals the Complex Structure of an Irradiated Human Chromosome on a Mouse Background in the Tc1 Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Stephen; Prigmore, Elena; Langley, Elizabeth; Yang, Fengtang; Maguire, Sean; Fu, Beiyuan; Rajan, Diana; Sheppard, Olivia; Scott, Carol; Hauser, Heidi; Stephens, Philip J.; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Ng, Bee Ling; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Quail, Michael A.; Banerjee, Ruby; Rothkamm, Kai; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype – phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1) presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2) overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439. PMID:23596509

  4. A YAC contig map of plasmodium falciparum chromosome 4: Characterization of a DNA amplification between two recently separated isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, J.P.; Triglia, T.; Cowman, A.F.

    1995-03-20

    We have generated a physical map of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 4 using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The map is defined by a YAC contig spanning approximately 1.05 Mb, which has been restriction mapped to a resolution of 30 kb and is punctuated by 22 sequence-tagged sites. The physical information obtained has enabled us to compare and contrast the structure of chromosome 4 in detail between FCR3 and B8, two recently separated isolates of P. falciparum, leading to characterization of a novel chromosome polymorphism occurring in a subtelomeric region. Comparison of chromosomes 4 from 10 different isolates has shown that chromosome size polymorphisms are restricted to both subtelomeric regions. These analyses provide a high-resolution physical map that will be important to complement genetic analysis of this human pathogen. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    PubMed

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-01

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings. PMID:12907787

  6. Higher order structure of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Okada, T A; Comings, D E

    1979-04-01

    Isolated Chinese hamster metaphase chromosomes were resuspended in 4 M ammonium acetate and spread on a surface of distilled water or 0.15 to 0.5 M ammonium acetate. The DNA was released in the form of a regular series of rosettes connected by interrossette DNA. The mean length of the rosette DNA was 14 micron, similar to the mean length of 10 micron for chromomere DNA of Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The mean interrosette DNA was 4.2 micron. SDS gel electrophoresis of the chromosomal nonhistone proteins showed them to be very similar to nuclear nonhistone proteins except for the presence of more actin and tubulin. Nuclear matrix proteins were present in the chromosomes and may play a role in forming the rosettes. Evidence that the rosette pattern is artifactual versus the possibility that it represents a real organizational substructure of the chromosomes is reviewed.

  7. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A.; Morris, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  8. [Evolution of differential chromosome banding].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    1999-03-01

    Specific chromosome banding patterns in different eukaryotic taxons are reviewed. In all eukaryotes, chromosomes are composed of alternating bands, each differing from the adjacent material by the molecular composition and structural characteristics. In minute chromosomes of fungi and Protozoa, these bands are represented by kinetochores (Kt- (Cd-)bands), nucleolus organizers (N-bands), and telomeres as well as the euchromatin. In genomes of most fungi and protists, long clusters of tandem repeats and, consequently, C-bands were not revealed but they are likely to be found out in species with chromosomes visible under a light microscope, which are several tens of million bp in size. Chromosomes of Metazoa are usually larger. Even in Cnidaria, they contain C-bands, which are replicated late in the S phase. In Deuterostomia, chromosome euchromatin regions differ by replication time: bands replicating at the first half of the S phase alternate with bands replicating at the second half of the S phase. Longitudinal differentiation in the replication pattern of euchromatic regions is observed in all classes of Vertebrata beginning with the bony fish although the time when it developed in Deuterostomia is unknown. Apparently, the evolution of early and late replicating subdomains in Vertebrata euchromatin promoted fast accumulation of differences in the molecular composition of nucleoproteid complexes characteristic of early and late replicating bands. As a result, the more contrasting G/R and Q-banding patterns of chromosomes developed especially in Eutheria. The evolution of Protostomia and Plantae followed another path. An increase in chromosome size was not accompanied by the appearance of wide RBE and RBL euchromatin bands. The G/R-like banding within the interstitial chromosome regions observed in some representatives of Invertebrates and higher plants arose independently in different phylogenetic lineages. This banding pattern seems to be closer to that of C

  9. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    Research continued on field flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress in the past year can be organized into three main categories: (1) chromosome sample preparation; (2) preliminary chromosome fractionation; (3) fractionation of a polystyrene aggregate model which approximates the chromosome shape. We have been successful in isolating metaphase chromosomes from the Chinese hamster. We also received a human chromosome sample from Dr. Carolyn Bell-Prince of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results are discussed. 2 figs.

  10. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  12. Technologies for large-scale physical mapping of human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1994-12-01

    Since its inception 6 years ago, the Human Genome Project has made rapid progress towards its ultimate goal of developing the complete sequence of all human chromosomes. This progress has been made possible through the development of automated devices by laboratories throughout the world that aid the molecular biologist in various phases of the project. The initial phase involves the generation of physical and genetic maps of each chromosome. This task is nearing completion at a low resolution level with several instances of very high detailed maps being developed for isolated chromosomes. In support of the initial mapping thrust of this program, the robotics and automation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed DNA gridding technologies along with associated database and user interface systems. This paper will discuss these systems in detail and focus on the formalism developed for subsystems which allow for facile system integration.

  13. Ordered yeast artificial chromosome clones representing the Dictyostelium discoideum genome.

    PubMed Central

    Kuspa, A; Loomis, W F

    1996-01-01

    High resolution gene maps of the six chromosomes of Dictyostelium discoideum have been generated by a combination of physical mapping techniques. A set of yeast artificial chromosome clones has been ordered into overlapping arrays that cover >98% of the 34-magabase pair genome. Clones were grouped and ordered according to the genes they carried, as determined by hybridization analyses with DNA fragments from several hundred genes. Congruence of the gene order within each arrangement of clones with the gene order determined from whole genome restriction site mapping indicates that a high degree of confidence can be placed on the clone map. This clone-based description of the Dictyostelium chromosomes should be useful for the physical mapping and subcloning of new genes and should facilitate more detailed analyses of this genome. cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. PMID:8643615

  14. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  15. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries. PMID:24191931

  16. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  17. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  18. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  19. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  20. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  1. Sorting of chromosomes on FACSAria(TM) SORP for the preparation of painting probes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu-Yan; Wu, Hou-Nan; Fang, Liang; Liu, Yun; Cheng, Li; Liu, Guang; Zhang, Mei-Li; Huang, Yue

    2016-09-01

    High purity chromosome sorting can be performed on instruments such as MoFlo MLS and BD influx, which are stream-in-air sorters equipped with water-cooled high power lasers. The FACSAria is a true fixed alignment, low laser powered instrument with a quartz flow cell gel-coupled to the collection optics. However, whether high purity mouse and human chromosomes can be obtained by sorting on the BD FACSAria(TM) Special Order Research Product (FACSAria SORP) remains to be determined. Here, we report that the high resolution flow karyotype of mouse lymphocytes and normal male human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) can be obtained on the FACSAria SORP using laser power settings of 50 mW for 355 nm and 20 mW for 444 nm excitation. Furthermore, the use of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that chromosome paints prepared from the sorted chromosomes demonstrated high purity and signal specificity. Notably, human chromosome 12 was separated from the chromosome 9-12 cluster in the flow karyotype, and its identity was confirmed using FISH in trisomy 12 human ES cell lines B2-C7 and B2-B8. In addition, multicolor FISH (mFISH) with human chromosome painting probes to 13,18, 21, and sex chromosomes X and Y showed high signal specificity in hPBMCs. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that high resolution flow karyotype can be obtained using FACSAria SORP. Moreover, a FISH analysis confirmed high purity of the sorted chromosomes. Additionally, in contrast to centromeric satellite probes, chromosome painting probes with high specificity are more suitable for detection of chromosome aberrations, such as deletions and translocations, in prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Sorting of chromosomes on FACSAria(TM) SORP for the preparation of painting probes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu-Yan; Wu, Hou-Nan; Fang, Liang; Liu, Yun; Cheng, Li; Liu, Guang; Zhang, Mei-Li; Huang, Yue

    2016-09-01

    High purity chromosome sorting can be performed on instruments such as MoFlo MLS and BD influx, which are stream-in-air sorters equipped with water-cooled high power lasers. The FACSAria is a true fixed alignment, low laser powered instrument with a quartz flow cell gel-coupled to the collection optics. However, whether high purity mouse and human chromosomes can be obtained by sorting on the BD FACSAria(TM) Special Order Research Product (FACSAria SORP) remains to be determined. Here, we report that the high resolution flow karyotype of mouse lymphocytes and normal male human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) can be obtained on the FACSAria SORP using laser power settings of 50 mW for 355 nm and 20 mW for 444 nm excitation. Furthermore, the use of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that chromosome paints prepared from the sorted chromosomes demonstrated high purity and signal specificity. Notably, human chromosome 12 was separated from the chromosome 9-12 cluster in the flow karyotype, and its identity was confirmed using FISH in trisomy 12 human ES cell lines B2-C7 and B2-B8. In addition, multicolor FISH (mFISH) with human chromosome painting probes to 13,18, 21, and sex chromosomes X and Y showed high signal specificity in hPBMCs. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that high resolution flow karyotype can be obtained using FACSAria SORP. Moreover, a FISH analysis confirmed high purity of the sorted chromosomes. Additionally, in contrast to centromeric satellite probes, chromosome painting probes with high specificity are more suitable for detection of chromosome aberrations, such as deletions and translocations, in prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27560925

  3. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F. A. Gemelli School of Medicine, Rome ); Cheng, S.; Gardiner, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span >100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total [approximately]6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Stable Chromosome Condensation Revealed by Chromosome Conformation Capture.

    PubMed

    Eagen, Kyle P; Hartl, Tom A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    Chemical cross-linking and DNA sequencing have revealed regions of intra-chromosomal interaction, referred to as topologically associating domains (TADs), interspersed with regions of little or no interaction, in interphase nuclei. We find that TADs and the regions between them correspond with the bands and interbands of polytene chromosomes of Drosophila. We further establish the conservation of TADs between polytene and diploid cells of Drosophila. From direct measurements on light micrographs of polytene chromosomes, we then deduce the states of chromatin folding in the diploid cell nucleus. Two states of folding, fully extended fibers containing regulatory regions and promoters, and fibers condensed up to 10-fold containing coding regions of active genes, constitute the euchromatin of the nuclear interior. Chromatin fibers condensed up to 30-fold, containing coding regions of inactive genes, represent the heterochromatin of the nuclear periphery. A convergence of molecular analysis with direct observation thus reveals the architecture of interphase chromosomes. PMID:26544940

  5. Molecular biology of chromosome function

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, K.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of chromosomes are closely linked since chromosome organization profoundly influences the activity of the genome in replication and transcription. Many fundamental results originated from studies of bacterial and viral systems chosen for their less-complex cycles. However, the processes of replication and transcription show differences between the higher and simpler systems. Three important subjects are covered in this volume: DNA replication and recombination, gene transcription, and chromosome organization. Eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral systems are discussed. The information presented is derived from techniques of structural biology and biophysics, including computer graphics and X-ray crystallography, as well as biochemistry, molecular and cell biology.

  6. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  7. Numerous Transitions of Sex Chromosomes in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  8. Repetitive telomeric sequences in chromosomal translocations involving chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Dallaire, L.; Fetni, R.

    1994-09-01

    Telomeres perform key functions in maintaining chromosome integrity. In some structural rearrangements the structure and polymorphism in human telomeres may play a significant role. However, of all the telomeric and subtelomeric sequences, only the terminal TTAGGG repeats are believed essential for telomere function. During the course of a study on the role of telomere structure and polymorphism in chromosomal rearrangements observed in families referred for prenatal diagnosis, we studied three cases in which chromosome 21 was involved. Repetitive TTAGGG sequences for all human chromosomes were used as probes (Oncor). Case 1, a de novo cryptic translocation (2;21) was initially identified as monosomy 21 in a child with psychomotor delay and mild dysmorphism. Using a cosmid probe specific for region 21q22.3 and whole chromosome 21 specific painting probe, the long arm of 21 was found on the short arm of chromosome 2 with an interstitial telomere at the breakpoint junction. All the cells were monosomic for 21pter{yields}q21. Case 2 is a familial (19;21) translocation. GTG-banding and FISH with a satellite probe showed no apparent loss of material at the end of either 19q or 21q, with an interstitial telomere at the fusion site of the two intact chromosomes. In case 3, a four generation reciprocal (20;21) translocation, there was no interstitial telomere. The persistence of an interstitial telomere is a relatively rare event which can now be observed with in situ hybridization. Its study may lead to a better understanding of the dynamics of translocations and of chromosome imbalance.

  9. Mitotic chromosome length scales in response to both cell and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Anne-Marie; Dorn, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular development requires that cells reduce in size as a result of consecutive cell divisions without increase in embryo volume. To maintain cellular integrity, organelle size adapts to cell size throughout development. During mitosis, the longest chromosome arm must be shorter than half of the mitotic spindle for proper chromosome segregation. Using high-resolution time-lapse microscopy of living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we have quantified the relation between cell size and chromosome length. In control embryos, chromosome length scaled to cell size. Artificial reduction of cell size resulted in a shortening of chromosome length, following a trend predicted by measurements from control embryos. Disturbing the RAN (Ras-related nuclear protein)-GTP gradient decoupled nuclear size from cell size and resulted in chromosome scaling to nuclear size rather than cell size; smaller nuclei contained shorter chromosomes independent of cell size. In sum, quantitative analysis relating cell, nuclear, and chromosome size predicts two levels of chromosome length regulation: one through cell size and a second in response to nuclear size. PMID:26033258

  10. Relatives with opposite chromosome constitutions, rec(10)dup(10p)inv(10)(p15.1q26.12) and rec(10)dup(10q)inv(10)(p15.1q26.12), due to a familial pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Ciuladaite, Zivile; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Utkus, Algirdas; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2014-01-01

    Large pericentric inversions in chromosome 10 are rare chromosomal aberrations with only few cases of familial inheritance. Such chromosomal rearrangements may lead to production of unbalanced gametes. As a result of a recombination event in the inversion loop, 2 recombinants with duplicated and deficient chromosome segments, including the regions distal to the inversion, may be produced. We report on 2 relatives in a family with opposite terminal chromosomal rearrangements of chromosome 10, i.e. rec(10)dup(10p)inv(10) and rec(10)dup(10q)inv(10), due to familial pericentric inversion inv(10)(p15.1q26.12). Based on array-CGH results, we characterized the exact genomic regions involved and compared the clinical features of both patients with previous reports on similar pericentric inversions and regional differences within 10p and 10q. The fact that both products of recombination are viable indicates a potentially high recurrence risk of unbalanced offspring. This report of unbalanced rearrangements in chromosome 10 in 2 generations confirms the importance of screening for terminal imbalances in patients with idiopathic intellectual disability by molecular cytogenetic techniques such as FISH, MLPA or microarrays. It also underlines the necessity for FISH to define structural characteristics of such cryptic intrachromosomal rearrangements and the underlying cytogenetic mechanisms.

  11. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  12. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-10-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry. PMID:22510847

  13. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-01-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry. PMID:22510847

  14. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  15. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  16. High-resolution genomic profiling of thyroid lesions uncovers preferential copy number gains affecting mitochondrial biogenesis loci in the oncocytic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kurelac, Ivana; de Biase, Dario; Calabrese, Claudia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Ng, Charlotte KY; Lim, Raymond; MacKay, Alan; Weigelt, Britta; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic change is the result of aberrant mitochondrial hyperplasia, which may occur in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells and is not infrequent in the thyroid. Despite being a well-characterized histologic phenotype, the molecular causes underlying such a distinctive cellular change are poorly understood. To identify potential genetic causes for the oncocytic phenotype in thyroid, we analyzed copy number alterations in a set of oncocytic (n=21) and non-oncocytic (n=20) thyroid lesions by high-resolution microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Each group comprised lesions of diverse histologic types, including hyperplastic nodules, adenomas and carcinomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of categorical aCGH data resulted in two distinct branches, one of which was significantly enriched for samples with the oncocytic phenotype, regardless of histologic type. Analysis of aCGH events showed that the oncocytic group harbored a significantly higher number of genes involved in copy number gains, when compared to that of conventional thyroid lesions. Functional annotation demonstrated an enrichment for copy number gains that affect genes encoding activators of mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cases but not in their non-oncocytic counterparts. Taken together, our data suggest that genomic alterations may represent additional/alternative mechanisms underlying the development of the oncocytic phenotype in the thyroid. PMID:26269756

  17. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Computational model for chromosomal instabilty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina

    2015-03-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of the chromosomes between the spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated into a coherent picture. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compares well with early observations in mammalian cell spindles. Our results shed new light on the origin of several pathological conditions related to chromosomal instability.

  19. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Rad61/Wpl1 (Wapl), a cohesin regulator, controls chromosome compaction during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Kiran; Lee, Min-Su; Shinohara, Miki; Kim, Keun P.; Shinohara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis-specific cohesin, required for the linking of the sister chromatids, plays a critical role in various chromosomal events during meiotic prophase I, such as chromosome morphogenesis and dynamics, as well as recombination. Rad61/Wpl1 (Wapl in other organisms) negatively regulates cohesin functions. In this study, we show that meiotic chromosome axes are shortened in the budding yeast rad61/wpl1 mutant, suggesting that Rad61/Wpl1 negatively regulates chromosome axis compaction. Rad61/Wpl1 is required for efficient resolution of telomere clustering during meiosis I, indicating a positive effect of Rad61/Wpl1 on the cohesin function required for telomere dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate distinct activities of Rad61/Wpl1 during the meiotic recombination, including its effects on the efficient processing of intermediates. Thus, Rad61/Wpl1 both positively and negatively regulates various cohesin-mediated chromosomal processes during meiosis. PMID:26825462

  1. Rad61/Wpl1 (Wapl), a cohesin regulator, controls chromosome compaction during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Challa, Kiran; Lee, Min-Su; Shinohara, Miki; Kim, Keun P; Shinohara, Akira

    2016-04-20

    Meiosis-specific cohesin, required for the linking of the sister chromatids, plays a critical role in various chromosomal events during meiotic prophase I, such as chromosome morphogenesis and dynamics, as well as recombination. Rad61/Wpl1 (Wapl in other organisms) negatively regulates cohesin functions. In this study, we show that meiotic chromosome axes are shortened in the budding yeast rad61/wpl1 mutant, suggesting that Rad61/Wpl1 negatively regulates chromosome axis compaction. Rad61/Wpl1 is required for efficient resolution of telomere clustering during meiosis I, indicating a positive effect of Rad61/Wpl1 on the cohesin function required for telomere dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate distinct activities of Rad61/Wpl1 during the meiotic recombination, including its effects on the efficient processing of intermediates. Thus, Rad61/Wpl1 both positively and negatively regulates various cohesin-mediated chromosomal processes during meiosis.

  2. A Copy Number Variant on Chromosome 20q13.3 Implicated in Thinness and Severe Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, Sandra J.; Xin, Yuanpei; Mao, Rong; Lewis, Tracey; Adams, Ted D.; Hunt, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives. To identify copy number variants (CNVs) which are associated with body mass index (BMI). Subjects/Methods. CNVs were identified using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on members of pedigrees ascertained through severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) sib pairs (86 pedigrees) and thin (BMI ≤ 23 kg/m2) probands (3 pedigrees). Association was inferred through pleiotropy of BMI with CNV log⁡2 intensity ratio. Results. A 77-kilobase CNV on chromosome 20q13.3, confirmed by real-time qPCR, exhibited deletions in the obese subjects and duplications in the thin subjects (P = 2.2 × 10−6). Further support for the presence of a deletion derived from inference by likelihood analysis of null alleles for SNPs residing in the region. Conclusions. One or more of 7 genes residing in a chromosome 20q13.3 CNV region appears to influence BMI. The strongest candidate is ARFRP1, which affects glucose metabolism in mice. PMID:26881067

  3. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Knuutila, Sakari; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  4. The 5q deletion size in myeloid malignancies is correlated to additional chromosomal aberrations and to TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the long arm of chromosome 5 (del(5q)) are recurrent abnormalities in myeloid malignancies. We analyzed del(5q) and accompanying molecular mutations in MDS, MPN and MDS/MPN cases. A high del(5q) frequency was revealed in MDS (1869/11398 cases; 16%), followed by MDS/MPN (37/1107; 3%) and MPN (97/6373; 2%). To investigate potential associations of the del(5q) size with the respective phenotypes, we applied array CGH analyses in selected cohorts of 61 MDS, 22 MDS/MPN and 23 MPN cases. The size varied between 16 and 119 Mb with no differences between the entities. However, MPN and MDS/MPN cases with del(5q) sole showed a significantly smaller del(5q) than cases with additional aberrations. Sequence analysis of 27 genes revealed ≥1 mutation in 91% of patients. The highest mutation frequencies in the total cohort were observed for TP53 (31%), JAK2 (23%) and DNMT3A (18%). The molecular mutation patterns in the del(5q) cohorts were different between the entities but resembled known patterns of cohorts not selected for del(5q). Further, TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in cases with a larger deletion size (P = 0.003). The results suggest a correlation of large del(5q) with TP53 mutations and with additional chromosomal aberrations possibly contributing to more severe courses of these cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218649

  5. Comprehensive Analyses of White-Handed Gibbon Chromosomes Enables Access to 92 Evolutionary Conserved Breakpoints Compared to the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Weise, Anja; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Voigt, Martin; Aust, Nadine; Mrasek, Kristin; Löhmer, Sharon; Rubtsov, Nikolai; Karamysheva, Tatyana V; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Hardekopf, David; Jančušková, Tereza; Pekova, Sona; Wilhelm, Kathleen; Liehr, Thomas; Fan, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Gibbon species (Hylobatidae) impress with an unusually high number of numerical and structural chromosomal changes within the family itself as well as compared to other Hominoidea including humans. In former studies applying molecular cytogenetic methods, 86 evolutionary conserved breakpoints (ECBs) were reported in the white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar, HLA) with respect to the human genome. To analyze those ECBs in more detail and also to achieve a better understanding of the fast karyotype evolution in Hylobatidae, molecular data for these regions are indispensably necessary. In the present study, we obtained whole chromosome-specific probes by microdissection of all 21 HLA autosomes and prepared them for aCGH. Locus-specific DNA probes were also used for further molecular cytogenetic characterization of selected regions. Thus, we could map 6 yet unreported ECBs in HLA with respect to the human genome. Additionally, in 26 of the 86 previously reported ECBs, the present approach enabled a more precise breakpoint mapping. Interestingly, a preferred localization of ECBs within segmental duplications, copy number variant regions, and fragile sites was observed.

  6. The Chromosome Microdissection and Microcloning Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Xin; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome microdissection followed by microcloning is an efficient tool combining cytogenetics and molecular genetics that can be used for the construction of the high density molecular marker linkage map and fine physical map, the generation of probes for chromosome painting, and the localization and cloning of important genes. Here, we describe a modified technique to microdissect a single chromosome, paint individual chromosomes, and construct single-chromosome DNA libraries. PMID:27511173

  7. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  8. A method for constructing radiation hybrid maps of whole genomes: Application to physically mapping chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.A.; Mirzavans, F.; Tsuji, S.

    1994-09-01

    By reverting to the original protocols of Goss and Harris, we have created a panel of whole genome radiation hybrids (WG-RHs) using a diploid human fibroblast as the chromosome donor, rather than the usual monochromosomal human/rodent somatic cell hybrid. We have analyzed markers from chromosome 14 to test the feasibility of using WG-RH cell lines to generate physical maps of human chromosomes. As WG-RH mapping exploits rodent/human differences, loci need not be polymorphic to be informative. Sixty-one chromosome 14 markers, including 24 STSs and ETSs, were used to create a high resolution radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 14. The average marker retention was found to be 22.4%, very similar to the marker retention frequencies of conventional radiation hybrids. Two point and multipoint statistical analyses of the patterns of chromosome 14 marker retention were used to create a WG-RH map of human chromosome 14 with 4 gaps, corresponding to regions of low marker density. We are currently testing additional markers to close the map. Conventional radiation hybrid mapping requires between 100 and 200 hybrids to map each chromosome. The large number of hybrids (up to 4,000) required to map the whole genome is a major drawback of this method. In contrast, a single panel of 100 to 200 WG-RH cell lines is sufficient to allow the construction of a high resolution map of the whole human genome with a single panel of only 100 to 200 hybrids. Our results demonstrate that chromosome fragmentation by WG-RH can be used to map one chromosome, and by extension, entire genomes.

  9. Array painting: a protocol for the rapid analysis of aberrant chromosomes using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Susan M; Ng, Bee Ling; Prigmore, Elena; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Carter, Nigel P

    2012-01-01

    Aarray painting is a technique that uses microarray technology to rapidly map chromosome translocation breakpoints. previous methods to map translocation breakpoints have used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FIsH) and have consequently been labor-intensive, time-consuming and restricted to the low breakpoint resolution imposed by the use of metaphase chromosomes. array painting combines the isolation of derivative chromosomes (chromosomes with translocations) and high-resolution microarray analysis to refine the genomic location of translocation breakpoints in a single experiment. In this protocol, we describe array painting by isolation of derivative chromosomes using a MoFlo flow sorter, amplification of these derivatives using whole-genome amplification and hybridization onto commercially available oligonucleotide microarrays. although the sorting of derivative chromosomes is a specialized procedure requiring sophisticated equipment, the amplification, labeling and hybridization of Dna is straightforward, robust and can be completed within 1 week. the protocol described produces good quality data; however, array painting is equally achievable using any combination of the available alternative methodologies for chromosome isolation, amplification and hybridization. PMID:19893508

  10. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  11. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations. PMID:25482192

  12. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  13. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  15. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  16. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  17. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  18. Meiotic chromosome structure and function in plants.

    PubMed

    Mainiero, Samantha; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome structure is important for many meiotic processes. Here, we outline 3 main determinants of chromosome structure and their effects on meiotic processes in plants. Cohesins are necessary to hold sister chromatids together until the first meiotic division, ensuring that homologous chromosomes and not sister chromatids separate during anaphase I. During meiosis in maize, Arabidopsis, and rice, cohesins are needed for establishing early prophase chromosome structure and recombination and for aligning bivalents at the metaphase plate. Condensin complexes play pivotal roles in controlling the packaging of chromatin into chromosomes through chromatin compaction and chromosome individualization. In animals and fungi, these complexes establish a meiotic chromosome structure that allows for proper recombination, pairing, and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. In plants, information on the role of condensins in meiosis is limited, but they are known to be required for successful completion of reproductive development. Therefore, we speculate that they play roles similar to animal and fungal condensins during meiosis. Plants generally have large and complex genomes due to frequent polyploidy events, and likely, condensins and cohesins organize chromosomes in such a way as to ensure genome stability. Hexaploid wheat has evolved a unique mechanism using a Ph1 locus-controlled chromosome organization to ensure proper chromosome pairing in meiosis. Altogether, studies on meiotic chromosome structure indicate that chromosome organization is not only important for chromatin packaging but also fulfills specific functions in facilitating chromosome interactions during meiosis, including pairing and recombination. PMID:25096046

  19. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  20. Surnames and the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Sykes, B; Irven, C

    2000-04-01

    A randomly ascertained sample of males with the surname "Sykes" was typed with four Y-chromosome microsatellites. Almost half the sample shared the same Y-chromosome haplotype, which has not been observed in control samples either from the same geographic region or from the United Kingdom as a whole. This points to a single surname founder for extant Sykes males, even though written sources had predicted multiple origins. The distribution of other Sykes Y-chromosome haplotypes were not significantly different from those in controls and may be accounted for by the historical accumulation of nonpaternity during the past 700 years, in which case the average rate estimate is 1.3%/generation. If this pattern is reproduced with other surnames, it may have important forensic and genealogical applications.

  1. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer.

  2. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child.

  3. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  4. Chromosome interior observation by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) using ionic liquid technique.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tohru; Dwiranti, Astari; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Fukuda, Shota; Kometani, Reo; Nakao, Masayuki; Takata, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ohmido, Nobuko; Fukui, Kiichi

    2014-10-01

    Attempts to elucidate chromosome structure have long remained elusive. Electron microscopy is useful for chromosome structure research because of its high resolution and magnification. However, biological samples such as chromosomes need to be subjected to various preparation steps, including dehydration, drying, and metal/carbon coating, which may induce shrinkage and artifacts. The ionic liquid technique has recently been developed and it enables sample preparation without dehydration, drying, or coating, providing a sample that is closer to the native condition. Concurrently, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) has been developed, allowing the investigation and direct analysis of chromosome interiors. In this study, we investigated chromosome interiors by FIB/SEM using plant and human chromosomes prepared by the ionic liquid technique. As a result, two types of chromosomes, with and without cavities, were visualized, both for barley and human chromosomes prepared by critical point drying. However, chromosome interiors were revealed only as a solid structure, lacking cavities, when prepared by the ionic liquid technique. Our results suggest that the existence and size of cavities depend on the preparation procedures. We conclude that combination of the ionic liquid technique and FIB/SEM is a powerful tool for chromosome study.

  5. Ring chromosomes in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans are composed of interspersed sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22.

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, R.; Lux, M. L.; Huang, S. F.; Naber, S. P.; Corson, J. M.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Ring chromosomes are found in most dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSPs), and recent reports demonstrate that portions of the DFSP ring chromosomes derive from chromosome 17. In this study we characterized ring chromosomes in three DFSPs using a combined approach of karyotyping, chromosome painting, and comparative genomic hybridization. Chromosome painting demonstrated that the ring chromosomes in each DFSP were composed of discontinuous, interwoven sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22. Amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was confirmed in each of these cases by comparative genomic hybridization, and over-representation of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was also demonstrated by comparative genomic hybridization in 1 of 2 cytogenetically unremarkable DFSPs. We conclude that amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences, in ring form, is a characteristic aberration in DFSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495279

  6. A male newborn with VACTERL association and Fanconi anemia with a FANCB deletion detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    PubMed

    Umaña, Luis A; Magoulas, Pilar; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A

    2011-12-01

    We report on a male newborn with multiple congenital abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis of VACTERL association (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal, and limb anomalies), who had Fanconi anemia (complementation group B) recognized by the detection of a deletion in chromosome Xp22.2 using an oligonucleotide array. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia was confirmed by increased chromosomal breakage abnormalities observed in cultured cells that were treated with cross-linking agents. This is the first report in the literature of Fanconi anemia complementation group B detected by oligonucleotide array testing postnatally.

  7. The use of chromosomal microarray for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dugoff, Lorraine; Norton, Mary E; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2016-10-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is a high-resolution, whole-genome technique used to identify chromosomal abnormalities, including those detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques, as well as small submicroscopic deletions and duplications referred to as copy number variants. Because chromosomal microarray analysis has a greater resolution than conventional karyotyping, it can detect deletions and duplications down to a 50- to 100-kb level. The purpose of this document is to discuss the technique, advantages, and disadvantages of chromosomal microarray analysis and its indications and limitations. We recommend the following: (1) that chromosomal microarray analysis be offered when genetic analysis is performed in cases with fetal structural anomalies and/or stillbirth and replaces the need for fetal karyotype in these cases (GRADE 1A); (2) that providers discuss the benefits and limitations of chromosomal microarray analysis and conventional karyotype with patients who are considering amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS), and that both options should be available to women who choose to undergo diagnostic testing (GRADE 1B); (3) that pre- and posttest counseling should be performed by trained genetic counselors, geneticists, or other providers with expertise in the complexities of interpreting chromosomal microarray analysis results (Best Practice); (4) that patients be informed that chromosomal microarray analysis does not detect every genetic disease or syndrome and specifically does not detect autosomal-recessive disorders associated with single gene point mutations, as well as that chromosomal microarray analysis can detect consanguinity and nonpaternity in some cases (Best Practice); (5) that patients in whom a fetal variant of uncertain significance is detected by prenatal diagnosis receive counseling from experts who have access to databases that provide updated information concerning genotype-phenotype correlations (Best Practice).

  8. Multiscale image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Castleman, Kenneth R.

    1996-10-01

    Visual examination of chromosome banding patterns is an important means of chromosome analysis. Cytogeneticists compare their patient's chromosome image against the prototype normal/abnormal human chromosome banding patterns. Automated chromosome analysis instruments facilitate this by digitally enhancing the chromosome images. Currently available systems employing traditional highpass/bandpass filtering and/or histogram equalization are approximately equivalent to photomicroscopy in their ability to support the detection of band pattern alterations. Improvements in chromosome image display quality, particularly in the detail of the banding pattern, would significantly increase the cost-effectiveness of these systems. In this paper we present our work on the use of multiscale transform and derivative filtering for image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns. A steerable pyramid representation of the chromosome image is generated by a multiscale transform. The derivative filters are designed to detect the bands of a chromosome, and the steerable pyramid transform is chosen based on its desirable properties of shift and rotation invariance. By processing the transform coefficients that correspond to the bands of the chromosome in the pyramid representation, contrast enhancement of the chromosome bands can be achieved with designed flexibility in scale, orientation and location. Compared with existing chromosome image enhancement techniques, this new approach offers the advantage of selective chromosome banding pattern enhancement that allows designated detail analysis. Experimental results indicate improved enhancement capabilities and promise more effective visual aid to comparison of chromosomes to the prototypes and to each other. This will increase the ability of automated chromosome analysis instruments to assist the evaluation of chromosome abnormalities in clinical samples.

  9. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  10. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  11. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  12. An Automated System for Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Melnyk, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a complete system to produce karyotypes and chromosome measurement data from human blood samples, and to provide a basis for statistical analysis of quantitative chromosome measurement data are described.

  13. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond , Pinkel, Daniel , Gray, Joe W.

    1997-05-27

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  14. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  15. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  16. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility. PMID:22120929

  17. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  18. Chromosome synteny in cucumis species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2x = 14) and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2x = 24) are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae). Two inter-fertile botanical varieties with 14 chromosomes, the cultivated C. sativus var. sativus L. and the wild C. sativus var. hardwick...

  19. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  20. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  1. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  2. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1995-09-05

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogeneous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include ways for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes. 3 figs.

  3. Molecular localization of the t(11; 22)(q24; q12) translocation of Ewing sarcoma by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Hermanson, G.G.; Eubanks, J.H.; Lewis, K.A.; Evans, G.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Chromosome translocations are associated with a variety of human leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. To localize molecular markers flanking the t(11;22)(q24;q12) breakpoint that occurs in virtually all cases of Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma, high-resolution chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization was carried out using a panel of cosmid clones localized and ordered on chromosome 11q. The location of the Ewing sarcoma translocation breakpoint was determined relative to the nearest two cosmid markers on 11q, clones 23.2 and 5.8, through the analysis of metaphase chromosome hybridization. By in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei, the approximate physical separation of these two markers was determined. In both Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma, cosmid clone 5.8 is translocated from chromosome 11q24 to the derivative chromosome 22 and a portion of chromosome 22q12 carrying the leukemia inhibitory factor gene is translocated to the derivative chromosome 11. The physical distance between the flanking cosmid markers on chromosome 11 was determined to be in the range of 1,000 kilobases, and genomic analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed no abnormalities over a region of 650 kilobases in the vicinity of the leukemia inhibitory factor gene on chromosome 22. This approach localizes the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint to a small region on chromosome 11q24 and provides a rapid and precise technique for the molecular characterization of chromosomal aberrations.

  4. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  5. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  6. Genomics of Sex and Sex Chromosomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes are distinctive, not only because of their gender determining role, but also for genomic features that reflect their evolutionary history. The genomic sequences in the ancient sex chromosomes of humans and in the incipient sex chromosomes of medaka, stickleback, and papaya exhibit u...

  7. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues.

  8. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues. PMID:26126956

  9. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  10. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R; Wheeler, Bayly S; Ralston, Edward J; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (∼1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  11. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R; Wheeler, Bayly S; Ralston, Edward J; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (∼1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  12. Micromanipulation studies of chromosome movement. II. Birefringent chromosomal fibers and the mechanical attachment of chromosomes to the spindle

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The degree of mechanical coupling of chromosomes to the spindles of Nephrotoma and Trimeratropis primary spermatocytes varies with the stage of meiosis and the birefringent retardation of the chromosomal fibers. In early prometaphase, before birefringent chromosomal fibers have formed, a bivalent can be displaced toward a spindle pole by a single, continuous pull with a microneedle. Resistance to poleward displacement increases with increased development of the chromosomal fibers, reaching a maximum at metaphase. At this stage kinetochores cannot be displaced greater than 1 micrometer toward either spindle pole, even by a force which is sufficient to displace the entire spindle within the cell. The abolition of birefringence with either colcemid or vinblastine results in the loss of chromosome-spindle attachment. In the absence of birefringent fibers a chromosome can be displaced anywhere within the cell. The photochemical inactivation of colcemid by irradiation with 366-nm light results in the reformation of birefringent chromosomal fibers and the concomitant re-establishment of chromosome attachment to the spindle. These results support the hypothesis that the birefringent chromosomal fibers anchor the chromosomes to the spindle and transmit the force for anaphase chromosome movement. PMID:479316

  13. High-resolution genomic profiling of adenomas and carcinomas of the salivary glands reveals amplification, rearrangement, and fusion of HMGA2.

    PubMed

    Persson, Fredrik; Andrén, Ywonne; Winnes, Marta; Wedell, Barbro; Nordkvist, Anders; Gudnadottir, Gunhildur; Dahlenfors, Rigmor; Sjögren, Helene; Mark, Joachim; Stenman, Göran

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (Ca-ex-PA) is an epithelial malignancy developing within a benign salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma (PA). Here we have used genome-wide, high-resolution array-CGH, and fluorescence in situ hybridization to identify genes amplified in double min chromosomes and homogeneously staining regions in PA and Ca-ex-PA and to identify additional genomic imbalances characteristic of these tumor types. Ten of the 16 tumors analyzed showed amplification/gain of a 30-kb minimal common region, consisting of the 5'-part of HMGA2 (encoding the three DNA-binding domains). Coamplification of MDM2 was found in nine tumors. Five tumors had cryptic HMGA2-WIF1 gene fusions with amplification of the fusion oncogene in four tumors. Expression analysis of eight amplified candidate genes in 12q revealed that tumors with amplification/rearrangement of HMGA2 and MDM2 had significantly higher expression levels when compared with tumors without amplification. Analysis of individual HMGA2 exons showed that the expression of exons 3-5 were substantially reduced when compared with exons 1-2 in 9 of 10 tumors with HMGA2 activation, indicating that gene fusions and rearrangements of HMGA2 are common in tumors with amplification. In addition, recurrent amplifications/gains of 1q11-q32.1, 2p16.1-p12, 8q12.1, 8q22-24.1, and 20, and losses of 1p21.3-p21.1, 5q23.2-q31.2, 8p, 10q21.3, and 15q11.2 were identified. Collectively, our results identify HMGA2 and MDM2 as amplification targets in PA and Ca-ex-PA and suggest that amplification of 12q genes (in particular MDM2), deletions of 5q23.2-q31.2, gains of 8q12.1 (PLAG1) and 8q22.1-q24.1 (MYC), and amplification of ERBB2 may be of importance for malignant transformation of benign PA.

  14. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrumintermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneriaspicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different genomes in

  15. The impact of imprinting: Prader-Willi syndrome resulting from chromosome translocation, recombination, and nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Olson, S.; Gunter, K.

    1996-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is most often the result of a deletion of bands q11.2-q13 of the paternally derived chromosome 15, but it also occurs either because of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of this region or, rarely, from a methylation imprinting defect. A significant number of cases are due to structural rearrangements of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15. We report two cases of PWS with UPD in which there was a meiosis I nondisjunction error involving an altered chromosome 15 produced by both a translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and recombination. In both cases, high-resolution banding of the long arm was normal, and FISH of probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3 indicated no loss of this material. Chromosome heteromorphism analysis showed that each patient had maternal heterodisomy of the chromosome 15 short arm, whereas PCR of microsatellites demonstrated allele-specific maternal isodisomy and heterodisomy of the long arm. SNRPN gene methylation analysis revealed only a maternal imprint in both patients. We suggest that the chromosome structural rearrangements, combined with recombination in these patients, disrupted normal segregation of an imprinted region, resulting in uniparental disomy and PWS. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 1 revealed by molecular analysis of a patient with pycnodysostosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, B D; Willner, J P; Dunn, T M; Kardon, N B; Verloes, A; Poncin, J; Desnick, R J

    1998-01-01

    Molecular analysis of a patient affected by the autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia, pycnodysostosis (cathepsin K deficiency; MIM 265800), revealed homozygosity for a novel missense mutation (A277V). Since the A277V mutation was carried by the patient's father but not by his mother, who had two normal cathepsin K alleles, paternal uniparental disomy was suspected. Karyotyping of the patient and of both parents was normal, and high-resolution cytogenetic analyses of chromosome 1, to which cathepsin K is mapped, revealed no abnormalities. Evaluation of polymorphic DNA markers spanning chromosome 1 demonstrated that the patient had inherited two paternal chromosome 1 homologues, whereas alleles for markers from other chromosomes were inherited in a Mendelian fashion. The patient was homoallelic for informative markers mapping near the chromosome 1 centromere, but he was heteroallelic for markers near both telomeres, establishing that the paternal uniparental disomy with partial isodisomy was caused by a meiosis II nondisjunction event. Phenotypically, the patient had normal birth height and weight, had normal psychomotor development at age 7 years, and had only the usual features of pycnodysostosis. This patient represents the first case of paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 and provides conclusive evidence that paternally derived genes on human chromosome 1 are not imprinted. PMID:9529353

  17. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  18. Precision in chromosome identification with leads in molecular cytogenetics: An illustrated review

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Usha R.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are a major cause of human genetic diseases. Conventional cytogenetic banding techniques are the method of identification for both numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities but with limited resolution. However, precise identification and characterization of the chromosomal abnormalities can only be achieved by advanced molecular cytogenetic techniques. These techniques are based mainly on fluorescence in situ hybridization, which have become an invaluable tool in the field of diagnostics. The advent of these molecular cytogenetic techniques has helped in the identification of chromosomal abnormalities to its minutest level. Apparently, the leads in molecular cytogenetic techniques have paved way for advanced molecular diagnosis, which now plays a significant role in both diagnostics and clinical research. These advances have led to the increased knowledge of the possible molecular mechanism involved in the chromosomal rearrangements and the genotype-phenotype correlation thus helping the patients towards better diagnosis and genetic counseling. This article highlights the advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques emphasizing the precision in identification of chromosomal rearrangements, and also illustrates few chromosomal abnormalities pediatric cases identified using these molecular cytogenetic techniques. PMID:27625861

  19. Immunofluorescent characterization of DNA . RNA hybrids on polytene chromosomes of Trichosia pubescens (Diptera, sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Büsen, W; Amabis, J M; Leoncini, O; Stollar, B D; Lara, F J

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of DNA X RNA hybrids on polytene chromosomes with the aid of a goat antibody against DNA X RNA hybrids using the immunofluorescence technique. Fixed polytene chromosomes of the sciarid Trichosia pubescens (Diptera) show distinct, stage-specific labelling patterns throughout larval development. Controls for the staining procedure - including preincubation with hybrid-specific endoribonuclease H - prove that DNA X RNA hybrids are present on fixed chromosomes. They are revealed only under mild fixation conditions which do not efficiently immobilize all chromosomal proteins, indicating that some proteins have to be removed to make the antigens accessible to antibody. Certain fixation conditions may also cause local denaturation of chromosomal DNA, and some hybrids may possibly form during specimen preparation. After incorporation of radioactive uridine, a combination of phase contrast, fluorescent, and autoradiographic images of one and the same chromosomal preparation demonstrates that hybrid fluorescence is confined to transcriptionally active regions. Two puff classes can be distinguished. The first binds antibody and includes most RNA puffs and all DNA puffs so far studied; the second, comprising some RNA puffs, does not show bright fluorescence in spite of the fact that RNA synthesis is high as revealed by 3H-uridine incorporation. DNA X RNA hybrids are not found at DNA puff sites during the DNA amplification period; these sites contain detectable hybrids only when transcription is taking place. - Combination of the fluorescent technique with its excellent resolution and autoradiography should be helpful in studying detailed topological aspects of transcriptionally active chromosomal regions.

  20. A flow cytometric study of chromosomes from rat kangaroo and Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, M; Hutter, K J; Frank, M; Futterman, G; Goerttler, K

    1980-01-01

    Chromosomes from rat kangaroo (PTK) and chinese hamster (CHV 79) cells have been prepared for quantitative flow-cytometric analysis. The preparation time was otimized down to 30 (PTK) and 40 min (CHV 79). DAPI was used as a AT-sensitive fluorescent dye to stain for monoparameter DNA measurements. Simultaneous two-parameter DNA-protein analysis was carried out with DAPI and SR 101 (as a general protein fluorochrome) in combination. The karyotype of the PTK cells with 13 (14) chromosomes was separated into 10DNA peaks. The X-chromosome bearing the nucleolus organizer region generates a distinct peak. The karyotype of the CHV 79 cells with 22 chromosomes was separated inot 15 peaks. The DNA profile obtained indicates a geometric grading of the chromosomal amount of AT components in teh karyotype of this particular cell line. The simultaneous DNA-protein analysis performed show enough sensitivity of the instrument utilizing hihg power UV excitation illumination to discriminate the two color emission consisting of blue (DAPI) and red (SR 101) fluorescence. Color overlapping could be completely avoided. Additionally, the quality (number, location, and resolution of peaks) of the DNA distribution was not influences by the simultaneous application of a second fluorescent stain. Fluorescence activated electronic sorting applied on chromosomal fluorescence distributions providing purified fractions of chromosomes for subsequent biochemical and biological determinations is discussed.

  1. Precision in chromosome identification with leads in molecular cytogenetics: An illustrated review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are a major cause of human genetic diseases. Conventional cytogenetic banding techniques are the method of identification for both numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities but with limited resolution. However, precise identification and characterization of the chromosomal abnormalities can only be achieved by advanced molecular cytogenetic techniques. These techniques are based mainly on fluorescence in situ hybridization, which have become an invaluable tool in the field of diagnostics. The advent of these molecular cytogenetic techniques has helped in the identification of chromosomal abnormalities to its minutest level. Apparently, the leads in molecular cytogenetic techniques have paved way for advanced molecular diagnosis, which now plays a significant role in both diagnostics and clinical research. These advances have led to the increased knowledge of the possible molecular mechanism involved in the chromosomal rearrangements and the genotype-phenotype correlation thus helping the patients towards better diagnosis and genetic counseling. This article highlights the advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques emphasizing the precision in identification of chromosomal rearrangements, and also illustrates few chromosomal abnormalities pediatric cases identified using these molecular cytogenetic techniques. PMID:27625861

  2. Isolation and mapping of 68 RFLP markers on human chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Susumo SRL Inc., Tokyo ); Okui, Keiko; Tokino, Takashi; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Oshimura, Mitsuo )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have isolated 68 new RFLP markers on human chromosome 6. Of these, 64 were localized on chromosomal bands by the fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) method, 25 on the short arm and 39 on the long arm. Their distribution was uneven; the makers were localized predominantly in regions of R-positive banding. Eleven markers defined VNTR loci. This expanded collection of DNA markers will contribute to high-resolution linkage mapping of genes causing inherited disorders and will provide useful reagents for isolation of putative tumor-suppressor genes on chromosome 6 that appear to be involved in malignancies. Furthermore, the new markers will be guideposts for detailed linkage and physical maps of this chromosome.

  3. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  4. An integrated physical map of 210 markers assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Redeker, E.; Hoovers, J.M.N.; Alders, M.

    1994-06-01

    Using a panel of patient cell lines with chromosomal breakpoints, the authors constructed a physical map for the short arm of human chromosome 11. They focused on 11p15, a chromosome band harboring at least 25 known genes and associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, several childhood tumors, and genomic imprinting. This underlines the need for a physical map for this region. They divided the short arm of chromosome 11 into 18 breakpoint regions, and a large series of new and previously described genes and markers was mapped within these intervals using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cosmid fingerprint analysis showed that 19 of these markers were included in cosmid contigs. A detailed 10-Mb pulsed-field physical map of the region 11p15.3-pter was constructed. These three different approaches enabled the high-resolution mapping of 210 markers, including 22 known genes. 64 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  6. Y-chromosome polymorphism: Possible largest Y chromosome in man?

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, D.S.K.; Al-Awadi, S.A.; Bastaki, L.

    1994-09-01

    The role of variations (inversions/deletion or duplication) in the heterochromatin in gonadal development and function, reproductive fitness, and malignant disease has been extensively studied. However, the causal-relationship of large Y (Yqh+) and repeated fetal loss has not been established unequivocally. An Arab couple (?Bedouin origin) with a history of repeated abortions were investigated. Karyotype analysis of the husband showed a very large Y chromosome, confirmed by GTG-, QFQ- and CBG-banding techniques. C-banding showed discontinuous distribution of the heterochromatin blocks separated by pale bands. The origin of the large heterochromatin segment could be due to tandem duplication of the Yq region or translocation (Yq:Yq). No other relatives (males) of the propositus have been available for investigation. Polymorphism of the Y chromosome could be attributed to evolutionary changes from an ancestral type, either by deletion or duplication of the heterochromatin segment. More detailed studies on isolated, aboriginal/tribal human populations will enable us to better understand the significance of the Y chromosome polymorphism.

  7. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  8. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  9. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  10. Method for obtaining chromosome painting probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for determining a clastogenic signature of a sample of chromosomes by quantifying a frequency of a first type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; quantifying a frequency of a second, different type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; and comparing the frequency of the first type of chromosome aberration to the frequency of the second type of chromosome aberration. A method is also provided for using that clastogenic signature to identify a clastogenic agent or dosage to which the cells were exposed.

  11. Polymer models of chromosome (re)organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirny, Leonid

    Chromosome Conformation Capture technique (Hi-C) provides comprehensive information about frequencies of spatial interactions between genomic loci. Inferring 3D organization of chromosomes from these data is a challenging biophysical problem. We develop a top-down approach to biophysical modeling of chromosomes. Starting with a minimal set of biologically motivated interactions we build ensembles of polymer conformations that can reproduce major features observed in Hi-C experiments. I will present our work on modeling organization of human metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Our works suggests that active processes of loop extrusion can be a universal mechanism responsible for formation of domains in interphase and chromosome compaction in metaphase.

  12. Chromosome painting of Z and W sex chromosomes in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae).

    PubMed

    Pazian, Marlon F; Shimabukuro-Dias, Cristiane Kioko; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2013-03-01

    Some species of the genus Characidium have heteromorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a totally heterochromatic W chromosome. Methods for chromosome microdissection associated with chromosome painting have become important tools for cytogenetic studies in Neotropical fish. In Characidium cf. fasciatum, the Z chromosome contains a pericentromeric heterochromatin block, whereas the W chromosome is completely heterochromatic. Therefore, a probe was produced from the W chromosome through microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction amplification. FISH was performed using the W probe on the chromosomes of specimens of this species. This revealed expressive marks in the pericentromeric region of the Z chromosome as well as a completely painted W chromosome. When applying the same probe on chromosome preparations of C. cf. gomesi and Characidium sp., a pattern similar to C. cf. fasciatum was found, while C. cf. zebra, C. cf. lagosantense and Crenuchus spilurus species showed no hybridization signals. Structural changes in the chromosomes of an ancestral sexual system in the group that includes the species C. cf. gomesi, C. cf. fasciatum and Characidium sp., could have contributed to the process of speciation and could represent a causal mechanism of chromosomal diversification in this group. The heterochromatinization process possibly began in homomorphic and homologous chromosomes of an ancestral form, and this process could have given rise to the current patterns found in the species with sex chromosome heteromorphism.

  13. BRCA1-mutated and basal-like breast cancers have similar aCGH profiles and a high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Basal-like breast cancers (BLBC) are aggressive breast cancers for which, so far, no targeted therapy is available because they typically lack expression of hormone receptors and HER2. Phenotypic features of BLBCs, such as clinical presentation and early age of onset, resemble those of breast tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. The genomic instability of BRCA1-mutated tumors can be effectively targeted with DNA-damaging agents and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors. Molecular similarities between BLBCs and BRCA1-mutated tumors may therefore provide predictive markers for therapeutic response of BLBCs. Methods There are several known molecular features characteristic for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors: 1) increased numbers of genomic aberrations, 2) a distinct pattern of genomic aberrations, 3) a high frequency of TP53 mutations and 4) a high incidence of complex, protein-truncating TP53 mutations. We compared the frequency of TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations between BRCA1-mutated breast tumors, BLBCs and luminal breast tumors by TP53 gene sequencing and array-based comparative genomics hybridization (aCGH) analysis. Results We found that the high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors are also characteristic for BLBCs and different from luminal breast tumors. Conclusions Complex, protein truncating TP53 mutations in BRCA1-mutated tumors may be a direct consequence of genomic instability caused by BRCA1 loss, therefore, the presence of these types of TP53 mutations in sporadic BLBCs might be a hallmark of BRCAness and a potential biomarker for sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Also, our data suggest that a small subset of genomic regions may be used to identify BRCA1-like BLBCs. BLBCs share molecular features that were previously found to be specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors. These features might be useful

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Stable persistence of the yeast plasmid by hitchhiking on chromosomes during vegetative and germ-line divisions of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Soumitra; Liu, Yen-Ting; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    The chromosome-like stability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid 2 micron circle likely stems from its ability to tether to chromosomes and segregate by a hitchhiking mechanism. The plasmid partitioning system, responsible for chromosome-coupled segregation, is comprised of 2 plasmid coded proteins Rep1 and Rep2 and a partitioning locus STB. The evidence for the hitchhiking model for mitotic plasmid segregation, although compelling, is almost entirely circumstantial. Direct tests for plasmid-chromosome association are hampered by the limited resolving power of current cell biological tools for analyzing yeast chromosomes. Recent investigations, exploiting the improved resolution of yeast meiotic chromosomes, have revealed the plasmid's propensity to be present at or near chromosome tips. This localization is consistent with the rapid plasmid movements during meiosis I prophase, closely resembling telomere dynamics driven by a meiosis-specific nuclear envelope motor. Current evidence is consistent with the plasmid utilizing the motor as a platform for gaining access to telomeres. Episomes of viruses of the papilloma family and the gammaherpes subfamily persist in latently infected cells by tethering to chromosomes. Selfish genetic elements from fungi to mammals appear to have, by convergent evolution, arrived at the common strategy of chromosome association as a means for stable propagation. PMID:26442178

  16. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome.

  17. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtu