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Sample records for resolution time resolved

  1. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  2. Time-resolved High Spectral Resolution Observation of 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Prato, Lisa; Mawet, Dimitri

    2017-03-01

    Many brown dwarfs (BDs) exhibit photometric variability at levels from tenths to tens of percents. The photometric variability is related to magnetic activity or patchy cloud coverage, characteristic of BDs near the L–T transition. Time-resolved spectral monitoring of BDs provides diagnostics of cloud distribution and condensate properties. However, current time-resolved spectral studies of BDs are limited to low spectral resolution (R ∼ 100) with the exception of the study of Luhman 16 AB at a resolution of 100,000 using the VLT+CRIRES. This work yielded the first map of BD surface inhomogeneity, highlighting the importance and unique contribution of high spectral resolution observations. Here, we report on the time-resolved high spectral resolution observations of a nearby BD binary, 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB. We find no coherent spectral variability that is modulated with rotation. Based on simulations, we conclude that the coverage of a single spot on 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB is smaller than 1% or 6.25% if spot contrast is 50% or 80% of its surrounding flux, respectively. Future high spectral resolution observations aided by adaptive optics systems can put tighter constraints on the spectral variability of 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB and other nearby BDs.

  3. Expected resolution and detectability of adenocarcinoma tumors within human breast in time-resolved images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Nossal, Ralph J.; Dadmarz, Roya; Schwartzentruber, Douglas; Bonner, Robert F.

    1995-04-01

    The prospects for time-resolved optical mammography rests on the ability to detect adenocarcinoma within the breast with sufficient resolution and specificity to compete with X-ray mammography. We characterized the optical properties of an unusually large (6 cm diameter) fresh adenocarcinoma and normal breast tissue (determined by histology to be predominantly adipose tissue) obtained from a patient undergoing mastectomy. Large specimens (5 mm thick and 3 cm wide) allowed the determination of absorption and scattering coefficients and their spatial heterogeneity as probed with a 1 mm diameter laser beam at 633 nm and 800 nm utilizing total reflectance and transmittance measure with integrating spheres. The difference between scattering coefficients of the malignant tumor and those of normal (principally adipose) breast tissue at 633 nm was much greater than the heterogeneity within each sample. This scattering difference is the principal source of contrast, particularly in time-resolved images. However, the high scattering coefficient of normal breast tissue at 633 nm limits the practicality of time-resolved mammography of a human breast compressed to 5 cm. Although the scattering coefficient of the normal breast tissue decreases at 800 nm, the differences between the optical properties of normal and abnormal breast tissue also are reduced. We used these empirical results in theoretical expressions obtained from random walk theory to quantify the expected resolution, contrast, and the detected intensity of 3, 6, and 9 mm tumors within otherwise homogeneous human breasts as a function of the gating-time of time-resolved optical mammography.

  4. Time-resolved serial crystallography captures high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupriya; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Heymann, Michael; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Grant, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Scales, Jennifer; Gati, Cornelius; Seuring, Carolin; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schwander, Peter; Fromme, Raimund; Ourmazd, Abbas; Moffat, Keith; Van Thor, Jasper J.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N.; Schmidt, Marius

    2014-12-05

    We report that serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) offers the possibility to study light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. Using microcrystals of the blue light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, as a model system, we present high resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features, which allow the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to 1.6 Å resolution. These results open the way to the study of reversible and non-reversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions which maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal.

  5. Simulations of the temporal and spatial resolution for a compact time-resolved electron diffractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2016-02-01

    A novel compact electron gun for use in time-resolved gas electron diffraction experiments has recently been designed and commissioned. In this paper we present and discuss the extensive simulations that were performed to underpin the design in terms of the spatial and temporal qualities of the pulsed electron beam created by the ionisation of a gold photocathode using a femtosecond laser. The response of the electron pulses to a solenoid lens used to focus the electron beam has also been studied. The simulated results show that focussing the electron beam affects the overall spatial and temporal resolution of the experiment in a variety of ways, and that factors that improve the resolution of one parameter can often have a negative effect on the other. A balance must, therefore, be achieved between spatial and temporal resolution. The optimal experimental time resolution for the apparatus is predicted to be 416 fs for studies of gas-phase species, while the predicted spatial resolution of better than 2 nm-1 compares well with traditional time-averaged electron diffraction set-ups.

  6. Assessment of lifetime resolution limits in time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry vs. transducer frequencies: setting the stage for picosecond resolution.

    PubMed

    Schaberle, Fábio A; Rego Filho, Francisco de Assis M G; Reis, Luís A; Arnaut, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC) gives access to lifetimes and energy fractions of reaction intermediates by deconvolution of the photoacoustic wave of a sample (E-wave) with that of the instrumental response (T-wave). The ability to discriminate between short lifetimes increases with transducer frequencies employed to detect the PAC waves. We investigate the lifetime resolution limits of PAC as a function of the transducer frequencies using the instrumental response obtained with the photoacoustic reference 2-hydroxybenzophenone in toluene or acetonitrile. The instrumental response was obtained for a set of transducers with central frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 225 MHz. The simulated dependence of the lifetime resolution with the transducer frequencies was anchored on experimental data obtained for the singlet state of naphthalene with a 2.25 MHz transducer. The shortest lifetime resolved with the 2.25 MHz transducer was 19 ns and our modelling of the transducer responses indicates that sub-nanosecond lifetimes of photoacoustic transients can be resolved with transducers of central frequencies above 100 MHz.

  7. Time-resolved photoemission apparatus achieving sub-20-meV energy resolution and high stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kiss, T.; Otsu, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-15

    The paper describes a time- and angle-resolved photoemission apparatus consisting of a hemispherical analyzer and a pulsed laser source. We demonstrate 1.48-eV pump and 5.92-eV probe measurements at the ⩾10.5-meV and ⩾240-fs resolutions by use of fairly monochromatic 170-fs pulses delivered from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system operating typically at 250 kHz. The apparatus is capable to resolve the optically filled superconducting peak in the unoccupied states of a cuprate superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. A dataset recorded on Bi(111) surface is also presented. Technical descriptions include the followings: A simple procedure to fine-tune the spatio-temporal overlap of the pump-and-probe beams and their diameters; achieving a long-term stability of the system that enables a normalization-free dataset acquisition; changing the repetition rate by utilizing acoustic optical modulator and frequency-division circuit.

  8. Time-resolved diffraction and interference: Young's interference with photons of different energy as revealed by time resolution.

    PubMed

    Garcia, N; Saveliev, I G; Sharonov, M

    2002-05-15

    We present time-resolved diffraction and two-slit interference experiments using a streak camera as a detector for femtosecond pulses of photons. These experiments show how the diffraction pattern is built by adding frames of a few photons to each frame. It is estimated that after 300 photons the diffraction pattern emerges. With time resolution we can check the speed of light and put an upper limit of 2 ps at our resolution to the time for wave function collapse in the quantum measurement process. We then produce interference experiments with photons of different energies impinging on the slits, i.e. we know which photon impinges on each slit. We show that for poor time resolution, no interference is observed, but for high time resolution, we have interference that is revealed as beats of 100 GHz frequency. The condition for interference is that the two pulses should overlap spatially at the detector, even if the pulses have different energies but are generated from the same pulse of the laser. The interference seems to be in agreement with classical theory at first sight. However, closer study and analysis of the data show deviations in the visibility of the interference fringes and of their phase. These experiments are discussed in connection with quantum mechanics and it may be concluded that the time resolution provides new data for understanding the longstanding and continuing arguments on wave-particle duality initiated by Newton, Young, Fresnel, Planck and others. A thought experiment is presented in the appendix to try to distinguish the photons at the detector by making it sensitive to colour.

  9. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  10. High-resolution time-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy on NSTX.

    PubMed

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Clementson, J; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kaita, R; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L; Zimmer, G

    2012-10-01

    We report on upgrades to the flat-field grazing-incidence grating spectrometers X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (XEUS) and Long-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (LoWEUS), at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. XEUS employs a variable space grating with an average spacing of 2400 lines/mm and covers the 9-64 Å wavelength band, while LoWEUS has an average spacing of 1200 lines/mm and is positioned to monitor the 90-270 Å wavelength band. Both spectrometers have been upgraded with new cameras that achieve 12.5 ms time resolution. We demonstrate the new time resolution capability by showing the time evolution of iron in the NSTX plasma.

  11. Time-Resolved High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Using a Piezo-Driving Specimen Holder for Atomic-Scale Mechanical Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kizuka; Tanaka; Deguchi; Naruse

    1998-05-01

    : Time-resolved high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at a spatial resolution of 0.2 nm and a time resolution of 1/60 sec using a piezo-driving specimen holder is reported here. Various types of atomic processes in mechanical interaction, such as contact, bonding, deformation, and fracture, in nanometer-sized gold crystallites and carbon nanotubes are demonstrated.

  12. Nonlinear spectroscopy in the near-field: time resolved spectroscopy and subwavelength resolution non-invasive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namboodiri, Mahesh; Khan, Tahirzeb; Karki, Khadga; Kazemi, Mehdi Mohammad; Bom, Sidhant; Flachenecker, Günter; Namboodiri, Vinu; Materny, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    The combination of near-field microscopy along with nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques is presented here. The scanning near-field imaging technique can be integrated with nonlinear spectroscopic techniques to improve spatial and axial resolution of the images. Additionally, ultrafast dynamics can be probed down to nano-scale dimension. The review shows some examples for this combination, which resulted in an exciton map and vibrational contrast images with sub-wavelength resolution. Results of two-color femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) on thin films of the organic semiconductor 3,4,9,10 Perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) are presented. While nonlinear Raman techniques have been used to obtain highly resolved images in combination with near-field microscopy, the use of femtosecond laser pulses in electronic resonance still constitutes a big challenge. Here, we present our first results on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) with femtosecond laser pulses detected in the near-field using SNOM. We demonstrate that highly spatially resolved images can be obtained from poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nano-structures where the fs-CARS process was in resonance with the P3HT absorption and with characteristic P3HT vibrational modes without destruction of the samples. Sub-diffraction limited lateral resolution is achieved. Especially the height resolution clearly surpasses that obtained with standard microCARS. These results will be the basis for future investigations of mode-selective dynamics in the near-field.

  13. Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol using High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2009-09-09

    Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/Δm). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity indexes (AI) in hundreds of identified individual SOA species.

  14. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  15. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  16. High harmonic generation based time resolved ARPES at 30 eV with 50 meV energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Timm; Sie, Edbert J.; Mahmood, Fahad; Gedik, Nuh

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a leading technique in identifying equilibrium properties of complex electronic systems as well as their correlated dynamics. By using femtosecond high harmonic generation (HHG) pulses, this technique can be extended to monitor ultrafast changes in the electronic structure in response to an optical excitation. However, the broad bandwidth of the HHG pulses has been a major experimental limitation. In this contribution, we combine the HHG source with an off-axis Czerny-Turner XUV monochromator and a three-dimensional ``ARTOF'' photoelectron detector to achieve an unrivaled overall energy resolution of 50 meV in multiple harmonic energies. Moreover, the use of a stack of different gratings enables us to fine control both the photon energy and time vs. energy resolution to its particular needs. The performance of our setup is demonstrated by studies on the transition metal dichalcogenide IrTe2 which undergoes a first-order structural transition and accompanied reconstruction of the band structure upon cooling without the characteristic opening of an energy gap.

  17. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Jozwiak, C.; Lanzara, A.

    2013-09-15

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E{sub F} spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  18. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of {sigma}=18 ps and energy resolution {delta}E/E=3.5%

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2008-06-15

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 {mu}m) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to {sigma}=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than {sigma}=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of {delta}E{sub FWHM}/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about {delta}m{sub FWHM}/m=1/4150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to {sigma}=115 {mu}m.

  19. An experimental setup for high resolution 10.5 eV laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using a time-of-flight electron analyzer.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, M H; Götberg, O; Tjernberg, O

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental setup for laser-based angle-resolved time-of-flight photoemission. Using a picosecond pulsed laser, photons of energy 10.5 eV are generated through higher harmonic generation in xenon. The high repetition rate of the light source, variable between 0.2 and 8 MHz, enables high photoelectron count rates and short acquisition times. By using a time-of-flight analyzer with angle-resolving capabilities, electrons emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to ±15° can be collected. Hence, simultaneous acquisition of photoemission data for a complete area of the Brillouin zone is possible. The current photon energy enables bulk sensitive measurements, high angular resolution, and the resulting covered momentum space is large enough to enclose the entire Brillouin zone in cuprate high-T(c) superconductors. Fermi edge measurements on polycrystalline Au shows an energy resolution better than 5 meV. Data from a test measurement of the Au(111) surface state are presented along with measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-T(c) superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + δ) (Bi2212).

  20. Time resolved astronomy with the SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; McPhate, J.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Potter, S. B.; O'Donoghue, D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Schellart, P.; Spark, M.; Welsh, B. Y.; Zietsman, E.

    2010-07-01

    While time resolved astronomical observations are not new, the extension of such studies to sub-second time resolution is and has resulted in the opening of a new observational frontier, High Time Resolution Astronomy (HTRA). HTRA studies are well suited to objects like compact binary stars (CVs and X-ray binaries) and pulsars, while asteroseismology of pulsating stars, occultations, transits and the study of transients, will all benefit from such HTRA studies. HTRA has been a SALT science driver from the outset and the first-light instruments, namely the UV-VIS imager, SALTICAM, and the multi-purpose Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS), both have high time resolution modes. These are described, together with some observational examples. We also discuss the commissioning observations with the photon counting Berkeley Visible Image Tube camera (BVIT) on SALT. Finally we describe the software tools, developed in Python, to reduce SALT time resolved observations.

  1. High-resolution time-resolved x-ray microscope for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Levesque, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Deane, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    A versatile x-ray microscope diagnostic has been built to perform target dynamics experiments on the Nova Ten Beam target irradiation facility. This system is based on Wolter's axisymmetric focusing scheme. An alignment system is described which provides for both quick and accurate alignment of the x-ray optic. Results are presented showing the system resolution and accuracy of alignment. Images from target dynamics experiments are also presented. 9 refs.

  2. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei; Champion, Paul; Heilweil, Edwin J.; Nelson, Keith A.; Ziegler, Larry

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haller, Emmanuel B.

    1996-01-01

    In response to an invitation by the editor-in-chief, I would like to present the current status of time-domain imaging. With exciting new photon diffusion techniques being developed in the frequency domain and promising optical coherence tomography, time-resolved transillumination is in constant evolution and the subject of passionate discussions during the numerous conferences dedicated to this subject. The purpose of time-resolved optical tomography is to provide noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of the interior of living bodies by the use of nonionizing radiation. Moreover, the use of visible to near-infrared wavelength yields metabolic information. Breast cancer screening is the primary potential application for time-resolved imaging. Neurology and tissue characterization are also possible fields of applications. Time- resolved transillumination and optical tomography should not only improve diagnoses, but the welfare of the patient. As no overview of this technique has yet been presented to my knowledge, this paper briefly describes the various methods enabling time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as the clinical challenges they face are discussed. Although an analytic and computable model of light transport through tissues is essential for a meaningful interpretation of the transillumination process, this paper will not dwell on the mathematics of photon propagation.

  4. Time-resolved RNA SHAPE chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Stefanie A; Weeks, Kevin M

    2008-12-03

    Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) chemistry yields quantitative RNA secondary and tertiary structure information at single nucleotide resolution. SHAPE takes advantage of the discovery that the nucleophilic reactivity of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group is modulated by local nucleotide flexibility in the RNA backbone. Flexible nucleotides are reactive toward hydroxyl-selective electrophiles, whereas constrained nucleotides are unreactive. Initial versions of SHAPE chemistry, which employ isatoic anhydride derivatives that react on the minute time scale, are emerging as the ideal technology for monitoring equilibrium structures of RNA in a wide variety of biological environments. Here, we extend SHAPE chemistry to a benzoyl cyanide scaffold to make possible facile time-resolved kinetic studies of RNA in approximately 1 s snapshots. We then use SHAPE chemistry to follow the time-dependent folding of an RNase P specificity domain RNA. Tertiary interactions form in two distinct steps with local tertiary contacts forming an order of magnitude faster than long-range interactions. Rate-determining tertiary folding requires minutes despite that no non-native interactions must be disrupted to form the native structure. Instead, overall folding is limited by simultaneous formation of interactions approximately 55 A distant in the RNA. Time-resolved SHAPE holds broad potential for understanding structural biogenesis and the conformational interconversions essential to the functions of complex RNA molecules at single nucleotide resolution.

  5. Nonradiative deactivation of excited hemicyanines studied with submolecular spatial resolution by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gassin, Gaelle; Villamaina, Diego; Vauthey, Eric

    2011-03-02

    The excited-state dynamics of aminostilbazolium dyes is known to be dominated by nonradiative deactivation through large-amplitude motion. In order to identify the coordinate(s) responsible for this process, the excited-state lifetimes of two dialkylaminostyryl-methylpyridinium iodides have been measured at liquid-liquid interfaces using time-resolved surface second harmonic generation. We found that the decay time of the excited-states of both compounds was increasing with the viscosity of the apolar phase, consisting of n-alkanes of varying length, but was unaffected by that of the polar phase, made of water/glycerol mixtures. This indicates that the nonradiative deactivation is associated with the twist of the dialkylaniline group, which is located in the apolar part of the molecule.

  6. Atomic Resolution Mapping of the Excited-State Electronic Structure of Cu2O with Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, Patrick B.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2009-09-29

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that that the conduction band and valence band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  7. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the OK edge and the CuL3 edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu3d and O2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the CuL3 - and OK -edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  8. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, Nils; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2010-05-02

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  9. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; ...

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa.more » The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.« less

  10. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array.

    PubMed

    King, R B; Agnew, C E; O'Connell, B F; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2016-08-07

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS(®) SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5

  11. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O'Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS® SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were

  12. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  13. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  14. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  15. Photon-number-resolving detector with 10 bits of resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Leaf A.; Dauler, Eric A.; Chang, Joshua T

    2007-06-15

    A photon-number-resolving detector with single-photon resolution is described and demonstrated. It has 10 bits of resolution, does not require cryogenic cooling, and is sensitive to near ir wavelengths. This performance is achieved by flood illuminating a 32x32 element In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}AsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array that has an integrated counter and digital readout circuit behind each pixel.

  16. Sensitive, time-resolved, broadband spectroscopy of single transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Baev, Ivan; Hellmig, Ortwin; Sengstock, Klaus; Baev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Intracavity absorption spectroscopy with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of transient gain and absorption in electrically excited Xe and Kr plasmas. The achieved time resolution for broadband spectral recording of a single process is 25 µs. For pulsed-periodic processes, the time resolution is limited by the laser pulse duration, which is set here to 3 µs. This pulse duration also predefines the effective absorption path length, which amounts to 900 m. The presented technique can be applied to multicomponent analysis of single transient processes such as shock tube experiments, pulse detonation engines, or explosives.

  17. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  18. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  19. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  20. The Resolution Code of Acute Inflammation: Novel Pro-Resolving Lipid Mediators in Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.; Chiang, Nan; Dalli, Jesmond

    2015-01-01

    Studies into the mechanisms in resolution of self-limited inflammation and acute reperfusion injury have uncovered a new genus of pro-resolving lipid mediators coined specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) including lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins that are each temporally produced by resolving-exudates with distinct actions for return to homeostasis. SPM evoke potent anti-inflammatory and novel pro-resolving mechanisms as well as enhance microbial clearance. While born in inflammation-resolution, SPM are conserved structures with functions discovered in microbial defense, pain, organ protection and tissue regeneration, wound healing, cancer, reproduction, and neurobiology-cognition. This review covers these SPM mechanisms and other new omega-3 PUFA pathways that open their path for functions in resolution physiology. PMID:25857211

  1. Femtosecond time-resolved optical and Raman spectroscopy of photoinduced spin crossover: temporal resolution of low-to-high spin optical switching.

    PubMed

    Smeigh, Amanda L; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A; McCusker, James K

    2008-10-29

    A combination of femtosecond electronic absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopies has been employed to determine the kinetics associated with low-spin to high-spin conversion following charge-transfer excitation of a FeII spin-crossover system in solution. A time constant of tau = 190 +/- 50 fs for the formation of the 5T2 ligand-field state was assigned based on the establishment of two isosbestic points in the ultraviolet in conjunction with changes in ligand stretching frequencies and Raman scattering amplitudes; additional dynamics observed in both the electronic and vibrational spectra further indicate that vibrational relaxation in the high-spin state occurs with a time constant of ca. 10 ps. The results set an important precedent for extremely rapid, formally forbidden (DeltaS = 2) nonradiative relaxation as well as defining the time scale for intramolecular optical switching between two electronic states possessing vastly different spectroscopic, geometric, and magnetic properties.

  2. Time-Resolved Measurements in Optoelectronic Microbioanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory; Kossakovski, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    A report presents discussion of time-resolved measurements in optoelectronic microbioanalysis. Proposed microbioanalytical laboratory-on-a-chip devices for detection of microbes and toxic chemicals would include optoelectronic sensors and associated electronic circuits that would look for fluorescence or phosphorescence signatures of multiple hazardous biomolecules in order to detect which ones were present in a given situation. The emphasis in the instant report is on gating an active-pixel sensor in the time domain, instead of filtering light in the wavelength domain, to prevent the sensor from responding to a laser pulse used to excite fluorescence or phosphorescence while enabling the sensor to respond to the decaying fluorescence or phosphorescence signal that follows the laser pulse. The active-pixel sensor would be turned on after the laser pulse and would be used to either integrate the fluorescence or phosphorescence signal over several lifetimes and many excitation pulses or else take time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence or phosphorescence. The report also discusses issues of multiplexing and of using time-resolved measurements of fluorophores with known different fluorescence lifetimes to distinguish among them.

  3. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, manipulate, and investigate solid surfaces on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules. The strength of this technique lies in its imaging capabilities, since for many scientists 'seeing is believing'. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy also suffers from a severe limitation, namely its poor time resolution. Recording a scanning tunnelling microscopy image typically requires a few tens of seconds for a conventional scanning tunnelling microscope to a fraction of a second for a specially designed fast scanning tunnelling microscope. Designing and building such a fast scanning tunnelling microscope is a formidable task in itself and therefore, only a limited number of these microscopes have been built [1]. There is, however, another alternative route to significantly enhance the time resolution of a scanning tunnelling microscope. In this alternative method, the tunnelling current is measured as a function of time with the feedback loop switched off. The time resolution is determined by the bandwidth of the IV converter rather than the cut-off frequency of the feedback electronics. Such an approach requires a stable microscope and goes, of course, at the expense of spatial information. In this issue, we have collected a set of papers that gives an impression of the current status of this rapidly emerging field [2]. One of the very first attempts to extract information from tunnel current fluctuations was reported by Tringides' group in the mid-1990s [3]. They showed that the collective diffusion coefficient can be extracted from the autocorrelation of the time-dependent tunnelling current fluctuations produced by atom motion in and out of the tunnelling junction. In general, current-time traces provide direct information on switching/conformation rates and distributions of residence times. In the case where these processes are thermally induced it is rather straightforward to map

  4. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  5. Ocean wavenumber estimation from wave-resolving time series imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, N.G.; Holland, K.T.; Haller, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    We review several approaches that have been used to estimate ocean surface gravity wavenumbers from wave-resolving remotely sensed image sequences. Two fundamentally different approaches that utilize these data exist. A power spectral density approach identifies wavenumbers where image intensity variance is maximized. Alternatively, a cross-spectral correlation approach identifies wavenumbers where intensity coherence is maximized. We develop a solution to the latter approach based on a tomographic analysis that utilizes a nonlinear inverse method. The solution is tolerant to noise and other forms of sampling deficiency and can be applied to arbitrary sampling patterns, as well as to full-frame imagery. The solution includes error predictions that can be used for data retrieval quality control and for evaluating sample designs. A quantitative analysis of the intrinsic resolution of the method indicates that the cross-spectral correlation fitting improves resolution by a factor of about ten times as compared to the power spectral density fitting approach. The resolution analysis also provides a rule of thumb for nearshore bathymetry retrievals-short-scale cross-shore patterns may be resolved if they are about ten times longer than the average water depth over the pattern. This guidance can be applied to sample design to constrain both the sensor array (image resolution) and the analysis array (tomographic resolution). ?? 2008 IEEE.

  6. Spin resolved bandstructure imaging with a high resolution momentum microscope.

    PubMed

    Tusche, Christian; Krasyuk, Alexander; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We present a spin resolving "momentum microscope" for the high resolution imaging of the momentum distribution of photoelectrons. Measurements of the band structure of a Au(111) single crystal surface demonstrate an energy resolution of ΔE=12 meV and a momentum resolution of Δk∥=0.0049 Å(-1), measured at the line-width of the spin-orbit split Shockley surface state. The relative accuracy of the k∥ measurement in the order of 10(-4) Å(-1) reveals a deviation from the ideal two-dimensional free electron gas model of the Shockley surface state, manifested in a threefold radial symmetry. Spin resolution in the full momentum image is obtained by an imaging spin-filter based on low-energy electron diffraction at a Au passivated Ir(100) single crystal. Using working points at 10.5 eV and 11.5 eV scattering energy with a completely reversed asymmetry of ±60% we demonstrate the efficient mapping of the spin texture of the Au(111) surface state.

  7. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  8. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  9. Recent Advances in 3D Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Stephen J.; Haider, Clifton R.; Borisch, Eric A.; Weavers, Paul T.; Young, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) was first introduced for clinical studies approximately 20 years ago. Early work provided 3 to 4 mm spatial resolution with acquisition times in the 30 sec range. Since that time there has been continuing effort to provide improved spatial resolution with reduced acquisition time, allowing high resolution three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved studies. The purpose of this work is to describe how this has been accomplished. Specific technical enablers have been: improved gradients allowing reduced repetition times, improved k-space sampling and reconstruction methods, parallel acquisition particularly in two directions, and improved and higher count receiver coil arrays. These have collectively made high resolution time-resolved studies readily available for many anatomic regions. Depending on the application, approximate 1 mm isotropic resolution is now possible with frame times of several seconds. Clinical applications of time-resolved CE-MRA are briefly reviewed. PMID:26032598

  10. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George R; Gleckler, Anthony

    2010-09-10

    Planetary mineralogy can be revealed through a variety of remote sensing and in situ investigations that precede any plans for eventual sample return. We briefly review those techniques and focus on the capabilities for on-surface in situ examination of Mars, Venus, the Moon, asteroids, and other bodies. Over the past decade, Raman spectroscopy has continued to develop as a prime candidate for the next generation of in situ planetary instruments, as it provides definitive structural and compositional information of minerals in their natural geological context. Traditional continuous-wave Raman spectroscopy using a green laser suffers from fluorescence interference, which can be large (sometimes saturating the detector), particularly in altered minerals, which are of the greatest geophysical interest. Taking advantage of the fact that fluorescence occurs at a later time than the instantaneous Raman signal, we have developed a time-resolved Raman spectrometer that uses a streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser to provide picosecond time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence spectra in minerals makes this technique ideal for exploration of diverse planetary environments, some of which are expected to contain strong, if not overwhelming, fluorescence signatures. We discuss performance capability and present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from several highly fluorescent and Mars-relevant minerals. In particular, we have found that conventional Raman spectra from fine grained clays, sulfates, and phosphates exhibited large fluorescent signatures, but high quality spectra could be obtained using our time-resolved approach.

  11. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  12. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  13. Resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, S. E.; Switzer, P.; Kowalik, W. S.; Lyon, R. J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate maximum likelihood technique employing a widely available discriminant analysis program is discussed that has been developed for resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements. The method uses all four channels of Landsat data simultaneously and does not require prior knowledge of the percentage of components in mixed pixels. It was tested in five cases that were chosen to represent mixtures of outcrop, soil and vegetation which would typically be encountered in geologic studies with Landsat data. For all five cases, the method proved to be superior to single band weighted average and linear regression techniques and permitted an estimate of the total area occupied by component terrains to within plus or minus 6% of the true area covered. Its major drawback is a consistent overestimation of the pixel component percent of the darker materials (vegetation) and an underestimation of the pixel component percent of the brighter materials (sand).

  14. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-15

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  15. Time-resolved Temperature Measurements in SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ludington, A R; Hill, D N; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2006-08-14

    We seek to measure time-resolved electron temperatures in the SSPX plasma using soft X-rays from free-free Bremsstrahlung radiation. To increase sensitivity to changes in temperature over the range 100-300 eV, we use two photodiode detectors sensitive to different soft X-ray energies. The detectors, one with a Zr/C coating and the other with a Ti/Pd coating, view the plasma along a common line of sight tangential to the magnetic axis of the spheromak, where the electron temperature is a maximum. The comparison of the signals, over a similar volume of plasma, should be a stronger function of temperature than a single detector in the range of Te< 300 eV. The success of using photodiodes to detect changing temperatures along a chord will make the case for designing an array of the detectors, which could provide a time changing temperature profile over a larger portion of the plasma.

  16. Bypassing the energy-time uncertainty in time-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randi, Francesco; Fausti, Daniele; Eckstein, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The energy-time uncertainty is an intrinsic limit for time-resolved experiments imposing a tradeoff between the duration of the light pulses used in experiments and their frequency content. In standard time-resolved photoemission, this limitation maps directly onto a tradeoff between the time resolution of the experiment and the energy resolution that can be achieved on the electronic spectral function. Here we propose a protocol to disentangle the energy and time resolutions in photoemission. We demonstrate that dynamical information on all time scales can be retrieved from time-resolved photoemission experiments using suitably shaped light pulses of quantum or classical nature. As a paradigmatic example, we study the dynamical buildup of the Kondo peak, a narrow feature in the electronic response function arising from the screening of a magnetic impurity by the conduction electrons. After a quench, the electronic screening builds up on timescales shorter than the inverse width of the Kondo peak and we demonstrate that the proposed experimental scheme could be used to measure the intrinsic time scales of such electronic screening. The proposed approach provides an experimental framework to access the nonequilibrium response of collective electronic properties beyond the spectral uncertainty limit and will enable the direct measurement of phenomena such as excited Higgs modes and, possibly, the retarded interactions in superconducting systems.

  17. Time Resolved Raman and Fluorescence Spectrometer for Planetary Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George

    2010-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a prime candidate for the next generation of planetary instruments, as it addresses the primary goal of mineralogical analysis which is structure and composition. It does not require sample preparation and provides unique mineral fingerprints, even for mixed phase samples. However, large fluorescence return from many mineral samples under visible light excitation can seriously compromise the quality of the spectra or even render Raman spectra unattainable. Fluorescence interference is likely to be a problem on Mars and is evident in Raman spectra of Martian Meteorites[1]. Our approach uses time resolution for elimination of fluorescence from Raman spectra, allowing for traditional visible laser excitation (532 nm). Since Raman occurs instantaneously with the laser pulse and fluorescence lifetimes vary from nsec to msec depending on the mineral, it is possible to separate them out in time. Complementary information can also be obtained simultaneously using the time resolved fluorescence data. The Simultaneous Spectral Temporal Adaptive Raman Spectrometer (SSTARS) is a planetary instrument under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, capable of time-resolved in situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. A streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser provide psec scale time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence in minerals provides a foundation for design of pulsed Raman and fluorescence spectrometers in diverse planetary environments. We will discuss the SSTARS instrument design and performance capability. We will also present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from a relevant set of minerals selected using available data on Mars mineralogy[2]. Of particular interest are minerals resulting from aqueous alteration on Mars. For comparison, we will present Raman spectra obtained using a commercial continuous wave (CW) green (514 nm) Raman system. In many cases using a CW laser

  18. Time-resolved single dopant charge dynamics in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohammad; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Taucer, Marco; Achal, Roshan; Pitters, Jason L.; Loth, Sebastian; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    As the ultimate miniaturization of semiconductor devices approaches, it is imperative that the effects of single dopants be clarified. Beyond providing insight into functions and limitations of conventional devices, such information enables identification of new device concepts. Investigating single dopants requires sub-nanometre spatial resolution, making scanning tunnelling microscopy an ideal tool. However, dopant dynamics involve processes occurring at nanosecond timescales, posing a significant challenge to experiment. Here we use time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy to probe and study transport through a dangling bond on silicon before the system relaxes or adjusts to accommodate an applied electric field. Atomically resolved, electronic pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy permits unprecedented, quantitative measurement of time-resolved single dopant ionization dynamics. Tunnelling through the surface dangling bond makes measurement of a signal that would otherwise be too weak to detect feasible. Distinct ionization and neutralization rates of a single dopant are measured and the physical process controlling those are identified. PMID:27782125

  19. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium is recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentration are also recovered successfully. PMID:23640084

  20. Aerosol hygroscopicity in the marine atmosphere: a closure study using high-time-resolution, multiple-RH DASH-SP and size-resolved C-ToF-AMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Sorooshian, A.; Murphy, S. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We have conducted the first airborne hygroscopic growth closure study to utilize data from an Aerodyne compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) coupled with size-resolved, multiple-RH, high-time-resolution hygroscopic growth factor (GF) measurements from the differential aerosol sizing and hygroscopicity spectrometer probe (DASH-SP). These data were collected off the coast of Central California during seven of the 16 flights carried out during the MASE-II field campaign in July 2007. Two of the seven flights were conducted in airmasses characterized by continental origin. These flights exhibited elevated organic volume fractions (VForganic=0.56±0.19, as opposed to 0.39±0.20 for all other flights), corresponding to significantly suppressed GFs at high RH (1.61±0.14 at 92% RH, as compared with 1.91±0.07 for all other flights), more moderate GF suppression at intermediate RH (1.53±0.10 at 85%, compared with 1.58±0.08 for all other flights), and no measurable GF suppression at low RH (1.31±0.06 at 74%, compared with 1.31±0.07 for all other flights). Organic loadings were slightly elevated in above-cloud aerosols, as compared with below-cloud aerosols, and corresponded to a similar trend of significantly suppressed GF at high RH, but more moderate impacts at lower values of RH. A hygroscopic closure based on a volume-weighted mixing rule provided good agreement with DASH-SP measurements (R2=0.78). Minimization of root mean square error between observations and predictions indicated mission-averaged organic GFs of 1.22, 1.45, and 1.48 at 74, 85, and 92% RH, respectively. These values agree with previously reported values for water-soluble organics such as dicarboxylic and multifunctional acids, and correspond to a highly oxidized, presumably water-soluble, organic fraction (mission-averaged O:C=0.92±0.33). Finally, a backward stepwise linear regression revealed that, other than RH, the most important predictor for GF is VForganic, indicating

  1. Time Resolved Imaging of Longitudinal Modulations in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    2007-11-01

    The longitudinal evolution of high intensity beams is not well understood despite its importance to the success of such applications as free electron lasers and light sources, heavy ion inertial fusion, and high energy colliders. For example any amplification of current modulations in an FEL photoinjector can lead to unwanted coherent synchrotron radiation further downstream in compression chicanes or bends. A significant factor usually neglected is the coupling to the transverse dynamics which can strongly affect the longitudinal evolution. Previous experiments at the University of Maryland have revealed much about the longitudinal physics of space-charge dominated beams by monitoring the evolution of longitudinal perturbations. For the first time, experimental results are presented here which reveal the effect of longitudinal perturbations on the transverse beam distribution, with the aid of several new diagnostics that capture detailed time-resolved density images. A longitudinal modulation of the particle density is deliberately generated at the source, and its evolution is tracked downstream using a number of diagnostics such as current monitors, high-resolution energy analyzers, as well as the transverse imaging devices. The latter consist of a high-resolution 16-bit gated camera coupled with very fast emitters such as prompt optical transition radiation (OTR) from an alumina screen, or fast Phosphor screens with 3-ns time resolution. Simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP are applied to cross-check the experimental results. These experiments and especially the comparisons to simulation represent significant progress towards understanding the longitudinal physics of intense beams.

  2. Time-resolved measurements of equilibrium profiles in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, B. H.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Yates, T. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Caspary, K.; McCollam, K. J.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Craig, D.

    2007-11-01

    Based on the high-speed, three-wave, far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer measurement of Bpol profiles and external coil measurements of Btave and Btw, a new method is developed to derive Btor and other equilibrium profiles (J// and q) with high time resolution. Using Faraday's law, the inductive electric field (E//) profile is also deduced from the temporal derivatives of the time-resolved magnetic field profiles. The derived B(0) values have excellent agreement with direct measurements using a Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic. Evolution of equilibrium profiles during single sawtooth events in MST, both the slow linear ramp and crash phases, are presented. Profile scaling with plasma current Ip and reversal parameter F is also explored. MHD stability is tested from the spatial gradients of the J// and q profiles, and correlation with fluctuation mode amplitude is investigated. Future improvements to equilibrium reconstruction are expected by measuring Btor(r,t) directly via Cotton-Mouton interferometry.

  3. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  4. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  5. High resolution time interval counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Victor S.; Davis, Dick D.; Lombardi, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed two types of high resolution, multi-channel time interval counters. In the NIST two-way time transfer MODEM application, the counter is designed for operating primarily in the interrupt-driven mode, with 3 start channels and 3 stop channels. The intended start and stop signals are 1 PPS, although other frequencies can also be applied to start and stop the count. The time interval counters used in the NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis System are implemented with 7 start channels and 7 stop channels. Four of the 7 start channels are devoted to the frequencies of 1 MHz, 5 MHz or 10 MHz, while triggering signals to all other start and stop channels can range from 1 PPS to 100 kHz. Time interval interpolation plays a key role in achieving the high resolution time interval measurements for both counters. With a 10 MHz time base, both counters demonstrate a single-shot resolution of better than 40 ps, and a stability of better than 5 x 10(exp -12) (sigma(sub chi)(tau)) after self test of 1000 seconds). The maximum rate of time interval measurements (with no dead time) is 1.0 kHz for the counter used in the MODEM application and is 2.0 kHz for the counter used in the Frequency Measurement and Analysis System. The counters are implemented as plug-in units for an AT-compatible personal computer. This configuration provides an efficient way of using a computer not only to control and operate the counters, but also to store and process measured data.

  6. Ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies of carotenoids in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the application of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies to the studies of carotenoids in photosynthesis. The focus is on the ultrafast time regime and the study of photophysics and photochemistry of carotenoids by femtosecond time-resolved stimulated Raman and four-wave mixing spectroscopies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  7. Time- and space-resolved reflectance from multilayered turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelebart, Bernard; Tualle, Jean-Michel; Tinet, Eric; Avrillier, Sigrid; Ollivier, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose is to develop an optical technique for in-vivo and non-invasive diagnosis using backscattered light measurements. We have already demonstrated that optical coefficients of turbid media ((mu) a, (mu) s) can be derived from time and space-resolved reflectance in the case of semi-infinite geometry. This procedure was then applied to the investigation of multi-layered media: the upper layer was an aqueous solution of calibrated latex microspheres in water and the lower layer of the sample was a solid phantom. Two different types of phantoms were used. In the first set of experiments, we used an absorbing medium for under layer. In the second case, the lower layer was an absorbing and scattering phantom. Comparison with Monte-Carlo simulations were achieved for the resolution of the inverse problem.

  8. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; Silly, M G; Krizmancic, D; Chauvet, C; Guzzo, M; Ricaud, J P; Izquierdo, M; Stebel, L; Pittana, P; Sergo, R; Cautero, G; Dufour, G; Rochet, F; Sirotti, F

    2011-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera-based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photoemitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station.

  9. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  10. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target.

  11. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures.

  12. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  13. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  14. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  15. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of <100 nm. In order to demonstrate the spatiotemporal magnetic imaging capability of this microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz.

  16. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa. The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  18. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Roschewsky, Niklas Schreier, Michael; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Geprägs, Stephan; Kamra, Akashdeep; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-05-19

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our thin film hybrid structures.

  20. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  1. Fielding of a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Frayer, Brian Cox, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Morris Kaufman

    2008-03-01

    A diagnostic instrument has been developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed in order to create time histories of the electron beam. Four discrete optical subsystems view Cerenkov light generated at an X-ray target inside of a vacuum envelope. Each system employs cylindrical optics to image light in one direction and collapse light in the orthogonal direction. Each of the four systems images and collapses in unique axes, thereby capturing unique information. Light along the imaging axis is relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. A computer is used to reconstruct the original image from the four optically collapsed images. Due to DARHT’s adverse environment, the instrument can be operated remotely to adjust optical parameters and contains a subsystem for remote calibration. The instrument was deployed and calibrated, and has been used to capture and reconstruct images. Matters of alignment, calibration, control, resolution, adverse conditions and maintenance will be discussed.

  2. Chopper system for time resolved experiments with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Marco; Eybert, Laurent; Ewald, Friederike; Reichenbach, Wolfgang; Wulff, Michael; Anfinrud, Philip; Schotte, Friedrich; Plech, Anton; Kong, Qingyu; Lorenc, Maciej; Lindenau, Bernd; Räbiger, Jürgen; Polachowski, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A chopper system for time resolved pump-probe experiments with x-ray beams from a synchrotron is described. The system has three parts: a water-cooled heatload chopper, a high-speed chopper, and a millisecond shutter. The chopper system, which is installed in beamline ID09B at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, provides short x-ray pulses for pump-probe experiments with ultrafast lasers. The chopper system can produce x-ray pulses as short as 200 ns in a continuous beam and repeat at frequencies from 0 to 3 kHz. For bunch filling patterns of the synchrotron with pulse separations greater than 100 ns, the high-speed chopper can isolate single 100 ps x-ray pulses that are used for the highest time resolution. A new rotor in the high-speed chopper is presented with a single pulse (100 ps) and long pulse (10 micros) option. In white beam experiments, the heatload of the (noncooled) high-speed chopper is lowered by a heatload chopper, which absorbs 95% of the incoming power without affecting the pulses selected by the high speed chopper.

  3. Fielding of a Time-Resolved Tomographic Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Frayer, Brian Cox, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Mike Jones, Morris Kaufman

    2008-09-11

    A diagnostic instrument has been developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed in order to create time histories of the electron beam. Four discrete optical subsystems view Cerenkov light generated at an x-ray target inside of a vacuum envelope. Each system employs cylindrical optics to image light in one direction and collapse light in the orthogonal direction. Each of the four systems images and collapses in unique axes, thereby capturing unique information. Light along the imaging axis is relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. A computer is used to reconstruct the original image from the four optically collapsed images. Due to DARHT’s adverse environment, the instrument can be operated remotely to adjust optical parameters and contains a subsystem for remote calibration. The instrument was deployed and calibrated, and has been used to capture and reconstruct images. Matters of alignment, calibration, control, resolution, and adverse conditions will be discussed.

  4. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; ...

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing themore » evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.« less

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; Tobey, R. I.; Hill, J. P.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing the evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.

  6. Millifluidics for Chemical Synthesis and Time-resolved Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V.; Yamane, Dawit G.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  7. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  8. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} . We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1995-05-01

    In response to the conference organizer's request, I am presenting a summary of the current status of medical optical imaging and spectroscopy. This is a topic which is advancing rapidly and on which there have been a number of conferences recently, and yet there has not been presented an overview of the field and some idea of what the advantages and disadvantages of the photon diffusion technology may be. Thus, this paper emphasizes diffusion waves for spectroscopy and imaging deep within the tissue and, at the same time, for providing specificity information of both absorption and scattering. In achieving this goal, I will not be able to cite all of the advantages of technologies that view the superficial layers of skin, retina, etc., on the one hand, nor those that measure the photons that have been scattered minimally on the transit between input and output. One of the main reasons for this is that specificity of the optical methods requires all of the information available: absorption and scattering of intrinsic signals naturally in the tissue, and of extrinsic signal due to contrast agents that have been artificially lodged in strategic tissue volumes. Since this paper is essentially the transcript of a lecture, it is not proposed as a topic review and does not contain full-scale bibliographic references, some of which may be found in a recent review elsewhere. This paper highlights what we all might accomplish in order to bring to bear with maximal effectiveness the optical method for altering the outcome of medical problems. I have not emphasized the mathematics of photon diffusion so well represented by the papers of this symposium volume. The achievable goals of the optical methods are to speed detection, improve diagnosis, guide therapy, and what appears in the minds of most, contribute to the improvement of medical economics. In order to fulfill these objectives, we will in the end have to demonstrate by lengthy and expensive clinical studies that the

  10. Time-Resolved Bandgap Reflectivity of Photoexcited Cadmium-Selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigo, Nicholas John

    The first time-resolved bandgap reflectivity measurements of CdSe are presented. The time resolution was in the ten picosecond range and was attained by using a two-pulse pump-probe technique. Carriers were created by the absorption of the pump pulse and the reflectivity of the probe pulse was measured as a function of the probe's wavelength and its time delay relative to the pump. Specifically, the excitonic reflectivity was the feature monitored in these experiments. In order to perform the experiments, a new type of two-wavelength picosecond dye laser was developed. Its novel intersecting cavity configuration permitted the high flux levels, wide tuning range, spectral location, and pulse synchronization needed for creating high electron -hole densities and measuring the reflectivity near the bandgap of CdSe. The reflectivity results were surprising. A rapid recovery of the screened excitonic reflectivity was seen that was unanticipated by earlier experimental results and theoretical estimates. Attempts to explain the data by electron-hole liquid formation, surface recombination, or bimolecular recombination were unable to agree with the data. To explain the unusual speed of the recovery a model was developed which emphasized carrier diffusion against impurity scattering. The carrier diffusion model gave estimates of the recovery time in substantial agreement with the reflectivity measurements. In addition, the model's predictions agreed well with a wide range of other reported experiments ranging from picosecond to nanosecond time scales in CdS, CdSe, and GaAs using gain and luminescence measurements. Approximate solutions in closed form were presented that duplicated the major features of the model. Preliminary evidence against electron-hole liquid formation was presented; a low power experiment failed to give the expected signature. This result is unexpected since the temperature of these experiments is estimated to be lower than the temperature of the

  11. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekenis, S. A.; McCann, H.; Tait, N.

    2015-03-15

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the “black box” view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  12. Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography of Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, Vukica; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2008-04-29

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third-generation synchrotrons provide 100-ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have recently permitted observing for the first time allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin.

  13. Development of ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahara, Akifumi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2017-04-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy (TR-DCS) has been demonstrated, which enables direct observations of transient responses of complex optical spectra by combining dual-comb spectroscopy with the pump-probe method. TR-DCS achieves two-dimensional spectroscopy with a wide dynamic range for both the temporal and frequency axes. As a demonstration, we investigated the femtosecond relaxation dynamics of a photo-excited InGaAs saturable absorber in the near-infrared frequency region. The transient response of the interferogram was successfully obtained, and both the amplitude and phase spectra of the dynamic complex transmittance were independently deduced without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. A high phase resolution in the order of milliradian was achieved by suppressing the effect from the slow phase drift caused in the experimental system. Our proof-of-principle experiment promotes a pathway to coherent, highly accurate, and multi-dimensional pump-probe spectroscopy using the optical frequency comb technology.

  14. The GMOX science case: resolving galaxies through cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Mario; Robberto, Massimo; Heckman, Timothy; Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert; Ninkov, Zoran; Adamo, Angela; Becker, George; Bellini, Andrea; Bianchi, Luciana; Bik, Arjan; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Calamida, Annalisa; Calzetti, Daniela; De Rosa, Gisella; Deustua, Susana; Kalirai, Jason; Lotz, Jennifer; MacKenty, John; Manara, Carlo Felice; Meixner, Margaret; Pacifici, Camilla; Sabbi, Elena; Sahu, Kailash; Tumlinson, Jason

    2016-08-01

    We present the key scientific questions that can be addressed by GMOX, a Multi-Object Spectrograph selected for feasibility study as a 4th generation instrument for the Gemini telescopes. Using commercial digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) as slit selection mechanisms, GMOX can observe hundreds of sources at R 5000 between the U and K band simultaneously. Exploiting the narrow PSF delivered by the Gemini South GeMS MCAO module, GMOX can synthesize slits as small as 40mas reaching extremely faint magnitude limits, and thus enabling a plethora of applications and innovative science. Our main scientific driver in developing GMOX has been Resolving galaxies through cosmic time: GMOX 40mas slit (at GeMS) corresponds to 300 pc at z 1:5, where the angular diameter distance reaches its maximum, and therefore to even smaller linear scales at any other redshift. This means that GMOX can take spectra of regions smaller than 300 pc in the whole observable Universe, allowing to probe the growth and evolution of galaxies with unprecedented detail. GMOXs multi-object capability and high angular resolution enable efficient studies of crowded fields, such as globular clusters, the Milky Way bulge, the Magellanic Clouds, Local Group galaxies and galaxy clusters. The wide-band simultaneous coverage and the very fast slit configuration mechanisms also make GMOX ideal for follow-up of LSST transients.

  15. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  16. Energy- and time-resolved microscopy using PEEM: recent developments and state-of-the-art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, N. B.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Oelsner, A.; Schönhense, G.

    2008-03-01

    Two novel methods of spectroscopic surface imaging are discussed, both based on photoemission electron microscopy PEEM. They are characterised by a simple electron-optical set up retaining a linear column. An imaging high-pass energy filter has been developed on the basis of lithographically-fabricated microgrids. Owing to a mesh size of only 7μm, no image distortions occur. The present energy resolution is 70 meV. The second approach employs time-of-flight energy dispersion and time-resolved detection using a Delayline Detector. In this case, the drift energy and the time resolution of the detector determine the energy resolution. The present time resolution is 180 ps, giving rise to an energy resolution in the 100 meV range.

  17. Time-resolved x-ray crystallography of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third generation synchrotrons provide 100ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have permitted observing allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin. PMID:18433638

  18. Biochemical Applications Of Frequency-Domain Fluorometry; Determination Of Time-Resolved Anisotropies And Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignazy; Cherek, Henryh; Laczko, Gabor; Joshi, Nanda

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of time-resolved fluorescence are often used for studies of biological macromolecules. Such measurements are usually performed in the time-domain, by measurement of the time-dependent emission following pulsed excitation. It has recently become possible to measure the frequency-response of the emission to intensity modulated light, over a wide range of modulation frequencies. We used frequency-domain fluorometers which operates from 1 to 220 MHz, and more recently to 2000 MHz. The frequency-domain data provide excellent resolution of time-dependent spectral parameters. It is now possible to resolve closely spaced fluorescence lifetimes, to determine multi-exponential decays of anisotropy and to determine time-resolved emission spectra of samples which display time-dependent spectral shifts. In this article we show representative results on tryptophan fluorescence from proteins and for protein-bound fluorophores.

  19. Study of dynamic processes on semiconductor surfaces using time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2010-07-07

    The time resolution of a conventional scanning tunneling microscope can be improved by many orders of magnitude by recording open feedback loop current-time traces. The enhanced time resolution comes, however, at the expense of the ability to obtain spatial information. In this paper, we first consider the Ge(111)-c(2 × 8) surface as an example of how surface dynamics can show up in conventional STM images. After a brief introduction to the time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy technique, its capabilities will be demonstrated by addressing the dynamics of a dimer pair of a Pt modified Ge(001).

  20. Time-resolved study of formate on Ni( 1 1 1 ) by picosecond SFG spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusafuka, K.; Noguchi, H.; Onda, K.; Kubota, J.; Domen, K.; Hirose, C.; Wada, A.

    2002-04-01

    Time-resolved vibrational measurements were carried out on formate (HCOO) adsorbed on Ni(1 1 1) surface by combining the sum-frequency generation method and picosecond laser system (time resolution of 6 ps). Rapid intensity decrease (within the time resolution) followed by intensity recovery (time constant of several tens of ps) of CH stretching signal was observed when picosecond 800 nm pulse was irradiated on the sample surface. From the results of temperature and pump fluence dependences of temporal behaviour of signal intensity, we concluded that the observed intensity change was induced by non-thermal process. Mechanism of the temporal intensity change was discussed.

  1. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkens, Matthew J.

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H)2L (Cp* = (CH3)5C5, L = PPh3, Ph = C6H5) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO)2 to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  2. High-resolution monsoon reconstruction using an annually resolved stalagmite from Kotumsar cave, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, S. T.; Yadava, M. G.; Sree, K.; Ramesh, R.; Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A stalagmite sample that grew between ~5000 and 4000 year BP, collected from Kotumsar cave (Chhattisgarh, India) shows annual laminations of ~1mm thickness. Sub-sampling for stable isotope analysis was carried out using micro-mill with spatial resolution of ~200 micrometer to resolve seasonal changes. The monsoon variability is reconstructed using δ18O and δ13C measured on DeltaV-plus IRMS. Six clusters of enriched δ18O and δ13C values in the reconstructed time series are identified as mega-drought events. Earlier archaeological evidences such as burnt charcoal, millets and grasses, suggesting dwelling site for prehistoric man, were reported from this cave. These are drought tolerant crops, and grow in low rainfall regions. Radiocarbon ages of some of the charcoal remains seem to be contemporary with the stalagmite drought events suggesting that caves were used as shelter during severe drought conditions.

  3. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator.

  4. An innovative Yb-based ultrafast deep ultraviolet source for time-resolved photoemission experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Dallera, C.; Cerullo, G.; Farinello, P.; Manzoni, C.; Carpene, E.; Magrez, A.; Berger, H.

    2014-12-15

    Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids. Here, an innovative optical setup based on a 100-kHz Yb laser source is presented. Exploiting non-collinear optical parametric amplification and sum-frequency generation, ultrashort pump (hν = 1.82 eV) and ultraviolet probe (hν = 6.05 eV) pulses are generated. Overall temporal and instrumental energy resolutions of, respectively, 85 fs and 50 meV are obtained. Time- and angle-resolved measurements on BiTeI semiconductor are presented to show the capabilities of the setup.

  5. An innovative Yb-based ultrafast deep ultraviolet source for time-resolved photoemission experiments.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Dallera, C; Farinello, P; Manzoni, C; Magrez, A; Berger, H; Cerullo, G; Carpene, E

    2014-12-01

    Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids. Here, an innovative optical setup based on a 100-kHz Yb laser source is presented. Exploiting non-collinear optical parametric amplification and sum-frequency generation, ultrashort pump (hν = 1.82 eV) and ultraviolet probe (hν = 6.05 eV) pulses are generated. Overall temporal and instrumental energy resolutions of, respectively, 85 fs and 50 meV are obtained. Time- and angle-resolved measurements on BiTeI semiconductor are presented to show the capabilities of the setup.

  6. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Hielscher, A.H.; Liu, H.; Chance, B.; Tittel, F.K.; Jacques, S.L.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze {ital in} {ital vivo} measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  7. Optoacoustic tomography using time-resolved interferometric detection of surface displacement.

    PubMed

    Payne, Barry P; Venugopalan, Vasan; Mikić, Bora B; Nishioka, Norman S

    2003-04-01

    We introduce a minimally invasive technique for optoacoustic imaging of turbid media using optical interferometric detection of surface displacement produced by thermoelastic stress transients. The technique exploits endogenous or exogenous optical contrast of heterogeneous tissues and the low attenuation of stress wave propagation to localize and image subsurface absorbers in optically turbid media. We present a system that utilizes a time-resolved high-resolution interferometer capable of angstrom-level displacement resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution to detect subsurface blood vessels within model tissue phantoms and a human forearm in vivo.

  8. Space-time super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Eli; Caspi, Yaron; Irani, Michal

    2005-04-01

    We propose a method for constructing a video sequence of high space-time resolution by combining information from multiple low-resolution video sequences of the same dynamic scene. Super-resolution is performed simultaneously in time and in space. By "temporal super-resolution," we mean recovering rapid dynamic events that occur faster than regular frame-rate. Such dynamic events are not visible (or else are observed incorrectly) in any of the input sequences, even if these are played in "slow-motion." The spatial and temporal dimensions are very different in nature, yet are interrelated. This leads to interesting visual trade-offs in time and space and to new video applications. These include: 1) treatment of spatial artifacts (e.g., motion-blur) by increasing the temporal resolution and 2) combination of input sequences of different space-time resolutions (e.g., NTSC, PAL, and even high quality still images) to generate a high quality video sequence. We further analyze and compare characteristics of temporal super-resolution to those of spatial super-resolution. These include: How many video cameras are needed to obtain increased resolution? What is the upper bound on resolution improvement via super-resolution? What is the temporal analogue to the spatial "ringing" effect?

  9. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path.

  10. Vagus nerve controls resolution and pro-resolving mediators of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Dalli, Jesmond; Granja, Tiago; Rosenberger, Peter; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-06-02

    Resolution of inflammation is now recognized as a biosynthetically active process involving pro-resolving mediators. Here, we show in zymosan-initiated peritoneal inflammation that the vagus nerve regulates local expression of netrin-1, an axonal guidance molecule that activates resolution, and that vagotomy reduced local pro-resolving mediators, thereby delaying resolution. In netrin-1(+/-) mice, resolvin D1 (RvD1) was less effective in reducing neutrophil influx promoting resolution of peritonitis compared with Ntn1(+/+). Netrin-1 shortened the resolution interval, decreasing exudate neutrophils, reducing proinflammatory mediators, and stimulating the production of resolvins, protectins, and lipoxins. Human monocytes incubated with netrin-1 produced proresolving mediators, including resolvins and lipoxins. Netrin-1 and RvD1 displayed bidirectional activation in that they stimulated each other's expression and enhanced efferocytosis. These results indicate that the vagus nerve regulates both netrin-1 and pro-resolving lipid mediators, which act in a bidirectional fashion to stimulate resolution, and provide evidence for a novel mechanism for local neuronal control of resolution.

  11. Resolving an inflammatory concept: The importance of inflammation and resolution in tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G.; Dudhia, Jayesh; Smith, Roger K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in equine athletes, but the healing response is poorly understood. One important drive for the healing of connective tissues is the inflammatory cascade, but the role of inflammation in tendinopathy has been contentious in the literature. This article reviews the processes involved in the healing of tendon injuries in natural disease and experimental models. The importance of inflammatory processes known to be active in tendon disease is discussed with particular focus on recent findings related specifically to the horse. Whilst inflammation is necessary for debridement after injury, persistent inflammation is thought to drive fibrosis, a perceived adverse consequence of tendon healing. Therefore the ability to resolve inflammation by the resident cell populations in tendons at an appropriate time would be crucial for successful outcome. This review summarises new evidence for the importance of resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. Given that many anti-inflammatory drugs suppress both inflammatory and resolving components of the inflammatory response, prolonged use of these drugs may be contraindicated as a therapeutic approach. We propose that these findings have profound implications not only for current treatment strategies but also for the possibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the inflammatory process. PMID:24556326

  12. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L; Li, Yinwan; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  13. Time-resolved imaging of cavitation effects during laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siano, Salvatore; Pini, Roberto; Salimbeni, Renzo; Vannini, Matteo

    1995-01-01

    We devised a diagnostic technique based on a pump-and-probe scheme that provided time- resolved imaging of photofragmentation effects during laser lithotripsy. The evolution of the cavitation bubble induced on kidney stone samples by underwater irradiation with a XeCl excimer laser is presented and analyzed.

  14. Development of a Time-resolved Soft X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Produced Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, K V; Dunn, J; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Brown, G V; Emig, J; James, D L; May, M J; Park, J; Shepherd, R; Widmann, K

    2010-05-12

    A 2400 line/mm variable spaced grating spectrometer (VSG) has been used to measure soft x-ray emission (8-22 {angstrom}) from laser-produced plasma experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) Laser Facility. The spectrometer was coupled to a Kentech x-ray streak camera to study the temporal evolution of soft x-rays emitted from the back of mylar and copper foils irradiated at 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The instrument demonstrated a resolving power of {approx} 120 at 19 {angstrom} with a time resolution of 31 ps. The time-resolved copper emission spectrum was consistent with a photodiode monitoring the laser temporal pulse shape and indicated that the soft x-ray emission follows the laser heating of the target. The time and spectral resolution of this diagnostic make it useful for studies of high temperature plasmas.

  15. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300–900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Thibault, Marilyne; Jennewein, Thomas; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto

    2014-10-14

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2 nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  16. First-principles approach to excitons in time-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, E.; Sangalli, D.; Marini, A.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we put forward a first-principles approach and propose an accurate diagrammatic approximation to calculate the time-resolved (TR) and angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of systems with excitons. We also derive an alternative formula to the TR photocurrent which involves a single time-integral of the lesser Green's function. The diagrammatic approximation applies to the relaxed regime characterized by the presence of quasistationary excitons and vanishing polarization. The nonequilibrium self-energy diagrams are evaluated using excited Green's functions; since this is not standard, the analytic derivation is presented in detail. The final result is an expression for the lesser Green's function in terms of quantities that can all be calculated in a first-principles manner. The validity of the proposed theory is illustrated in a one-dimensional model system with a direct gap. We discuss possible scenarios and highlight some universal features of the exciton peaks. Our results indicate that the exciton dispersion can be observed in TR and angle-resolved photoemission.

  17. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales.

  18. Time Resolved Measurements and Reactive Pathways of Hypergolic Bipropellant Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the...0704-0188,) Washington, DC 20503. 1 . AGENCY USE ONLY ( Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5...Standard Form 298 (Rev.2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 298-102 Enclosure 1 03/31/06 Final Report 01 Aug 02 - 31 Dec 05 TIME RESOLVED

  19. Watching a signaling protein function in real time via 100-ps time-resolved Laue crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schotte, Friedrich; Cho, Hyun Sun; Kaila, Ville R.I.; Kamikubo, Hironari; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Henry, Eric R.; Graber, Timothy J.; Henning, Robert; Wulff, Michael; Hummer, Gerhard; Kataoka, Mikio; Anfinrud, Philip A.

    2012-11-06

    To understand how signaling proteins function, it is necessary to know the time-ordered sequence of events that lead to the signaling state. We recently developed on the BioCARS 14-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source the infrastructure required to characterize structural changes in protein crystals with near-atomic spatial resolution and 150-ps time resolution, and have used this capability to track the reversible photocycle of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) following trans-to-cis photoisomerization of its p-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore over 10 decades of time. The first of four major intermediates characterized in this study is highly contorted, with the pCA carbonyl rotated nearly 90° out of the plane of the phenolate. A hydrogen bond between the pCA carbonyl and the Cys69 backbone constrains the chromophore in this unusual twisted conformation. Density functional theory calculations confirm that this structure is chemically plausible and corresponds to a strained cis intermediate. This unique structure is short-lived (~600 ps), has not been observed in prior cryocrystallography experiments, and is the progenitor of intermediates characterized in previous nanosecond time-resolved Laue crystallography studies. The structural transitions unveiled during the PYP photocycle include trans/cis isomerization, the breaking and making of hydrogen bonds, formation/relaxation of strain, and gated water penetration into the interior of the protein. This mechanistically detailed, near-atomic resolution description of the complete PYP photocycle provides a framework for understanding signal transduction in proteins, and for assessing and validating theoretical/computational approaches in protein biophysics.

  20. Attosecond Time-Resolved Photoelectron Dispersion and Photoemission Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Q.; Thumm, U.

    2014-01-01

    We compute spectrograms and relative time delays for laser-assisted photoemission by single attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses from valence band (VB) and 2p core levels (CLs) of a Mg(0001) surface within a quantum-mechanical model. Comparing the time-dependent dispersion of photoelectron (PE) wave packets for VB and CL emission, we find striking differences in their dependence on the (i) electron mean free path (MFP) in the solid, (ii) screening of the streaking laser field, and (iii) chirp of the attosecond pulse. The relative photoemission delay between VB and 2p PEs is shown to be sensitive to the electron MFP and screening of the streaking laser field inside the solid. Our model is able to reproduce a recent attosecond-streaking experiment [S. Neppl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 087401 (2012)], which reveals no relative streaking time delay between VB and 2p PEs.

  1. Time Resolution of Fast Photomultipliers for Time of Flight PET

    SciTech Connect

    Szczesniak, Tomasz; Iwanowska, Joanna

    2010-01-05

    Time resolution study of 1 inch Photonis XP1020 photomultiplier is reported. The number of photoelectrons, time jitter and time resolution with 4x4x20 mm{sup 3} LSO crystal were measured. All the mentioned PMT properties were measured at five positions on the photocathode.

  2. [Progress in research and application of time-resolved optoacoustic method in biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Li, Fenlan; Xu, Kexin; Wang, Ruikang

    2006-12-01

    Based on optoacoustic effect, time-resolved optoacoustic technique effectively combines optical technology with acoustic technology and partly overcomes the biological tissue's scatter characteristics which might influence the results of measurement. Optoacoustic technique has the advantages of high sensitivity and high resolution and has been widely applied in biomedicine field. In this paper, the measuring principles, the key technique, application and future direction of this technique are synthetically reviewed to promote the research in theory and application in the future.

  3. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  4. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Hillman, E M; Hebden, J C; Schweiger, M; Dehghani, H; Schmidt, F E; Delpy, D T; Arridge, S R

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  5. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  6. The RATIO method for time-resolved Laue crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Pitak, Mateusz; Gembicky, Milan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Scheins, Stephan; Benedict, Jason; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Chollet, Matthieu; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    A RATIO method for analysis of intensity changes in time-resolved pump–probe Laue diffraction experiments is described. The method eliminates the need for scaling the data with a wavelength curve representing the spectral distribution of the source and removes the effect of possible anisotropic absorption. It does not require relative scaling of series of frames and removes errors due to all but very short term fluctuations in the synchrotron beam. PMID:19240334

  7. Time-Resolved Conformational Dynamics in Hydrocarbon Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Michael P.; Weber, Peter M.

    2007-06-22

    Internal rotation about carbon-carbon bonds allows N,N-dimethyl-2-butanamine (DM2BA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-hexanamine (DM3HA) to assume multiple conformeric structures. We explore the equilibrium composition and dynamics between such conformeric structures using Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Time constants for conformeric interconversion of DM2BA (at 1.79 eV of internal energy) are 19 and 66 ps, and for DM3HA (1.78 eV) 23 and 41 ps. For the first time, a time-resolved and quantitative view of conformational dynamics of flexible hydrocarbon molecules at high temperatures is revealed.

  8. Towards neutron scattering experiments with sub-millisecond time resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Adlmann, F. A.; Gutfreund, Phillip; Ankner, John Francis; ...

    2015-02-01

    Neutron scattering techniques offer several unique opportunities in materials research. However, most neutron scattering experiments suffer from the limited flux available at current facilities. This limitation becomes even more severe if time-resolved or kinetic experiments are performed. A new method has been developed which overcomes these limitations when a reversible process is studied, without any compromise on resolution or beam intensity. We demonstrate that, by recording in absolute time the neutron detector events linked to an excitation, information can be resolved on sub-millisecond timescales. Specifically, the concept of the method is demonstrated by neutron reflectivity measurements in time-of-flight mode atmore » the Liquids Reflectometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA, combined with in situ rheometry. Finally, the opportunities and limitations of this new technique are evaluated by investigations of a micellar polymer solution offering excellent scattering contrast combined with high sensitivity to shear.« less

  9. Towards neutron scattering experiments with sub-millisecond time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adlmann, F. A.; Gutfreund, Phillip; Ankner, John Francis; Browning, James F.; Parizzi, Andre A.; Vacaliuc, Bogdan; Halbert, Candice E.; Rich, J. P.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Wolff, Max

    2015-02-01

    Neutron scattering techniques offer several unique opportunities in materials research. However, most neutron scattering experiments suffer from the limited flux available at current facilities. This limitation becomes even more severe if time-resolved or kinetic experiments are performed. A new method has been developed which overcomes these limitations when a reversible process is studied, without any compromise on resolution or beam intensity. We demonstrate that, by recording in absolute time the neutron detector events linked to an excitation, information can be resolved on sub-millisecond timescales. Specifically, the concept of the method is demonstrated by neutron reflectivity measurements in time-of-flight mode at the Liquids Reflectometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA, combined with in situ rheometry. Finally, the opportunities and limitations of this new technique are evaluated by investigations of a micellar polymer solution offering excellent scattering contrast combined with high sensitivity to shear.

  10. Time-resolved lidar fluorosensor for sea pollution detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrario, A.; Pizzolati, P. L.; Zanzottera, E.

    1986-01-01

    A contemporary time and spectral analysis of oil fluorescence is useful for the detection and the characterization of oil spills on the sea surface. Nevertheless the fluorosensor lidars, which were realized up to now, have only partial capability to perform this double analysis. The main difficulties are the high resolution required (of the order of 1 nanosecond) and the complexity of the detection system for the recording of a two-dimensional matrix of data for each laser pulse. An airborne system whose major specifications were: time range, 30 to 75 ns; time resolution, 1 ns; spectral range, 350 to 700 nm; and spectral resolution, 10 nm was designed and constructed. The designed system of a short pulse ultraviolet laser source and a streak camera based detector are described.

  11. Relationship between time-resolved and non-time-resolved Beer-Lambert law in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Hazeki, O; Tamura, M

    1997-06-01

    The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law proposed for oxygen monitoring using pulsed light was extended to the non-time-resolved case in a scattered medium such as living tissues with continuous illumination. The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law was valid for the phantom model and living tissues in the visible and near-infrared regions. The absolute concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in rat brain and thigh muscle could be determined. The temporal profile of rat brain was reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation. When the temporal profiles of rat brain under different oxygenation states were integrated with time, the absorbance difference was linearly related to changes in the absorption coefficient. When the simulated profiles were integrated, there was a linear relationship within the absorption coefficient which was predicted for fractional inspiratory oxygen concentration from 10 to 100% and, in the case beyond the range of the absorption coefficient, the deviation from linearity was slight. We concluded that an optical pathlength which is independent of changes in the absorption coefficient is a good approximation for near-infrared oxygen monitoring.

  12. Simultaneous time and frequency resolved fluorescence microscopy of single molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Carl C.; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Chandler, David W.; Luong, A. Khai

    2005-01-01

    Single molecule fluorophores were studied for the first time with a new confocal fluorescence microscope that allows the wavelength and emission time to be simultaneously measured with single molecule sensitivity. In this apparatus, the photons collected from the sample are imaged through a dispersive optical system onto a time and position sensitive detector. This detector records the wavelength and emission time of each detected photon relative to an excitation laser pulse. A histogram of many events for any selected spatial region or time interval can generate a full fluorescence spectrum and correlated decay plot for the given selection. At the single molecule level, this approach makes entirely new types of temporal and spectral correlation spectroscopy of possible. This report presents the results of simultaneous time- and frequency-resolved fluorescence measurements of single rhodamine 6G (R6G), tetramethylrhodamine (TMR), and Cy3 embedded in thin films of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA).

  13. Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    ,; Neill, M

    2012-07-01

    An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

  14. Time-resolved FRET for single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Nardo, Luca; Bondani, Maria

    2009-05-01

    By tens-of-picosecond resolved fluorescence detection (TCSPC, time-correlated single-photon counting) we study Förster resonance energy transfer between a donor and a black-hole-quencher acceptor bound at the 5'- and 3'-positions of a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide. This dual labelled oligonucleotide is annealed with either the complementary sequence or with sequences that mimic single-nucleotide polymorphic gene sequences: they differ in one nucleotide at positions near either the ends or the center of the oligonucleotide. We find donor fluorescence decay times whose values are definitely distinct and discuss the feasibility of single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by this method.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  17. Ultrafast Time Resolved X-ray Diffraction Studies of Laser Heated Metals and Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peilin; Tomov, I. V.; Rentzepis, P. M.

    1998-03-01

    Time resolved hard x-ray diffraction has been employed to study the dynamics of lattice structure deformation. When laser pulse energy is deposited in a material it generates a non uniform transient temperature distribution, which alters the lattice structure of the crystal. The deformed crystal lattice will change the angle of diffraction for a monochromatic x-ray beam. We report picosecond and nanosecond time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice temperature distribution, transient structure and stress, in Pt (111) and GaAs (111) crystals, caused by pulsed UV laser irradiation. An ArF excimer laser operated at 300 Hz was used, both, to drive an x-ray diode with copper anode and heat the crystal. Bragg diffracted x-ray radiation was recorded by a direct imaging x-ray CCD. Changes in the diffraction patterns induced by a few millijouls pulse energy were observed at different time delays between the laser heating pulse and the x-ray probing pulse. A kinematical model for time resolved x-ray diffraction was used to analyze the experimental data. Good agreement between the measured and calculated scattered x-ray intensities profiles was achieved, indicating that detailed time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements can be made with nanosecond and picosecond resolution for small temperature changes. Our system can detect changes in the lattice spacing of about 10-3 A.

  18. Millifluidics for time-resolved mapping of the growth of gold nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Navin, Chelliah; Biswas, Sanchita; Singh, Varshni; Ham, Kyungmin; Bovencamp, L. S.; Theegala, Chandra; Miller, Jeffrey T; Spivey, James J.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-04-10

    Innovative in situ characterization tools are essential for understanding the reaction mechanisms leading to the growth of nanoscale materials. Though techniques, such as in situ transmission X-ray microscopy, fast single-particle spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, etc., are currently being developed, these tools are complex, not easily accessible, and do not necessarily provide the temporal resolution required to follow the formation of nanomaterials in real time. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the utility of a simple millifluidic chip for an in situ real time analysis of morphology and dimension-controlled growth of gold nano- and microstructures with a time resolution of 5 ms. The structures formed were characterized using synchrotron radiation-based in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 3-D X-ray tomography, and high-resolution electron microscopy. These gold nanostructures were found to be catalytically active for conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, providing an example of the potential opportunities for time-resolved analysis of catalytic reactions. While the investigations reported here are focused on gold nanostructures, the technique can be applied to analyze the time-resolved growth of other types of nanostructured metals and metal oxides. With the ability to probe at least a 10-fold higher concentrations, in comparison with traditional microfluidics, the tool has potential to revolutionize a broad range of fields from catalysis, molecular analysis, biodefense, and molecular biology.

  19. Elasticity and Anelasticity of Materials from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Smith, J.; Lin, C.; Bai, L.; Rod, E.; Shen, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for studying elasticity and anelasticity of minerals using fast compression and cyclic compression-decompression. A few recent studies will be highlighted. For example, with fast x-ray area detectors having millisecond time resolution, accurate thermal equations of state of materials at temperatures up to 1000K and megabar pressures can be collected in a matter of seconds using membrane-driven diamond anvil cells (DAC), yielding unprecedented time and pressure resolution of true isotherms. Short duration of the experiments eliminates temperature variation during the experiments and in general allows volume measurements at higher pressures and temperatures. Alternatively, high-frequency (kilohertz range) radial diffraction measurements in a panoramic DAC combined with fast, precise cyclic loading/unloading by piezo drive could provide the short time scale necessary for studying rheology of minerals from the elastic response and lattice relaxation as a function of pressure, temperature and strain rate. Finally, we consider some possible future applications for time-resolved high-pressure, high-temperature research of mantle minerals.

  20. Lucas-Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas-Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169-82). The so-called Lucas-Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1-16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27-71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  1. Combined continuous and time-resolved CL to study semiconductor structure and defects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonderegger, Samuel; Gachet, David; Berney, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Spectroscopic information may be acquired using an electron beam in a modern scanning electron microscope (SEM), exploiting the cathodoluminescence (CL) signal. CL offers several advantages over the usual optical spectroscopy. The multimode imaging capabilities of the SEM enable the correlation of optical properties (via CL) with surface morphology (secondary electron mode) at the nanometer scale and the large energy of the electrons allows the excitation of wide-bandgap materials. Here, we present results obtained on a field emission time-resolved and continuous (CW) cathodoluminescence scanning electron microscope. The microscope can either be operated in CW mode by heating up the emitter (Schottky emission), or in time-resolved mode by illuminating the field emission gun with a femtosecond UV laser, so that ultrafast electron pulses are emitted through the photoelectric effect. In both modes, a spacial resolution around 10 nm is demonstrated. The collected cathodoluminescence signal is dispersed in a spectrometer and analyzed with a CCD camera (CW mode) or an ultrafast STREAK camera to obtain <10 ps time resolution (TR mode). Quantitative CW cathodoluminescence was first used to quickly map defects in III-V semiconductor structures. Then, time-resolved cathodoluminescence measurements were carried out on specific regions in order to measure local lifetimes and carrier diffusion within the structures. We will also discuss the advantages of combining CL with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and introduce Attolight's most recent developments in this field.

  2. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Glownia, James; Cryan, J.; Andreasson, J.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Blaga, C.L.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; DiMauro, L.F.; Fang, L.; Frisch, J.; Gessner, O.; Guhr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hertlein, M.P.; Hoener, M.; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; Marangos, J.P.; March, A.M.; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  3. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

    PubMed

    Glownia, James M; Cryan, J; Andreasson, J; Belkacem, A; Berrah, N; Blaga, C I; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; DiMauro, L F; Fang, L; Frisch, J; Gessner, O; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hertlein, M P; Hoener, M; Huang, G; Kornilov, O; Marangos, J P; March, A M; McFarland, B K; Merdji, H; Petrovic, V S; Raman, C; Ray, D; Reis, D A; Trigo, M; White, J L; White, W; Wilcox, R; Young, L; Coffee, R N; Bucksbaum, P H

    2010-08-16

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  4. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of a Sheared Flow Stabilized Z-pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Eleanor

    2016-10-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-pinch Project investigates the use of sheared-axial flows to stabilize an otherwise unstable plasma configuration. Diagnostics with sub-microsecond resolution are required to obtain accurate time-resolved data since the plasma pulse is approximately 100 μs. Analyzing the Doppler shift of impurity line radiation from the pinch provides a measure of the velocity profile and is a reliable method of determining the plasma sheared flow. The velocity profile is spatially resolved through the use of a 20-chord fiber bundle. The ZaP-HD experiment has used a PI-MAX intensified CCD array to record a single time-resolved spectrum per plasma pulse. Obtaining the evolution of the velocity profile using this method required spectra acquired over hundreds of pulses with identical initial parameters and varying acquisition times. The use of a Kirana 05M ultra-fast framing camera is investigated for recording time-resolved velocity profiles during a single pulse. The Kirana utilizes an ultraviolet intensifier to record 180 frames of UV light at up to 2 million frames per second. An ultraviolet optics system is designed to couple the exit port of an Acton SP-500i spectrometer to the Kirana UV intensifier and focus spectra at the camera detector plane. This work is supported by US DoE FES, NNSA, and ARPA-E ALPHA.

  5. Time resolved spectral behavior of bright BATSE precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Greiner, J.; Celotti, A.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are sometimes preceded by dimmer emission episodes, called “precursors”, whose nature is still a puzzle: they could either have the same origin as the main emission episode or they could be due to another mechanism. We investigate if precursors have some spectral distinctive feature with respect to the main GRB episodes. Methods: To this aim we compare the spectral evolution of the precursor with that of the main GRB event. We also study if and how the spectral parameters, and in particular the peak of the ν Fν spectrum of time resolved spectra, correlates with the flux. This allows us to test if the spectra of the precursor and of the main event belong to the same correlation (if any). We searched GRBs with precursor activity in the complete sample of 2704 bursts detected by BATSE finding that 12% of GRBs have one or more precursors. Among these we considered the bursts with time resolved spectral analysis performed by Kaneko et al. ( 2006, ApJS, 166, 298), selecting those having at least two time resolved spectra for the precursor. Results: We find that precursors and main events have very similar spectral properties. The spectral evolution within precursors has similar trends as the spectral evolution observed in the subsequent peaks. Also the typical spectral parameters of the precursors are similar to those of the main GRB events. Moreover, in several cases we find that within the precursors the peak energy of the spectrum is correlated with the flux similarly to what happens in the main GRB event. This strongly favors models in which the precursor is due to the same fireball physics of the main emission episodes. Figures 8 to 41 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Goett, Johnny; Zhu, Brian

    2016-12-22

    TRPS code was developed for the project "Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy". Routines contained in this piece of software were specially created to model phonon generation and tracking within materials that interact with ionizing radiation, particularly applicable to the modeling of cryogenic radiation detectors for dark matter and neutrino research. These routines were created to link seamlessly with the open source Geant4 framework for the modeling of radiation transport in matter, with the explicit intent of open sourcing them for eventual integration into that code base.

  7. Femtosecond time-resolved electronic relaxation dynamics in tetrathiafulvalene

    SciTech Connect

    Staedter, D.; Polizzi, L.; Thiré, N.; Mairesse, Y.; Mayer, P.; Blanchet, V.

    2015-05-21

    In the present paper, the ultrafast electronic relaxation of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) initiated around 4 eV is studied by femtosecond time-resolved velocity-map imaging. The goal is to investigate the broad double structure observed in the absorption spectrum at this energy. By monitoring the transients of the parent cation and its fragments and by varying the pump and the probe wavelengths, two internal conversions and intramolecular vibrational relaxation are detected both on the order of a few hundred of femtoseconds. Photoelectron images permit the assignment of a dark electronic state involved in the relaxation. In addition, the formation of the dimer of TTF has been observed.

  8. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Owens, Clai; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ =π /2 . In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  9. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  10. Experimental Time Resolved Electron Beam Temperature Measurements Using Bremsstrahlung Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Menge, P.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1999-06-25

    Electron beam temperature, {beta}{perpendicular} (= v{perpendicular}/v), is important to control for the development of high dose flash radiographic bremsstrahlung sources. At high voltage (> 5 MV) increasing electron beam temperature has a serious deleterious effect on dose production. The average and time resolved behavior of beam temperature was measured during radiographic experiments on the HERMES III accelerator (10 MV, 50 kA, 70 ns). A linear array of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the time integrated average of beam temperature. On and off-axis photoconducting diamond (PCD) detectors were used to measure the time resolved bremsstrahlung dose rate, which is dependent on beam energy and temperature. The beam temperature can be determined by correlating PCD response with accelerator voltage and current and also by analyzing the ratio of PCD amplitudes on and off axis. This ratio is insensitive to voltage and current and thus, is more reliable than utilizing absolute dose rate. The data is unfolded using comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations to obtain absolute beam temperatures. The data taken on HERMES III show abrupt increases in {beta}{perpendicular} midway through the pulse indicating rapid onset of beam instability.

  11. Heterodyning Time Resolution Boosting for Velocimetry and Reflectivity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2004-08-02

    A theoretical technique is described for boosting the temporal resolving power by several times, of detectors such as streak cameras in experiments that measure light reflected from or transmitted through a target, including velocity interferometer (VISAR) measurements. This is a means of effectively increasing the number of resolvable time bins in a streak camera record past the limit imposed by input slit width and blur on the output phosphor screen. The illumination intensity is modulated sinusoidally at a frequency similar to the limiting time response of the detector. A heterodyning effect beats the high frequency science signal down a lower frequency beat signal, which is recorded together with the conventional science signal. Using 3 separate illuminating channels having different phases, the beat term is separated algebraically from the conventional signal. By numerically reversing the heterodyning, and combining with the ordinary signal, the science signal can be reconstructed to better effective time resolution than the detector used alone. The effective time resolution can be approximately halved for a single modulation frequency, and further decreased inversely proportional to the number of independent modulation frequencies employed.

  12. A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M.; Carley, R.; Döbrich, K.; Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph.

    2013-07-15

    We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

  13. Recombination of photodissociated iodine: A time-resolved x-ray-diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, M.; Bratos, S.; Plech, A.; Vuilleumier, R.; Mirloup, F.; Lorenc, M.; Kong, Q.; Ihee, H.

    2006-01-21

    A time-resolved x-ray-diffraction experiment is presented that aims to study the recombination of laser-dissociated iodine molecules dissolved in CCl{sub 4}. This process is monitored over an extended time interval from pico- to microseconds. The variations of atom-atom distances are probed with a milliangstrom resolution. A recent theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction is used to analyze the experimental data; it employs the correlation function approach of statistical mechanics. The most striking outcome of this study is the experimental determination of time-dependent I-I atom-atom distribution functions. The structure of the CCl{sub 4} solvent changes simultaneously; the solvent thus appears as a reaction partner rather than an inert medium hosting it. Thermal expansion of the system is nonuniform in time, an effect due to the presence of the acoustic horizon. One concludes that a time-resolved x-ray diffraction permits real-time visualization of solvent and solute motions during a chemical reaction.

  14. Motor Oil Classification Based on Time-Resolved Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Taotao; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Meng, Fandong

    2014-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) technique is presented for classifying motor oils. The system is constructed with a third harmonic Nd:YAG laser, a spectrometer, and an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) measurements are reported for several motor oils. It is found that steady-state fluorescence is insufficient to distinguish the motor oil samples. Then contour diagrams of TRF intensities (CDTRFIs) are acquired to serve as unique fingerprints to identify motor oils by using the distinct TRF of motor oils. CDTRFIs are preferable to steady-state fluorescence spectra for classifying different motor oils, making CDTRFIs a particularly choice for the development of fluorescence-based methods for the discrimination and characterization of motor oils. The two-dimensional fluorescence contour diagrams contain more information, not only the changing shapes of the LIF spectra but also the relative intensity. The results indicate that motor oils can be differentiated based on the new proposed method, which provides reliable methods for analyzing and classifying motor oils. PMID:24988439

  15. Nonadiabatic and Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Flick, Johannes; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2014-04-08

    We quantify the nonadiabatic contributions to the vibronic sidebands of equilibrium and explicitly time-resolved nonequilibrium photoelectron spectra for a vibronic model system of trans-polyacetylene. Using exact diagonalization, we directly evaluate the sum-over-states expressions for the linear-response photocurrent. We show that spurious peaks appear in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the vibronic spectral function, which are not present in the exact spectral function of the system. The effect can be traced back to the factorized nature of the Born-Oppenheimer initial and final photoemission states and also persists when either only initial or final states are replaced by correlated vibronic states. Only when correlated initial and final vibronic states are taken into account are the spurious spectral weights of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation suppressed. In the nonequilibrium case, we illustrate for an initial Franck-Condon excitation and an explicit pump-pulse excitation how the vibronic wavepacket motion of the system can be traced in the time-resolved photoelectron spectra as a function of the pump-probe delay.

  16. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. II

    SciTech Connect

    Szkody, P.; Howell, S.B.; Mateo, M.; Kreidl, T.J. Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ )

    1989-10-01

    Time-resolved optical broad-band light curves obtained from differential photometry on sequential CCD frames of the known or suspected cataclysmic variable FO And, EH Aqr, WX Cet, XX Cet, AL Com, V503 Cyg, AH Eri, CP Eri, IR Gem, RW UMi, PG0134+070, and US 3215 are presented. The analysis of the light curves with coverage of greater than 2 hrs shows repeatable periodicity in five objects. PG0134+070 exhibits eclipses of 1.3-1.8 mag depth with a period of 313 min. V503 Cyg has a 0.7-1.0 mag peak-to-peak modulation with a period of 109 min. IR Gem shows a large modulation at the orbital period of 99 min, and comparison with previous data indicates that this modulation may have an amplitude dependent on outburst phase. AH Eri reveals a 0.1-0.3 mag modulation, at a period of 42 min. Better time-resolved data on AL Com confirm the 0.4-mag variation reported by Howell and Szkody (1988) at a period of 42 min. These latter two short periods likely indicate magnetic systems. There is also some evidence of periodicity in RW UMi and WX Cet which must be confirmed with further data. 25 refs.

  17. Time-resolved luminescent lateral flow assay technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuedong; Knotts, Michael

    2008-09-26

    We here report a detection technology that integrates highly sensitive time-resolved luminescence technique into lateral flow assay platform to achieve excellent detection performance with low cost. We have developed very bright, surface-functionalized and mono-dispersed phosphorescent nanoparticles of long lifetime under ambient conditions. The phosphorescent nanoparticles have been used to conjugate with monoclonal antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker. Lateral flow immunoassay devices have been developed using the conjugate for highly sensitive detection of CRP. The CRP assay can achieve a detection sensitivity of <0.2 ngmL(-1) in serum with a linear response from 0.2 to 200 ngmL(-1) CRP. We have also developed a low cost time-resolved luminescence reader for the lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) devices. The reader does not use expensive band pass filter and still provide very low detection background and high detection sensitivity on solid substrates such as nitrocellulose membranes. The reader can detect less than 2.5 ng phosphorescent particles captured on a nitrocellulose membrane strip with more than three orders of magnitude linear detection dynamic range. The technology should find a number of applications, ranging from clinical diagnostics, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents, to food and environmental monitoring.

  18. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  19. Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering studies of native photosystems.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The internal molecular dynamics of proteins plays an important role in a number of functional processes in native photosystems. Prominent examples include the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin and electron transfer in the reaction center of plant photosystem II. In this regard, the recently developed technique of time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation opens up new perspectives for the study of protein/membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. The first direct observation of a functionally modulated protein dynamics has just recently been reported for the model system bacteriorhodopsin (Pieper et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 2008, 228103.), where a transient softening of the protein was observed on a timescale of approximately 1 ms along with the large-scale structural change in the M-intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast, photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer show a suppression of protein dynamics approximately 160 mus after the actinic laser flash (Pieper and Renger, Biochemistry 48, 2009, 6111). This effect may reflect aggregation-like conformational changes capable of dissipation of excess excitation energy to prevent photodamage in the absence of Q(A)-->Q(B) electron transfer. These findings indicate that proteins exhibit a remarkable flexibility to accommodate different functional processes. This contribution will discuss methodical aspects, challenges, and recent applications of laser-excited, time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering.

  20. Formulation for Time-resolved Aerodynamic Damping in Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas; Bowles, Patrick; Coleman, Dusty; Thomas, Flint

    2012-11-01

    A new Hilbert transform formulation of the equation of motion for a pitching airfoil in a uniform stream yields a time resolved aerodynamic damping factor, Ξ (t) = (√{ (Cm2 (t) +C m2 } /αmax) sinψ (t) , where Cm (t) is the instantaneous pitch moment coefficient, and C m (t) is the Hilbert transform of Cm (t) , αmax is the pitching amplitude, and ψ (t) is the time-resolved phase difference between the aerodynamic pitch moment and the instantaneous angle of attack. A Ξ (t) < 0 indicates unstable pressure loading that can be considered a necessary condition to excite stall flutter in an elastic airfoil. This will be illustrated in experiments with conditions producing ``light'' dynamic stall for a range of Mach numbers from 0.3-0.6. These reveal large negative excursions of Ξ (t) during the pitch-up portion of the cycle that correlates with the formation and convection of the dynamic stall vortex. The fact that the cycle-integrated damping coefficient is positive in all these cases underscores how the traditional diagnostic masks much of the physics that underlies the destabilizing effect of the dynamic stall process. This new insight can explain instances of transient limit-cycle growth of helicopter rotor vibrations. Supported by Bell Helicopter.

  1. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  2. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  3. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  4. Portable optical oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chu, Ssu-Wei

    2014-11-10

    A new, simple signal processing, low-cost technique for the fabrication of a portable oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence is described. The sensing film uses the oxygen sensing dye platinum meso-tetra (pentfluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) embedded in a polymer matrix. The ratio τ0100 measures sensitivity of the sensing film, where τ0 and τ100 represent the detected fluorescence lifetimes from the sensing film exposed to 100% nitrogen and 100% oxygen, respectively. The experimental results reveal that the PtTFPP-doped oxygen sensor has a sensitivity of 2.2 in the 0%-100% range. A preparation procedure for coating the photodiodes with the oxygen sensor film that produces repetitive and reliable sensing devices is proposed. The developed time-resolved optical oxygen sensor is portable, low-cost, has simple signal processing, and lacks optical filter elements. It is a cost-effective alternative to traditional electrochemical-based oxygen sensors and provides a platform for other optical based sensors.

  5. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  6. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J R; Krenner, Hubert J; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length).

  7. Ultrafast dynamics in solids probed by femtosecond time-resolved broadband electronic sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Laura; Wolf, Martin; Stähler, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Time-resolved sum frequency generation is an established tool to investigate the ultrafast vibrational dynamics with surface and interface specificity, which can be extended to the regime of electronic transitions using a white light continuum as demonstrated previously by studies of liquid interfaces. We expand this technique to the investigation of solid single crystal samples. In particular, we demonstrate the potential of electronic sum frequency generation by probing the non-equilibrium dynamics at excitonic resonances in ZnO with a sensitivity as small as 0.6% and with a time resolution of 160 fs.

  8. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  9. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchione, T.; Denes, P.; Jobe, R. K.; Johnson, I. J.; Joseph, J. M.; Li, R. K.; Perazzo, A.; Shen, X.; Wang, X. J.; Weathersby, S. P.; Yang, J.; Zhang, D.

    2017-03-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μ m spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.

  10. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chii Dong

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  11. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  12. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  13. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light. PMID:27762396

  14. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light.

  15. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  16. Time-resolved phase-sensitive second harmonic generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Paweł J.; Woods, David A.; Bain, Colin D.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology based on time-resolved, phase-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) for probing the excited state dynamics of species at interfaces is presented. It is based on an interference measurement between the SHG from the sample and a local oscillator generated at a reference together with a lock-in measurement to remove the large constant offset from the interference. The technique is characterized by measuring the phase and excited state dynamics of the dye malachite green at the water/air interface. The key attributes of the technique are that the observed signal is directly proportional to sample concentration, in contrast to the quadratic dependence from non-phase sensitive SHG, and that the real and imaginary parts of the 2nd order non-linear susceptibility can be determined independently. We show that the method is highly sensitive and can provide high quality excited state dynamics in short data acquisition times.

  17. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  18. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  19. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  1. Evaluation of thermally driven flows and orographic convection at cloud-resolving resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidli, J.; Langhans, W.; Fuhrer, O.; Bieri, S.; Schar, C.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to evaluate the representation of thermally driven flows and moist convection over the European Alps at cloud-resolving resolutions (CRM; 1.1 and 2.2 km). The two simulations and further sensitivity experiments are validated against a large set of observations for an 18-day fair-weather summer period. The episode considered is characterized by pronounced plain-valley pressure gradients, strong daytime upvalley flows, and weak nighttime down-valley flows. In addition, convective precipitation is recorded during the late afternoon and is preceded by a phase of shallow convection. The observed transition from shallow to deep convection occurs within a 3-h period. The results indicate generally good agreement between both CRMs and the observed diurnal evolution in terms of near-surface winds, cloud formation, and precipitation. The differences between the 1.1 and 2.2 km resolution runs are surprisingly small. In contrast, a convection-parameterizing simulation with 6.6 km resolution (CPM) produces too-early peaks of cloud cover and precipitation that are due to a too-early activation of deep convection. Detailed sensitivity experiments show that the convection scheme, rather than the under-resolved small-scale topography, is responsible for the poor performance of the CPM.

  2. Theory of time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering for imaging ultrafast coherent electron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Slowik, Jan Malte; Santra, Robin

    2014-04-01

    Future ultrafast x-ray light sources might image ultrafast coherent electron motion in real space and in real time. For a rigorous understanding of such an imaging experiment, we extend the theory of nonresonant x-ray scattering to the time domain. The role of energy resolution of the scattering detector is investigated in detail. We show that time-resolved nonresonant x-ray scattering with no energy resolution offers an opportunity to study time-dependent electronic correlations in nonequilibrium quantum systems. Furthermore, our theory presents a unified description of ultrafast x-ray scattering from electronic wave packets and the dynamical imaging of ultrafast dynamics using inelastic x-ray scattering by Abbamonte and co-workers. We examine closely the relation of the scattering signal and the linear density response of electronic wave packets. Finally, we demonstrate that time-resolved x-ray scattering from a crystal consisting of identical electronic wave packets recovers the instantaneous electron density.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  4. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Pawate, Ashtamurthy S; Šrajer, Vukica; Schieferstein, Jeremy; Guha, Sudipto; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Schmidt, Marius; Ren, Zhong; Kenis, Paul J A; Perry, Sarah L

    2015-07-01

    Serial methods for crystallography have the potential to enable dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. The use of serial data-collection strategies can circumvent challenges associated with radiation damage and repeated reaction initiation. This work utilizes a microfluidic crystallization platform for the serial time-resolved Laue diffraction analysis of macroscopic crystals of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Reaction initiation was achieved via pulsed laser illumination, and the resultant electron-density difference maps clearly depict the expected pR(1)/pR(E46Q) and pR(2)/pR(CW) states at 10 µs and the pB1 intermediate at 1 ms. The strategies presented here have tremendous potential for extension to chemical triggering methods for reaction initiation and for extension to dynamic, multivariable analyses.

  5. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  6. Time-resolve study of the photooxygenation of 3-hydroxyflavone

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, S.L.; Brewer, W.E.; Martinez, M.L.; Chou, Pi-Tai )

    1989-09-13

    3-hydroxyflavones are prototype molecules for studying the dynamics of the proton-transfer reaction in the excited state as well as in the ground state. Their lasing action has been reported with a high efficiency of laser gain. Unfortunately, a major obstruction to the practical application of 3-hydroxy-flavones as laser dyes is due to a photochemical reaction possibly involving molecular oxygen. In this communication we report a direct time-resolved study of the photooxygenation of 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) in the normal state as well as in the tau-tomer state. Our results not only provide a detailed mechanism of the photooxygenation reaction but also give indirect evidence to support the role of the triplet state in the reverse proton-transfer reaction.

  7. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  8. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Šrajer, Vukica; Schieferstein, Jeremy; Guha, Sudipto; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Schmidt, Marius; Ren, Zhong; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Perry, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Serial methods for crystallography have the potential to enable dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. The use of serial data-collection strategies can circumvent challenges associated with radiation damage and repeated reaction initiation. This work utilizes a microfluidic crystallization platform for the serial time-resolved Laue diffraction analysis of macroscopic crystals of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Reaction initiation was achieved via pulsed laser illumination, and the resultant electron-density difference maps clearly depict the expected pR1/pRE46Q and pR2/pRCW states at 10 µs and the pB1 intermediate at 1 ms. The strategies presented here have tremendous potential for extension to chemical triggering methods for reaction initiation and for extension to dynamic, multivariable analyses. PMID:26144226

  9. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Antolovic, I. Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A.; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  10. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  11. New time-resolved micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy of natural and synthetic analogue minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panczer, G.; Ollier, N.; Champagnon, B.; Gaft, M.

    2003-04-01

    Minerals as well as geomaterials often present light emissions under UV or visible excitations. This property called photoluminescence is due to low concentration impurities such as the rare earths, the transition elements and the lanthanides. The induced color is used for ore prospection but only spectroscopic analyses indicate the nature of the emitted centers. However natural samples contained numerous luminescent centers simultaneously and with regular steady-state measurements (such as in cathodoluminescence) all the emissions are often over lapping. In order to record the contributions of each separate center, it is possible to use time-resolved measurements based on the decay time of the emissions and using pulsed laser excitation. Some characteristic examples will be presented on apatites, zircons as well as gemstones. Geomaterials present as well micro scale heterogeneities (growth zoning, inclusions, devitrification, microphases...). Precise identification and optical effects of such heterogeneities have to be taken into account. To reach the microscale using photo luminescence studies, a microscope has be modified to allowed pulsed laser injection (from UV to visible), beam focus with micro scale resolution on the sample (<10 μm), as well as time resolved collection of micro fluorescence. Such equipment allows now undertaking time-resolved measurements of microphases. Applications on geomaterials will be presented.

  12. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Bath, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J.; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sebastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jorg

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, this study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.

  13. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; ...

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within themore » crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, this study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.« less

  14. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J.; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX. PMID:27545823

  15. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits). PMID:27140147

  16. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  17. 30 CFR 291.103 - May I use alternative dispute resolution to informally resolve an allegation that open and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... informally resolve an allegation that open and nondiscriminatory access was denied? 291.103 Section 291.103 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPEALS OPEN AND... alternative dispute resolution to informally resolve an allegation that open and nondiscriminatory access...

  18. Time-resolved experiments in the frequency domain using synchrotron radiation (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    De Stasio, G. ); Giusti, A.M.; Parasassi, T.; Ravagnan, G. ); Sapora, O. )

    1992-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beam line in the world that performs time-resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and the dynamics of molecules. This technique measures fluorescence lifetimes with picosecond resolution in the near UV spectral range. Such accurate measurements are rendered possible by taking phase and modulation data, and by the advantages of the cross-correlation technique. A successful experiment demonstrated the radiation damage induced by low doses of radiation on rabbit blood cell membranes.

  19. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nan; Cheung, Ka Wai; Wong, Hiu Tung; Ho, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art. PMID:25365460

  20. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Kühn, H.; Häsing, F. W.; Münnemann, K.; Blümich, B.; Appelt, S.

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol.

  1. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  2. High Time Resolution Studies with the GBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Natalia; Lynch, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    The detection of neutron stars 49 years ago has created many new and independent branches of research. In 1967, fast rotating neutron stars, or pulsars, became the first objects of this kind to be discovered at radio wavelengths -- more than 30years after their theoretical prediction.In spite of numerous studies throughout the years, the mechanism of the observed radio emission of pulsars is still not understood. Recent technological developments allow observations of pulsars with time resolutions extending into the nanoseconds range, providing a unique insight into the momentary state of a pulsar.Radio giant pulses are known to occur non-periodically in certain phase ranges, exhibit much higher peak flux densities than regular pulses, and to have pulse widths ranging from the micro- to nanoseconds. Their characteristics make them suitable for high time resolution studies. We present the first high time resolution observations of the original millisecond pulsar PSR B1937+21 carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope.

  3. Phase-ambiguity resolution for QPSK modulation systems. Part 2: A method to resolve offset QPSK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1989-05-01

    Part 2 presents a new method to resolve the phase-ambiguity for Offset QPSK modulation systems. When an Offset Quaternary Phase-Shift-Keyed (OQPSK) communications link is utilized, the phase ambiguity of the reference carrier must be resolved. At the transmitter, two different unique words are separately modulated onto the quadrature carriers. At the receiver, the recovered carrier may have one of four possible phases, 0, 90, 180, or 270 degrees, referenced to the nominally correct phase. The IF portion of the channel may cause a phase-sense reversal, i.e., a reversal in the direction of phase rotation for a specified bit pattern. Hence, eight possible phase relationships (the so-called eight ambiguous phase conditions) between input and output of the demodulator must be resolved. Using the In-phase (I)/Quadrature (Q) channel reversal correcting property of an OQPSK Costas loop with integrated symbol synchronization, four ambiguous phase conditions are eliminated. Thus, only four possible ambiguous phase conditions remain. The errors caused by the remaining ambiguous phase conditions can be corrected by monitoring and detecting the polarity of the two unique words. The correction of the unique word polarities results in the complete phase-ambiguity resolution for the OQPSK system.

  4. Phase-ambiguity resolution for QPSK modulation systems. Part 2: A method to resolve offset QPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1989-01-01

    Part 2 presents a new method to resolve the phase-ambiguity for Offset QPSK modulation systems. When an Offset Quaternary Phase-Shift-Keyed (OQPSK) communications link is utilized, the phase ambiguity of the reference carrier must be resolved. At the transmitter, two different unique words are separately modulated onto the quadrature carriers. At the receiver, the recovered carrier may have one of four possible phases, 0, 90, 180, or 270 degrees, referenced to the nominally correct phase. The IF portion of the channel may cause a phase-sense reversal, i.e., a reversal in the direction of phase rotation for a specified bit pattern. Hence, eight possible phase relationships (the so-called eight ambiguous phase conditions) between input and output of the demodulator must be resolved. Using the In-phase (I)/Quadrature (Q) channel reversal correcting property of an OQPSK Costas loop with integrated symbol synchronization, four ambiguous phase conditions are eliminated. Thus, only four possible ambiguous phase conditions remain. The errors caused by the remaining ambiguous phase conditions can be corrected by monitoring and detecting the polarity of the two unique words. The correction of the unique word polarities results in the complete phase-ambiguity resolution for the OQPSK system.

  5. High-accuracy time- and space-resolved Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Adams, R.; Carlson, A.L.; Ching, C.H.; Filuk, A.B.; Lake, P.

    1996-07-01

    Stark-shift measurements using emission spectroscopy are a powerful tool for advancing understanding in many plasma physics experiments. The authors use simultaneous 2-D-spatial and time-resolved spectra to study the electric field evolution in the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II ion diode acceleration gap. Fiber optic arrays transport light from the gap to remote streaked spectrographs operated in a multiplexed mode that enables recording time-resolved spectra from eight spatial locations on a single instrument. Design optimization and characterization measurements of the multiplexed spectrograph properties include the astigmatism, resolution, dispersion variation, and sensitivity. A semi-automated line-fitting procedure determines the Stark shift and the related uncertainties. Fields up to 10 MV/cm are measured with an accuracy {+-}2--4%. Detailed tests of the fitting procedure confirm that the wavelength shift uncertainties are accurate to better than {+-}20%. Development of an active spectroscopy probe technique that uses laser-induced fluorescence from an injected atomic beam to obtain 3-D space- and time-resolved measurements of the electric and magnetic fields is in progress.

  6. Discovery of specialized pro-resolving mediators marks the dawn of resolution physiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Charles N

    2017-03-03

    It is with great pleasure that I write this foreword and introduction to this Special Issue dedicated to the protective actions of the pro-resolving mediators and edited by my colleague Dr. Jesmond Dalli. Many of my collaborators and colleagues that helped to uncover the actions and clinical potential of the resolvins and other specialized proresolving mediators (SPM), namely, the superfamily of pro-resolving mediators that includes the resolvin (E-series, D-series and DPA-derived), protectin and maresin families, as well as the arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins, join me in this special issue. They have given contributions that present exciting new results on the remarkable actions and potency of these unique molecules, the SPM moving forward the importance of their mediators and pathways in human biology. Each contribution to this issue is presented by world authorities in their respective fields covering discoveries that demonstrate the importance and impact of resolution mediators in biology, medicine and surgery. While some of the authors were students and/or fellows with me and others, they are today the founding "resolutionists" of a new era of appreciation of autacoid biosynthesis and metabolomics in human health and disease with their rigorous attention to experimental detail and discovery. The chapters of this issue are filled with exciting new discoveries demonstrating the dynamics and potential of resolution mediators.

  7. Mid-infrared time-resolved photoconduction in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Ryan J.; Leong, Edward; Garrett, Joseph L.; Zhou, Tong; Salem, Reza; Munday, Jeremy N.; Murphy, Thomas E.; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Black phosphorus has attracted interest as a material for use in optoelectronic devices due to many favorable properties such as a high carrier mobility, field-effect, and a direct bandgap that can range from 0.3 eV in its bulk crystalline form to 1.7-2.0 eV for a single atomic layer. The low bandgap energy for multilayer black phosphorus consisting of more than approximately five atomic layers allows for direct transition photoabsorption that enables detection of light out to mid-infrared frequencies. In this work, we characterize the room temperature optical response of a black phosphorus photoconductive detector at wavelengths ranging from 1.56 to 3.75 μm. Pulsed autocorrelation measurements in the near-infrared regime reveal a strong, sub-linear photocurrent nonlinearity with a response time of 1 ns, indicating that gigahertz electrical bandwidth is feasible. Time resolved photoconduction measurements covering near- and mid-infrared frequencies show a fast 65 ps rise time, followed by a carrier relaxation with a time scale that matches the intrinsic limit determined by autocorrelation. The sublinear photoresponse is shown to be caused by a reduction in the carrier relaxation time as more energy is absorbed in the black phosphorus flake and is well described by a carrier recombination model that is nonlinear with excess carrier density. The device exhibits a measured noise-equivalent power of 530 pW Hz-1/2, which is the value expected for Johnson noise limited performance. The fast and sensitive room temperature photoresponse demonstrates that black phosphorus is a promising new material for mid-infrared optoelectronics.

  8. Time-Resolved Luminescence Nanothermometry with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Liu, Hsiou-Yuan; Chen, Oliver Y; Hsu, Hsiang; Yee, Fu-Goul; Chang, Ming-Shien; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-06-10

    Measuring temperature in nanoscale spatial resolution either at or far from equilibrium is of importance in many scientific and technological applications. Although negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers in diamond have recently emerged as a promising nanometric temperature sensor, the technique has been applied only under steady state conditions so far. Here, we present a three-point sampling method that allows real-time monitoring of the temperature changes over ±100 K and a pump-probe-type experiment that enables the study of nanoscale heat transfer with a temporal resolution of better than 10 μs. The utility of the time-resolved luminescence nanothermometry was demonstrated with 100 nm fluorescent nanodiamonds spin-coated on a glass substrate and submerged in gold nanorod solution heated by a near-infrared laser, and the validity of the measurements was verified with finite-element numerical simulations. The combined theoretical and experimental approaches will be useful to implement time-resolved temperature sensing in laser processing of materials and even for devices in operation at the nanometer scale.

  9. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  10. A Multi-Enzyme Bioluminescent Time-Resolved Pyrophosphate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Golovlev, Val

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a high-sensitivity assay for measurement of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) contaminated samples. The assay is based on time-resolved measurements of the luminescence kinetics and implements multiple enzymes to convert PPi to ATP that is, in turn, utilized to produce light; and to hydrolyze PPi for measurement of the steady-state background luminescence. A theoretical model for describing luminescence kinetics and optimizing composition of the assay detection mixture is presented. We found the model is in excellent agreement with the experimental results. We have developed and evaluated two algorithms for PPi measurement from luminescence kinetics acquired from ATP-contaminated samples. The first algorithm is considered to be the method of choice for analysis of long, i.e., 3-5 min, kinetics. The activity of enzymes is controlled during the experiment; the sensitivity of PPi detection is about 7 pg/ml or 15 pM of PPi in ATP-contaminated samples. The second algorithm is designed for analysis of short, i.e., less than 1-min luminescence kinetics. It has about 20 pM PPi detection sensitivity and may be the better choice for assays in microplate format, where a short measurement time is required. The PPi assay is primarily developed for RNA expression analysis, but it also can be used in various applications, which require high sensitivity PPi detection in ATP-contaminated samples. PMID:17540325

  11. Time-resolved shadowgraphy of optical breakdown in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. A.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Nguyen, V. H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Le, N. T.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2015-07-01

    Dynamics of a laser-induced optical breakdown in the bulk of fused silica initiated by a sub-nanosecond laser pulse of an energy fluence as high as 8.7 kJ/cm2 was investigated by using femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphy. Plasma ignition, growth of the damaged region and accompanying hydrodynamic motion were recorded from the moment directly before the arrival of the driving laser pulse, in the time steps adapted to the rate of the occurring processes. The growth rate of the plasma channel, curvature radii and velocities of the wave fronts were extracted from the shadowgrams. It was found that the plasma channel develops with a supersonic velocity and the first observed shock front tends to transform itself from the initial bowl-like shape to the final spherical one characterising an acoustic wave. Appearance of multiple fronts accompanying the main shock front was registered and used in more detailed analysis of the optical breakdown dynamics in the transparent dielectrics.

  12. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  13. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  14. Time-Resolved Measurements of Carbon Nanotube and Nanohorn Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geohegan, David

    2005-11-01

    Mechanisms for carbon nanotube growth have been investigated for both laser vaporization (LV) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis techniques through the use of time-resolved, in situ laser-based diagnostics for the measurement of absolute growth rates. Optimization of both the production of loose single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by LV and the sustained growth of mm-long, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs) by CVD are described. For SWNT growth by laser co-vaporization of carbon and trace metal catalysts at high (1200 C) temperatures, nanotubes are found to grow at ˜ 1--5 microns/second to lengths of only several microns, as determined by gated-ICCD imaging and laser spectroscopy of the plume of ejected material. Efforts to scale the LV production of SWNTs utilizing an industrial Nd:YAG laser (600 W average power, 1-500 Hz repetition rate, 0.5-10ms pulse width) are described. In addition to vaporizing material at much higher rates, the high-power laser irradiation provides sufficient plasma plume density and temperature to enable the growth of novel single-wall carbon nanohorn (SWNH) structures without the need for metal catalysts in the target. Applications of these SWNH structures as metal catalyst supports will be discussed. Through the application of time-resolved reflectivity and direct imaging, CVD growth of VANTAs from hydrocarbon gases at sustained rates of 0.2 -- 0.5 microns/second have been directly measured over millimeters of length at lower (˜ 700 C) temperatures. Now, through a new laser-CVD setup at the ALPS (Advanced Laser Processing and Synthesis) facility at ORNL, high-power laser heating is being employed for the fast and position-controlled growth of carbon nanotubes on substrates. In situ fast optical pyrometry is employed to record the rapid thermal processing of metal-catalyst-prepared substrates to investigate the nucleation and early growth behavior of CVD-grown nanotubes. New nanotube growth and tunable Raman

  15. Interpolating Low Time-Resolution Forecast Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shuai Lu, PNNL

    2015-11-03

    Methodology that interpolates low time-resolution data (e.g., hourly) to high time-resolution (e.g., minutely) with variability patterns extracted from historical records. Magnitude of the variability inserted into the low timeresolution data can be adjusted according to the installed capacity represented by the low time-resolution data compared to that by historical records. This approach enables detailed analysis of the impacts from wind and solar on power system intra-hour operations and balancing reserve requirements even with only hourly data. It also allows convenient creation of high resolution wind or solar generation data with various degree of variability to investigate their operational impacts. The methodology comprises of the following steps: 1. Smooth the historical data (set A) with an appropriate window length l to get its trend (set B); l can be a fraction of an hour (e.g., 15 minutes) or longer than an hour, of which the length of the variability patterns will be; 2. Extract the variable component (set C) of historical data by subtracting the smooth trend from it, i.e. set C = set A – set B 3. For each window length l of the variable component data set, find the average value x (will call it base component) of the corresponding window of the historical data set; 4. Define a series of segments (set D) that the values of data will be grouped into, e.g. (0, 0.1), (0.1, 0.2), …, (0.9, 1.0) after normalization; Link each variability pattern to a data segment based on its corresponding base component x; after this step, each data segment should be linked to multiple variability patterns after this step; 5. Use spline function to interpolate the low time-resolution forecast data (set E) to become a high time-resolution smooth curve (set F); 6. Based on the window length l , calculate the average value y in each window length of set F; find the data segment that y belongs to; then randomly select one of the variability patterns linked to this data

  16. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertot, Yoann; Schmidt, Cédric; Matthews, Mary; Chauvet, Adrien; Huppert, Martin; Svoboda, Vit; von Conta, Aaron; Tehlar, Andres; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS) has so far practically been limited to large-scale facilities, to subpicosecond temporal resolution, and to the condensed phase. We report the realization of TR-XAS with a temporal resolution in the low femtosecond range by developing a tabletop high-harmonic source reaching up to 350 electron volts, thus partially covering the spectral region of 280 to 530 electron volts, where water is transmissive. We used this source to follow previously unexamined light-induced chemical reactions in the lowest electronic states of isolated CF4+ and SF6+ molecules in the gas phase. By probing element-specific core-to-valence transitions at the carbon K-edge or the sulfur L-edges, we characterized their reaction paths and observed the effect of symmetry breaking through the splitting of absorption bands and Rydberg-valence mixing induced by the geometry changes.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopic study of the KrF laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target

    SciTech Connect

    Girault, C.; Damiani, D.; Aubreton, J.; Catherinot, A.

    1989-07-10

    The laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target by a KrF laser beam (248 nm) is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy. High-resolution spectra are obtained and ejection velocities of ablated species are deduced from temporal evolution of spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements.

  18. Time-resolved diagnostics for concrete target response

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Reaugh, J.E.; Simonson, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    In order to facilitate the design of advanced penetrating weapons for defeating land targets, the interaction of concrete with high-velocity penetrators needs to be better characterized. To aid in this effort, three new types of time-resolved diagnostics are being developed and have been used in two experiments and one demonstration: fiber optic arrays to localize penetrators in space and time, Fabry-Perot velocimetry to record the concrete particle velocity, which is related to the pressure, at specific locations within concrete targets, and micropower impulse radar to provide a non-intrusive measure of the penetrator position-time history in a target. The two experiments used the fiber optic array and the Fabry-Perot velocimeter to diagnose the response of concrete to penetration by a Viper shaped charge jet. The results were analyzed using the CALE continuum mechanics simulation program, for which a preliminary model of the material properties of concrete was developed. The fiber optic arrays recorded the bow shock at locations 6.4 and 16.9 cm from the front surfaces. The Fabry-Perot velocimeter measured a free-surface velocity of 0.13 km/s at a distance of 3 cm and obliquity 70{degree} from the jet, which was moving at an interface velocity of 4.0 km/s at a depth of 29 cm. These values imply a pressure of about 6.6 kbar at that location. The demonstration used micropower impulse radar with a pulse repetition frequency of 0.25 MHz and a cell size of 30 ps to detect and record the motion of a metal penetrator simulant moving inside a cylindrical concrete target.

  19. Time-Resolved Photoemission of Correlated Electrons Driven Out of Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T.P.; Freericks, J.K.; /Georgetown U.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the temporal evolution of the time-resolved photoemission response of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model driven out of equilibrium by strong, applied fields. The model is one of the few possessing a metal-insulator transition and admitting an exact solution in the time domain. The nonequilibrium dynamics, evaluated using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory, show how the driven system differs from two common viewpoints - a quasi-equilibrium system at an elevated, effective temperature (the 'hot' electron model) or a rapid interaction quench ('melting' of the Mott gap) - due to the rearrangement of electronic states and redistribution of spectral weight. The results demonstrate the inherent trade-off between energy and time resolution accompanying the finite width probe-pulses, characteristic of those employed in pump-probe, time-domain experiments, which can be used to focus attention on different aspects of the dynamics near the transition.

  20. Picosecond time-resolved imaging using SPAD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Warburton, Ryan; Chan, Susan; Henderson, Robert; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    The recent development of 2D arrays of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) has driven the development of applications based on the ability to capture light in motion. Such arrays are composed typically of 32x32 SPAD detectors, each having the ability to detect single photons and measure their time of arrival with a resolution of about 100 ps. Thanks to the single-photon sensitivity and the high temporal resolution of these detectors, it is now possible to image light as it is travelling on a centimetre scale. This opens the door for the direct observation and study of dynamics evolving over picoseconds and nanoseconds timescales such as laser propagation in air, laser-induced plasma and laser propagation in optical fibres. Another interesting application enabled by the ability to image light in motion is the detection of objects hidden from view, based on the recording of scattered waves originating from objects hidden by an obstacle. Similarly to LIDAR systems, the temporal information acquired at every pixel of a SPAD array, combined with the spatial information it provides, allows to pinpoint the position of an object located outside the line-of-sight of the detector. A non-line-of-sight tracking can be a valuable asset in many scenarios, including for search and rescue mission and safer autonomous driving.

  1. Time-resolved neurite mechanics by thermal fluctuation assessments.

    PubMed

    Gárate, Fernanda; Betz, Timo; Pertusa, María; Bernal, Roberto

    2015-12-30

    In the absence of simple noninvasive measurements, the knowledge of temporal and spatial variations of axons mechanics remains scarce. By extending thermal fluctuation spectroscopy (TFS) to long protrusions, we determine the transverse amplitude thermal fluctuation spectra that allow direct and simultaneous access to three key mechanics parameters: axial tension, bending flexural rigidity and plasma membrane tension. To test our model, we use PC12 cell protrusions-a well-know biophysical model of axons-in order to simplify the biological system under scope. For instance, axial and plasma membrane tension are found in the range of nano Newton and tens of pico Newtons per micron respectively. Furthermore, our results shows that the TFS technique is capable to distinguish quasi-identical protrusions. Another advantage of our approach is the time resolved nature of the measurements. Indeed, in the case of long term experiments on PC12 protrusions, TFS has revealed large temporal, correlated variations of the protrusion mechanics, displaying extraordinary feedback control over the axial tension in order to maintain a constant tension value.

  2. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of phytochrome and stentorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pill-Soon

    1991-05-01

    Phytochrome is a tetrapyrrole chromoprotein. It serves as a sensitive photosensor for red lightmediated gene expression and other developmental/morphological responses in plants. In this paper photochemical dynamics of the phytochrome molecule have been described in terms of photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore in its singlet excited state and subsequent thermal processes in the Pr Pfr phototransformation of phytochrome. Stentorin acts as the photosensor molecule in the ciliate Stentor coeruleus. This unicellular protozoan is most sensitive to red light (610-620 urn). Stentor also senses the direction of light propagation as evidenced by their light-avoiding and negative phototactic swimming behaviors. This aneural photosensory phenomenon is triggered by the photoreceptor stentorin. The possible involvement of a light-induced transient proton release from the photoreceptor as the primary mechanism of light-signal processing has been discussed on the basis of picosecond fluorescence decays and time-resolved fluorescence spectra of stentorin in solution. An initial sensory signal generated by the primary photoprocess of stentorin then triggers subsequent transduction steps that include calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium. Calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium to the cytosol causes the Stentor cell to reverse its ciliary beating and subsequently steer away from the light trap. II.

  3. Monitoring tissue metabolism via time-resolved laser fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Marx, Uwe

    1999-05-01

    Most assays for drug screening are monitoring the metabolism of cells by detecting the NADH content, which symbolize its metabolic activity, indirectly. Nowadays, the performance of a LASER enables us to monitor the metabolic state of mammalian cells directly and on-line by using time-resolved autofluorescence detection. Therefore, we developed in combination with tissue engineering, an assay for monitoring minor toxic effects of volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are accused of inducing Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). Furthermore, we used the Laserfluoroscope (LF) for pharmacological studies on human bone marrow in vitro with special interest in chemotherapy simulation. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; up to now without great success. However, it showed among other things that tissue structure plays a vital role. Consequently, we succeeded in simulating a chemotherapy in vitro on human bone marrow. Furthermore, after tumor ektomy we were able to distinguish between tumoric and its surrounding healthy tissue by using the LF. With its sensitive detection of metabolic changes in tissues the LF enables a wide range of applications in biotechnology, e.g. for quality control in artificial organ engineering or biocompatability testing.

  4. Time resolved strain dependent morphological study of electrically conducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Mateus, Artur; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and reliable method is introduced to understand the network behaviour of nano-fillers in a polymeric matrix under uniaxial strain coupled with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes) are conductive and the particles form a percolating network that becomes apparent source of electrical conduction and consequently the samples behave as a bulk conductor. Polyurethane based nanocomposites containing 2% w/w multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite was (3.28×10-5s/m).The sample was able to be extended to an extension ratio of 1.7 before fracture. A slight variation in the electrical conductivity is observed under uniaxial strain which we attribute to the disturbance of conductive pathways. Further, this work is coupled with in- situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering measurements using a synchrotron beam line to enable its measurements to be made during the deformation cycle. We use a multiscale structure to model the small angle x-ray data. The results of the analysis are interpreted as the presence of aggregates which would also go some way towards understanding why there is no alignment of the carbon nanotubes.

  5. Development of dispersive XAFS system for analysis of time-resolved spatial distribution of electrode reaction.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Misaki; Miyahara, Ryota; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Hirona; Yamashita, Shohei; Kizaki, Terue; Sugawara, Yoshimi; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Apparatus for a technique based on the dispersive optics of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been developed at beamline BL-5 of the Synchrotron Radiation Center of Ritsumeikan University. The vertical axis of the cross section of the synchrotron light is used to disperse the X-ray energy using a cylindrical polychromator and the horizontal axis is used for the spatially resolved analysis with a pixel array detector. The vertically dispersive XAFS (VDXAFS) instrument was designed to analyze the dynamic changeover of the inhomogeneous electrode reaction of secondary batteries. The line-shaped X-ray beam is transmitted through the electrode sample, and then the dispersed transmitted X-rays are detected by a two-dimensional detector. An array of XAFS spectra in the linear footprint of the transmitted X-ray on the sample is obtained with the time resolution of the repetition frequency of the detector. Sequential measurements of the space-resolved XAFS data are possible with the VDXAFS instrument. The time and spatial resolutions of the VDXAFS instrument depend on the flux density of the available X-ray beam and the size of the light source, and they were estimated as 1 s and 100 µm, respectively. The electrode reaction of the LiFePO4 lithium ion battery was analyzed during the constant current charging process and during the charging process after potential jumping.

  6. Time resolved spectroscopy of the cool Ap star HD 213637*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, V. G.; Kurtz, D. W.; Mathys, G.

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of high time resolution spectra of the chemically peculiar Ap star HD 213637. The star shows rapid radial velocity variations with a period close to the photometric pulsation period. Radial velocity pulsation amplitudes vary significantly for different rare earth elements. The highest pulsation amplitudes belong to lines of Tb III (˜360 m s-1), Pr II (˜250 m s-1) and Pr III (˜230 m s-1). We did not detect any pulsations from spectral lines of Eu II and in Hα, in contrast to many other roAp stars. We also did not find radial velocity pulsations using spectral lines of other chemical elements, including Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y and Ba. There are phase shifts between the maxima of pulsation amplitudes of different rare earth elements and ions, which is evidence of an outwardly running magneto-acoustic wave propagating through the upper stellar atmosphere.

  7. Resolving the spatial relationship between intracellular components by dual color super resolution optical fluctuations imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Maria Elena; Xu, Jianmin; Dertinger, Thomas; Aizer, Adva; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Multi-color super-resolution (SR) imaging microscopy techniques can resolve ultrastructura relationships between- and provide co-localization information of- different proteins inside the cell or even within organelles at a higher resolution than afforded by conventional diffraction-limited imaging. While still very challenging, important SR colocalization results have been reported in recent years using STED, PALM and STORM techniques. Results In this work, we demonstrate dual-color Super Resolution Optical Fluctuations Imaging (SOFI) using a standard far-field fluorescence microscope and different color blinking quantum dots. We define the spatial relationship between hDcp1a, a processing body (P-body, PB) protein, and the tubulin cytoskeletal network. Our finding could open up new perspectives on the role of the cytoskeleton in PB formation and assembly. Further insights into PB internal organization are also reported and discussed. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the suitability and facile use of multi-color SOFI for the investigation of intracellular ultrastructures. PMID:24324919

  8. Imaging dental sections with polarization-resolved SHG and time-resolved autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun Huang; Lin, Po-Yen; Hsu, Stephen C. Y.; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we are using two-photon (2-p) excited autofluorescence and second harmonic (SH) as imaging modalities to investigate dental sections that contains the enamel and the dentin. The use of near-infrared wavelengths for multiphoton excitation greatly facilitates the observation of these sections due to the hard tissue's larger index of refraction and highly scattering nature. Clear imaging can be achieved without feature altering preparation procedures of the samples. Specifically, we perform polarization resolving on SH and lifetime analysis on autofluorescence. Polarization resolved SH reflects the preferred orientation of collagen while very different autofluorescence lifetimes are observed from the dentin and the enamel. The origin of 2-p autofluorescence and SH signals are attributed to hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibrils, respectively. Hydroxyapatite is found to be present throughout the sections while collagen fibrils exist only in the dentin and dentinoenamel junctions.

  9. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Gopal; Santra, Robin

    2013-04-07

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)]. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  10. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  11. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  12. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10(16). At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  13. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE PAGES

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; ...

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  14. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.

  15. Real-Time Eddy-Resolving Ocean Prediction in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, H. E.; Smedstad, O. M.; Shriver, J. F.; Townsend, T. L.; Murphy, S. J.

    2001-12-01

    A {1/16}o eddy-resolving, nearly global ocean prediction system has been developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Stennis Space Center, MS. It has been run in real-time by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO), Stennis Space Center, MS since 18 Oct 2000 with daily updates for the nowcast and 30-day forecasts performed every Wednesday. The model has ~8 km resolution in the Caribbean region and assimilates real-time altimeter sea surface height (SSH) data from ERS-2, GFO and TOPEX/POSEIDON plus multi-channel sea surface temperature (MCSST) from satellite IR. Real-time and archived results from the system can be seen at web site: http://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/global\

  16. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5-9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 110 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL.

  17. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5 9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 1/10 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL.

  18. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert J. Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-15

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  19. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-01

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  20. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  1. Length of Time to Resolve Criminal Charges of Child Sexual Abuse: A Three-County Case Study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Wendy A; Lippert, Tonya; Edelson, Meredyth Goldberg; Jones, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    The present study sought to examine the court culture of three Oregon counties and their timelines for resolving felony child sexual abuse cases. Specifically, we examined (a) case outcomes, churning (i.e., the extent to which four court events were rescheduled), the length of time to reach a criminal case resolution, and how this length of time compared to that for felonies generally; (b) whether mandatory minimum sentences affected resolution timeliness; and (c) key stakeholders' perceptions about their local court culture. Data included retrospective case-file abstraction (N = 532) on all felony child sex crimes for a 2-year period and interviews with legal professionals (N = 23). Across all three counties, a minority of child sexual abuse cases (18% to 47%) were resolved within the target timeframe of 4 months. In contrast, most felonies (65% to 77%) were resolved within this timeframe. The rescheduling of trials and the requirement of mandatory minimum sentences for some felony child sexual abuse crimes increased the time until case resolution. Results suggest that court cultures that are hierarchical and cooperative may lead to longer case resolution times than court cultures that are self-managing or autonomous. Implications of these results and other results are discussed.

  2. Advances in coincidence time resolution for PET.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2016-03-21

    Coincidence time resolution (CTR), an important parameter for time-of-flight (TOF) PET performance, is determined mainly by properties of the scintillation crystal and photodetector used. Stable production techniques for LGSO:Ce (Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce) with decay times varying from ∼ 30-40 ns have been established over the past decade, and the decay time can be accurately controlled with varying cerium concentration (0.025-0.075 mol%). This material is promising for TOF-PET, as it has similar light output and equivalent stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons compared to industry standard LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce, and the decay time is improved by more than 30% with proper Ce concentration. This work investigates the achievable CTR with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%) when coupled to new silicon photomultipliers. Crystal element dimension is another important parameter for achieving fast timing. 20 mm length crystal elements achieve higher 511 keV photon detection efficiency, but also introduce higher scintillation photon transit time variance. 3 mm length crystals are not practical for PET, but have reduced scintillation transit time spread. The CTR between pairs of 2.9 × 2.9 × 3 mm(3) and 2.9 × 2.9 × 20 mm(3) LGSO:Ce crystals was measured to be 80 ± 4 and 122 ± 4 ps FWHM, respectively. Measurements of light yield and intrinsic decay time are also presented for a thorough investigation into the timing performance with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%).

  3. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Ryo

    The behavior of superconductors far from equilibrium has been intensively studied over decades. Goals of these studies are the elucidation of bosonic fluctuations essential for the pairing mechanisms, the manifestation of competing orders or hidden phases, and the optical manipulation of superconductivity. The study of collective modes is crucially important for these perspectives as it provides the information on the dynamics of order parameters in non-equilibirium states. Generally, collective modes in ordered phases associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking are classified into 1) gapless phase modes and 2) gapped amplitude modes. In superconductors, the phase mode is eaten by gauge field, according to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. The remaining amplitude mode is recently termed as Higgs mode from its analogy to the Higgs boson in particle physics. Despite its long history of investigation, unambiguous observation of Higgs mode has remained elusive. This is because the Higgs mode does not have a charge nor electric dipole and therefore it does not couple directly to the electromagnetic field. Here we report on our recent observation of Higgs mode in s-wave superconductors by using THz-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy technique. After nonadiabatic excitation near the superconducting gap energy with monocycle THz pulses, Higgs mode was observed as oscillations in the transmission of THz probe pulse. The resonant nonlinear coupling between the Higgs mode and coherent radiation field was also discovered, resulting in an efficient third order harmonic generation of the incident THz radiation. The extension of experiments to multiband superconductors and unconventional superconductors will be discussed. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors.

  4. Time-Resolved Tunneling in Gallium-Arsenide Quantum Well Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Theodore Blake

    Tunneling in quantum well structures has been a subject of considerable interest in semiconductor physics in recent years. Few time-domain experiments, however, have been brought to bear on the questions of the mechanisms or time-dependence of tunneling. We have developed techniques for a measurement of picosecond and femtosecond optical spectra, and applied them for the first time to the study of tunneling in quantum well structures. We have developed a novel dye oscillator and amplifier to generate optical pulses of 100-fs duration at the 15 -muJ level with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. These pulses were used to generate a white-light continuum, which enabled us to perform optical absorption spectroscopy over the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum with a time resolution of about 100 fs. We have also developed an experimental setup for time-resolved photoluminescence appropriate for GaAs quantum well studies, utilizing a picosecond near-infrared dye laser in conjunction with a synchroscan streak camera. Using time resolved photoluminescence, we have studied the tunneling escape rate of electrons from a quantum well through a thin barrier into a continuum, and its dependence on barrier height and width, and on an applied electric field. The observed rates are well-described by a straightforward semiclassical theory. We have investigated the problem of tunneling between coupled quantum wells using both time-resolved luminescence and absorption spectroscopy. We have directly observed in luminescence the buildup of a "charge-transfer" state via electron and hole tunneling in opposite directions, and the dependence of this charge transfer on an electric field. At moderate fields (2.5 times 10^4 V/cm), the charge transfer occurs faster than 20 ps, indicating an unexpectedly fast hole tunneling rate. The time-resolved absorption experiments measure the time electrons initially excited into one quantum well require to tunnel into a second well. The

  5. Efficiency estimates and practical aspects of an optical Kerr gate for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitruk, I.; Shynkarenko, Ye; Dmytruk, A.; Aleksiuk, D.; Kadan, V.; Korenyuk, P.; Zubrilin, N.; Blonskiy, I.

    2016-12-01

    We report experience of assembling an optical Kerr gate setup at the Femtosecond Laser Center for collective use at the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. This offers an inexpensive solution to the problem of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Practical aspects of its design and alignment are discussed and its main characteristics are evaluated. Theoretical analysis and numerical estimates are performed to evaluate the efficiency and the response time of an optical Kerr gate setup for fluorescence spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution. The theoretically calculated efficiency is compared with the experimentally measured one of ~12% for Crown 5 glass and ~2% for fused silica. Other characteristics of the Kerr gate are analyzed and ways to improve them are discussed. A method of compensation for the refractive index dispersion in a Kerr gate medium is suggested. Examples of the application of the optical Kerr gate setup for measurements of the time-resolved luminescence of Astra Phloxine and Coumarin 30 dyes and both linear and nonlinear chirp parameters of a supercontinuum are presented.

  6. Time-Resolved Single-State Measurements of the Electronic Structure of Isochoric Heated Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2004-10-22

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) Cu. Single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution is used in conjunction with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated Cu foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These are the first picosecond x-ray laser time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultra-thin Cu foil showing changes in electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  7. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  8. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  9. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Liu, Zhongkai; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J.; Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  10. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C Michael; Moore, Robert G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Merriam, Andrew J; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10(12) photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å(-1), respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å(-1), granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  11. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C. Michael; Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.; Merriam, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 1012 photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å-1, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å-1, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  12. High resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for 3D spin vectorial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Taichi; Miyamoto, Koji; Kimura, Akio; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) is the excellent tool which can directly observe the band structure of crystals with separating spin-up and -down states. Recent findings of new class of materials possessing strong spin orbit interaction such as Rashba spin splitting systems or topological insulators stimulate to develop new SARPES apparatuses and many sophisticated techniques have been reported recently. Here we report our newly developed a SARPES apparatus for spin vectorial analysis with high precision at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. Highly efficient spin polarimeter utilizing very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) makes high resolution (ΔE < 10 meV, Δθ ~ +/- 0.2 °) compatible with the SARPES measurement. By placing two VLEED spin detectors orthogonally we have realized the polarization measurement of all spin components (x, y and z) with the high resolution. Some examples of the three-dimensional spin observation will be presented. This work is supported by KAKENHI (23244066), Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  13. Quantum theory of (femtosecond) time-resolved stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Lu, J; Zhang, Dong H; Lee, Soo-Y

    2008-04-14

    We present a complete perturbation theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which includes the new experimental technique of femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS), where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond probe pulse simultaneously act on a stationary or nonstationary vibrational state. It is shown that eight terms in perturbation theory are required to account for SRS, with observation along the probe pulse direction, and they can be grouped into four nonlinear processes which are labeled as stimulated Raman scattering or inverse Raman scattering (IRS): SRS(I), SRS(II), IRS(I), and IRS(II). Previous FSRS theories have used only the SRS(I) process or only the "resonance Raman scattering" term in SRS(I). Each process can be represented by an overlap between a wave packet in the initial electronic state and a wave packet in the excited Raman electronic state. Calculations were performed with Gaussian Raman pump and probe pulses on displaced harmonic potentials to illustrate various features of FSRS, such as high time and frequency resolution; Raman gain for the Stokes line, Raman loss for the anti-Stokes line, and absence of the Rayleigh line in off-resonance FSRS from a stationary or decaying v=0 state; dispersive line shapes in resonance FSRS; and the possibility of observing vibrational wave packet motion with off-resonance FSRS.

  14. A time resolved microfocus XEOL facility at the Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Taylor, R. P.; Quinn, P. D.; Finch, A. A.; Cibin, G.; Gianolio, D.; Sapelkin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We have constructed a Time-Resolved X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence (TR-XEOL) detection system at the Microfocus Spectroscopy beamline I18 at the Diamond Light Source. Using the synchrotron in "hybrid bunch mode", the data collection is triggered by the RF clock, and we are able to record XEOL photons with a time resolution of 6.1 ps during the 230 ns gap between the hybrid bunch and the main train of electron bunches. We can detect photons over the range 180-850 nm using a bespoke optical fibre, with X-ray excitation energies between 2 and 20 keV. We have used the system to study a range of feldspars. The detector is portable and has also been used on beamline B18 to collect Optically Determined X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (OD-XAS) in QEXAFS mode.

  15. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; Pai, E. F.; Pearson, A. R.; Olson, J. S.; Anfinrud, P. A.; Ernst, O. P.; Dwayne Miller, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs. PMID:26798825

  16. Fast, deep record length, time-resolved visible spectroscopy of plasmas using fiber grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Cruz, Edward; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Horton, Robert; Klauser, Ruth; Hwang, D. Q.

    2016-10-01

    HyperV Technologies is developing a fiber-coupled, deep-record-length, low-light camera head for performing high time resolution spectroscopy on visible emission from plasma events. New solid-state Silicon Photo-Multiplier (SiPM) chips are capable of single photon event detection and high speed data acquisition. By coupling the output of a spectrometer to an imaging fiber bundle connected to a bank of amplified SiPMs, time-resolved spectroscopic imagers of 100 to 1,000 pixels can be constructed. Target pixel performance is 10 Megaframes/sec with record lengths of up to 256,000 frames yielding 25.6 milliseconds of record at10 Megasamples/sec resolution. Pixel resolutions of 8 to 12 bits are pos- sible. Pixel pitch can be refined by using grids of 100 μm to 1000 μm diameter fibers. A prototype 32-pixel spectroscopic imager employing this technique was constructed and successfully tested at the University of California at Davis Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) as a full demonstration of the concept. Experimental results will be dis-cussed, along with future plans for the Phase 2 project, and potential applications to plasma experiments . Work supported by USDOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0013801.

  17. Quantum state resolved inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics in molecular systems via high resolution IR laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, William Brewster

    This thesis describes a series of experiments undertaken to investigate inelastic and reactive molecular collision dynamics at the quantum-state resolved level of detail. First, time- and frequency-resolved infrared laser absorption is used to probe state-resolved collisional energy transfer in scattering of fast C1(2P3/2) radicals with room temperature HCl molecules. Final state distributions of HCl are monitored via transient infrared laser absorption yielding absolute integral collisional cross sections for energy transfer into final rotational states. Analysis of translational distributions inferred from high-resolution infrared Dopplerimetry leads to state-resolved differential scattering cross sections, which exhibit forward scattering into all observed levels. Results are compared with quasiclassical trajectory calculations on a recently proposed potential surface. Second, absolute state-to-state cross sections are reported for rotationally inelastic scattering of HF, CH4, and H2O with rare gases in crossed supersonic jets. Column-integrated densities of HF, CH4, and H2O in initial and final scattering states are probed in the jet intersection region via direct infrared laser absorption. Total inelastic cross sections for loss out of rotational ground states and excitation into higher states are determined in absolute units from the dependence of infrared absorption signals on collider gas concentration. Comparison is made with close coupling calculations performed on best available potential energy surfaces for each of the scattering systems. Finally, fluorine radicals from a pulsed discharge source are crossed with supersonically cooled hydrogen molecules to study the F + H2 /to HF(v,J) + H reaction under single collision conditions. HF(v,J) product states are probed with complete rovibrational state resolution via direct infrared laser absorption. The nascent HF(v,J) state distribution is measured for all populated vibrational manifolds at a collision

  18. Satellite Remote Sensing for Developing Time and Space Resolved Estimates of Ambient Particulate in Cleveland, OH.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Chu, Allen D; Foster, Andrew D; Peters, Thomas; Willis, Robert

    2011-09-01

    This article empirically demonstrates the use of fine resolution satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to develop time and space resolved estimates of ambient particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in aerodynamic diameters (PM(2.5) and PM(10), respectively). AOD was computed at three different spatial resolutions, i.e., 2 km (means 2 km × 2 km area at nadir), 5 km, and 10 km, by using the data from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. Multiresolution AOD from MODIS (AOD(MODIS)) was compared with the in situ measurements of AOD by NASA's AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sunphotometer (AOD(AERONET)) at Bondville, IL, to demonstrate the advantages of the fine resolution AOD(MODIS) over the 10-km AOD(MODIS), especially for air quality prediction. An instrumental regression that corrects AOD(MODIS) for meteorological conditions was used for developing a PM predictive model.The 2-km AOD(MODIS) aggregated within 0.025° and 15-min intervals shows the best association with the in situ measurements of AOD(AERONET). The 2-km AOD(MODIS) seems more promising to estimate time and space resolved estimates of ambient PM than the 10-km AOD(MODIS), because of better location precision and a significantly greater number of data points across geographic space and time. Utilizing the collocated AOD(MODIS) and PM data in Cleveland, OH, a regression model was developed for predicting PM for all AOD(MODIS) data points. Our analysis suggests that the slope of the 2-km AOD(MODIS) (instrumented on meteorological conditions) is close to unity with the PM monitored on the ground. These results should be interpreted with caution, because the slope of AOD(MODIS) ranges from 0.52 to 1.72 in the site-specific models. In the cross validation of the overall model, the root mean square error (RMSE) of PM(10) was smaller (2.04 µg/m(3) in overall model) than that of PM(2.5) (2.5 µg/m(3)). The predicted PM in the AOD

  19. The time-resolved natural flow field of a fluidic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woszidlo, Rene; Ostermann, Florian; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-06-01

    The internal and external flow field of a fluidic oscillator with two feedback channels are examined experimentally within the incompressible flow regime. A scaled-up device with a square outlet nozzle is supplied with pressurized air and emits a spatially oscillating jet into quiescent environment. Time-resolved information are obtained by phase-averaging pressure and PIV data based on an internal reference signal. The temporal resolution is better than a phase angle of 3°. A detailed analysis of the internal dynamics reveals that the oscillation mechanism is based on fluid feeding into a separation bubble between the jet and mixing chamber wall which pushes the jet to the opposite side. The total volume of fluid transported through one feedback channel during one oscillation cycle matches the total growth of the separation bubble from its initial size to its maximum extent. Although the oscillation frequency increases linearly with supply rate, sudden changes in the internal dynamics are observed. These changes are caused by a growth in reversed flow through the feedback channels. The time-resolved properties of the emitted jet such as instantaneous jet width and exit velocity are found to oscillate substantially during one oscillation cycle. Furthermore, the results infer that the jet's oscillation pattern is approximately sinusoidal with comparable residence and switching times.

  20. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  1. Nanosecond time-scale switching of permalloy thin film elements studied by wide-field time-resolved Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, Dmitry; McCord, Jeffrey; Schäfer, Rudolf; Schultz, Ludwig; Vinzelberg, Hartmut; Kaltofen, Rainer; Mönch, Ingolf

    2005-01-01

    The switching of extended Ni81Fe19 thin film elements with a thickness of 50nm and various shapes (squared, rectangular, pointed) has been studied by time-resolved stroboscopic Kerr microscopy based on a conventional wide-field optical polarization microscope. The elements are deposited on coplanar strip-lines that generate field pulses driven by electronic pulse generators. Time resolution is obtained by imaging with a gated and intensified charge-coupled device camera. The opening can be varied from 250ps to continuous exposure, allowing the comparison of fast magnetization processes and quasistatic switching in slowly varying fields. The latter is typically characterized by the formation of a concertina domain pattern that irreversibly decays in a multidomain ground state by the abrupt motion of vortices and domain walls. After excitation with fast field pulses similar blocked patterns are formed. They dissolve by spatially inhomogeneous rotational processes involving cross-tie-wall-like domain boundaries.

  2. Complete time-resolved polarimetry of scattered light at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, David; Ayers, Shannon; Bell, Perry; Chow, Robert; Frieders, Gene; Hibbard, Robin L.; Michel, Pierre; Ralph, Joseph E.; Ross, James S.; Stanley, Joel R.; Vickers, James L.; Zeid, Ziad M.; Moody, John D.

    2015-08-01

    The 3ω scattered light polarimetry diagnostic in the 30° incidence cone backscatter diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being upgraded to measure the full time-resolved Stokes vector. Previously, the diagnostic had a single channel capable of diagnosing the time-integrated balance of the horizontal and vertical polarizations. Two additional channels were added - one that measures the balance of the 45° and 135° projections, and another that measures the right- and left-circular polarizations - and together the three complete the Stokes vector measurement. A division-of-aperture scheme is employed in which three nearby portions of the near field are sampled simultaneously. Time resolution is obtained by relaying an image of the measured regions onto a set of fibers coupled to diodes. The new diagnostic will be capable of measuring scattered light signals <≍ .1GW with ≍ 120ps time resolution. This will allow more rigorous evaluation of earlier indications that backscatter polarization can serve as a quantitative diagnostic of crossed-beam energy transfer in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. It will also be used to diagnose Faraday rotation induced by magnetic fields in collisionless shock and turbulent dynamo experiments later this year.

  3. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Wilson; Peth, Christian; Busse, Gerhard; Scholz, Mirko; Mann, Klaus; Techert, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns) and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm). The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs). Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems. PMID:20087463

  4. Molecular component distribution imaging of living cells by multivariate curve resolution analysis of space-resolved Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.

    2014-01-01

    Label-free Raman microspectroscopy combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis can be a powerful tool for studying a wide range of biomedical molecular systems. The MCR with the alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, which retrieves the pure component spectra from complicatedly overlapped spectra, has been successfully applied to in vivo and molecular-level analysis of living cells. The principles of the MCR-ALS analysis are reviewed with a model system of titanium oxide crystal polymorphs, followed by two examples of in vivo Raman imaging studies of living yeast cells, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Due to the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm used in the MCR-ALS analysis, the spectral information derived from this technique is just ready for physical and/or chemical interpretations. The corresponding concentration profiles provide the molecular component distribution images (MCDIs) that are vitally important for elucidating life at the molecular level, as stated by Schroedinger in his famous book, "What is life?" Without any a priori knowledge about spectral profiles, time- and space-resolved Raman measurements of a dividing fission yeast cell with the MCR-ALS elucidate the dynamic changes of major cellular components (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) during the cell cycle. The MCR-ALS technique also resolves broadly overlapped OH stretch Raman bands of water, clearly indicating the existence of organelle-specific water structures in a living budding yeast cell.

  5. Molecular component distribution imaging of living cells by multivariate curve resolution analysis of space-resolved Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    Label-free Raman microspectroscopy combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis can be a powerful tool for studying a wide range of biomedical molecular systems. The MCR with the alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, which retrieves the pure component spectra from complicatedly overlapped spectra, has been successfully applied to in vivo and molecular-level analysis of living cells. The principles of the MCR-ALS analysis are reviewed with a model system of titanium oxide crystal polymorphs, followed by two examples of in vivo Raman imaging studies of living yeast cells, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Due to the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm used in the MCR-ALS analysis, the spectral information derived from this technique is just ready for physical and/or chemical interpretations. The corresponding concentration profiles provide the molecular component distribution images (MCDIs) that are vitally important for elucidating life at the molecular level, as stated by Schroedinger in his famous book, "What is life?" Without any a priori knowledge about spectral profiles, time- and space-resolved Raman measurements of a dividing fission yeast cell with the MCR-ALS elucidate the dynamic changes of major cellular components (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) during the cell cycle. The MCR-ALS technique also resolves broadly overlapped OH stretch Raman bands of water, clearly indicating the existence of organelle-specific water structures in a living budding yeast cell.

  6. High-Resolution Imaging of Intraretinal Structures in Active and Resolved Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Ryan N.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Scoles, Drew; Carroll, Joseph; Weinberg, David V.; Kim, Judy E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We improved our understanding of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), we performed an analysis of noninvasive, high-resolution retinal imaging in patients with active and resolved CSC. Methods Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed on five subjects with CSC. A custom AOSLO system was used to simultaneously collect confocal and split-detector images. Spectral domain–OCT volume scans were used to create en face views of various retinal layers, which then were compared to montaged AOSLO images after coregistration. Results Three distinct types of intraretinal hyperreflective clusters were seen with AOSLO. These clusters had a well-demarcated, round, and granular appearance. Clusters in active CSC over areas of serous retinal detachment were termed type-1. They were found primarily in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and were associated with large defects in the photoreceptor mosaic and ellipsoid zone. Clusters in areas where the retina had reattached were termed type-2. They also were located primarily in the ONL but showed stability in location over a period of at least 8 months. Smaller clusters in the inner retina along retinal capillaries were termed type-3. Conclusions Retinal imaging in CSC using en face OCT and AOSLO allows precise localization of intraretinal structures and detection of features that cannot be seen with SD-OCT alone. These findings may provide greater insight into the pathophysiology of the active and resolved phases of the disease, and support the hypothesis that intraretinal hyperreflective foci on OCT in CSC are cellular in nature. PMID:28055101

  7. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  8. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  9. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  10. Time-resolved X-ray PIV measurements of hemodynamic information of real pulsatile blood flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    X-ray imaging technique has been used to visualize various bio-fluid flow phenomena as a nondestructive manner. To obtain hemodynamic information related with circulatory vascular diseases, a time-resolved X-ray PIV technique with high temporal resolution was developed. In this study, to embody actual pulsatile blood flows in a circular conduit without changes in hemorheological properties, a bypass loop is established by connecting a microtube between the jugular vein and femoral artery of a rat. Biocompatible CO2 microbubbles are used as tracer particles. After mixing with whole blood, CO2 microbubbles are injected into the bypass loop. Particle images of the pulsatile blood flows in the bypass loop are consecutively captured by the time-resolved X-ray PIV system. The velocity field information are obtained with varying flow rate and pulsataility. To verify the feasibility of the use of CO2 microbubbles under in vivo conditions, the effects of the surrounding-tissues are also investigated, because these effects are crucial for deteriorating the image contrast of CO2 microbubbles. Therefore, the velocity information of blood flows in the abdominal aorta are obtained to demonstrate the visibility and usefulness of CO2 microbubbles under ex vivo conditions. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  11. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  12. Time-resolved visible/near-infrared spectrometric observations of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, Donald; Wade, Gregg A.

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved spectrometric measurements of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite were collected on three consecutive nights in July 2014 with the 1.6-m telescope at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic in Québec, Canada. Approximately 300 low-resolution spectra (R ≈ 700 , where R = λ / Δλ) of the satellite were collected each night, covering a spectral range between 425 and 850 nm. The two objectives of the experiment were to conduct material-type identification from the spectra and to study how the spectral energy distribution inferred from these measurements varied as the illumination and observation geometry changed on nightly timescales. We present results that indicate the presence of a highly reflective aluminized surface corresponding to the solar concentrator arrays of the Galaxy 11 spacecraft. Although other material types could not be identified using the spectra, the results showed that the spectral energy distribution of the reflected sunlight from the Galaxy 11 spacecraft varied significantly, in a systematic manner, over each night of observation. The variations were quantified using colour indices calculated from the time-resolved spectrometric measurements.

  13. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  14. Frequency domain approach for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, J.; Kawasumi, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes. The modulation frequencies of the pump and probe beams are varied up to 500 MHz with fixed frequency detuning typically set at 15 kHz. The frequency response of the pump-probe signal is detected using a lock-in amplifier referenced at the beat frequency. This frequency domain method is capable of characterizing the nanosecond to picosecond relaxation dynamics of sample species without the use of a high speed detector or a high frequency lock-in amplifier. Furthermore, as the pump-probe signal is based on the nonlinear interaction between the two laser beams and the sample, our scheme provides better spatial resolution than the conventional diffraction-limited optical microscopes. Time-resolved pump-probe imaging of fluorescence beads and aggregates of quantum dots demonstrates that this method is useful for the microscopic analysis of optoelectronic devices. The system is implemented using compact and low-cost laser diodes, and thus has a broad range of applications in the fields of photochemistry, optical physics, and biological imaging.

  15. Time-resolved Optical Spectroscopy of the Cataclysmic Variable PG 0859+415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, D. W.; Szkody, Paula

    1996-10-01

    We present time-resolved, high-resolution (2 Å) spectra of the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) PG 0859+415. The average optical spectrum of this star displays a continuum slope that is steeper than expected for a steady state accretion disk this is attributed to the presence of a hot spot with T ˜ 12,000 K at the impact site of the accretion stream. As first observed by Grauer et al., the time- resolved spectra exhibit a transient central absorption feature in the Balmer lines that appears near φ = 0.6 and lasts into the (partial) eclipse, and the radial velocity solution of the Balmer lines shows a phase offset of Δφ = -0.1 from the photometric phasing. System parameters are estimated from the radial velocity solution to the He II lines (which is consistent with an origin close to the white dwarf primary star). Doppler tomograms constructed from the Balmer emission lines reveal the presence of a region of enhanced emission at a location consistent with the expected impact site of the accretion stream with the edge of the disk. Finally, the similarities between PG 0859+415 and the recently identified SW Sextantis subclass of CV is discussed, and a qualitative model for the system is proposed to explain the observational results.

  16. Visualizing solution-phase reaction dynamics with time-resolved X-ray liquidography.

    PubMed

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2009-02-17

    )H(4)I(2) and C(2)F(4)I(2) have completely different structures and corresponding subsequent reaction pathways, underscoring the dramatic effect of the fluorine substitution. We have also used TRXL to identify a new reaction intermediate of the photolysis of Ru(3)(CO)(12) that has no bridging carbonyl groups. Though not detected by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, this intermediate predominates based on the TRXL data. In looking at the quaternary conformational changes of hemoglobin, TRXL analysis suggests a faster transition than was suggested by optical spectroscopy. The time resolution of TRXL is currently limited by the X-ray pulse width available from synchrotron sources ( approximately 100 ps). The resolution should improve to 100 fs or better with X-ray free electron lasers. With this higher resolution, real time observation of ultrafast chemical events such as bond-breaking and bond-making will be possible.

  17. Planetary Surface Exploration Using Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy on Rovers and Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, Erik; Maruyama, Yuki; Charbon, Edoardo; Rossman, George

    2013-04-01

    Planetary surface exploration using laser spectroscopy has become increasingly relevant as these techniques become a reality on Mars surface missions. The ChemCam instrument onboard the Curiosity rover is currently using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on a mast-mounted platform to measure elemental composition of target rocks. The RLS Raman Spectrometer is included on the payload for the ExoMars mission to be launched in 2018 and will identify minerals and organics on the Martian surface. We present a next-generation instrument that builds on these widely used techniques to provide a means for performing both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS in conjunction with microscopic imaging. Microscopic Raman spectroscopy with a laser spot size smaller than the grains of interest can provide surface mapping of mineralogy while preserving morphology. A very small laser spot size (~ 1 µm) is often necessary to identify minor phases that are often of greater interest than the matrix phases. In addition to the difficulties that can be posed by fine-grained material, fluorescence interference from the very same material is often problematic. This is particularly true for many of the minerals of interest that form in environments of aqueous alteration and can be highly fluorescent. We use time-resolved laser spectroscopy to eliminate fluorescence interference that can often make it difficult or impossible to obtain Raman spectra. As an added benefit, we have found that with small changes in operating parameters we can include microscopic LIBS using the same hardware. This new technique relies on sub-ns, high rep-rate lasers with relatively low pulse energy and compact solid state detectors with sub-ns time resolution. The detector technology that makes this instrument possible is a newly developed Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The use of this solid state time-resolved detector offers a

  18. Time and space resolved electron impact excitation rates in an RF glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnick, Daniel E.; Li, Yuan

    1992-02-01

    Research on rf glow discharge plasmas was carried out to better understand the fundamental physics and chemistry of important aspects of plasma deposition and etching. A standard reference system for rf plasma processing research was utilized. Power, voltage and current waveforms were monitored and time and space resolved measurements were made using plasma induced emission (PIE). Nanosecond time resolution for PIE greatly expanded the utility of these plasma diagnostics over previous studies. Measurements were carried out with a prototype rf model discharge, atomic argon, concentrating on the important 4s levels 11.5 eV above the ground state and the manifold of p levels coupled to these states by strong dipole transitions. Extensive analysis and computer modeling was carried out to reproduce the experimental data obtained and to test assumptions often used for this model system. Models of electron excitation waves were stringently tested and evaluated. The research concentrated on studying details of excitation waveforms as a function of pressure and rf power. Information on electron energy distribution functions were derived from the experimental results. New experimental techniques to enhance time and space resolution were developed.

  19. Time-resolved radiation beam profiles in water obtained by ultrasonic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Heyman, Joseph S.; Chen-Mayer, H. Heather; Tosh, Ronald E.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a practical ultrasonic system for near real-time imaging of spatial temperature distributions in water caused by absorption of radiation. Initial testing with radiation from a highly attenuated infrared lamp demonstrates that the system is able to map sub-millikelvin temperature changes, thus making it suitable for characterizing dose profiles of therapy-level ionizing radiation beams. The system uses a fan-beam tomographic reconstruction algorithm to invert time-of-flight data derived from ultrasonic pulses produced and detected by a circular array of transducers immersed in water. Temperature dependence of the speed of sound in water permits the conversion of these measured two-dimensional velocity distributions into temperature distributions that indicate the absorbed radiation dose. The laboratory prototype, based on a 128-element transducer array, is used to acquire temperature maps of a 230 mm × 230 mm area every 4 s with sub-millikelvin resolution in temperature and about 5 mm resolution in space. Earlier measurements with a single-channel version of this prototype suggest refinements in signal-conditioning electronics and signal-processing algorithms that would allow the present instrument to resolve temperature changes as low as a few microkelvin. Possible applications include real-time intensity profiling of radiation beams and three-dimensional characterization of the absorbed dose.

  20. Time-resolved (kHz) 3D imaging of OH PLIF in a flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellander, Rikard; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus

    2014-06-01

    Based on scanning planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH, a measurement system with the capability to record time-resolved three-dimensional image sequences of the OH concentration and the flame front is demonstrated on a premixed flame. A dual-mirror scanning system is used to obtain equidistance between the illuminated planes. Non-uniformities in the laser sheet and laser absorption in the flame are compensated for as the position- and time-dependent OH concentration is calculated throughout the measurement volume. A method for identifying the flame front in large data sets with a single set of filtering parameter is demonstrated. The artefacts introduced by the non-instantaneous recording of the measurement volume are suppressed using linear interpolation from successive recordings in the same measurement plane. The impact from filtering and image post-processing on the achieved spatial resolution is investigated. A final spatial and temporal resolution of 3.2 × 3.2 × 0.75 lines/mm and 2 ms, respectively, are obtained in a measurement volume spanning 11 × 22 × 6 mm during a time span of 0.5 s.

  1. Time, Energy, and Spatially Resolved TEM Investigations of Defectsin InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Jinschek, J.R.; Kisielowski, C.

    2005-10-01

    A novel sample preparation technique is reported to fabricate electron transparent samples from devices utilizing a FIB process with a successive wet etching step. The high quality of the obtained samples allows for band gap--and chemical composition measurements of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum wells where electron beam induced damage can be controlled and shown to be negligible. The results reveal indium enrichment in nanoclusters and defects that cause fluctuations of the band gap energy and can be measured by low loss Electron Energy Spectroscopy with nm resolution. Comparing our time, energy, and spatially resolved measurements of band gap energies, chemical composition, and their related fluctuations with literature data, we find quantitative agreement if the band gap energy of InN is 1.5-2 eV.

  2. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  3. Time-resolved spectrophotometry of the AM Herculis system E2003 + 225

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick; Bowyer, Stuart; Clarke, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved, medium-resolution photometry is reported for the binary system E2003 + 225 over a complete orbital period in 1984. The object was 1.5-2 mag fainter than when viewed earlier in 1984. The fluxes, equivalent widths and full widths at FWHM for dominant lines are presented for four points in the cycle. A coincidence of emission lines and a 4860 A continuum line was observed for the faster component, which had a 500 km/sec velocity amplitude that was symmetric around the zero line. An aberrant emission line component, i.e., stationary narrow emission lines displaced about 9 A from the rest wavelengths, is modeled as Zeeman splitting of emission from material close to the primary.

  4. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  5. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  6. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  7. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-29

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  8. Time-resolved luminescent biosensing based on inorganic lanthanide-doped nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Tu, Datao; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Zhuo; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-03-11

    Time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL) biosensing has been widely adopted in many research and medical institutions. However, commercial molecular TRPL bioprobes like lanthanide (Ln(3+))-chelates suffer from poor photochemical stability and long-term toxicity. Inorganic Ln(3+)-doped nanocrystals (NCs), owing to their superior physicochemical properties over Ln(3+)-chelates, are regarded as a new generation of luminescent nanoprobes for TRPL biosensing. The long-lived PL of Ln(3+)-doped NCs combined with the TRPL technique is able to completely suppress the interference of the short-lived background, resulting in a background-free signal and therefore a remarkable sensitivity for biosensing. In this feature article, we summarize the latest advancements in inorganic Ln(3+)-doped NCs as TRPL nano-bioprobes from their fundamental optical properties to their potential applications for ultrasensitive biodetection and high-resolution bioimaging. Future efforts towards the commercialization of these nanoprobes are also proposed.

  9. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  10. Time- and space-resolved dynamic studies on ceramic and cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P; Colston, S; Craster, B; Hall, C; Jupe, A; Jacques, S; Cockcroft, J; Morgan, S; Johnson, M; O'Connor, D; Bellotto, M

    2000-05-01

    A review is given of the results and lessons arising from a sustained in situ diffraction study of the structure and performance of functional ceramic/cementitious materials in which synchrotron-based energy-dispersive diffraction has been the central under-pinning technique. Five particular points of discussion emerge: the demands on time resolution; the use of penetrating radiation for the in situ mode; the need for complementary techniques; re-analysing of data; spatially resolved diffraction: a new tomography. These aspects are discussed in turn using illustrative examples taken from the fields of cement hydration, clay intercalation, cation-exchanged zeolites, and particulate/fluid invasion into building and archaeological objects.

  11. A mass resolved, high resolution neutral particle analyzer for C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, R.; Roquemore, A.; Douglass, J.; Jaramillo, D.; Korepanov, S.; Magee, R.; Medley, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    C-2U is a high-confinement, advanced beam driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment which sustains the configuration for >5 ms, in excess of typical MHD and fast particle instability times, as well as fast particle slowing down times. Fast particle dynamics are critical to C-2U performance and several diagnostics have been deployed to characterize the fast particle population, including neutron and proton detectors. To increase our understanding of fast particle behavior and supplement existing diagnostics, an E ∥ B neutral particle analyzer was installed, which simultaneously measures H0 and D0 flux with large dynamic range and high energy resolution. Here we report the commissioning of the E ∥ B analyzer, confirm the instrument has energy resolution Δ E / E ≲ 0 . 1 and a dynamic range E max / E min ˜ 30 , and present measurements of initial testing on C-2U.

  12. Spectroscopic analysis of time-resolved emission from detonating thin film explosive samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Jilek, Brook A.; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander S.; Damm, David L.

    2017-01-01

    We report a series of time-resolved spectroscopic measurements that aim to characterize the reactions that occur during shock initiation of high explosives. The experiments employ time- and wavelength-resolved emission spectroscopy to analyze light emitted from detonating thin explosive films. This paper presents analysis of optical emission spectra from hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) thin film samples. Both vibrationally resolved and broadband emission features are observed in the spectra and area as electronic transitions of intermediate species.

  13. The High Time Resolution Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsars are laboratories for extreme physics unachievable on Earth. As individual sources and possible orbital companions can be used to study magnetospheric, emission, and superfluid physics, general relativistic effects, and stellar and binary evolution. As populations they exhibit a wide range of sub-types, with parameters varying by many orders of magnitude signifying fundamental differences in their evolutionary history and potential uses. There are currently around 2200 known pulsars in the Milky Way, the Magellanic clouds, and globular clusters, most of which have been discovered with radio survey observations. These observations, as well as being suitable for detecting the repeating signals from pulsars, are well suited for identifying other transient astronomical radio bursts that last just a few milliseconds that either singular in nature, or rarely repeating. Prior to the work of this thesis non-repeating radio transients at extragalactic distances had possibly been discovered, however with just one example status a real astronomical sources was in doubt. Finding more of these sources was a vital to proving they were real and to open up the universe for millisecond-duration radio astronomy. The High Time Resolution Universe survey uses the multibeam receiver on the 64-m Parkes radio telescope to search the whole visible sky for pulsars and transients. The temporal and spectral resolution of the receiver and the digital back-end enable the detection of relatively faint, and distant radio sources. From the Parkes telescope a large portion of the Galactic plane can be seen, a rich hunting ground for radio pulsars of all types, while previously poorly surveyed regions away from the Galactic plane are also covered. I have made a number of pulsar discoveries in the survey, including some rare systems. These include PSR J1226-6208, a possible double neutron star system in a remarkably circular orbit, PSR J1431-471 which is being eclipsed by its companion with

  14. A high-efficiency spin-resolved photoemission spectrometer combining time-of-flight spectroscopy with exchange-scattering polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, Chris M.; Graff, Jeff; Lebedev, Gennadi; Andresen, Nord; Schmid, Andreas; Fedorov, Alexei; El Gabaly, Farid; Wan, Weishi; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hussain, Zahid

    2010-04-13

    We describe a spin-resolved electron spectrometer capable of uniquely efficient and high energy resolution measurements. Spin analysis is obtained through polarimetry based on low-energy exchange scattering from a ferromagnetic thin-film target. This approach can achieve a similar analyzing power (Sherman function) as state-of-the-art Mott scattering polarimeters, but with as much as 100 times improved efficiency due to increased reflectivity. Performance is further enhanced by integrating the polarimeter into a time-of-flight (TOF) based energy analysis scheme with a precise and flexible electrostatic lens system. The parallel acquisition of a range of electron kinetic energies afforded by the TOF approach results in an order of magnitude (or more) increase in efficiency compared to hemispherical analyzers. The lens system additionally features a 90 degrees bandpass filter, which by removing unwanted parts of the photoelectron distribution allows the TOF technique to be performed at low electron drift energy and high energy resolution within a wide range of experimental parameters. The spectrometer is ideally suited for high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES), and initial results are shown. The TOF approach makes the spectrometer especially ideal for time-resolved spin-ARPES experiments.

  15. Analytical model of SiPM time resolution and order statistics with crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, S.

    2015-07-01

    Time resolution is the most important parameter of photon detectors in a wide range of time-of-flight and time correlation applications within the areas of high energy physics, medical imaging, and others. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) have been initially recognized as perfect photon-number-resolving detectors; now they also provide outstanding results in the scintillator timing resolution. However, crosstalk and afterpulsing introduce false secondary non-Poissonian events, and SiPM time resolution models are experiencing significant difficulties with that. This study presents an attempt to develop an analytical model of the timing resolution of an SiPM taking into account statistics of secondary events resulting from a crosstalk. Two approaches have been utilized to derive an analytical expression for time resolution: the first one based on statistics of independent identically distributed detection event times and the second one based on order statistics of these times. The first approach is found to be more straightforward and "analytical-friendly" to model analog SiPMs. Comparisons of coincidence resolving times predicted by the model with the known experimental results from a LYSO:Ce scintillator and a Hamamatsu MPPC are presented.

  16. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions.

  17. Vibrationally resolved high-resolution NEXAFS and XPS spectra of phenanthrene and coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Fronzoni, Giovanna; Baseggio, Oscar; Stener, Mauro; Hua, Weijie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi; Apicella, Barbara; Alfé, Michela; Simone, Monica de; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2014-07-28

    We performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the C1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy in the gas phase of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and coronene), typically formed in combustion reactions. In the NEXAFS of both molecules, a double-peak structure appears in the C1s → LUMO region, which differ by less than 1 eV in transition energies. The vibronic coupling is found to play an important role in such systems. It leads to weakening of the lower-energy peak and strengthening of the higher-energy one because the 0 − n (n > 0) vibrational progressions of the lower-energy peak appear in nearly the same region of the higher-energy peak. Vibrationally resolved theoretical spectra computed within the Frank-Condon (FC) approximation and linear coupling model agree well with the high-resolution experimental results. We find that FC-active normal modes all correspond to in-plane vibrations.

  18. Time-resolved confocal analysis of antibody penetration into living, solid tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Myrdal, S; Foster, M

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo function of a biologically active molecule is governed in part by the dynamics of its distribution within its target tissue. To enhance our ability to probe living cells, we have endeavored to improve live confocal microscopy methods and to develop analytical methods that simplify the handling of the resulting complex data sets. To do this we attached a recently developed micro-incubation system to the stage of a Leica confocal laser scanning microscope and were able to maintain physiologic culture conditions over several hours. Axial stability was achieved by modifying the room air conditioning. Laser illumination was low enough to retain cell viability through several hours of continuous scanning. With this setup, planar, time-resolved data sets (xyt) were produced by continuously rescanning a single xy plane at the rate of one scan/min. As an alternative, volumetric data sets (xyz) were acquired by stepping the scanned plane through the z axis. In both types of data sets, a semi-quantitative determination of the concentration of a fluorescent reporter molecule (e.g., FITC) over a gray level range of 0.255 was recorded along with the positional information. Thus, concentration (as intensity of fluorescence, or i) gave a fourth variable by either scan method, resulting in high-density xyti or xyzi data sets. The biological model we used to examine these methods was the penetration of a FITC-labeled, anti-carcinoma monoclonal antibody into cultured spheroids of tumor cells bearing the antibody-binding epitope. In one case, the distribution of antibody-FITC conjugate was compared with that of a long wavelength membrane dye, DiIC18(5). Several different software analyses were compared, including examining xyt data sets as "volumes". We observed that by increasing the displayed resolution of one variable, the demonstrable resolution of the other variables was reduced. For example, with high temporal resolution, either quantitative or positional resolution

  19. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: An Exact Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Johanna I.; Luo, Kai; Sandoval, Ernesto D.; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2015-05-01

    A fundamental property of a quantum system driven by an external field is that when the field is turned off the positions of its response frequencies are independent of the time at which the field is turned off. We show that this leads to an exact condition for the exchange-correlation potential of time-dependent density functional theory. The Kohn-Sham potential typically continues to evolve after the field is turned off, which leads to time dependence in the response frequencies of the Kohn-Sham response function. The exchange-correlation kernel must cancel out this time dependence. The condition is typically violated by approximations currently in use, as we demonstrate by several examples, which has severe consequences for their predictions of time-resolved spectroscopy.

  20. Time and Space Resolved Wall Temperature Measurements during Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work is to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleate bubbles on a constant heat flux surface. This was performed using a microheater array with 100 micron resolution that allowed effectively simultaneous measurements of surface temperature while supplying a constant dissipative heat flux. This data is then correlated with high speed (> 1000Hz) visual recordings of the bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that a significant source of energy during bubble nucleation and initial growth is the superheated layer around the bubble. Bubble coalescence was not observed to decrease surface temperature as significantly as bubble departure from the surface. Since bubble departure is typically followed by a sharp increase in the heater surface temperature, it is surmised that the departing bubble effectively removes the superheated layer, allowing a high local heat transfer rate with the bulk fluid through transient conduction/micro-convection during rewetting.

  1. Protein structural dynamics in solution unveiled via 100-ps time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Schotte, Friedrich; Graber, Timothy; Henning, Robert; Anfinruda, Philip

    2010-04-21

    We have developed a time-resolved x-ray scattering diffractometer capable of probing structural dynamics of proteins in solution with 100-ps time resolution. This diffractometer, developed on the ID14B BioCARS (Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, records x-ray scattering snapshots over a broad range of q spanning 0.02-2.5 {angstrom}{sup -1}, thereby providing simultaneous coverage of the small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) regions. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have tracked structural changes in myoglobin as it undergoes a photolysis-induced transition from its carbon monoxy form (MbCO) to its deoxy form (Mb). Though the differences between the MbCO and Mb crystal structures are small (rmsd < 0.2 {angstrom}), time-resolved x-ray scattering differences recorded over 8 decades of time from 100 ps to 10 ms are rich in structure, illustrating the sensitivity of this technique. A strong, negative-going feature in the SAXS region appears promptly and corresponds to a sudden > 22 {angstrom}{sup 3} volume expansion of the protein. The ensuing conformational relaxation causes the protein to contract to a volume {approx}2 {angstrom}{sup 3} larger than MbCO within {approx}10 ns. On the timescale for CO escape from the primary docking site, another change in the SAXS/WAXS fingerprint appears, demonstrating sensitivity to the location of the dissociated CO. Global analysis of the SAXS/WAXS patterns recovered time-independent scattering fingerprints for four intermediate states of Mb. These SAXS/WAXS fingerprints provide stringent constraints for putative models of conformational states and structural transitions between them.

  2. Time-resolved transglottal pressure measurements in a scaled up vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Rogers, Dylan; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Experimental measurements of flow through a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The simplified 10x scale vocal fold model from Krane, et al. (2007) was used to examine fundamental features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. Of particular interest was the temporal variation of transglottal pressure multiplied by the volume flow rate through the glottis throughout an oscillation cycle. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data have been presented in previous APS-DFD meetings. This talk will focus more on the relation between the flow and aeroacoustics associated with vocal fold oscillations. Supported by the NIH.

  3. Time-Resolved Luminescence Nanothermometry with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-Chang; Chen, Oliver Y.; Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Liu, Hsiou-Yuan; Hsu, Hsiang; Huang, Shaio-Chih; Chen, Jeson; Yee, Fu-Ghoul; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Chang, Ming-Shien

    2016-05-01

    Measuring thermal properties with nanoscale spatial resolution either at or far from equilibrium is gaining importance in many scientific and engineering applications. Although negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers in diamond have recently emerged as promising nanometric temperature sensors, most previous measurements were performed under steady state conditions. Here we employ a three-point sampling method which not only enables real-time detection of temperature changes over +/-100 K with a sensitivity of 2 K/(Hz)1/2, but also allows the study of nanometer scale heat transfer with a temporal resolution of better than 1 μs with the use of a pump-probe-type experiment. In addition to temperature sensing, we further show that nanodiamonds conjugated with gold nanorods, as optically-activated dual-functional nanoheaters and nanothermometers, are useful for highly localized hyperthermia treatment. We experimentally demonstrated time-resolved fluorescence nanothermometry, and the validity of the measurements was verified with finite-element numerical simulations. The approaches provided here will be useful for probing dynamical thermal properties on nanodevices in operation.

  4. Time resolved studies on pulsed fluorocarbon plasmas using chirped quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Stepanov, S.; Meichsner, J.; Röpcke, J.

    2010-03-01

    The kinetics of stable species has been studied in situ in pulsed CF4/H2 radio frequency discharges by means of time resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. The absorption spectra were usually recorded with a time resolution of 5 ms and required a multi-species analysis, because of interfering complex absorption features of CF4 and C3F8. For this reason, measurements were carried out at two different spectral positions. High resolution spectroscopic data were established by calibrating effective absorption cross sections and their relative temperature dependences for the relevant low pressure conditions (10 Pa). During the discharge a decrease in the CF4 density by ~12% was observed. The off-phase was characterized mainly by the gas exchange. The C3F8 density in the off-phase was found to be of the order of the detection limit (3 × 1013 cm-3). Spectra acquired during the plasma-on phase showed a rapid temperature-induced increase in the absorption signal and, additionally, suggested the influence of a short-lived broadband absorbing species. The reasonable assumption of the presence of CF4 hotbands has not yet enabled a further quantification.

  5. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  6. Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution.

    PubMed

    Misof, Bernhard; Liu, Shanlin; Meusemann, Karen; Peters, Ralph S; Donath, Alexander; Mayer, Christoph; Frandsen, Paul B; Ware, Jessica; Flouri, Tomáš; Beutel, Rolf G; Niehuis, Oliver; Petersen, Malte; Izquierdo-Carrasco, Fernando; Wappler, Torsten; Rust, Jes; Aberer, Andre J; Aspöck, Ulrike; Aspöck, Horst; Bartel, Daniela; Blanke, Alexander; Berger, Simon; Böhm, Alexander; Buckley, Thomas R; Calcott, Brett; Chen, Junqing; Friedrich, Frank; Fukui, Makiko; Fujita, Mari; Greve, Carola; Grobe, Peter; Gu, Shengchang; Huang, Ying; Jermiin, Lars S; Kawahara, Akito Y; Krogmann, Lars; Kubiak, Martin; Lanfear, Robert; Letsch, Harald; Li, Yiyuan; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Jiguang; Lu, Haorong; Machida, Ryuichiro; Mashimo, Yuta; Kapli, Pashalia; McKenna, Duane D; Meng, Guanliang; Nakagaki, Yasutaka; Navarrete-Heredia, José Luis; Ott, Michael; Ou, Yanxiang; Pass, Günther; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Pohl, Hans; von Reumont, Björn M; Schütte, Kai; Sekiya, Kaoru; Shimizu, Shota; Slipinski, Adam; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Song, Wenhui; Su, Xu; Szucsich, Nikolaus U; Tan, Meihua; Tan, Xuemei; Tang, Min; Tang, Jingbo; Timelthaler, Gerald; Tomizuka, Shigekazu; Trautwein, Michelle; Tong, Xiaoli; Uchifune, Toshiki; Walzl, Manfred G; Wiegmann, Brian M; Wilbrandt, Jeanne; Wipfler, Benjamin; Wong, Thomas K F; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Gengxiong; Xie, Yinlong; Yang, Shenzhou; Yang, Qing; Yeates, David K; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wenwei; Zhang, Yunhui; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Chengran; Zhou, Lili; Ziesmann, Tanja; Zou, Shijie; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Kjer, Karl M; Zhou, Xin

    2014-11-07

    Insects are the most speciose group of animals, but the phylogenetic relationships of many major lineages remain unresolved. We inferred the phylogeny of insects from 1478 protein-coding genes. Phylogenomic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, with site-specific nucleotide or domain-specific amino acid substitution models, produced statistically robust and congruent results resolving previously controversial phylogenetic relations hips. We dated the origin of insects to the Early Ordovician [~479 million years ago (Ma)], of insect flight to the Early Devonian (~406 Ma), of major extant lineages to the Mississippian (~345 Ma), and the major diversification of holometabolous insects to the Early Cretaceous. Our phylogenomic study provides a comprehensive reliable scaffold for future comparative analyses of evolutionary innovations among insects.

  7. Real-time digital signal processing in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2016-03-01

    The use of multiphoton interactions in biological tissue for imaging contrast requires highly sensitive optical measurements. These often involve signal processing and filtering steps between the photodetector and the data acquisition device, such as photon counting and lock-in amplification. These steps can be implemented as real-time digital signal processing (DSP) elements on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices, an approach that affords much greater flexibility than commercial photon counting or lock-in devices. We will present progress toward developing two new FPGA-based DSP devices for multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy applications. The first is a high-speed multiharmonic lock-in amplifier for transient absorption microscopy, which is being developed for real-time analysis of the intensity-dependence of melanin, with applications in vivo and ex vivo (noninvasive histopathology of melanoma and pigmented lesions). The second device is a kHz lock-in amplifier running on a low cost (50-200) development platform. It is our hope that these FPGA-based DSP devices will enable new, high-speed, low-cost applications in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy.

  8. High resolution coherence domain depth-resolved nailfold capillaroscopy based on correlation mapping optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; O'Gorman, Sean; Neuhaus, Kai; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel application of correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cm-OCT) for volumetric nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC). NFC is a widely used non-invasive diagnostic method to analyze capillary morphology and microvascular abnormalities of nailfold area for a range of disease conditions. However, the conventional NFC is incapable of providing volumetric imaging, when volumetric quantitative microangiopathic parameters such as plexus morphology, capillary density, and morphologic anomalies of the end row loops most critical. cm-OCT is a recently developed well established coherence domain magnitude based angiographic modality, which takes advantage of the time-varying speckle effect, which is normally dominant in the vicinity of vascular regions compared to static tissue region. It utilizes the correlation coefficient as a direct measurement of decorrelation between two adjacent B-frames to enhance the visibility of depth-resolved microcirculation.

  9. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  10. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology.

    PubMed

    Manning, Sturt W; Griggs, Carol B; Lorentzen, Brita; Barjamovic, Gojko; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kromer, Bernd; Wild, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur) and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C) measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar) chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681-1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density range), ~20

  11. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Carol B.; Lorentzen, Brita; Barjamovic, Gojko; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kromer, Bernd; Wild, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur) and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C) measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar) chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681–1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density range), ~20

  12. Picosecond time resolved conductance measurements of redox molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arielly, Rani; Nachman, Nirit; Zelinskyy, Yaroslav; May, Volkhard; Selzer, Yoram

    2017-03-01

    Due to bandwidth limitations of state of the art electronics, the transient transport properties of molecular junctions are experimentally a terra incognita, which can only be explored if novel picosecond current-probing techniques are developed. Here we demonstrate one such approach: the laser pulse-pair sequence scheme. The method is used to monitor in picosecond resolution the oxidation state of a redox molecule, 6-ferrocenyl-1-hexanethiol, within a junction and to quantify its redox rate constant, which is found to be (80 ps)-1.

  13. The beauty of resolution: The SN Ib factory NGC 2770 spatially resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2015-02-01

    The late-type spiral NGC 2770 hosted 3 Type Ib supernovae (SNe) in or next to star-forming regions in its outer spiral arms. We study the properties of the SN sites and the galaxy at different spatial resolutions to infer propeties of the SN progenitors and the SF history of the galaxy. Several 3D techniques are used and, for the first time, we present images of metallicity, shocks and stellar population ages from OSIRIS/GTC imaging with tunable narrowband filters.

  14. ASIC-enabled High Resolution Optical Time Domain Reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skendzic, Sandra

    Fiber optics has become the preferred technology in communication systems because of what it has to offer: high data transmission rates, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and lightweight, flexible cables. An optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) provides a convenient method of locating and diagnosing faults (e.g. break in a fiber) along a fiber that can obstruct crucial optical pathways. Both the ability to resolve the precise location of the fault and distinguish between two discrete, closely spaced faults are figures of merit. This thesis presents an implementation of a high resolution OTDR through the use of a compact and programmable ASIC (application specific integrated circuit). The integration of many essential OTDR functions on a single chip is advantageous over existing commercial instruments because it enables small, lightweight packaging, and offers low power and cost efficiency. Furthermore, its compactness presents the option of placing multiple ASICs in parallel, which can conceivably ease the characterization of densely populated fiber optic networks. The OTDR ASIC consists of a tunable clock, pattern generator, precise timer, electrical receiver, and signal sampling circuit. During OTDR operation, the chip generates narrow electrical pulse, which can then be converted to optical format when coupled with an external laser diode driver. The ASIC also works with an external photodetector to measure the timing and amplitude of optical reflections in a fiber. It has a 1 cm sampling resolution, which allows for a 2 cm spatial resolution. While this OTDR ASIC has been previously demonstrated for multimode fiber fault diagnostics, this thesis focuses on extending its functionality to single mode fiber. To validate this novel approach to OTDR, this thesis is divided into five chapters: (1) introduction, (2) implementation, (3), performance of ASIC-based OTDR, (4) exploration in optical pre-amplification with a semiconductor optical amplifier, and

  15. Time-resolved homo-FRET studies of biotin-streptavidin complexes.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Nardo, Luca; Rigler, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching that is notably useful for characterizing properties of biomolecules and/or their interactions. Here we study water-solutions of Biotin-Streptavidin complexes, in which Biotin is labeled with a rigidly-bound fluorophore that can interact by Förster resonance energy transfer with the fluorophores labeling the other, up to three, Biotins of the same complex. The fluorophore, Atto550, is a Rhodamine analogue. We detect the time-resolved fluorescence decay of the fluorophores with an apparatus endowed with single-photon sensitivity and temporal resolution of ~30ps. The decay profiles we observe for samples containing constant Biotin-Atto550 conjugates and varying Streptavidin concentrations are multi-exponential. Each decay component can be associated with the rate of quenching exerted on each donor by each of the acceptors that label the other Biotin molecules, depending on the binding site they occupy. The main features that lead to this result are that (i) the transition dipole moments of the up-to-four Atto550 fluorophores that label the complexes are fixed as to both relative positions and mutual orientations; (ii) the fluorophores are identical and the role of donor in each Biotin-Streptavidin complex is randomly attributed to the one that has absorbed the excitation light (homo-FRET). Obviously the high-temporal resolution of the excitation-detection apparatus is necessary to discriminate among the fluorescence decay components.

  16. Ultrabroadband Relay Imaged GRENOUILLE as a Time-Resolved Diagnostic for Relativistic Hole Boring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Craig; Bernstein, Aaron; Dyer, Gilliss; Ditmire, Todd

    2015-11-01

    In a highly intense laser-solid interaction, the surface of the resultant plasma is pushed into the interior of the target at a significant fraction of the speed of light as a result of the intense radiation pressure from the focused laser beam. This is known as hole boring. During the hole boring process laser interactions with electrons at the receding target surface generate light at frequency harmonics of the incident laser. The frequency shift of these harmonics is proportional to the velocity of the target surface. In previous experiments at the Texas Petawatt we observed red-shifts in the 351nm harmonic up to 513nm, corresponding to a recession velocity of 0.18c. We designed an ultra-broadband GRENOUILLE to conduct time resolved measurements of spectral shifting of second harmonic light over the duration of the incident laser pulse. This GRENOUILLE is relay imaged from the target plane to prevent spectral splitting, and is an all reflective design to reduce pulse broadening and chromatic aberrations. With an f/3.15 optic focusing into a thick BBO crystal, the system accepts wavelengths from 526nm to 766nm with 4.8nm spectral resolution and 5.6fs temporal resolution. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008.

  17. Intraoperative imaging of cortical perfusion by time-resolved thermography using cold bolus approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmach, Julia; Schnabel, Christian; Hoffmann, Nico; Radev, Yordan; Sobottka, Stephan; Kirsch, Matthias; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-03-01

    During the past decade, thermographic cameras with high thermal and temporal resolution of up to 30 mK and 50 Hz, respectively, have been developed. These camera systems can be used to reveal thermal variations and heterogeneities of tissue and blood. Thus, they provide a fast, sensitive, noninvasive, and label-free application to investigate blood perfusion and to detect perfusion disorders. Therefore, time-resolved thermography is evaluated and tested for intraoperative imaging of the cerebral cortex during neurosurgeries. The motivation of this study is the intraoperative evaluation of the cortical perfusion by observing the temporal temperature curve of the cortex during and after the intravenous application of a cold bolus. The temperature curve caused by a cold bolus is influenced by thermodilution, depending on the temperature difference to the patient's circulation, and the pattern of mixing with the patient's blood. In this initial study, a flow phantom was used in order to determine the temperature variations of cold boli under stable conditions in a vascular system. The typical temperature profile of cold water passing by can be approximated by a bi- Gaussian function involving a set of four parameters. These parameters can be used to assess the cold bolus, since they provide information about its intensity, duration and arrival time. The findings of the flow phantom can be applied to thermographic measurements of the human cortex. The results demonstrate that time-resolved thermographic imaging is a suitable method to detect cold boli not only at a flow phantom but also at the human cortex.

  18. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  19. Miniaturized time-resolved Raman spectrometer for planetary science based on a fast single photon avalanche diode detector array.

    PubMed

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, Erik; Maruyama, Yuki; Cochrane, Corey J; Rossman, George R

    2016-02-01

    We present recent developments in time-resolved Raman spectroscopy instrumentation and measurement techniques for in situ planetary surface exploration, leading to improved performance and identification of minerals and organics. The time-resolved Raman spectrometer uses a 532 nm pulsed microchip laser source synchronized with a single photon avalanche diode array to achieve sub-nanosecond time resolution. This instrument can detect Raman spectral signatures from a wide variety of minerals and organics relevant to planetary science while eliminating pervasive background interference caused by fluorescence. We present an overview of the instrument design and operation and demonstrate high signal-to-noise ratio Raman spectra for several relevant samples of sulfates, clays, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we present an instrument design suitable for operation on a rover or lander and discuss future directions that promise great advancement in capability.

  20. The time-resolved transcriptome of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, Max E.; Huynh, Chau; Gevirtzman, Lou; Thompson, Owen A.; Wang, Guilin; Kasper, Dionna M.; Reinke, Valerie; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Waterston, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We generated detailed RNA-seq data for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans with high temporal resolution in the embryo as well as representative samples from post-embryonic stages across the life cycle. The data reveal that early and late embryogenesis is accompanied by large numbers of genes changing expression, whereas fewer genes are changing in mid-embryogenesis. This lull in genes changing expression correlates with a period during which histone mRNAs produce almost 40% of the RNA-seq reads. We find evidence for many more splice junctions than are annotated in WormBase, with many of these suggesting alternative splice forms, often with differential usage over the life cycle. We annotated internal promoter usage in operons using SL1 and SL2 data. We also uncovered correlated transcriptional programs that span >80 kb. These data provide detailed annotation of the C. elegans transcriptome. PMID:27531719

  1. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  2. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  3. Time-Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is being used to characterize the decay of turbulence in jet flows a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A TR-PIV system, developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 10 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number.

  4. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Perenzoni, Matteo; Pancheri, Lucio; Stoppa, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (<25 μm) and high fill factor (>20%) as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved. PMID:27223284

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved energy transfer from CdSe nanoparticles to phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, S.; Królicki, R.; Lou, Y.; Qiu, X.; Berlin, J. C.; Kenney, M. E.; Burda, C.

    2006-07-01

    The first real-time observation of the early events during energy transfer from a photoexcited CdSe nanoparticle to an attached phthalocyanine molecule are presented in terms of a femtosecond spectroscopic pump-probe study of the energy transfer in conjugates of CdSe nanoparticles (NPs) and silicon phthalocyanines (Pcs) with 120 fs time resolution. Four different silicon phthalocyanines have been conjugated to CdSe NPs. All of these have proven potential for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In such NP-Pc conjugates efficient energy transfer (ET) from CdSe NPs to Pcs occurs upon selective photoexcitation of the NP moiety. Spectral analysis as well as time-resolved fluorescence up-conversion measurements revealed the structure and dynamics of the investigated conjugates. Femtosecond transient differential absorption (TDA) spectroscopy was used for the investigation of the non-radiative carrier and ET dynamics. The formation of excitons, trapped carriers states, as well as stimulated emission was monitored in the TDA spectra and the corresponding lifetimes of these states were recorded. The time component for energy transfer was found to be between 15 and 35 ps. The ET efficiencies are found to be 20-70% for the four Pc conjugates, according to fluorescence quenching experiments. Moreover, as a result of the conjugation between NP and the Pcs the photoluminescence efficiency of the Pc moieties in the conjugates do not strictly follow the quantum yields of the bare phthalocyanines.

  6. [Time-Resolved XEOL Experiment System on BL14W1 at SSRF].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao-hong; Jiang, Zheng; Xue, Song; Zheng, Li-fang

    2015-08-01

    A novel time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) experiment system was developed for X ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(XAFS) beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The TRXEOL system is composed of three parts: timing system, spectrometer system and nuclear instrument module (NIM) system. These three systems were integrated to measure and record the optical luminescence from the sample excited by the synchrotron X-ray pulses, according to the time-correlated single photon counting methodology. It's the first time in the domestic synchrotron radiation facilities to achieve TRXEOL experiment using the synchrotron X-ray pulses and the time structure of the storage ring. In this work, a SSRF-self-developed timing system was used, which is based on the Field programmable Gate Array and the high-speed serial communication technology. The timing system can provide trigger pulse synchronized with the X-ray pulse. The timing jitter is about 6 ps, and the timing delay resolution is 5 ps. The NIM system is the core of the TRXEOL experiment system, it has three main modules: the Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD), the Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC) and the Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA). During one excitation circle, the spectrometer and the Photomultiplier Tube detector translate the induced luminescence of the sample excited by a single X-ray pulse into electrical pulse. The CFD module eliminates the timing walk larger than 50 ps induced by the amplitude of the electrical pulse. The TAC module calculates the time interval between the timing trigger pulse and the luminescence electrical pulse, and converts the interval into proportional amplitude of voltage. After plenty of circles, the MCA module gets the luminescence decay curve by recording and analyzing the voltage signals. And the data acquisition system gets the TRXEOL spectra by scanning the spectrometer and acquiring the frequency of the voltage pulses from the TAC

  7. Enabling time resolved microscopy with random Raman lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Bixler, Joel N.; Nodurft, Dawson T.; Noojin, Gary D.; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J.; Cao, Hui; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2017-03-01

    Optical imaging of fast events and processes is essential for understanding dynamics of complex systems. A bright flash of illuminating light is required to acquire sufficient number of photons for superior image quality. Laser pulses can provide extreme brightness and are typically employed to achieve high temporal resolution; however, the high degree of coherence associated with the lasing process degrades the image quality with speckle formation. Random lasers are low-coherence sources of stimulated emission and do not suffer from speckle, but are rather broadband and have a relatively low output power limiting the scope of their potential applications. In this report, we demonstrate the use of random Raman lasing as a novel imaging light source with unprecedented brightness for a speckle-free and narrowband light source. We showcase the advantages of a random Raman laser to image the nanosecond scale dynamics of cavitation formation in water and quantitatively compare these images to those taken with incoherent fluorescent emission and coherent laser light as illumination source.

  8. Enabling time resolved microscopy with random Raman lasing

    PubMed Central

    Hokr, Brett H.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Bixler, Joel N.; Nodurft, Dawson T.; Noojin, Gary D.; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J.; Cao, Hui; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging of fast events and processes is essential for understanding dynamics of complex systems. A bright flash of illuminating light is required to acquire sufficient number of photons for superior image quality. Laser pulses can provide extreme brightness and are typically employed to achieve high temporal resolution; however, the high degree of coherence associated with the lasing process degrades the image quality with speckle formation. Random lasers are low-coherence sources of stimulated emission and do not suffer from speckle, but are rather broadband and have a relatively low output power limiting the scope of their potential applications. In this report, we demonstrate the use of random Raman lasing as a novel imaging light source with unprecedented brightness for a speckle-free and narrowband light source. We showcase the advantages of a random Raman laser to image the nanosecond scale dynamics of cavitation formation in water and quantitatively compare these images to those taken with incoherent fluorescent emission and coherent laser light as illumination source. PMID:28294165

  9. Time- and polarization-resolved cellular autofluorescence towards quantitative biochemistry on living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfveby, John; TImerman, Randi; Soto Velasquez, Monica P.; Wickramasinghe, Dhanushka W. P. M.; Bartusek, Jillian; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Native coenzymes such as the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide play pivotal roles in energy metabolism and a myriad of biochemical reactions in living cells/tissues. These coenzymes are naturally fluorescent and, therefore, have the potential to serve as intrinsic biomarkers for mitochondrial activities, programmed cell death (apoptosis), oxidative stress, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. In this contribution, we employ two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved anisotropy imaging of intracellular NADH for quantitative, non-invasive biochemistry on living cells in response to hydrogenperoxide- induced oxidative stress. In contrast with steady-state one-photon, UV-excited autofluorescence, two-photon FLIM is sensitive to both molecular conformation and stimuli-induced changes in the local environment in living cells with minimum photodamage and inherently enhanced spatial resolution. On the other hand, time-resolved, two-photon anisotropy imaging of cellular autofluorescence allows for quantitative assessment of binding state and environmental restrictions on the tumbling mobility of intrinsic NADH. Our measurements reveal that free and enzyme-bound NADH exist at equilibrium, with a dominant autofluorescence contribution of the bound fraction in living cells. Parallel studies on NADH-enzyme binding in controlled environments serve as a point of reference in analyzing autofluorescence in living cells. These autofluorescence-based approaches complement the conventional analytical biochemistry methods that require the destruction of cells/tissues, while serving as an important step towards establishing intracellular NADH as a natural biomarker for monitoring changes in energy metabolism and redox state of living cells in response to environmental hazards.

  10. Detection of Rupture-Prone Atherosclerotic Plaques by Time-Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Laura; Jo, Javier A.; Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Reil, Todd; Qiao, Jian-Hua; Baker, J. Dennis; Freischlag, Julie A.; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Plaque with dense inflammatory cells, including macrophages, thin fibrous cap and superficial necrotic/lipid core is thought to be prone-to-rupture. We report a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) technique for detection of such markers of plaque vulnerability in human plaques. Methods The autofluorescence of carotid plaques (65 endarterectomy patients) induced by a pulsed laser (337 nm, 0.7 ns) was measured from 831 distinct areas. The emission was resolved spectrally- (360–550 nm range) and temporally- (0.3 ns resolution) using a prototype fiber-optic TR-LIFS apparatus. Lesions were evaluated microscopically and quantified as to the % of different components (fibrous cap, necrotic core, inflammatory cells, foam cells, mature and degraded collagen, elastic fibers, calcification, and smooth muscle cell of the vessel wall). Results We determined that the spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters at discrete emission wavelengths 1) allow for discrimination (sensitivity >81%, specificity >94%) of various compositional and pathological features associated with plaque vulnerability including infiltration of macrophages into intima and necrotic/lipid core under a thin fibrous cap, and 2) show a linear correlation with plaque biochemical content: elastin (P<0.008), collagen (P<0.02), inflammatory cells (P<0.003), necrosis (P<0.004). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of TR-LIFS as a method for the identification of markers of plaque vulnerability. Current findings enable future development of TR-LIFS based clinical devices for rapid investigation of atherosclerotic plaques and detection of those at high-risk. PMID:18926540

  11. Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Kupitz, Christopher; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Rendek, Kimberly N.; Hunter, Mark S.; Shoeman, Robert L.; White, Thomas A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Yang, Jay-How; Cobb, Danielle E.; Reeder, Brenda; Sierra, Raymond G.; Liu, Haiguang; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew L.; Deponte, Daniel; Kirian, Richard A.; Bari, Sadia; Bergkamp, Jesse J.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Davis, Katherine M.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Galli, Lorenzo; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Milathianaki, Despina; Nass, Karol; Ros, Alexandra; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Schmidt, Kevin; Seibert, Marvin; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Yan, Lifen; Yoon, Chunhong; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Pushkar, Yulia; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Doak, R. Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis, a process catalysed by plants, algae and cyanobacteria converts sunlight to energy thus sustaining all higher life on Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), act in series to catalyse the light-driven reactions in photosynthesis. PSII catalyses the light-driven water splitting process, which maintains the Earth’s oxygenic atmosphere1. In this process, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII cycles through five states, S0 to S4, in which four electrons are sequentially extracted from the OEC in four light-driven charge-separation events. Here we describe time resolved experiments on PSII nano/microcrystals from Thermosynechococcus elongatus performed with the recently developed2 technique of serial femtosecond crystallography. Structures have been determined from PSII in the dark S1 state and after double laser excitation (putative S3 state) at 5 and 5.5 Å resolution, respectively. The results provide evidence that PSII undergoes significant conformational changes at the electron acceptor side and at the Mn4CaO5 core of the OEC. These include an elongation of the metal cluster, accompanied by changes in the protein environment, which could allow for binding of the second substrate water molecule between the more distant protruding Mn (referred to as the ‘dangler’ Mn) and the Mn3CaOx cubane in the S2 to S3 transition, as predicted by spectroscopic and computational studies3,4. This work shows the great potential for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography for investigation of catalytic processes in biomolecules. PMID:25043005

  12. Signal to noise considerations for single crystal femtosecond time resolved crystallography of the Photoactive Yellow Protein.

    PubMed

    van Thor, Jasper J; Warren, Mark M; Lincoln, Craig N; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik Till; Fritz, David M; Schmidt, Marius; Tenboer, Jason; Ren, Zhong; Srajer, Vukica; Moffat, Keith; Graber, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond time resolved pump-probe protein X-ray crystallography requires highly accurate measurements of the photoinduced structure factor amplitude differences. In the case of femtosecond photolysis of single P63 crystals of the Photoactive Yellow Protein, it is shown that photochemical dynamics place a considerable restraint on the achievable time resolution due to the requirement to stretch and add second order dispersion in order to generate threshold concentration levels in the interaction region. Here, we report on using a 'quasi-cw' approach to use the rotation method with monochromatic radiation and 2 eV bandwidth at 9.465 keV at the Linac Coherent Light Source operated in SASE mode. A source of significant Bragg reflection intensity noise is identified from the combination of mode structure and jitter with very small mosaic spread of the crystals and very low convergence of the XFEL source. The accuracy with which the three dimensional reflection is approximated by the 'quasi-cw' rotation method with the pulsed source is modelled from the experimentally collected X-ray pulse intensities together with the measured rocking curves. This model is extended to predict merging statistics for recently demonstrated self seeded mode generated pulse train with improved stability, in addition to extrapolating to single crystal experiments with increased mosaic spread. The results show that the noise level can be adequately modelled in this manner, indicating that the large intensity fluctuations dominate the merged signal-to-noise (I/σI) value. Furthermore, these results predict that using the self seeded mode together with more mosaic crystals, sufficient accuracy may be obtained in order to resolve typical photoinduced structure factor amplitude differences, as taken from representative synchrotron results.

  13. Time resolved diagnostics of ions in colliding carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2014-11-14

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic behaviour of ions at different pressures in laser ablated colliding and single plasma plumes using 2D imaging, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and a retarding field analyser (RFA). 2D imaging shows the splitting of plasma plumes due to different velocities of various plasma species. OES shows enhancement in abundance of ionic species with their presence for a longer time in colliding plume. C{sub 2} molecular formation is seen at later time in colliding plume compared to single plume and is attributed to dominating collisional processes in the colliding region of the plumes. The time of flight distribution of ions traced by the RFA shows the variation with change in fluence as well as ambient pressure for both colliding and single plume. Time of flight analysis of ions also shows the appearance of a fast peak in ion signal due to acceleration of ions at larger fluence.

  14. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  15. In vivo flow cytometry and time-resolved near-IR angiography and lymphography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brock, Robert W.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2007-05-01

    Integration of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques with high-speed, high-resolution transmission and fluorescence microscopy shows great potential for in vivo flow cytometry and indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared (IR) angiography of blood and lymph microvessels. In particular, the capabilities of in vivo flow cytometry using rat mesentery and nude mouse ear models are demonstrated for real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells in skin, mesentery, lymph nodes, liver, kidney; studying vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics; monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems; high-speed imaging of cell deformability in flow; and label-free real-time monitoring of single cell extravasation from blood vessel lumen into tissue. As presented, the advantages of ICG IR-angiography include estimation of time resolved dye dynamics (appearance and clearance) in blood and lymph microvessels using fluorescent and photoacoustic modules of the integrated technique. These new approaches are important for monitoring and quantifying metastatic and apoptotic cells; comparative measurements of plasma and cell velocities; analysis of immune responses; monitoring of circulating macromolecules, chylomicrons, bacteria, viruses and nanoparticles; molecular imaging. In the future, we believe that the integrated technique presented will have great potential for translation to early disease diagnoses (e.g. cancer) or assessment of innovative therapeutic interventions in humans.

  16. Time resolved metal line profile by near-ultraviolet tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelaru, C.; de Poucques, L.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed systems are extensively used to produce active species such as atoms, radicals, excited states, etc. The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) is successfully used to quantify the density of absorbing species, but especially for stationary or slow changing systems. The time resolved-direct absorption profile (TR-DAP) measurement method by TD-LAS, with time resolution of μs is proposed here as an extension of the regular use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The spectral narrowness of laser diodes, especially in the blue range (˜0.01 pm), combined with the nanosecond fast trigger of the magnetron pulsed plasma and long trace recording on the oscilloscope (period of second scale) permit the detection of the sputtered titanium metal evolution in the afterglow (˜ms). TR-DAP method can follow the time-dependence of the temperature (Doppler profile) and the density (deduced from the absorbance) of any medium and heavy species in a pulsed system.

  17. Development of a time-resolved attenuated total reflectance spectrometer in far-ultraviolet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Higashi, Noboru; Takaba, Kyoko; Kariyama, Naomi; Goto, Takeyoshi; Ikehata, Akifumi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-07-01

    A far-ultraviolet transient absorption spectrometer based on time-resolved attenuated total reflectance (ATR) has been developed and tested for aqueous solutions of phenol and tryptophan in the region 170-185 nm. In this region, a stable tunable laser was not available, and therefore, white light from a laser-driven Xe lamp source was used. The time resolution, which was determined by the time response of a continuous light detector, was 40 ns. A new ATR cell where a sample liquid is exchanged continuously by a flow system was designed to reduce efficiently the stray light from the excitation light. We have tested the performance of the instrument by using aqueous solutions of phenol and tryptophan, whose photochemistry is already well known. Phenol and tryptophan have very strong absorptions due to a π-π* transition near 180 nm. Even for dilute solutions (10-3 mol dm-3), we could observe decreases in their concentrations due to photochemistry that occurred upon their irradiation with a fourth harmonic generation laser pulse produced by an Nd:YAG laser. The sensitivity of the spectrometer was about 10-4 abs, which corresponded to a concentration variation of 10-3 mol dm-3 for phenol and tryptophan.

  18. Time-resolved measurements of short-wavelength fluorescence from x-ray-excited ions.

    PubMed

    Kapteyn, H C; Murnane, M M; Falcone, R W

    1987-09-01

    We demonstrate a novel technique for time-resolved spectroscopic studies of highly excited ions. The technique uses a laser-produced plasma as a short-pulse, soft-x-ray light source with a high repetition rate. A Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 90 psec, a pulse energy of 70 microJ, and repetition rate of 10(4) pulses per second is focused onto a rotating metal target. Soft x rays from the resulting plasma photoionize a gas surrounding the target, and fluorescence from the gas is detected by using a spectrometer and a high-speed photodetector. Using the technique of time-correlated photon counting, we determined the radiative lifetime and collisional quenching rate of the Xe III 5s(0)5p(6)(1)S(0) state by observing its fluorescence at 108.9 nm. A time resolution of better than 400 psec was obtained. We also measured relative Auger decay yields of a core hole state in xenon using a higher-energy laser-produced plasma light source at a lower repetition rate.

  19. Real time optical Biopsy: Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy instrumentation and validation

    PubMed Central

    Kittle, David S.; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G.; Mamelak, Adam; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-01-01

    The Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-FS) has the potential to differentiate tumor and normal tissue in real time during surgical excision. In this manuscript, we describe the design of a novel TR-FS device, along with preliminary data on detection accuracy for fluorophores in a mixture. The instrument is capable of near real-time fluorescence lifetime acquisition in multiple spectral bands and analysis. It is also able to recover fluorescence lifetime with sub-20ps accuracy as validated with individual organic fluorescence dyes and dye mixtures yielding lifetime values for standard fluorescence dyes that closely match with published data. We also show that TR-FS is able to quantify the relative concentration of fluorescence dyes in a mixture by the unmixing of lifetime decays. We show that the TR-FS prototype is able to identify in near-real time the concentrations of dyes in a complex mixture based on previously trained data. As a result, we demonstrate that in complex mixtures of fluorophores, the relative concentration information is encoded in the fluorescence lifetime across multiple spectral bands. We show for the first time the temporal and spectral measurements of a mixture of fluorochromes and the ability to differentiate relative concentrations of each fluorochrome mixture in real time. PMID:27929039

  20. Real time optical Biopsy: Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy instrumentation and validation.

    PubMed

    Kittle, David S; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G; Mamelak, Adam; Black, Keith L; Butte, Pramod V

    2016-12-08

    The Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-FS) has the potential to differentiate tumor and normal tissue in real time during surgical excision. In this manuscript, we describe the design of a novel TR-FS device, along with preliminary data on detection accuracy for fluorophores in a mixture. The instrument is capable of near real-time fluorescence lifetime acquisition in multiple spectral bands and analysis. It is also able to recover fluorescence lifetime with sub-20ps accuracy as validated with individual organic fluorescence dyes and dye mixtures yielding lifetime values for standard fluorescence dyes that closely match with published data. We also show that TR-FS is able to quantify the relative concentration of fluorescence dyes in a mixture by the unmixing of lifetime decays. We show that the TR-FS prototype is able to identify in near-real time the concentrations of dyes in a complex mixture based on previously trained data. As a result, we demonstrate that in complex mixtures of fluorophores, the relative concentration information is encoded in the fluorescence lifetime across multiple spectral bands. We show for the first time the temporal and spectral measurements of a mixture of fluorochromes and the ability to differentiate relative concentrations of each fluorochrome mixture in real time.

  1. Real time optical Biopsy: Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy instrumentation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittle, David S.; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G.; Mamelak, Adam; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-12-01

    The Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-FS) has the potential to differentiate tumor and normal tissue in real time during surgical excision. In this manuscript, we describe the design of a novel TR-FS device, along with preliminary data on detection accuracy for fluorophores in a mixture. The instrument is capable of near real-time fluorescence lifetime acquisition in multiple spectral bands and analysis. It is also able to recover fluorescence lifetime with sub-20ps accuracy as validated with individual organic fluorescence dyes and dye mixtures yielding lifetime values for standard fluorescence dyes that closely match with published data. We also show that TR-FS is able to quantify the relative concentration of fluorescence dyes in a mixture by the unmixing of lifetime decays. We show that the TR-FS prototype is able to identify in near-real time the concentrations of dyes in a complex mixture based on previously trained data. As a result, we demonstrate that in complex mixtures of fluorophores, the relative concentration information is encoded in the fluorescence lifetime across multiple spectral bands. We show for the first time the temporal and spectral measurements of a mixture of fluorochromes and the ability to differentiate relative concentrations of each fluorochrome mixture in real time.

  2. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Worden, Helen

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  3. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  4. Time-resolved spin-dependent processes in magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the time-resolved magnetic field effects (MFEs) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the transient electroluminescence (EL) method. The values of magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) decrease with the time, and the decreasing slope is proportional to the driving voltage. Specifically, negative MELs are seen when the driving voltage is high enough (V > 11 V). We propose a model to elucidate the spin-dependent processes and theoretically simulate the time-resolved MELs. In particular, this dynamic analysis of time-resolved MELs reveals that the intersystem crossing between singlet and triplet electron-hole pairs and the triplet-triplet annihilation are responsible for the time-resolved MELs at the beginning and enduring periods of the pulse, respectively.

  5. Vector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Lai, Simon S M; Yu, Alfred C H

    2014-09-01

    Achieving non-invasive, accurate and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded on three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results indicated that by using three transmit angles and three receive angles (-10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (-10°, 0°, +10°) and of different sizes (dilated diameter: 2.2, 4.4 and 6.3 mm; steady flow rate: 2.5 mL/s). The practical merit of VPI was further illustrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2-Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using a nominal frame rate of 416 fps or 2.4-ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcations (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray scattering instrumentation

    DOEpatents

    Borso, C.S.

    1985-11-21

    An apparatus and method for increased speed and efficiency of data compilation and analysis in real time is presented in this disclosure. Data is sensed and grouped in combinations in accordance with predetermined logic. The combinations are grouped so that a simplified reduced signal results, such as pairwise summing of data values having offsetting algebraic signs, thereby reducing the magnitude of the net pair sum. Bit storage requirements are reduced and speed of data compilation and analysis is increased by manipulation of shorter bit length data values, making real time evaluation possible.

  7. Feasibility study of an avalanche photodiode readout for a high resolution PET with nsec time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, C.; Ziegler, S.; Bradbury, S.M.; Holl, I.; Lorenz, E.; Renker, D.

    1995-08-01

    A feasibility study for a high resolution positron emission tomograph, based on 9.5 x 4 x 4 mm{sup 3} LSO crystals viewed by 3 mm diameter avalanche photodiodes, has been carried out. Using a Na{sup 22} source the authors determined a spatial resolution of 2.3 {+-} 0.1 mm, an energy resolution around 15 % and a time resolution of 2.6 nsec. Possible configurations for larger scale tests and a tomograph are given.

  8. Static and time-resolved optical spectroscopy on Lithium Iridate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralek, Jake; Hinton, Jamie; Patankar, Shreyas; Orenstein, Joe; Smidt, Tess; Breznay, Nicholas; Nair, Nityan; Analytis, James

    2014-03-01

    We use FTIR and pump-probe spectroscopy to study lithium iridates. The IR spectrum shows an anomalous peak which emerges as temperature is reduced and is highly anisotropic in the ab-plane polarization. In the time-domain we observe similarly anisotropic reflectivity transients whose multiple dynamic components evolve as temperature is reduced.

  9. Synchrotron-based rotationally resolved high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of azulene and the unidentified infrared bands of astronomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sieghard; Lerch, Philippe; Quack, Martin

    2013-10-07

    Chasing the unidentified IR bands: The first rotationally resolved high-resolution infrared spectrum of azulene is reported using synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy including a rovibrational analysis of the out-of-plane fundamental ν44. Comparison of azulene, naphthalene, indole, and biphenyl infrared bands leads to coincidences with UIR bands at 12.8 μm with naphthalene and at 13.55 and 14.6 μm with biphenyl bands, but excluding azulene as a strong absorber.

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Draxler, S; Lippitsch, M E

    1996-07-20

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  11. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-07-01

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of time-resolved social interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Petri, Giovanni; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Sinatra, Roberta; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Latora, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Cooperation among unrelated individuals is frequently observed in social groups when their members combine efforts and resources to obtain a shared benefit that is unachievable by an individual alone. However, understanding why cooperation arises despite the natural tendency of individuals toward selfish behavior is still an open problem and represents one of the most fascinating challenges in evolutionary dynamics. Recently, the structural characterization of the networks in which social interactions take place has shed some light on the mechanisms by which cooperative behavior emerges and eventually overcomes the natural temptation to defect. In particular, it has been found that the heterogeneity in the number of social ties and the presence of tightly knit communities lead to a significant increase in cooperation as compared with the unstructured and homogeneous connection patterns considered in classical evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate the role of social-ties dynamics for the emergence of cooperation in a family of social dilemmas. Social interactions are in fact intrinsically dynamic, fluctuating, and intermittent over time, and they can be represented by time-varying networks. By considering two experimental data sets of human interactions with detailed time information, we show that the temporal dynamics of social ties has a dramatic impact on the evolution of cooperation: the dynamics of pairwise interactions favors selfish behavior.

  14. Resolution and sensitivity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a photon-number-resolving detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wildfeuer, Christoph F.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Pearlman, Aaron J.; Chen, Jun; Fan, Jingyun; Migdall, Alan

    2009-10-15

    With photon-number resolving detectors, we show compression of interference fringes with increasing photon numbers for a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This feature provides a higher precision in determining the position of the interference maxima compared to a classical detection strategy. We also theoretically show supersensitivity if N-photon states are sent into the interferometer and a photon-number resolving measurement is performed.

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the fluorescence quenching of a donor — acceptor pair by halothane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Draxler, S.; Lippitsch, M. E.

    1992-04-01

    Donor (anthracene) sensitized acceptor (perylene) fluorescence is quenched more efficiently by halothane than is intrinsic perylene fluorescence. The underlying process of dynamic fluorescence quenching is investigated by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  16. Radical ions and excited states in radiolysis. Optically detected time resolved EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Excited-state production and radical-ion recombination kinetics in pulse-irradiated solutions of aromatic solutes in cyclohexane are studied by a new method of optical detection of time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. 7 figures.

  17. Time Resolved Studies of Bright Short Gamma Ray Bursts in the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.; Preece, R.; Goldstein, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present preliminary results on using a Bayesian Block representation of Fermi GBM data to select intervals for time resolved analysis of short GRBs. Additionally, we search for possible precursor and extended emission in short GRBs.

  18. Highly resolved two-dimensional ¹H spectroscopy of the human brain using ISIS CT-PRESS with resolution enhancement.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Takaya, Nobuhiro; Mitsumori, Fumiyuki

    2012-01-01

    In constant time (CT) point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS), echo centers shift with the fast decay of short T₂* on two-dimensional (2D) time domain (TD) data under inhomogeneous B₀ field like in vivo conditions. Though ¹H decoupling along the F₁ direction is a feature of this method, the tilted and broadened peak pattern on the F₁-F₂ plane after reconstruction causes the peaks to overlap. To enhance resolution to achieve highly resolved 2D CT-PRESS spectra in the human brain, we propose a 2-part window function that comprises an enhancement part for shifting echoes with fast decay and a conventional part, such as Lorentzian, Gaussian, or sine-bell function. We obtained 2D spectra from human brains at 4.7T. The 3 diagonal peaks of C4H of glutamate (Glu C4H) at 2.35 ppm, C2H of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA C2H) at 2.28 ppm, and C4H of glutamine (Gln C4H) at 2.44 ppm-overlapped on the spectra processed with the conventional window but clearly resolved on the spectra using the proposed enhancement window. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit measurement time of Glu C4H on a CT-PRESS spectrum of the human brain was 1.7 times higher than that on a spectrum obtained by CT-correlation spectroscopic (COSY). In conclusion, 2D CT-PRESS spectra processed with the proposed window function to enhance resolution can resolve peaks of coupled ¹H spins with higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  19. Time Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is the newest and most exciting tool recently developed to support our continuing efforts to characterize and improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows -- a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A new TR-PIV system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center which is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 25 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number

  20. Time resolved imaging of carrier and thermal transport in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Hurley; O. B. Wright; O. Matsuda; S. L. Shinde

    2010-01-01

    We use ultrashort optical pulses to microscopically image carrier and thermal diffusion in two spatial dimensions in pristine and mechanically polished surfaces of crystalline silicon. By decomposing changes in reflectivity in the latter sample into a transient component that varies with delay time and a steady state component that varies with pump chopping frequency, the influence of thermal diffusion is isolated from that of carrier diffusion and recombination. Additionally, studies using carrier injection density as a parameter are used to clearly identify the carrier recombination pathway.

  1. Resolving inflammation: dual anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.; Chiang, Nan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Preface Active resolution of acute inflammation is a previously unrecognized interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Once thought to be a passive process, the resolution of inflammation is now shown to involve active biochemical programmes that enable inflamed tissues to return to homeostasis. This Review presents newly uncovered cellular and molecular mechanisms for the resolution of inflammation, revealing key roles for eicosanoids, such as lipoxins, and new families of endogenous chemical mediators, termed resolvins and protectins. These mediators carry antiinflammatory and pro-resolution properties with leukocytes, protect organs and stimulate mucosal antimicrobial defence and clearance. Together, they control local inflammatory responses at multiple levels to stimulate resolution. PMID:18437155

  2. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; ...

    2015-08-18

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linacmore » Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). As a result, the chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.« less

  3. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  4. Particulate PAH emissions from residential biomass combustion: time-resolved analysis with aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A C; Nordin, E Z; Nyström, R; Pettersson, E; Swietlicki, E; Bergvall, C; Westerholm, R; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2014-06-17

    Time-resolved emissions of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total organic particulate matter (OA) from a wood log stove and an adjusted pellet stove were investigated with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). The highest OA emissions were found during the addition of log wood on glowing embers, that is, slow burning pyrolysis conditions. These emissions contained about 1% PAHs (of OA). The highest PAH emissions were found during fast burning under hot air starved combustion conditions, in both stoves. In the latter case, PAHs contributed up to 40% of OA, likely due to thermal degradation of other condensable species. The distribution of PAHs was also shifted toward larger molecules in these emissions. AMS signals attributed to PAHs were found at molecular weights up to 600 Da. The vacuum aerodynamic size distribution was found to be bimodal with a smaller mode (Dva ∼ 200 nm) dominating under hot air starved combustion and a larger sized mode dominating under slow burning pyrolysis (Dva ∼ 600 nm). Simultaneous reduction of PAHs, OA and total particulate matter from residential biomass combustion may prove to be a challenge for environmental legislation efforts as these classes of emissions are elevated at different combustion conditions.

  5. Multiple regimes of carrier cooling in photoexcited graphene probed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, A. J.; Gabor, N. M.; Herring, P. K.; Fang, W.; Kong, J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Gedik, N.

    2013-03-01

    Energy relaxation and cooling of photoexcited charge carriers in graphene has recently attracted significant attention due to possible hot carrier effects, large quantum efficiencies, and photovoltaic applications. However, the details of these processes remain poorly understood, with many conflicting interpretations reported. Here we use time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy to explore multiple relaxation and cooling regimes in graphene in order to elucidate the fundamental physical processes which occur upon photoexcitation of charge carriers. We observe a novel negative terahertz photoconductivity that results from the unique linear dispersion and allows us to measure the electron temperature with ultrafast time resolution. Additionally, we present measurements of the relaxation dynamics over a wide range of excitation fluence. By varying the pump photon energy, we demonstrate that cooling dynamics of photoexcited carriers depend on the amount of energy deposited in the graphene system by the pump pulse, not the number of absorbed photons. The data suggest that fundamentally different regimes are encountered for different excitation fluences. These results may provide a unifying framework for reconciling various measurements of energy relaxation and cooling in graphene.

  6. Time-resolved measurement of bubble cavitation by using power Doppler ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Ren; Izumi, Yosuke; Nagai, Hayato; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel measurement method for a secondary ultrasound wave irradiated by microbubble cavitation is proposed. High-intensity ultrasound (h-US, 1.0–1.5 MPa), which produces bubble cavitation, is irradiated with a fixed time delay after introducing imaging US, whose frequency is different from that of the h-US. The bubble cavitation signal (BCS) is detected by the signal-processing unit of an ultrasound power Doppler imaging instrument. By this method, both a spatially resolved bubble image (S-image) and the temporal transition of the BCS (T-image) are monitored simultaneously. A feature of the method is that the BCS is observed in situ with sub-µs time resolution. The accuracy of the method is evaluated and it is found that the maximum deviation of the amplitude of the simulated BCS is 4.80%. This method is applied to measure the BCS of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. As a result, the dependence of the inherent temporal transition of the BCS on the sound pressure of the h-US (0.6–1.2 MPa) is observed.

  7. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  8. Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Joost M; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g cm(-2) in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use.

  9. Phase-locked 10 MHz reference signal for frequency domain time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor A.; Bird, Damian K.; Nuske, John W.

    2007-05-01

    A complete electronic system that is suitable for use in megahertz frequency domain time-resolved fluorescence instruments based on mode-locked lasers is described. The circuit produces a 10MHz signal, phase locked to the mode-locked laser pulse frequency, which is required by many commercial frequency synthesizers as the external reference signal. This device is particularly useful in conjunction with ultrafast gated intensified charge coupled device cameras capable of being frequency modulated for time-resolved fluorescence imaging.

  10. Domain-wall oscillations studies by time-resolved soft x-ray mircorscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, L.; Kruger, B.; Eiselt, R.; Bolte, M.; Fischer, P.; Meier, G.

    2009-03-25

    Fast magnetization dynamics in the micro- and nanometer regime are an interesting field of research. On these length scales magnetic structures can be designed to contain a single vortex or a single domain wall. Both size and speed of these patterns are of great interest in todays research for prospective non-volatile data storage devices. Especially the possibility to move domain-walls by spin-polarized current gained a lot of interest. Magnetic configurations can be imaged by soft X-ray magnetic microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 15 nm. By a stroboscopic pump and probe measurement scheme a temporal resolution below 100 ps is achieved. This provides the opportunity to directly image changes in magnetic domains and domain-wall motion. We image oscillations of a single domain wall in a confining potential in time steps of 200 ps by time resolved X-ray microscopy at the full-field soft X-ray transmission microscope at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley (beamline 6.1.2). Domain walls are prepared in permalloy nanostructures with a restoring potential. The oscillation of a 180{sup o} domain wall is triggered by nanosecond current pulses. The spin-polarized current and the accompanying Oersted field can contribute to the motion of the wall. By analysis of the distinct domain-wall dynamics the dominant contribution is determined. In our geometry the motion of the wall is determined by the Oersted field although the spin-polarized current directly flows through the ferromagnetic structure. An analytical model of a rigid particle precisely describes the domain-wall motion. Oscillations are studied for different pulse length and amplitudes. From the observed oscillations we extract the driving force, the confining potential, and the domain-wall mass. Nonharmonic terms determine the motion of the wall. The influence of the nonharmonic potential is studied by looking at various phase spaces of the domain-wall motion.

  11. Photophysics of 1-aminonaphthalene: a theoretical and time-resolved experimental study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Raúl; Longarte, Asier; Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Redondo, Carolina; Castaño, Fernando; González-Ramírez, Israel; Giussani, Angelo; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela

    2009-12-03

    The photophysics of 1-aminonaphthalene (1-napthylamine, AMN) has been investigated on the basis of a constructive experimental-theoretical interplay derived from time-resolved measurements and high-level quantum-chemical ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF calculations. Transient ionization signals at femtosecond resolution were collected for AMN cold isolated molecules following excitation from the vibrationless ground level to a number of vibrational states (within the pump resolution) in the lowest accessible excited state and further multiphoton ionization probing at 500, 800, and 1300 nm. Theory predicts two pipi* states, (1)L(b) and (1)L(a), as the lowest singlet electronic excitations, with adiabatic transitions from S(0) at 3.50 and 3.69 eV, respectively. Since the associated oscillator strength for the lowest transition is exceedingly small, the (1)L(b) state is not expected to become populated significantly and the (1)L(a) state appears as the main protagonist of the AMN photophysics. Though calculations foresee a surface crossing between (1)L(a) and the lower (1)L(b) states, no dynamical signature of it is observed in the time-dependent measurements. In the relaxation of (1)L(a), the radiant emission competes with the intersystem crossing and internal conversion channels. The rates of these mechanisms have been determined at different excitation energies. The internal conversion is mediated by a (1)L(a)/S(0) conical intersection located 0.7 eV above the (1)L(a) minimum. The relaxation of a higher-lying singlet excited state, observed above 40 000 cm(-1) (4.96 eV) and calculated at 5.18 eV, has been also explored.

  12. NOTE: LaBr3:Ce and SiPMs for time-of-flight PET: achieving 100 ps coincidence resolving time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; van Dam, Herman T.; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J.

    2010-04-01

    The use of time-of-flight (TOF) information in positron emission tomography (PET) enables significant improvement in image noise properties and, therefore, lesion detection. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are solid-state photosensors that have several advantages over photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). SiPMs are small, essentially transparent to 511 keV gamma rays and insensitive to magnetic fields. This enables novel detector designs aimed at e.g. compactness, high resolution, depth-of-interaction (DOI) correction and MRI compatibility. The goal of the present work is to study the timing performance of SiPMs in combination with LaBr3:Ce(5%), a relatively new scintillator with promising characteristics for TOF-PET. Measurements were performed with two, bare, 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LaBr3:Ce(5%) crystals, each coupled to a 3 mm × 3 mm SiPM. Using a 22Na point source placed at various positions in between the two detectors, a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of ~100 ps FWHM for 511 keV annihilation photon pairs was achieved, corresponding to a TOF positioning resolution of ~15 mm FWHM. At the same time, pulse height spectra with well-resolved full-energy peaks were obtained. To our knowledge this is the best CRT reported for SiPM-based scintillation detectors to date. It is concluded that SiPM-based scintillation detectors can provide timing resolutions at least as good as detectors based on PMTs.

  13. Time-Resolved Spectral Analysis of Blazar 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosamaria; Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    As electromagnetic (EM) waves from sources such as blazars travel through the intergalactic medium (IGM), they are slowed by electrons; a phenomenon called dispersion delay [2]. We study the propagation effects in emissions of EM waves from blazar source BL 0716+714 by estimating the average electron density, or dispersion measure (DM), of the IGM on a line of sight to the blazar. Measuring the variations in these effects with time allow us to understand the properties of the intervening material. Toward this goal we analyzed months of archived observations of BL 0716+714 taken by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The ATA's correlator produces cross-power vs. frequency spectra for every baseline (distance between a pair of antennas) in ten-second intervals. To reduce this immense load of data we used a technique based on interferometry called bispectrum, which does not depend on complicated array calibration and simplifies our work. The bispectrum multiplies baselines, three at a time, so that they form a closed loop, then the cube root of spectra are averaged [1]. This technique is independent of phase errors associated with any individual antenna and has a better SNR ratio than simply taking the average of all the baselines. We developed a numerical analysis program that takes in archived blazar files containing correlation data, computes the bispectrum, and outputs FITS images for each day of observations. The results show that our observations do not have sufficient sensitivity to reveal blazar variations in the frequency ranges that were studied. It is suggested that future observations at higher frequencies and/or with another telescope having greater sensitivity would reveal the time/frequency dependence of emission structure that would allow measurements of electron content. This work shows that but bispectrum is a useful tool for rapid characterization of interferometer data that does not require interferometer caclibration which could introduce artifacts

  14. A method for time-resolved calorespirometry of terrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Wadsö, Lars

    2015-04-01

    A new vessel for simultaneous isothermal calorimetry and respirometry (calorespirometry) on terrestrial (non-aqueous) samples has been developed. All types of small (<1 g) biological samples (insects, soil, leaves, fungi, etc.) can be studied. The respirometric measurements are made by opening and closing a valve to a vial inside the sample ampoule containing a carbon dioxide absorbent. Typically a 7 h measurement results in seven measurements of heat production rate, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production, which can be used to evaluate how the metabolic activity in a sample changes over time. Results from three experiments on leaves, a cut vegetable, and mold are given. As uncertainties--especially in the carbon dioxide production--tend to be quite high, improvements to the technique are also discussed.

  15. Time-resolved metabolomics reveals metabolic modulation in rice foliage

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shigeru; Arita, Masanori; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nishioka, Takaaki; Tomita, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    Background To elucidate the interaction of dynamics among modules that constitute biological systems, comprehensive datasets obtained from "omics" technologies have been used. In recent plant metabolomics approaches, the reconstruction of metabolic correlation networks has been attempted using statistical techniques. However, the results were unsatisfactory and effective data-mining techniques that apply appropriate comprehensive datasets are needed. Results Using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and capillary electrophoresis diode-array detection (CE-DAD), we analyzed the dynamic changes in the level of 56 basic metabolites in plant foliage (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) at hourly intervals over a 24-hr period. Unsupervised clustering of comprehensive metabolic profiles using Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) allowed classification of the biochemical pathways activated by the light and dark cycle. The carbon and nitrogen (C/N) metabolism in both periods was also visualized as a phenotypic linkage map that connects network modules on the basis of traditional metabolic pathways rather than pairwise correlations among metabolites. The regulatory networks of C/N assimilation/dissimilation at each time point were consistent with previous works on plant metabolism. In response to environmental stress, glutathione and spermidine fluctuated synchronously with their regulatory targets. Adenine nucleosides and nicotinamide coenzymes were regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We also demonstrated that SOM analysis was applicable to the estimation of unidentifiable metabolites in metabolome analysis. Hierarchical clustering of a correlation coefficient matrix could help identify the bottleneck enzymes that regulate metabolic networks. Conclusion Our results showed that our SOM analysis with appropriate metabolic time-courses effectively revealed the synchronous dynamics among metabolic modules and elucidated the underlying biochemical

  16. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  17. Time-resolved pulsed spray drop sizing at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drallmeier, J. A.; Peters, J. E.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to measure drop sizes in pulsed sprays for diesel and fuel-injected spark ignition engine applications. A forward-scattering unit was designed with a high-speed data acquisition system to permit the measurement of drop sizes in sprays at 0.4-ms intervals. Data were taken at elevated pressures from 0.345 to 3.45 MPa with a 0-deg pintle nozzle. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and size distribution were calculated using a computational method that is independent of a predetermined distribution function. Results taken at the spray centerline indicate that for most elevated pressures, the SMD in the secondary injection region tended to increase as the pressure in the fuel line decreased and tended to increase with increasing environmental pressure, both suggesting an inverse relationship between drop size and the pressure drop across the nozzle. Also as the environmental pressure was raised, the distribution width decreased at a slower rate than the SMD increased, indicating a spreading of the drop sizes with injection time at elevated pressures. Significant cycle-to-cycle variation in both the SMD and distribution width indicate that cycle-to-cycle variations must be considered in pulsed sprays. In addition, more variation was seen between random rather than consecutive cycles.

  18. Time-resolved phosphorescence of proteins and polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousslang, Kenneth W.; Buratto, Steve K.; Haynes, D.; Heath, P.; Holloway, D.; Hulteen, John C.; Dick, Lisa; Stevenson, K.; Harding, C. O.; Ross, J. B. Alexander

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes the use of luminescent coenzymes and substrates in the study of two proteins, horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and sex steroid-binding protein (SBP). We report the phosphorescence emission and lifetimes of NAD and e-NAD in pyrazole ternary complexes with ADH. Whereas the decay of NAD is adequately described as monoexponential with a lifetime of 2.4 s, the decay of e-NAD obeys a double exponential decay law with time constants of 0.4 and 0.15 sec. Ternary complexes with NAD have the same decay kinetics as ADH by itself. However, in ternary complexes with f-NAD, it is possible to selectively excite and detect the coenzyme phosphorescence. We show that f-NAD is a more useful probe than NAD for protein structure in ADH. We also measured the triplet emission and decay lifetimes of dihydroequilenin, an equine steroid bound by SBP. We find that the phosphorescence spectra and lifetimes are pH dependent, with the protonated species dominating emission below pH 10.0, and the deprotonated form dominating at pH 10.0 and above. The acidic and basic species can be selectively excited, and the emission at pH near the pKa is characteristic of the equilibrium ground state populations. Since hydrogen bonding is implicated in SBP-steroid complexes, dihydroequilenin is a potential phosphorescent probe for the binding interaction.

  19. Ultimate sensitivity of time-resolved optoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Karabutov, Alexander A.

    2000-05-01

    The major limitation in sensitivity of the optical tomography is associated with strong optical attenuation in human tissues. Opto-acoustic tomography overcomes this limitation utilizing detection of acoustic waves instead of detection of transmitted photons. Exceptional sensitivity of the opto-acoustic tomography allows early detection of small tumors located dep in human tissues, such as breast. This paper demonstrates that an optimally designed opto-acoustic imaging system can detect early 1-mm tumors with minimal blood content of only 7 percent at the depth of up to 7-cm within the breast attenuating laser irradiation 3.3 times per each 1-cm of its depth. A theoretical consideration of the ultimate sensitivity of piezo-detection in a wide ultrasonic frequency band is developed. The detection sensitivity is presented as a function of the ultrasonic frequency, tumor dimensions and optical absorption coefficient. Comparative analysis of piezo and optical interferometric detection of opto-acoustic transients is presented. The theoretical models of piezo detection were developed for the open-circuit and short-circuit schemes of operation. The ultimate sensitivity limited by thermal noise of electric capacitor of the piezo-element was estimated. It was shown that the limit of detection depends on the frequency band, the electric capacity of the transducer and the sped of sound in the piezo-element. Comparative analysis of various piezo-materials was made from the point of view of their utility for sensitive opto-acoustic detection.

  20. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of a Leonid Fireball Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jiří.; Jenniskens, Peter

    Two video spectra of a meteoric afterglow were obtained for the first time during the 1999 Leonid aircraft campaign. The train was produced by a -13 magnitude Leonid fireball at a relatively low height between 91-75 km. The meteor spectrum has a strong hydrogen emission, proportional to 10-20 II atoms per one Fe atom The train spectrum consisted of a red continuum, yellow continuum, and about 50 atomic lines between 3700-9000 Å. The yellow continuum, possibly due to NO_2, was also detected in the persistent train. The red continuum is interpreted as a thermal radiation of dust from meteoric debris at about 1400 K. Evidence for secondary ablation is found in the afterglow. The atomic lines decayed within seconds of the meteor. The lines of Fe I, Mg I, Na I, Ca I, Ca II, Cr I, Mn I, K I, and possibly Al I were present in the glow together with the 5577 Å forbidden O I line. The gas temperature in the train was close to 5000 K at the beginning and decayed to 1200 K within two seconds. However, thermal equilibrium was not satisfied for all populated levels.

  1. Allosteric action in real time: Time-resolved crystallographic studies of a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, James E.; Pahl, Reinhard; Šrajer, Vukica; Royer, William E.

    2006-01-01

    Protein allostery provides mechanisms for regulation of biological function at the molecular level. We present here an investigation of global, ligand-induced allosteric transition in a protein by time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The study provides a view of structural changes in single crystals of Scapharca dimeric hemoglobin as they proceed in real time, from 5 ns to 80 μs after ligand photodissociation. A tertiary intermediate structure forms rapidly (<5 ns) as the protein responds to the presence of an unliganded heme within each R-state protein subunit, with key structural changes observed in the heme groups, neighboring residues, and interface water molecules. This intermediate lays a foundation for the concerted tertiary and quaternary structural changes that occur on a microsecond time scale and are associated with the transition to a low-affinity T-state structure. Reversal of these changes shows a considerable lag as a T-like structure persists well after ligand rebinding, suggesting a slow T-to-R transition. PMID:16684887

  2. High time-resolution photodetectors for PET applications

    DOE PAGES

    Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes recent developments aiming at the improvement of the time resolution of photodetectors used in positron emission tomography (PET). Promising photodetector candidates for future PET-time-of-flight (TOF) applications are also discussed.

  3. Resolving mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from satellite: Is fine resolution worth the hassle? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2013-12-01

    In early 2000 we began receiving global aerosol products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at nominal 10 km and 17.5 km resolution, respectively. Aerosol products derived from other satellite sensors such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with spatial resolution nominally at 13 x 12 km later joined these data. Suddenly the global aerosol system popped into focus. For global-scale science, a 10 km product appeared to be adequate. Questions concerning the adequacy of this moderate resolution data set began to arise as the community's interest in satellite-derived aerosol products branched towards more local questions. As of Collection 6, the MODIS aerosol product will now include a fine resolution product at nominal 3 km resolution. What can we learn about mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from this new product? Was the effort worth it? We take advantage of the AERONET DRAGON networks in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., in Korea and in California to compare the accuracy of the MODIS 3 km product with the MODIS 10 km product, and just for fun, with the 6 km Visible Infrared Imager Suite (VIIRS) aerosol product. Do the finer resolution aerosol products show us aerosol features unobtainable by the coarser resolution products? Are the finer resolution products worth the hassle?

  4. Determining Chemically and Spatially Resolved Atomic Profile of Low Contrast Interface Structure with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P. C.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  5. Time-resolved and continuous wave spectroscopic imaging of biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, Mohammad

    Time-resolved and spectroscopic imaging approaches were developed and adapted and developed to detect and localize tumors in ex vivo breast tissue samples and tumorlike inhomogeneities breastlike phantoms. The experimental arrangement for time-sliced optical imaging used 120 fs, 1 kHz repetition-rate, 800 nm light pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser system for sample illumination and a 80 ps resolution ultrafast gated intensified camera system for recording 2-D time-sliced images. The spectroscopic imaging arrangement used 1225-1300 nm tunable output of a Cr: forsterite laser for sample illumination, a Fourier space gate to discriminate against multiple-scattered light and a near-infrared area camera to record 2-D images. Results of these direct time-resolved imaging measurements on thin (5 mm--10 mm) breast tissue specimens revealed that early-light images highlight cancerous regions of the specimens, while late arriving light accentuates the normal fibroglandular tissues. These differences are attributed to the difference in light scattering characteristics of normal and cancerous tissues. In direct spectroscopic imaging measurements, when light was tuned closer to the 1203 nm absorption resonance of adipose tissues, a marked enhancement in contrast between the images of adipose and fibro-glandular tissues was observed. A similar wavelength-dependent difference between normal and cancerous tissues was observed. These results correlate well with pathology and nuclear magnetic resonance based analyses of the samples, and indicate the diagnostic potential of optical imaging approaches. Detection and localization of targets in thick breast tissue specimens and phantoms was accomplished using independent component analysis (ICA) from information theory. The approach known as Optical Tomography using Independent Component Analysis (OPTICA) made use of multi-source probing of the samples, multi-detector transillumination signal acquisition, and analysis of resulting data

  6. Super-resolution endoscopy for real-time wide-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Lai, Hok Sum Sam; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Pan; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2015-06-29

    Resolving subcellular structures in vitro beyond optical diffraction barrier by a light microscope has achieved significant development since the advancement of super-resolution fluorescence microscopes, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). However, the resolution of observation in deep and dense in vivo tissues is still confined to cellular level presently, and hence, exploring image details at subcellular level or even beyond organelle level in vivo has continued to attract much research attention. Currently, endoscopy provides an effective way to achieve in vivo observations and is compatible with mature optical microscopy technologies, but its resolution is usually confined to ~1 µm. Here we report a new endoscopy method by functionalizing graded-index (GRIN) lens with microspheres for real-time white-light or fluorescent super-resolution imaging. The capability of resolving objects with feature size of ~λ/5, which breaks the diffraction barrier of traditional GRIN lens based endoscopes by a factor of two, has been demonstrated by using this super-resolution endoscopy method. Further development of such a super-resolution endoscopy technique may provide new opportunities for in vivo life sciences studies.

  7. Feasibility experiments on time-resolved fluorosensing applied to oil slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camagni, P.; Colombo, G.; Koechler, C.; Pedrini, A.; Omenetto, N.; Rossi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of time resolved observations can provide a very penetrating tool in the practice of laser fluorosensing. The investigations have demonstrated a relevance of multispectral, time resolved analysis for oil fingerprinting. By comparative studies on a variety of crude oils and their most significant fractions, it was found that the process of time decay in a composite oil is characterized by a few steps, which are associated with specific components in the medium light range. The average decay times of these pure fractions are markedly differentiated as to absolute values and spectral spread; as a consequence, the corresponding parameters in the resultant crude are quite sensitive to the particular mixture of these components. Measurements of the time response give then a finer discrimination between oil classes, depending on the relative content of certain fractions. Experiments were pursued with an improved fluorosensor facility, in order to test the application of time resolved fluorosensing to remote samples on water.

  8. Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Sheftman, D; Shafer, D; Efimov, S; Gruzinsky, K; Gleizer, S; Krasik, Ya E

    2012-10-01

    A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A ~4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

  9. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Transient Free Radicals in the Mid-Infrared Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjork, Bryce J.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Changala, Bryan; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Cossel, Kevin; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of transient free radicals, such as HOCO and Criegee intermediates, play important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. Establishing accurate kinetics models for these complex systems require knowledge of the reaction rates and lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. However, standard spectroscopic techniques lack a combination of sensitivity, frequency resolution, and adequate temporal resolution to survey these reactions on the μs timescale. To answer this challenge, we have developed time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS). This novel technique allows for the detection of transient intermediates with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We demonstrate this technique in the mid-infrared spectral region, at 3.7 μm, by studying the photolysis of deuterated acrylic acid. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of photoproducts trans-DOCO, HOD, and D_2O, identified through their unique rovibrational structure, with 5 × 1010 molecules cm-3 sensitivity, and with a time resolution of 25 μs. We aim to apply this technique to detect directly the formation of the DOCO intermediate in the OD + CO chemical reaction at atmospherically relevant pressures, in order to validate statistical rate models of this reaction.

  10. High Resolution Imaging of Very Low Mass Spectral Binaries: Three Resolved Systems and Detection of Orbital Motion in an L/T Transition Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2015-11-01

    We present high resolution Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics imaging of 43 late-M, L and T dwarf systems with Keck/NIRC2. These include 17 spectral binary candidates, systems whose spectra suggest the presence of a T dwarf secondary. We resolve three systems: 2MASS J1341-3052, SDSS J1511+0607 and SDSS J2052-1609 the first two are resolved for the first time. All three have projected separations <8 AU and estimated periods of 14-80 years. We also report a preliminary orbit determination for SDSS J2052-1609 based on six epochs of resolved astrometry between 2005 and 2010. Among the 14 unresolved spectral binaries, 5 systems were confirmed binaries but remained unresolved, implying a minimum binary fraction of {47}-11+12% for this sample. Our inability to resolve most of the spectral binaries, including the confirmed binaries, supports the hypothesis that a large fraction of very low mass systems have relatively small separations and are missed with direct imaging. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  11. Probing Anisotropic Structure Changes in Proteins with Picosecond Time-Resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Schotte, Friedrich; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Kyndt, John; Anfinrud, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    We have exploited the principle of photoselection and the method of time-resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) to investigate protein size and shape changes following photoactivation of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) in solution with ~150 ps time resolution. This study partially overcomes the orientational average intrinsic to solution scattering methods, and provides structural information at a higher level of detail. Photoactivation of the p-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore in PYP produces a highly-contorted, short-lived, red shifted intermediate (pR0), and triggers prompt, protein compaction of approximately 0.3% along the direction defined by the electronic transition dipole moment of the chromophore. Contraction along this dimension is accompanied by expansion along the orthogonal directions, with the net protein volume change being approximately -0.25%. More than half the strain arising from formation of pR0 is relieved by the pR0 to pR1 structure transition (1.8 ± 0.2 ns), with the persistent strain presumably contributing to the driving force needed to generate the spectroscopically blue-shifted pB signaling state. The results reported here are consistent with the near-atomic resolution structural dynamics reported in a recent time-resolved Laue crystallography study of PYP crystals, and suggest that the early-time structural dynamics in the crystalline state carry over to proteins in solution. PMID:24125473

  12. Total variation based reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities in tissue from time-resolved optical projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Alexander B.; Vlasov, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    The important advantage of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is the possibility of tissue functional diagnosis. However the possibility implements if only we separately reconstruct the spatial distributions of optical parameters, specifically the absorption and scattering coefficients. We have recently demonstrated that time-domain DOT based on the perturbation model by Lyubimov is capable of reconstructing absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue with a DOT high spatial resolution (better than 3 mm at a depth of 4 cm). This paper continues our research and focuses on the reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities. We consider the flat layer transmission geometry which is traditional for optical mammography, and use diffusion approximation to derive analytical expressions for weight functions responsible for the reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities. To confirm that our calculations are correct we perform a numerical experiment where we reconstruct a rectangular scattering object 10×8 cm in size with 4 circular scattering macroinhomogeneities 4 mm in diameter each, and a randomly inhomogeneous scattering structure. The inverse DOT problem is solved with a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique where interim iterations are processed through total variation norm minimization. The results suggest that our DOT method reliably resolves the scattering macroinhomogeneities of mentioned size against a randomly inhomogeneous structure.

  13. Magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense: time-resolved magnetic and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Fdez-Gubieda, M Luisa; Muela, Alicia; Alonso, Javier; García-Prieto, Ana; Olivi, Luca; Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Barandiarán, José Manuel

    2013-04-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria biosynthesize magnetite nanoparticles of high structural and chemical purity that allow them to orientate in the geomagnetic field. In this work we have followed the process of biomineralization of these magnetite nanoparticles. We have performed a time-resolved study on magnetotactic bacteria Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1. From the combination of magnetic and structural studies by means of Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy we have identified and quantified two phases of Fe (ferrihydrite and magnetite) involved in the biomineralization process, confirming the role of ferrihydrite as the source of Fe ions for magnetite biomineralization in M. gryphiswaldense. We have distinguished two steps in the biomineralization process: the first, in which Fe is accumulated in the form of ferrihydrite, and the second, in which the magnetite is rapidly biomineralized from ferrihydrite. Finally, the XANES analysis suggests that the origin of the ferrihydrite could be at bacterial ferritin cores, characterized by a poorly crystalline structure and high phosphorus content.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of detonating heterogeneous explosives. [HMX and HNS

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy and pulsed-laser-excited Raman scattering methods have been applied to the study of detonating heterogeneous explosives, including PETN, HMX and HNS. Time-resolved spectra of emission from detonating HNS show the evolution of features due to electronically-excited radical species. For HNS, the CN(B-X) system near 388 nm has been studied at a wavelength resolution of 0.5 A. Boltzmann vibrational temperatures have been calculated by comparing the experimental data with computer-simulated spectra. These temperatures are consistent with the expected trend of detonation temperature as a function of charge density. Using 532-nm laser excitation, single-pulse Raman scattering measurements have been made at the free surface of detonating HMX and PETN samples. Monotonic attenuation of Raman scattering intensity over a 100-ns interval is observed after detonation front arrival at the free surface. Depletion of the Raman signal occurs prior to significant loss of the scattered laser light. The significance of the Raman measurements as a possible probe of reaction zone length in detonating explosives is discussed. 21 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. J.; Diaz, L.; Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Caceres, J. O.

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1-0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C+, C2 +, C3 +, Mg+, Mg2 +, N+, N2 +, Ca+, O+ and O2 + species and molecular band systems of CN(B2Σ+-X2Σ+), C2(d3Πg-a3Πu), CH(B2Σ--X2Π; A2Δ-X2Π), NH(A3Π-X3Σ-), OH(A2Σ+-X2 Σ+), and CaOH(B2Σ+-X2Σ+; A2Π-X2Σ+). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated.

  16. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. IV. Lateral inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiberg, Matthias; Bertram, Frank; Müller, Mathias; Scheer, Roland

    2017-02-01

    In the fourth part of this series, we study the impact of lateral inhomogeneities on the time-resolved luminescence decay (TRL) after a pulsed excitation by means of simulation with Synopsys® TCAD and analytical approximation. This work consists of two parts: In the first part, the effect of excitations being inhomogeneous on a lateral scale is investigated. It turns out that for localized excitations there may be a strong lateral diffusion of charge carriers, thereby limiting the resolution of a micro-TRL experiment. In this case, a replacement of the inhomogeneous excitation in the simulation by a homogeneous excitation and an average photon density is not possible, especially due to defect saturation depending non-linearly on the excitation. In the second part, we consider a homogeneous excitation and study inhomogeneous material parameters, namely, inhomogeneous charge carrier lifetimes, band gaps, and doping densities. We find that their effects strongly depend on their characteristic lengths of variation. For length scales smaller than the diffusion length, inhomogeneous material parameters can lead to curved luminescence decays.

  17. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Borodziuk, S.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalal, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-10-15

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  18. Angstrom-resolved real-time dissection of electrochemically active noble metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha R; Baimpos, Theodoros; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-06-24

    Electrochemical solid|liquid interfaces are critically important for technological applications and materials for energy storage, harvesting, and conversion. Yet, a real-time Angstrom-resolved visualization of dynamic processes at electrified solid|liquid interfaces has not been feasible. Here we report a unique real-time atomistic view into dynamic processes at electrochemically active metal interfaces using white light interferometry in an electrochemical surface forces apparatus. This method allows simultaneous deciphering of both sides of an electrochemical interface-the solution and the metal side-with microsecond resolution under dynamically evolving reactive conditions that are inherent to technological systems in operando. Quantitative in situ analysis of the potentiodynamic electrochemical oxidation/reduction of noble metal surfaces shows that Angstrom thick oxides formed on Au and Pt are high-ik materials; that is, they are metallic or highly defect-rich semiconductors, while Pd forms a low-ik oxide. In contrast, under potentiostatic growth conditions, all noble metal oxides exhibit a low-ik behavior. On the solution side, we reveal hitherto unknown strong electrochemical reaction forces, which are due to temporary charge imbalance in the electric double layer caused by depletion/generation of charged species. The real-time capability of our approach reveals significant time lags between electron transfer, oxide reduction/oxidation, and solution side reaction during a progressing electrode process. Comparing the kinetics of solution and metal side responses provides evidence that noble metal oxide reduction proceeds via a hydrogen adsorption and subsequent dissolution/redeposition mechanism. The presented approach may have important implications for designing emerging materials utilizing electrified interfaces and may apply to bioelectrochemical processes and signal transmission.

  19. Measuring Exciton Migration in Conjugated Polymer Films with Ultrafast Time Resolved Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penwell, Samuel

    Conjugated polymers are highly tunable organic semiconductors, which can be solution processed to form thin films, making them prime candidates for organic photovoltaic devices. One of the most important parameters in a conjugated polymer solar cell is the exciton diffusion length, which depends on intermolecular couplings, and is typically on the order of 10 nm. This mean exciton migration can vary dramatically between films and within a single film due to heterogeneities in morphology on length scales of 10's to 100's nm. To study the variability of exciton diffusion and morphology within individual conjugated polymer films, we are adapting stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. STED is typically used in biology with sparse well-engineered fluorescent labels or on NV-centers in diamond. I will, however, describe how we have demonstrated the extension of STED to conjugated polymer films and nanoparticles of MEH-PPV and CN-PPV, despite the presence of two photon absorption, by taking care to first understand the material's photophysical properties. We then further adapt this approach, by introducing a second ultrafast STED pulse at a variable delay. Excitons that migrate away from the initial subdiffraction excitation volume during the ps-ns time delay, are preferentially quenched by the second STED pulse, while those that remain in the initial volume survive. The resulting effect of the second STED pulse is modulated by the degree of migration over the ultrafast time delay, thus providing a new method to study exciton migration. Since this technique utilizes subdiffraction optical excitation and detection volumes with ultrafast time resolution, it provides a means of spatially and temporally resolving measurements of exciton migration on the native length and time scales. In this way, we will obtain a spatiotemporal map of exciton distributions and migration that will help to correlate the energetic landscape to film morphology at the nanoscale.

  20. Avalanche statistics from data with low time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Michael; Nawano, Aya; Wright, Wendelin J.; Gu, Xiaojun; Uhl, J. T.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-11-01

    Extracting avalanche distributions from experimental microplasticity data can be hampered by limited time resolution. We compute the effects of low time resolution on avalanche size distributions and give quantitative criteria for diagnosing and circumventing problems associated with low time resolution. We show that traditional analysis of data obtained at low acquisition rates can lead to avalanche size distributions with incorrect power-law exponents or no power-law scaling at all. Furthermore, we demonstrate that it can lead to apparent data collapses with incorrect power-law and cutoff exponents. We propose new methods to analyze low-resolution stress-time series that can recover the size distribution of the underlying avalanches even when the resolution is so low that naive analysis methods give incorrect results. We test these methods on both downsampled simulation data from a simple model and downsampled bulk metallic glass compression data and find that the methods recover the correct critical exponents.

  1. Avalanche statistics from data with low time resolution.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Michael; Nawano, Aya; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Uhl, J T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    Extracting avalanche distributions from experimental microplasticity data can be hampered by limited time resolution. We compute the effects of low time resolution on avalanche size distributions and give quantitative criteria for diagnosing and circumventing problems associated with low time resolution. We show that traditional analysis of data obtained at low acquisition rates can lead to avalanche size distributions with incorrect power-law exponents or no power-law scaling at all. Furthermore, we demonstrate that it can lead to apparent data collapses with incorrect power-law and cutoff exponents. We propose new methods to analyze low-resolution stress-time series that can recover the size distribution of the underlying avalanches even when the resolution is so low that naive analysis methods give incorrect results. We test these methods on both downsampled simulation data from a simple model and downsampled bulk metallic glass compression data and find that the methods recover the correct critical exponents.

  2. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  3. A Resolution in Service: SFX Usage Logs as a Basis for Link Resolver Menu Redesign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Anne L.; Ponsford, Bennett Claire

    2011-01-01

    In this study, three years of SFX usage logs at Texas A&M University were analyzed to determine how patrons use link resolver services. The study contrasts the actions taken by users when full text is and is not available and compares public versus staff usage. The results confirmed users' preference for full-text services but also provided…

  4. The uses of alternative dispute resolution to resolve genetic disputes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    The report sets out lessons learned while carrying out the study. It concludes that genetic disputes will increase in number and that ADR processes including mediation, arbitration, the use of independent experts and court-appointed masters can be helpful in resolving them. It suggests additional effort on bioremediation, and workplace disputes and training for ADR neutrals.

  5. Characteristics and sensitivity analysis of multiple-time-resolved source patterns of PM2.5 with real time data using Multilinear Engine 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xing; Shi, Guo-Liang; Gao, Jian; Liu, Jia-Yuan; HuangFu, Yan-Qi; Ma, Tong; Wang, Hai-Ting; Zhang, Yue-Chong; Wang, Han; Li, Hui; Ivey, Cesunica E.; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-08-01

    With real time resolved data of Particulate matter (PM) and chemical species, understanding the source patterns and chemical characteristics is critical to establish controlling of PM. In this work, PM2.5 and chemical species were measured by corresponding online instruments with 1-h time resolution in Beijing. Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2) model was applied to explore the sources, and four sources (vehicle emission, crustal dust, secondary formation and coal combustion) were identified. To investigate the sensitivity of time resolution on the source contributions and chemical characteristics, ME2 was conducted with four time resolution runs (1-h, 2-h, 4-h, and 8-h). Crustal dust and coal combustion display large variation in the four time resolutions runs, with their contributions ranging from 6.7 to 10.4 μg m-3 and from 6.4 to 12.2 μg m-3, respectively. The contributions of vehicle emission and secondary formation range from 7.5 to 10.5 and from 14.7 to 16.7 μg m-3, respectively. The sensitivity analyses were conducted by principal component analysis-plot (PCA-plot), coefficient of divergence (CD), average absolute error (AAE) and correlation coefficients. For the four time resolution runs, the source contributions and profiles of crustal dust and coal combustion were more unstable than other source categories, possibly due to the lack of key markers of crustal dust and coal combustion (e.g. Si, Al). On the other hand, vehicle emission and crustal dust were more sensitive to time series of source contributions at different time resolutions. Findings in this study can improve our knowledge of source contributions and chemical characteristics at different time solutions.

  6. Time-Resolved Dynamics in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Significance of Non-locality in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Neepa

    2013-03-01

    The usual approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) have achieved an unprecedented balance between accuracy and efficiency for calculating excitation spectra and response. We show however that these approximations are less successful for time-resolved dynamics beyond the linear response regime. Step and peak structures develop in the exact exchange-correlation potential that have a density-dependence that is non-local both in time and in space, missed by all approximations in use today. The lack of these structures leads to their incorrect predictions of dynamics, such as faster time-scales, and incomplete charge-transfer. [P. Elliott, J.I. Fuks, A. Rubio, N.T. Maitra arXiv:1211.2012; J. I. Fuks, P. Elliott, A. Rubio, N. T. Maitra, arXiv:1211.2849] Support from NSF and DOE is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  8. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  9. Factors influencing timing resolution in a commercial LSO PETcamera

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Ullisch, Marcus

    2004-10-23

    The CPS Accel is a commercial PET camera based on a block detector with 64 LSO scintillator crystals (each 6.75 x 6.75 x 25 mm)read out with 4 photomultiplier tubes. The excellent timing resolution of LSO suggests that this camera might be used for time-of-flight (TOF) PET, thereby reducing the statistical noise significantly. Although the Accel achieves 3 ns coincidence resolution (a factor of two better than BGO-based PET cameras), its timing resolution is nearly an order of magnitude worse than that demonstrated with individual LSO crystals. This paper quantifies the effect on the timing of each component in the Accel timing chain to identify which components most limit the camera's timing resolution. The components in the timing chain are: the scintillator crystal, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), and the time to digital converter (TDC). To measure the contribution of each component, we construct a single crystal test system with high-performance versions of these components. This system achieves 221 ps fwhm coincidence timing resolution, which is used as a baseline measurement. One of the high-performance components is replaced by a production component, the coincidence timing resolution is re-measured, and the difference between measurements is the contribution of that (production) component. We find that the contributions of the TDC, CFD, PMT, and scintillator are 2000 ps, 1354 ps, 422 ps, and 326 psfwhm respectively, and that the overall timing resolution scales like the square root of the amount of scintillation light detected by the PMT. Based on these measurements we predict that the limit for the coincidence timing resolution in a practical, commercial, LSO-based PET camera is 528ps fwhm.

  10. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, T.; Anderson, S.; Brewer, H.; Chen, Y.-S.; Cho, H.; Dashdorj, N.; Henning, R.W.; Kosheleva, I.; Macha, G.; Meron, M.; Pahl, R.; Ren, Z.; Ruan, S.; Schotte, F.; Srajer, V.; Viccaro, P.J.; Westferro, F.; Anfinrud, P.; Moffat, K.

    2011-08-16

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 {micro}m horizontal by 20 {micro}m vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to {approx}4 x 10{sup 10} photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450-2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained.

  11. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science

    PubMed Central

    Graber, T.; Anderson, S.; Brewer, H.; Chen, Y.-S.; Cho, H. S.; Dashdorj, N.; Henning, R. W.; Kosheleva, I.; Macha, G.; Meron, M.; Pahl, R.; Ren, Z.; Ruan, S.; Schotte, F.; Šrajer, V.; Viccaro, P. J.; Westferro, F.; Anfinrud, P.; Moffat, K.

    2011-01-01

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 µm horizontal by 20 µm vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to ∼4 × 1010 photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450–2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained. PMID:21685684

  12. A time-resolved imaging and electrical study on a high current atmospheric pressure spark discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares, J. M.; Kohut, A.; Galbács, G.; Engeln, R.; Geretovszky, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    We present a time-resolved imaging and electrical study of an atmospheric pressure spark discharge. The conditions of the present study are those used for nanoparticle generation in spark discharge generator setups. The oscillatory bipolar spark discharge was generated between two identical Cu electrodes in different configurations (cylindrical flat-end or tipped-end geometries, electrode gap from 0.5 to 4 mm), in a controlled co-axial N2 flow, and was supplied by a high voltage capacitor. Imaging data with nanosecond time resolution were collected using an intensified CCD camera. This data were used to study the time evolution of plasma morphology, total light emission intensity, and the rate of plasma expansion. High voltage and high current probes were employed to collect electrical data about the discharge. The electrical data recorded allowed, among others, the calculation of the equivalent resistance and inductance of the circuit, estimations for the energy dissipated in the spark gap. By combining imaging and electrical data, observations could be made about the correlation of the evolution of total emitted light and the dissipated power. It was also observed that the distribution of light emission of the plasma in the spark gap is uneven, as it exhibits a "hot spot" with an oscillating position in the axial direction, in correlation with the high voltage waveform. The initial expansion rate of the cylindrical plasma front was found to be supersonic; thus, the discharge releases a strong shockwave. Finally, the results on equivalent resistance and channel expansion are comparable to those of unipolar arcs. This shows the spark discharge has a similar behavior to the arc regime during the conductive phase and until the current oscillations stop.

  13. Time-Resolved Studies of Molecular Dynamics Using - and Femto-Second Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliwala, Shrenik Mahendra

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of two experiments that measure the evolution of laser excited molecules. The experiment performed with 0.1-ps laser pulses elucidates the dynamics of desorption of O_2 and formation of CO_2 on a platinum surface. The experiment performed with nanosecond time resolution reveals the inter- and intra-molecular vibrational dynamics of infrared laser pumped molecules. Desorption of O_2 and formation of CO_2 were induced with subpicosecond laser pulses on a Pt(111) surface dosed with coadsorbed O_2 and CO. Fluence dependent yields obtained over a range of laser wavelengths from 267 to 800 nm, and pulse durations from 80 fs to 3.6 ps are presented. We observe a dependence of the nonlinear desorption yield on wavelength. Two-pulse correlation measurements show two different time-scales relevant to the desorption. The results show that nonthermal electrons play a role in the surface chemistry, and that an equilibrated pre-heating of the surface modes leads to enhanced desorption. In the second set of experiments reported in this thesis, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy was used to obtain the rovibrational energy distributions in polyatomic molecules following infrared multiphoton excitation. In addition to presenting new results on SF _6, we review previously obtained data on SO_2 and OCS. The data yield new details about infrared multiphoton excitation and intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation. In particular they show the significance of collisions in redistributing vibrational energy following excitation. The results also clearly show stronger inter-mode coupling and higher excitation in systems with increasing numbers of atoms per molecule. In addition, a detailed description is provided of the Ti:Sapphire based ultrashort pulsed amplified laser system. Both, the principles and the design of the laser system are discussed to serve as a manual for the femtosecond laser system constructed for the study of

  14. Time-resolved imaging of material response during laser-induced bulk damage in SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Negres, R A

    2008-10-24

    We report on time resolved imaging of the dynamic events taking place during laser-induced damage in the bulk of fused silica samples with nanosecond temporal resolution and one micron spatial resolution. These events include: shock/pressure wave formation and propagation, transient absorption, crack propagation and formation of residual stress fields. The work has been performed using a time-resolved microscope system that utilizes a probe pulse to acquire images at delay times covering the entire timeline of a damage event. Image information is enhanced using polarized illumination and simultaneously recording the two orthogonal polarization image components. For the case of fused silica, an electronic excitation is first observed accompanied by the onset of a pressure wave generation and propagation. Cracks are seen to form early in the process and reach their final size at about 25 ns into the damage event. In addition, changes that in part are attributed to transient absorption in the modified material are observed for delays up to about 200 microseconds.

  15. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Resonance-Enhanced CARS of Gaseous Iodine at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Fan, Rong-Wei; Xia, Yuan-Qin; Yu, Xin; Yao, Yong; Chen, De-Ying

    2011-04-01

    Time-resolved resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is applied to investigate molecular dynamics in gaseous iodine. 40 fs laser pulses are applied to create and monitor the high vibrational states of iodine at room temperature (corresponding to a vapor pressure as low as about 35 Pa) by femtosecond time-resolved CARS. Depending on the time delay between the probe pulse and the pump/Stokes pulse pairs, the high vibrational states both on the electronically ground states and the excited states can be detected as oscillations in the CARS transient signal. It is proved that the femtosecond time-resolved CARS technique is a promising candidate for investigating the molecular dynamics of a low concentration system and can be applied to environmental and atmospheric monitoring measurements.

  16. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  17. Apparatus and Techniques for Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction using Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lin, C.; Rod, E.; Bai, L.; Shen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Complementary advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have recently made possible many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. Herein we present key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  18. Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-11-01

    We present a time-resolved study of the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue phantoms. When a laser pulse interacts with a material, optical energy is absorbed by a combination of linear (heat generation and thermoelastic expansion) and nonlinear absorption (expanding plasma), according to both the laser light irradiance and material properties. The objective is to elucidate the contribution of linear and nonlinear optical absorption to bubble formation. Depending on the local temperatures and pressures reached, both interactions may lead to the formation of bubbles. We discuss three experimental approaches: piezoelectric sensors, time-resolved shadowgraphy, and time-resolved interferometry, to follow the formation of bubbles and measure the pressure originated by 6 ns laser pulses interacting with tissue phantoms. We studied the bubble formation and pressure transients for varying linear optical absorption and for radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation. We report a rapid decay (of 2 orders of magnitude) of the laser-induced mechanical pressure measured (by time-resolved shadowgraphy) very close to the irradiation spot and beyond 1 mm from the irradiation site (by the piezoelectric sensor). Through time-resolved interferometry measurements, we determined that bubble formation can occur at marginal temperature increments as low as 3°C.

  19. Chirp Z transform based enhanced frequency resolution for depth resolvable non stationary thermal wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, B.; Subhani, Sk.; Vijayalakshmi, A.; Vardhan, V. H.; Ghali, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel post processing modality to enhance depth resolution in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging using chirp Z transform. It explores the spectral zooming feature of the proposed modality to enhance depth resolution and validates it through the experimentation carried over a carbon fiber reinforced plastic and mild steel specimens. Further, defect detection capability of the proposed modality has been compared with that of the other contemporary modalities by taking the defect signal to noise ratio into consideration.

  20. Chirp Z transform based enhanced frequency resolution for depth resolvable non stationary thermal wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Suresh, B; Subhani, Sk; Vijayalakshmi, A; Vardhan, V H; Ghali, V S

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel post processing modality to enhance depth resolution in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging using chirp Z transform. It explores the spectral zooming feature of the proposed modality to enhance depth resolution and validates it through the experimentation carried over a carbon fiber reinforced plastic and mild steel specimens. Further, defect detection capability of the proposed modality has been compared with that of the other contemporary modalities by taking the defect signal to noise ratio into consideration.

  1. Combined single-pulse holography and time-resolved laser schlieren for flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1981-06-01

    A pulsed ruby laser and continuous-wave argon ion laser were used in a combined setup at the Langley Expansion Tube for single pulse holography and time resolved laser schlieren with a common optical axis. The systems can be operated simultaneously for a single run. For a single frame, the pulsed holographic setup offers the options of shadowgraph, Schlieren, and interferometry from the reconstructed hologram as well as the advantage of post-run sensitivity adjustments. For flow establishment studies the time resolved laser Schlieren provides visualization of the flow field every 12.5 microns for up to 80 frames with an exposure time per frame of 5.4 microns.

  2. Probing ultrafast internal conversion of o-xylene via femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhu; Tang, Bifeng; Shen, Huan; Zhang, Song; Zhang, Bing

    2010-03-15

    The dynamics of excited states in o-xylene molecules has been studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging coupled with time-resolved mass spectroscopy. The ultrafast internal conversion from the S(2) state to the vibrationally hot S(1) state on timescale of 60 fs is observed on real time. The secondarily populated high vibronic S(1) state deactivates further to the S(0) state on timescale of 9.85 ps. Interestingly, the lifetime of the low vibronic S(1) state is much longer, extrapolated to ~12.7 ns. The great differences of lifetime of different vibronic S(1) state are due to their different radiationless dynamics.

  3. Modelling the effect of nuclear motion on the attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectra of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford-Uranga, A.; De Giovannini, U.; Mowbray, D. J.; Kurth, S.; Rubio, A.

    2014-06-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory we examine the energy, angular and time-resolved photoelectron spectra (TRPES) of ethylene in a pump-probe setup. To simulate TRPES we expose ethylene to an ultraviolet femtosecond pump pulse, followed by a time delayed extreme ultraviolet probe pulse. Studying the photoemission spectra as a function of this delay provides us direct access to the dynamic evolution of the molecule’s electronic levels. Further, by including the nuclei’s motion, we provide direct chemical insight into the chemical reactivity of ethylene. These results show how angular and energy resolved TRPES could be used to directly probe electron and nucleus dynamics in molecules.

  4. Monte Carlo algorithm for efficient simulation of time-resolved fluorescence in layered turbid media.

    PubMed

    Liebert, A; Wabnitz, H; Zołek, N; Macdonald, R

    2008-08-18

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm for simulation of time-resolved fluorescence in a layered turbid medium. It is based on the propagation of excitation and fluorescence photon bundles and the assumption of equal reduced scattering coefficients at the excitation and emission wavelengths. In addition to distributions of times of arrival of fluorescence photons at the detector, 3-D spatial generation probabilities were calculated. The algorithm was validated by comparison with the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for time-resolved fluorescence from a homogeneous semi-infinite turbid medium. It was applied to a two-layered model mimicking intra- and extracerebral compartments of the adult human head.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zenesini, A; Lignier, H; Tayebirad, G; Radogostowicz, J; Ciampini, D; Mannella, R; Wimberger, S; Morsch, O; Arimondo, E

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  6. Time-Resolved Measurement of Landau-Zener Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Radogostowicz, J.; Ciampini, D.; Mannella, R.; Arimondo, E.; Lignier, H.; Morsch, O.; Tayebirad, G.; Wimberger, S.

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  7. Temperature-Induced Electronic Structure Evolution of ZrTe5 Revealed by High resolution & Laser Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chenlu; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Genfu; Yu, Li; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The transition metal pentatellurides ZrTe5 have attracted consideration attention since the 70s, due to the unusual transport properties like resistivity peak at ~140K and the sign change of the Hall coefficient and thermopower. The origin of the most peculiar resistivity peak remains controversial. In this talk we will present high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) study on the Fermi surface and band structure of ZrTe5, by using our high resolution ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. Upon cooling down, we found a gradual transition from hole-like band into electron-like band around the Brillouin zone center. Such an electron state transition forms the underlying physics for the abnormal transport properties. We will also comment on the possibility of a Dirac semimetal in ZrTe5.

  8. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  9. Experimental results on time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography with fast-gated SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    We present experimental results of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) and show an increased imaged depth range for a given acquisition time compared to the non gated mode.

  10. Fiber-coupled high-speed asynchronous optical sampling with sub-50 fs time resolution.

    PubMed

    Krauss, N; Nast, A; Heinecke, D C; Kölbl, C; Barros, H G; Dekorsy, T

    2015-02-09

    We present a fiber-coupled pump-probe system with a sub-50 fs time resolution and a nanosecond time window, based on high-speed asynchronous optical sampling. By use of a transmission grism pulse compressor, we achieve pump pulses with a pulse duration of 42 fs, an average power of 300 mW and a peak power exceeding 5 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 1 GHz after 6 m of optical fiber. With this system we demonstrate thickness mapping of soft X-ray mirrors at a sub-nm thickness resolution on a cm(2) scan area. In addition, terahertz field generation with resolved spectral components of up to 3.5 THz at a GHz frequency resolution is demonstrated.

  11. Limitation of Time-of-Flight Resolution in the Ultra High Mass Range

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeonghoon

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have examined the reason for the deterioration of resolution and mass accuracy of time-of-flight mass analyzers with increasing mass after the expansion induced kinetic energy has been eliminated by collisional cooling in an ion guide. Theoretically, removing the expansion–induced kinetic energy by collisional cooling permits the ions to travel along the ion guide axes without significant deviation so that they can be injected into the analyzer in a well-collimated ion beam with well-defined kinetic energy. If the ions can be injected into an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass analyzer (oa-TOF) in this manner, high resolution mass analysis can be obtained regardless of mass or m/z. Unfortunately, high resolution did not result. It is our contention that the effusive expansion out of the first ion guide yields dispersive axial ejection that reduces TOF resolving power with increasing mass not m/z. PMID:21728303

  12. Time resolved ion energy distribution functions of non-reactive and reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Katharina; Breilmann, Wolfgang; Maszl, Christian; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a technique for thin film deposition and can be operated in reactive and non-reactive mode. The growth rate of HiPIMS in non-reactive mode reduces to 30% compared to direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS) at same average power. However, the quality of the coatings produced with HiPIMS is excellent which makes these plasmas highly appealing. In reactive mode target poisoning is occurring which changes the plasma dynamics. An advantage of reactive HiPIMS is that it can be operated hysteresis-free which can result in a higher growth rate compared to dcMS. In this work thin films are deposited by a HiPIMS plasma which is generated by short pulses of 100 μs with high power densities in the range of 1 kW/cm2. Ar and Ar/N2 admixtures are used as a working gas to sputter a 2'' titanium target. The particle transport is analysed with time resolved ion energy distribution functions which are measured by a mass spectrometer with a temporal resolution of 2 μs. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy is executed to investigate the particle dynamics of different species. The time and energy resolved particle fluxes in non-reactive and reactive mode are compared and implications on the sputter process are discussed.

  13. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  14. Time-resolved 3D contrast-enhanced MRA of an extended FOV using continuous table motion.

    PubMed

    Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Kruger, David G; Riederer, Stephen J; Glockner, James F; Hu, Houchun H

    2004-03-01

    A method is presented for acquiring 3D time-resolved MR images of an extended (>100 cm) longitudinal field of view (FOV), as used for peripheral MR angiographic runoff studies. Previous techniques for long-FOV peripheral MRA have generally provided a single image (i.e., with no time resolution). The technique presented here generates a time series of 3D images of the FOV that lies within the homogeneous volume of the magnet. This is achieved by differential sampling of 3D k-space during continuous motion of the patient table. Each point in the object is interrogated in five consecutive 3D image sets generated at 2.5-s intervals. The method was tested experimentally in eight human subjects, and the leading edge of the bolus was observed in real time and maintained within the imaging FOV. The data revealed differential bolus velocities along the vasculature of the legs.

  15. High time resolved electron temperature measurements by using the multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Yasuhara, Ryo; Ohta, Koichi; Chikatsu, Masayuki; Shima, Yoriko; Kohagura, Junko; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakashima, Yousuke; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ichimura, Makoto; Yamada, Ichihiro; Funaba, Hisamichi; Minami, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    High time resolved electron temperature measurements are useful for fluctuation study. A multi-pass Thomson scattering (MPTS) system is proposed for the improvement of both increasing the TS signal intensity and time resolution. The MPTS system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been constructed for enhancing the Thomson scattered signals for the improvement of measurement accuracy. The MPTS system has a polarization-based configuration with an image relaying system. We optimized the image relaying optics for improving the multi-pass laser confinement and obtaining the stable MPTS signals over ten passing TS signals. The integrated MPTS signals increased about five times larger than that in the single pass system. Finally, time dependent electron temperatures were obtained in MHz sampling.

  16. High time-resolved measurements of organic air toxics in different source regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logue, J. M.; Huff-Hartz, K. E.; Lambe, A. T.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    High time-resolved (HTR) measurements can provide significant insight into sources and exposures of air pollution. In this study, an automated instrument was developed and deployed to measure hourly concentrations of 18 gas-phase organic air toxics and 6 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three sites in and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The sites represent different source regimes: a site with substantial mobile-source emissions; a residential site adjacent to a heavily industrialized zone; and an urban background site. Despite the close proximity of the sites (less than 13 km apart), the temporal characteristic of outdoor concentrations varied widely. Most of the compounds measured were characterized by short periods of elevated concentrations or plume events, but the duration, magnitude and composition of these events varied from site to site. The HTR data underscored the strong role of emissions from local sources on exposure to most air toxics. Plume events contributed more than 50% of the study average concentrations for all pollutants except chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Wind directional dependence of air toxic concentrations revealed that emissions from large industrial facilities affected concentrations at all of the sites. Diurnal patterns and weekend/weekday variations indicated the effects of the mixing layer, point source emissions patterns, and mobile source air toxics (MSATs) on concentrations. Concentrations of many air toxics were temporally correlated, especially MSATs, indicating that they are likely co-emitted. It was also shown that correlations of the HTR data were greater than lower time resolution data (24-h measurements). This difference was most pronounced for the chlorinated pollutants. The stronger correlations in HTR measurements underscore their value for source apportionment studies.

  17. Overpressure wave interaction with droplets: time resolved measurements by laser shadowscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Pierre; Aprin, Laurent; Heymes, Frédéric; Munier, Laurent; Lapébie, Emmanuel; Dusserre, Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Risk sciences involve increasingly optics applications to perform accurate analysis of critical behavior such as failures, explosions, fires. In this particular context, different area sizes are investigated under high temporal sampling rate up to 10000fps. With the improvement of light sources and optical sensors, it is now possible to cope with high spatial resolution even for time resolved measurement. The paper deals with the study of the interaction between overpressure waves, occurring in case of explosion for example, with a liquid droplet present in the vicinity of the overpressure wave. This is a typical scenario encountered in case of industrial breakdown including liquid leakage and explosions. We designed an experimental setup for the evaluation of the interaction between the overpressure wave and falling liquid droplets. A gas chamber is filled with nitrogen until breakage of the outlet rupture disk at about 4 bar. The droplets fall is controlled by an automatic syringe injector placed in the overpressure wave. The imaging system is based on laser shadowscopy. The laser source is a double cavity 15mJ- 1000Hz Nd YLF laser emitting double pulses of about 10ns at 527nm. To record the double pulse after crossing the falling droplets, the transmitted light is captured by a lasersynchronized double frame camera. Since these measurements are time-synchronized, it is then possible to know accurately the different parameters of the phenomenon, such as overpressure wave velocity, droplets diameter, and Reynolds number. Different experiments have been carried out at about 4000 doubleframe/s. The paper presents the whole experiment, the enhancements of the setup and the results for different liquid products from water to acetone.

  18. 20 CFR 670.991 - How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion? 670.991 Section 670.991 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... resolved in a timely fashion? (a) If a complaint is not resolved by the center operator or service...

  19. 20 CFR 670.991 - How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion? 670.991 Section 670.991 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... resolved in a timely fashion? (a) If a complaint is not resolved by the center operator or service...

  20. 20 CFR 670.991 - How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does Job Corps ensure that complaints or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion? 670.991 Section 670.991 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... or disputes are resolved in a timely fashion? (a) If a complaint is not resolved by the...

  1. The kinetic dose limit in room-temperature time-resolved macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M.; Šrajer, V.; Purwar, N.; Tripathi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein X-ray structures are determined with ionizing radiation that damages the protein at high X-ray doses. As a result, diffraction patterns deteriorate with the increased absorbed dose. Several strategies such as sample freezing or scavenging of X-ray-generated free radicals are currently employed to minimize this damage. However, little is known about how the absorbed X-ray dose affects time-resolved Laue data collected at physiological temperatures where the protein is fully functional in the crystal, and how the kinetic analysis of such data depends on the absorbed dose. Here, direct evidence for the impact of radiation damage on the function of a protein is presented using time-resolved macromolecular crystallography. The effect of radiation damage on the kinetic analysis of time-resolved X-ray data is also explored. PMID:22338689

  2. Solving the Structure of Reaction Intermediates by Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Hanson, J; Frenkel, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a robust data analysis method of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments suitable for chemical speciation and structure determination of reaction intermediates. Chemical speciation is done by principal component analysis (PCA) of the time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge structure data. Structural analysis of intermediate phases is done by theoretical modeling of their extended x-ray absorption fine-structure data isolated by PCA. The method is demonstrated using reduction and reoxidation of Cu-doped ceria catalysts where we detected reaction intermediates and measured fine details of the reaction kinetics. This approach can be directly adapted to many time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy experiments where new rapid throughput data collection and analysis methods are needed.

  3. A high-resolution time-to-digital converter using a three-level resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Asma; Saneei, Mohsen; Mahani, Ali

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a three-level resolution Vernier delay line time-to-digital converter (TDC) was proposed. The proposed TDC core was based on the pseudo-differential digital architecture that made it insensitive to nMOS and pMOS transistor mismatches. It also employed a Vernier delay line (VDL) in conjunction with an asynchronous read-out circuitry. The time interval resolution was equal to the difference of delay between buffers of upper and lower chains. Then, via the extra chain included in the lower delay line, resolution was controlled and power consumption was reduced. This method led to high resolution and low power consumption. The measurement results of TDC showed a resolution of 4.5 ps, 12-bit output dynamic range, and integral nonlinearity of 1.5 least significant bits. This TDC achieved the consumption of 68.43 µW from 1.1-V supply.

  4. Mapping atomic motions with ultrabright electrons: towards fundamental limits in space-time resolution.

    PubMed

    Manz, Stephanie; Casandruc, Albert; Zhang, Dongfang; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf A; Marx, Alexander; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Liu, Lai Chung; Bayesteh, Shima; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Hoffmann, Matthias; Felber, Matthias; Hachmann, Max; Mayet, Frank; Hirscht, Julian; Keskin, Sercan; Hada, Masaki; Epp, Sascha W; Flöttmann, Klaus; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The long held objective of directly observing atomic motions during the defining moments of chemistry has been achieved based on ultrabright electron sources that have given rise to a new field of atomically resolved structural dynamics. This class of experiments requires not only simultaneous sub-atomic spatial resolution with temporal resolution on the 100 femtosecond time scale but also has brightness requirements approaching single shot atomic resolution conditions. The brightness condition is in recognition that chemistry leads generally to irreversible changes in structure during the experimental conditions and that the nanoscale thin samples needed for electron structural probes pose upper limits to the available sample or "film" for atomic movies. Even in the case of reversible systems, the degree of excitation and thermal effects require the brightest sources possible for a given space-time resolution to observe the structural changes above background. Further progress in the field, particularly to the study of biological systems and solution reaction chemistry, requires increased brightness and spatial coherence, as well as an ability to tune the electron scattering cross-section to meet sample constraints. The electron bunch density or intensity depends directly on the magnitude of the extraction field for photoemitted electron sources and electron energy distribution in the transverse and longitudinal planes of electron propagation. This work examines the fundamental limits to optimizing these parameters based on relativistic electron sources using re-bunching cavity concepts that are now capable of achieving 10 femtosecond time scale resolution to capture the fastest nuclear motions. This analysis is given for both diffraction and real space imaging of structural dynamics in which there are several orders of magnitude higher space-time resolution with diffraction methods. The first experimental results from the Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic

  5. Accelerating calculations of ultrafast time-resolved electronic spectra with efficient quantum dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Marius; Sulc, Miroslav; Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    We explore three specific approaches for speeding up the calculation of quantum time correlation functions needed for time-resolved electronic spectra. The first relies on finding a minimum set of sufficiently accurate electronic surfaces. The second increases the time step required for convergence of exact quantum simulations by using different split-step algorithms to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The third approach lowers the number of trajectories needed for convergence of approximate semiclassical dynamics methods.

  6. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  7. Time-resolved X-ray PIV technique for diagnosing opaque biofluid flow with insufficient X-ray fluxes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    X-ray imaging is used to visualize the biofluid flow phenomena in a nondestructive manner. A technique currently used for quantitative visualization is X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although this technique provides a high spatial resolution (less than 10 µm), significant hemodynamic parameters are difficult to obtain under actual physiological conditions because of the limited temporal resolution of the technique, which in turn is due to the relatively long exposure time (~10 ms) involved in X-ray imaging. This study combines an image intensifier with a high-speed camera to reduce exposure time, thereby improving temporal resolution. The image intensifier amplifies light flux by emitting secondary electrons in the micro-channel plate. The increased incident light flux greatly reduces the exposure time (below 200 µs). The proposed X-ray PIV system was applied to high-speed blood flows in a tube, and the velocity field information was successfully obtained. The time-resolved X-ray PIV system can be employed to investigate blood flows at beamlines with insufficient X-ray fluxes under specific physiological conditions. This method facilitates understanding of the basic hemodynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. TRIASSIC: the Time-Resolved Industrial Alpha-Source Scanning Induced Current microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Arthur

    Time-resolved ion beam induced current (TRIBIC) microscopy yields useful information such as carrier mobility and lifetimes in semiconductors and defect locations in devices; however, traditional TRIBIC uses large, expensive particle accelerators that require specialized training to operate and maintain. The time-resolved industrial alpha-source scanning induced current (TRIASSIC) microscope transforms TRIBIC by replacing the particle accelerator facility with an affordable, tabletop instrument suitable for use in research and education at smaller colleges and universities. I will discuss the development of, successes with, setbacks to and future directions for TRIASSIC.

  9. A time-resolved infrared vibrational spectroscopic study of the photo-dynamics of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Towrie, Mike; Parker, Anthony W; Ronayne, Kate L; Bowes, Katharine F; Cole, Jacqueline M; Raithby, Paul R; Warren, John E

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared vibrational spectroscopy is a structurally sensitive probe of the excited-state properties of matter. The technique has found many applications in the study of molecules in dilute solution phase but has rarely been applied to crystalline samples. We report on the use of a sensitive pump-probe time-resolved infrared spectrometer and sample handling techniques for studies of the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of crystalline materials. The charge transfer excited states of crystalline metal carbonyls and the proton transfer of dihydroxyquinones are presented and compared with the solution phase.

  10. Spectroscopic Analysis of Time-Resolved Emission from Shocked Explosive Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey; Jilek, Brook; Wixom, Ryan; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander; Damm, David

    2015-06-01

    We report a series of time-resolved spectroscopic measurements that aim to characterize the reactions that occur during shock initiation of high explosives. The experiments employ time- and wavelength-resolved emission spectroscopy to analyze light emitted from shocked and detonating thin explosive films. In this talk we present analysis of optical emission spectra from hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB), hexanitrostilbene (HNS), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) samples. The emission features observed in the spectra are assigned to electronic transitions of molecular fragments, and the implications of these findings on our understanding of the underlying reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Standoff Time-Resolved Laser-Based Spectroscopy Tools for Sample Characterization and Biosignature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, P. J.; Acosta-Maeda, T.; Lucey, P. G.; Misra, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Taylor, J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Mars2020 rover will be searching for signs of past habitability and past life on Mars. Additionally, the rover mission will prepare a cache of highly significant samples for a future sample return mission. NASA requires these samples to be well characterized; the instruments on the rover must be capable of fine-scale in situ mineralogical or elemental analysis with emphasis on biosignature detection or characterization. We have been developing multiple standoff laser-based instruments at the University of Hawaii, Manoa that are capable of fine-scale in situ chemical analysis and biosignatures detection. By employing a time-resolved spectroscopy, we can perform elemental analysis with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), mineral and organic analysis with Raman spectroscopy, and biosignature detection with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Each of these techniques share the same optics and detection equipment, allowing us to integrate them into a single, compact instrument. High time-resolution (~100 ns/pulse) is the key to this instrument; with it, the detector only records data when the signal is the brightest. Spectra can be taken during the day, LIBS can be measured without a plasma light background, and the Raman signal can be separated from the mineral fluorescence signal. Since bio-organics have very short fluorescence lifetimes, the new instrument can be used to unambiguously detect bio-organics. The prototype uses a low power (0.5 mJ/pulse) 532 nm laser with a detection limit of < 30 ppm of organics in a sample of Antarctica Dry Valley soil measured from 8 m. Another LIF instrument under development in our lab, called the Biofinder, takes advantage of the extremely intense fluorescence signal produced by organics by using a wide laser spot and a camera to produce LIF images of wide area (25 cm area from 2 m distance with 2 mm/pixel resolution). The Biofinder can quickly assess the area around the rover (at 10 frames/s) by imaging sample

  12. Time-resolved and spatially-resolved infrared spectroscopic observation of seeded nucleation controlling geopolymer gel formation.

    PubMed

    Hajimohammadi, Ailar; Provis, John L; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2011-05-15

    The effect of seeded nucleation on the formation and structural evolution of one-part ("just add water") geopolymer gels is investigated. Gel-forming systems are seeded with each of three different oxide nanoparticles, and seeding is shown to have an important role in controlling the silica release rate from the solid geothermal silica precursor, and in the development of physical properties of the gels. Nucleation accelerates the chemical changes taking place during geopolymer formation. The nature of the seeds affects the structure of the growing gel by affecting the extent of phase separation, identified by the presence of a distinct silica-rich gel in addition to the main, more alumina-rich gel phase. Synchrotron radiation-based infrared microscopy (SR-FTIR) shows the effect of nucleation on the heterogeneous nanostructure and microstructure of geopolymer gels, and is combined with data obtained by time-resolved FTIR analysis to provide a more holistic view of the reaction processes at a level of detail that has not previously been available. While spatially averaged (ATR-FTIR) infrared results show similar spectra for seeded and unseeded samples which have been cured for more than 3 weeks, SR-FTIR results show marked differences in gel structure as a result of seeding.

  13. High resolution-angle resolved photoemission studies of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Lynch, D.W.; Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P.; Arko, A.J.; List, R.S.; Argonne National Lab., IL; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-08-01

    Recent photoemission studies of Y 123 and Bi 2212 performed with high energy and angular resolution have provided detailed information on the nature of the states near the Fermi level. Measurements of the superconducting gap, band dispersion, and the density of states near the Fermi level in the normal state all support a Fermi liquid description of these materials. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of oil spill detected by ocean lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-long; Chen, Yong-hua; Li, Jie; Jiang, Jingbo; Ni, Zuotao; Liu, Zhi-shen

    2016-10-01

    Based on time-resolved fluorescence of oils, an oceanographic fluorescence Lidar was designed to identify oil pollutions. A third harmonic (at 355nm) of Nd:YAG laser is used as the excitation source, and the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of oil fluorescence at wavelength from 380 nm to 580 nm are measured by an intensified CCD (ICCD). In the experiments, time-resolved fluorescence spectra of 20 oil samples, including crude oils, fuel oils, lubricating oil, diesel oils and gasoline, are analyzed to discuss fluorescence spectral characteristics of samples for oil classification. The spectral characteristics of oil fluorescence obtained by ICCD with delay time of 2 ns, 4 ns, and 6 ns were studied by using the principal component analysis (PCA) method. Moreover, an efficient method is used to improve the recognition rate of the oil spill types, through enlarging spectral differences of oil fluorescence at different delay times. Experimental analysis shows that the optimization method can discriminate between crude oil and fuel oil, and a more accurate classification of oils is obtained by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As the result, comparing to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy, a higher recognition rate of oil spill types is achieved by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy which is also a feasibility technology for Ocean Lidar.

  15. Watching a protein as it functions with 150-ps time-resolved x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Schotte, Friedrich; Lim, Manho; Jackson, Timothy A; Smirnov, Aleksandr V; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Phillips, George N; Wulff, Michael; Anfinrud, Philip A

    2003-06-20

    We report picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction from the myoglobin (Mb) mutant in which Leu29 is replaced by Phe (L29Fmutant). The frame-by-frame structural evolution, resolved to 1.8 angstroms, allows one to literally "watch" the protein as it executes its function. Time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy of flash-photolyzed L29F MbCO revealed a short-lived CO intermediate whose 140-ps lifetime is shorter than that found in wild-type protein by a factor of 1000. The electron density maps of the protein unveil transient conformational changes far more dramatic than the structural differences between the carboxy and deoxy states and depict the correlated side-chain motion responsible for rapidly sweeping CO away from its primary docking site.

  16. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  17. Proton radiography and proton computed tomography based on time-resolved dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Mauro; Verburg, Joost M.; Rose, Mark; Min, Chul Hee; Tang, Shikui; Hassane Bentefour, El; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2013-11-01

    We present a proof of principle study of proton radiography and proton computed tomography (pCT) based on time-resolved dose measurements. We used a prototype, two-dimensional, diode-array detector capable of fast dose rate measurements, to acquire proton radiographic images expressed directly in water equivalent path length (WEPL). The technique is based on the time dependence of the dose distribution delivered by a proton beam traversing a range modulator wheel in passive scattering proton therapy systems. The dose rate produced in the medium by such a system is periodic and has a unique pattern in time at each point along the beam path and thus encodes the WEPL. By measuring the time dose pattern at the point of interest, the WEPL to this point can be decoded. If one measures the time-dose patterns at points on a plane behind the patient for a beam with sufficient energy to penetrate the patient, the obtained 2D distribution of the WEPL forms an image. The technique requires only a 2D dosimeter array and it uses only the clinical beam for a fraction of second with negligible dose to patient. We first evaluated the accuracy of the technique in determining the WEPL for static phantoms aiming at beam range verification of the brain fields of medulloblastoma patients. Accurate beam ranges for these fields can significantly reduce the dose to the cranial skin of the patient and thus the risk of permanent alopecia. Second, we investigated the potential features of the technique for real-time imaging of a moving phantom. Real-time tumor tracking by proton radiography could provide more accurate validations of tumor motion models due to the more sensitive dependence of proton beam on tissue density compared to x-rays. Our radiographic technique is rapid (˜100 ms) and simultaneous over the whole field, it can image mobile tumors without the problem of interplay effect inherently challenging for methods based on pencil beams. Third, we present the reconstructed p

  18. Recipes for high resolution time-of-flight detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anz, S.J. |; Felter, T.E.; Hess, B.V.; Daley, R.S.; Roberts, M.L.; Williams, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics, construction, implementation and benefits of a time-of-flight (TOF) detector with count rates an order of magnitude higher and resolution three to four times better than that obtainable with a surface barrier detector. The propose use of design criteria for a time-of-flight detector is outlined, and the determination of a TOF detector`s total relative timing error and how this value determines the mass resolution are illustrated using a graphical analysis. They present simulation and experimental examples employing light ions and discuss advantages and pitfalls of medium-energy heavy ion TOF spectrometry.

  19. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  20. Time-resolved imaging of bulk a-SiO2 upon various ultrashort excitation sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermillod-Blondin, A.; Mauclair, C.; Rosenfeld, A.; Bonse, J.; Stoian, R.; Audouard, E.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort pulses lasers are tools of choice for functionalizing the bulk of transparent materials. In particular, direct photoinscription of simple photonic functions have been demonstrated. Those elementary functions rely on the local refractive index change induced when focusing an ultrashort pulse in the volume of a transparent material. The range of possibilities offered by direct photoinscription is still under investigation. To help understanding, optimizing and assessing the full potential of this method, we developed a time-resolved phase contrast microscopy setup. The imaginary part (absorption) and the real part of the laser-induced complex refractive index can be visualized in the irradiated region. The setup is based on a commercially available phase contrast microscope extended into a pump-probe scheme. The originality of our approach is that the illumination is performed by using a pulsed laser source (i.e. a probe beam). Speckle-related issues are solved by employing adequate sets of diffusers. This laser-microscopy technique has a spatial resolution of 650 nm, and the impulse response is about 300 fs. The laser-induced refractive index changes can be tracked up to milliseconds after the energy deposition. The excitation beam (the pump) is focused with a microscope objective (numerical aperture of 0.45) into the bulk of an a-SiO2 sample. The pump beam can be temporally shaped with a SLM-based pulse shaping unit. This additional degree of flexibility allows for observing different interaction regimes. For instance, bulk material processing with femtosecond and picosecond duration pulses will be studied.

  1. In Vivo Time-Resolved Microtomography Reveals the Mechanics of the Blowfly Flight Motor

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Doube, Michael; Stampanoni, Marco; Krapp, Holger G.; Taylor, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Dipteran flies are amongst the smallest and most agile of flying animals. Their wings are driven indirectly by large power muscles, which cause cyclical deformations of the thorax that are amplified through the intricate wing hinge. Asymmetric flight manoeuvres are controlled by 13 pairs of steering muscles acting directly on the wing articulations. Collectively the steering muscles account for <3% of total flight muscle mass, raising the question of how they can modulate the vastly greater output of the power muscles during manoeuvres. Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based study performing micrometre-resolution, time-resolved microtomography on the 145 Hz wingbeat of blowflies. These data represent the first four-dimensional visualizations of an organism's internal movements on sub-millisecond and micrometre scales. This technique allows us to visualize and measure the three-dimensional movements of five of the largest steering muscles, and to place these in the context of the deforming thoracic mechanism that the muscles actuate. Our visualizations show that the steering muscles operate through a diverse range of nonlinear mechanisms, revealing several unexpected features that could not have been identified using any other technique. The tendons of some steering muscles buckle on every wingbeat to accommodate high amplitude movements of the wing hinge. Other steering muscles absorb kinetic energy from an oscillating control linkage, which rotates at low wingbeat amplitude but translates at high wingbeat amplitude. Kinetic energy is distributed differently in these two modes of oscillation, which may play a role in asymmetric power management during flight control. Structural flexibility is known to be important to the aerodynamic efficiency of insect wings, and to the function of their indirect power muscles. We show that it is integral also to the operation of the steering muscles, and so to the functional flexibility of the insect flight motor

  2. Time-Resolved Emission Spectra Of Tryptophan And Proteins From Frequency-Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmacineki, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1988-06-01

    We report measurements of time-resolved emission spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, residues 1-24), and of S. Nuclease. These spectra were calculated from the frequency-response of the emission, measured at several wavelengths across the emission spectra. Measurements were performed on samples not quenched and quenched by acrylamide, the latter providing additional information on the short time events. The time-resolved center-of-gravity does not decay as a single exponential. At least two spectral relaxation times are needed to account for the present data. NATA and ACTH each display relaxation times near 50 and 800 ps, which may be characteristic of exposed tryptophan residues. S. nuclease displayed slower relaxation times near 0.5 and 10 ns, which probably reflect the dynamic protein matrix which surrounds the residue.

  3. Proton radiography and proton computed tomography based on time-resolved dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Testa, Mauro; Verburg, Joost M; Rose, Mark; Min, Chul Hee; Tang, Shikui; Bentefour, El Hassane; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2013-11-21

    We present a proof of principle study of proton radiography and proton computed tomography (pCT) based on time-resolved dose measurements. We used a prototype, two-dimensional, diode-array detector capable of fast dose rate measurements, to acquire proton radiographic images expressed directly in water equivalent path length (WEPL). The technique is based on the time dependence of the dose distribution delivered by a proton beam traversing a range modulator wheel in passive scattering proton therapy systems. The dose rate produced in the medium by such a system is periodic and has a unique pattern in time at each point along the beam path and thus encodes the WEPL. By measuring the time dose pattern at the point of interest, the WEPL to this point can be decoded. If one measures the time–dose patterns at points on a plane behind the patient for a beam with sufficient energy to penetrate the patient, the obtained 2D distribution of the WEPL forms an image. The technique requires only a 2D dosimeter array and it uses only the clinical beam for a fraction of second with negligible dose to patient. We first evaluated the accuracy of the technique in determining the WEPL for static phantoms aiming at beam range verification of the brain fields of medulloblastoma patients. Accurate beam ranges for these fields can significantly reduce the dose to the cranial skin of the patient and thus the risk of permanent alopecia. Second, we investigated the potential features of the technique for real-time imaging of a moving phantom. Real-time tumor tracking by proton radiography could provide more accurate validations of tumor motion models due to the more sensitive dependence of proton beam on tissue density compared to x-rays. Our radiographic technique is rapid (~100 ms) and simultaneous over the whole field, it can image mobile tumors without the problem of interplay effect inherently challenging for methods based on pencil beams. Third, we present the reconstructed p

  4. Femtosecond time-resolved XUV + UV photoelectron imaging of pure helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Bacellar, Camila; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Liquid helium nanodroplets, consisting of on average 2 × 106 atoms, are examined using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. The droplets are excited by an extreme ultraviolet light pulse centered at 23.7 eV photon energy, leading to states within a band that is associated with the 1s3p and 1s4p Rydberg levels of free helium atoms. The initially excited states and subsequent relaxation dynamics are probed by photoionizing transient species with a 3.2 eV pulse and using velocity map imaging to measure time-dependent photoelectron kinetic energy distributions. Significant differences are seen compared to previous studies with a lower energy (1.6 eV) probe pulse. Three distinct time-dependent signals are analyzed by global fitting. A broad intense signal, centered at an electron kinetic energy (eKE) of 2.3 eV, grows in faster than the experimental time resolution and decays in ˜100 fs. This feature is attributed to the initially excited droplet state. A second broad transient feature, with eKE ranging from 0.5 to 4 eV, appears at a rate similar to the decay of the initially excited state and is attributed to rapid atomic reconfiguration resulting in Franck-Condon overlap with a broader range of cation geometries, possibly involving formation of a Rydberg-excited (Hen)* core within the droplet. An additional relaxation pathway leads to another short-lived feature with vertical binding energies ≳2.4 eV, which is identified as a transient population within the lower-lying 1s2p Rydberg band. Ionization at 3.2 eV shows an enhanced contribution from electronically excited droplet states compared to ejected Rydberg atoms, which dominate at 1.6 eV. This is possibly the result of increased photoelectron generation from the bulk of the droplet by the more energetic probe photons.

  5. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  6. Latent fingerprint and trace explosives detection by photoluminescence and time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldin, Kimberly Kay

    Latent fingerprint detection by photoluminescence is a well-developed field. Many development techniques exist and are currently being employed in forensic laboratories to detect fingerprints by making them luminescent. However, in forensic science, time-resolved imaging techniques, designed to suppress background fluorescence that interferes with fingerprint detectability, are to date not used outside of the research laboratory, and the chemistry necessary to use time-resolved imaging for fingerprint detection is somewhat limited. For this reason, the first section of this dissertation deals with fingerprint detection methods that have direct application to time-resolved imaging techniques. Trace explosive detection field methods based on chemical reactions have until recently utilized only colorimetric products. To increase the sensitivity of such detection, a field explosive test kit which produces a product that is both colorimetric and luminescent is studied. Detection sensitivity can be gained by taking advantage of the luminescence of these products, something that has not been done to date. When the appropriate chemistry is chosen for explosive detection, time-resolved imaging techniques may again be applicable. This dissertation thus looks at possibilities of taking trace explosives detection to this next level.

  7. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  8. Two-dimensional time resolved measurements of toroidal velocity correlated with density blobs in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Podesta, M.

    2008-08-15

    A new method for toroidal velocity measurements with Mach probes is presented. This technique is based on the conditional sampling technique, the triggering events being density blobs. A reconstruction of the time resolved two-dimensional profile of electron density, electron temperature, plasma potential, and toroidal velocity is possible with a single point measurement on a shot-to-shot basis.

  9. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  10. Distortion dependent intersystem crossing: A femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene

    PubMed Central

    Stephansen, Anne B.; Sølling, Theis I.

    2017-01-01

    The competition between ultrafast intersystem crossing and internal conversion in benzene, toluene, and p-xylene is investigated with time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By exciting to S2 out-of-plane symmetry breaking, distortions are activated at early times whereupon spin-forbidden intersystem crossing becomes (partly) allowed. Natural bond orbital analysis suggests that the pinnacle carbon atoms distorting from the aromatic plane change hybridization between the planar Franck-Condon geometry and the deformed (boat-shaped) S2 equilibrium geometry. The effect is observed to increase in the presence of methyl-groups on the pinnacle carbon-atoms, where largest extents of σ and π orbital-mixing are observed. This is fully consistent with the time-resolved spectroscopy data: Toluene and p-xylene show evidence for ultrafast triplet formation competing with internal conversion, while benzene appears to only decay via internal conversion within the singlet manifold. For toluene and p-xylene, internal conversion to S1 and intersystem crossing to T3 occur within the time-resolution of our instrument. The receiver triplet state (T3) is found to undergo internal conversion in the triplet manifold within ≈100–150 fs (toluene) or ≈180–200 fs (p-xylene) as demonstrated by matching rise and decay components of upper and lower triplet states. Overall, the effect of methylation is found to both increase the intersystem crossing probability and direct the molecular axis of the excited state dynamics. PMID:28345010

  11. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adámek, P.; Olejníček, J.; Hubička, Z.; Čada, M.; Kment, Š.; Kohout, M.; Do, H. T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the development and construction of an apparatus for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) for the diagnostics of pulsed plasma. A detailed description of the extension of a progressive method of laser absorption spectroscopy in continuous regime to a direct triggering method of the time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy (TR-LAS) is presented. The main advantage of the developed method is its capability to measure the time evolution of the whole absorption profile with a preset time resolution, which can be less than 1 μs. Therefore, the presented method of repetitive sampling applied on LAS in plasma processes is capable of simultaneous measurement of the density and kinetic temperature of selected particles. Its appropriate applications are to periodical processes in technological plasma, namely pulsed plasma discharges. The developed method of TR-LAS was applied to measurements of the temporal evolution of density and kinetic temperature of argon metastable species during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium and titanium dioxide thin films.

  12. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Hubička, Z; Čada, M; Kment, Š; Kohout, M; Do, H T

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the development and construction of an apparatus for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) for the diagnostics of pulsed plasma. A detailed description of the extension of a progressive method of laser absorption spectroscopy in continuous regime to a direct triggering method of the time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy (TR-LAS) is presented. The main advantage of the developed method is its capability to measure the time evolution of the whole absorption profile with a preset time resolution, which can be less than 1 μs. Therefore, the presented method of repetitive sampling applied on LAS in plasma processes is capable of simultaneous measurement of the density and kinetic temperature of selected particles. Its appropriate applications are to periodical processes in technological plasma, namely pulsed plasma discharges. The developed method of TR-LAS was applied to measurements of the temporal evolution of density and kinetic temperature of argon metastable species during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium and titanium dioxide thin films.

  13. Time resolution of the plastic scintillator strips with matrix photomultiplier readout for J-PET tomograph.

    PubMed

    Moskal, P; Rundel, O; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Giergiel, K; Gorgol, M; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Sharma, N G; Słomski, A; Silarski, M; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Witkowski, P; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2016-03-07

    Recent tests of a single module of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomography system (J-PET) consisting of 30 cm long plastic scintillator strips have proven its applicability for the detection of annihilation quanta (0.511 MeV) with a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of 0.266 ns. The achieved resolution is almost by a factor of two better with respect to the current TOF-PET detectors and it can still be improved since, as it is shown in this article, the intrinsic limit of time resolution for the determination of time of the interaction of 0.511 MeV gamma quanta in plastic scintillators is much lower. As the major point of the article, a method allowing to record timestamps of several photons, at two ends of the scintillator strip, by means of matrix of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is introduced. As a result of simulations, conducted with the number of SiPM varying from 4 to 42, it is shown that the improvement of timing resolution saturates with the growing number of photomultipliers, and that the [Formula: see text] configuration at two ends allowing to read twenty timestamps, constitutes an optimal solution. The conducted simulations accounted for the emission time distribution, photon transport and absorption inside the scintillator, as well as quantum efficiency and transit time spread of photosensors, and were checked based on the experimental results. Application of the [Formula: see text] matrix of SiPM allows for achieving the coincidence resolving time in positron emission tomography of [Formula: see text]0.170 ns for 15 cm axial field-of-view (AFOV) and [Formula: see text]0.365 ns for 100 cm AFOV. The results open perspectives for construction of a cost-effective TOF-PET scanner with significantly better TOF resolution and larger AFOV with respect to the current TOF-PET modalities.

  14. Time resolution of the plastic scintillator strips with matrix photomultiplier readout for J-PET tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, P.; Rundel, O.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Gajos, A.; Giergiel, K.; Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B.; Kamińska, D.; Kapłon, Ł.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Sharma, N. G.; Słomski, A.; Silarski, M.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Witkowski, P.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recent tests of a single module of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomography system (J-PET) consisting of 30 cm long plastic scintillator strips have proven its applicability for the detection of annihilation quanta (0.511 MeV) with a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of 0.266 ns. The achieved resolution is almost by a factor of two better with respect to the current TOF-PET detectors and it can still be improved since, as it is shown in this article, the intrinsic limit of time resolution for the determination of time of the interaction of 0.511 MeV gamma quanta in plastic scintillators is much lower. As the major point of the article, a method allowing to record timestamps of several photons, at two ends of the scintillator strip, by means of matrix of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is introduced. As a result of simulations, conducted with the number of SiPM varying from 4 to 42, it is shown that the improvement of timing resolution saturates with the growing number of photomultipliers, and that the 2× 5 configuration at two ends allowing to read twenty timestamps, constitutes an optimal solution. The conducted simulations accounted for the emission time distribution, photon transport and absorption inside the scintillator, as well as quantum efficiency and transit time spread of photosensors, and were checked based on the experimental results. Application of the 2× 5 matrix of SiPM allows for achieving the coincidence resolving time in positron emission tomography of ≈ 0.170 ns for 15 cm axial field-of-view (AFOV) and ≈ 0.365 ns for 100 cm AFOV. The results open perspectives for construction of a cost-effective TOF-PET scanner with significantly better TOF resolution and larger AFOV with respect to the current TOF-PET modalities.

  15. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    PubMed Central

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications. PMID:24009998

  16. LaBr(3):Ce and SiPMs for time-of-flight PET: achieving 100 ps coincidence resolving time.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Dennis R; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; van Dam, Herman T; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J

    2010-04-07

    The use of time-of-flight (TOF) information in positron emission tomography (PET) enables significant improvement in image noise properties and, therefore, lesion detection. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are solid-state photosensors that have several advantages over photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). SiPMs are small, essentially transparent to 511 keV gamma rays and insensitive to magnetic fields. This enables novel detector designs aimed at e.g. compactness, high resolution, depth-of-interaction (DOI) correction and MRI compatibility. The goal of the present work is to study the timing performance of SiPMs in combination with LaBr(3):Ce(5%), a relatively new scintillator with promising characteristics for TOF-PET. Measurements were performed with two, bare, 3 mm x 3 mm x 5 mm LaBr(3):Ce(5%) crystals, each coupled to a 3 mm x 3 mm SiPM. Using a (22)Na point source placed at various positions in between the two detectors, a coincidence resolving time (CRT) of approximately 100 ps FWHM for 511 keV annihilation photon pairs was achieved, corresponding to a TOF positioning resolution of approximately 15 mm FWHM. At the same time, pulse height spectra with well-resolved full-energy peaks were obtained. To our knowledge this is the best CRT reported for SiPM-based scintillation detectors to date. It is concluded that SiPM-based scintillation detectors can provide timing resolutions at least as good as detectors based on PMTs.

  17. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Combustion of Ethanol and Gasoline Combustion in AN Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    In order to pursue In Situ measurements in an internal combustion engine, a MegaTech Mark III transparent spark ignition engine was modified with a sapphire combustion chamber. This modification will allow the transmission of infrared radiation for time-resolved spectroscopic measurements by an infrared spectrometer. By using a Step-scan equipped Fourier transform spectrometer, temporally resolved infrared spectral data were acquired and compared for combustion in the modified Mark III engine. Measurements performed with the FTIR system provide insight into the energy transfer vectors that precede combustion and also provides an in situ measurement of the progress of combustion. Measurements were performed using ethanol and gasoline.

  18. The time resolution domain of stellar radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, J.

    1985-07-01

    High time resolution (HTR) radio observations of stellar sources is a very young technique. One of the main limitations on HTR observations is the refusal of stars to cooperate with the observer - i.e. low flare rates. Instrumental problems, obtaining the necessary sensitivity (i.e. low noise) on short integration times is also a major problem. Few instruments are likely to excel Arecibo or the VLA for this mode of observing. High time resolution observations are necessary to determine the nature of both the acceleration and emission mechanisms responsible for the short-lived radio phenomena that have already been observed.

  19. A 5-kg time-resolved luminescence photometer with multiple excitation sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable fluorometer was developed to detect food contaminants and environmental pollutants including, in particular, two classes of antibiotics: tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. Time resolution was implemented to take advantage of lanthanide-sensitized luminescence. Excitation sources included...

  20. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy of para-difluorobenzene·Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichert, A.; Riehn, C.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Jarzeba, W.; Brutschy, B.

    2002-07-01

    We report on time-resolved rotational spectroscopy experiments of the cluster para-difluorobenzene·Ar ( pDFB·Ar) by picosecond laser pulses in a supersonic expansion. Rotational coherences of pDFB·Ar are generated by resonant electronic excitation and probed by time-resolved fluorescence depletion spectroscopy and time-resolved photoionization ((1+1') PPI) spectroscopy. The former allows the determination of both ground and excited state rotational constants, whereas the latter technique enables the separate study of the excited state with the benefit of mass-selective detection. Since pDFB·Ar represents a near symmetric oblate rotor, persistent J-type transients with tJ≈ n/2( A+ B) could be measured. From their analysis, (A″+B″)=2234.9±2 MHz and (A'+B')=2237.9±2 MHz were obtained. A structural investigation, based on data of the pDFB monomer, is presented resulting in a pDFB·Ar center-of-mass distance of both moieties of R z=3.543±0.017 Å with a change of ΔR z=-0.057±0.009 Å upon electronic excitation. These results are compared to data of former frequency-resolved experiments and ab initio computations.

  1. Time-resolved rhodopsin activation currents in a unicellular expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J M; Shukla, P

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) is the charge redistribution occurring in plasma membrane rhodopsin during light activation of photoreceptors. Both the molecular mechanism of the ERC and its relationship to rhodopsin conformational activation are unknown. To investigate whether the ERC could be a time-resolved assay of rhodopsin structure-function relationships, the distinct sensitivity of modern electrophysiological tools was employed to test for flash-activated ERC signals in cells stably expressing normal human rod opsin after regeneration with 11-cis-retinal. ERCs are similar in waveform and kinetics to those found in photoreceptors. The action spectrum of the major R(2) charge motion is consistent with a rhodopsin photopigment. The R(1) phase is not kinetically resolvable and the R(2) phase, which overlaps metarhodopsin-II formation, has a rapid risetime and complex multiexponential decay. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, kinetically resolved electrical state transitions during activation of expressed visual pigment in a unicellular environment (single or fused giant cells) containing only 6 x 10(6)-8 x 10(7) molecules of rhodopsin. This method improves measurement sensitivity 7 to 8 orders of magnitude compared to other time-resolved techniques applied to rhodopsin to study the role particular amino acids play in conformational activation and the forces that govern those transitions. PMID:10465746

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7∘ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7(∘) angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  4. From Non-equilibrium to Equilibrium: Micellar Kinetics seen by Time-resolved Small-angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Reidar

    The kinetic pathways of self-assembled nanostructures are not fully understood. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray/neutron scattering (TR-SAXS/SANS) is powerful technique1 that allows kinetics processes such as nucleation processes2,3 and morphological transitions4,5 to be followed with structural resolution over time scales starting from milliseconds. Neutrons offer the additional advantage of facile contrast variation through H/D substitution schemes, which also allow equilibrium processes such as molecular exchange and diffusion to be studied1 , 6 , 7. Here we will highlight the current capabilities of TR-SAS and show results on the kinetics of polymeric micelles. We will address how the understanding of kinetic pathways can be used control the nanostructure.

  5. Time-resolved investigation of nanometer scale deformations induced by a high flux x-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, J; Keitel, B; Jurgilaitis, A; Nüske, R; Guérin, L; Larsson, J; Mann, K; Schäfer, B; Tiedtke, K; Trapp, A; Tschentscher, Th; Yang, F; Wulff, M; Sinn, H; Flöter, B

    2011-08-01

    We present results of a time-resolved pump-probe experiment where a Si sample was exposed to an intense 15 keV beam and its surface monitored by measuring the wavefront deformation of a reflected optical laser probe beam. By reconstructing and back propagating the wavefront, the deformed surface can be retrieved for each time step. The dynamics of the heat bump, build-up and relaxation, is followed with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range. The results are interpreted taking into account results of finite element method simulations. Due to its robustness and simplicity this method should find further developments at new x-ray light sources (FEL) or be used to gain understanding on thermo-dynamical behavior of highly excited materials.

  6. Dislocation-mediated relaxation in nanograined columnar palladium films revealed by on-chip time-resolved HRTEM testing

    PubMed Central

    Colla, M. -S.; Amin-Ahmadi, B.; Idrissi, H.; Malet, L.; Godet, S.; Raskin, J. -P.; Schryvers, D.; Pardoen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The high-rate sensitivity of nanostructured metallic materials demonstrated in the recent literature is related to the predominance of thermally activated deformation mechanisms favoured by a large density of internal interfaces. Here we report time-resolved high-resolution electron transmission microscopy creep tests on thin nanograined films using on-chip nanomechanical testing. Tests are performed on palladium, which exhibited unexpectedly large creep rates at room temperature. Despite the small 30-nm grain size, relaxation is found to be mediated by dislocation mechanisms. The dislocations interact with the growth nanotwins present in the grains, leading to a loss of coherency of twin boundaries. The density of stored dislocations first increases with applied deformation, and then decreases with time to drive additional deformation while no grain boundary mechanism is observed. This fast relaxation constitutes a key issue in the development of various micro- and nanotechnologies such as palladium membranes for hydrogen applications. PMID:25557273

  7. Isotope identification capabilities using time resolved prompt gamma emission from epithermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Arcidiacono, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Minniti, T.; Cazzaniga, C.; Scherillo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a concept of integrated measurements for isotope identification which takes advantage of the time structure of spallation neutron sources for time resolved γ spectroscopy. Time resolved Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (T-PGAA) consists in the measurement of gamma energy spectrum induced by the radioactive capture as a function of incident neutron Time Of Flight (TOF), directly related with the energy of incident neutrons. The potential of the proposed concept was explored on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (U.K.). Through this new technique we show an increase in the sensitivity to specific elements of archaeometric relevance, through incident neutron energy selection in prompt γ spectra for multicomponent samples. Results on a standard bronze sample are presented.

  8. Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-09-01

    We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

  9. Carrier-driven disordering in semiconductors: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and density functional perturbation theory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, Patrick Brian

    Time-resolved x-ray science has opened the door to a previously inaccessible experimental world. Now the possibility of imaging ultrafast events with atomic spatial resolution is a reality. This dissertation highlights these new experimental techniques and uses them to study the effects of carrier photo-excitation in semiconductors using both time-resolved x-ray diffraction and time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. I have probed the ultrafast atomic disordering in InSb after intense photoexcitation with ultrafast x-ray diffraction measurements at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS), The results indicate that three disordering regimes exist, depending on the photoinduced carrier density. At lower carrier densities, disordering occurs via a thermal mechanism, occurring on a picosecond time scale with the dominant relaxation mechanism being the transfer of energy from hot carriers to the lattice. At intermediate carrier density values, the potential energy surface flattens, allowing the atoms to move with the inertial room temperature velocities for approximately ~500 fs at which point other processes take over including thermal energy transfer, atomic collision, and diffusion. At higher carrier densities, it is observed that accelerated atomic disordering occurs, indicating the formation of a repulsive potential energy surface. These experimental observations are in contrast with previous theoretical work and therefore, I have performed calculations using Density Functional Perturbation Theory (DFPT) to more clearly outline the role of excited carriers in lattice destabilization. The calculations show that with increasing carrier density the transverse acoustic modes soften and the lattice destabilizes first in the (100) direction (X point) with 3.7% of the valence band electrons excited into the conduction band. Increasing the carrier density leads to the entire transverse acoustic mode becoming unstable, indicating a repulsive interatomic potential. A

  10. Theory and experiments on time-resolved reflectance from adult heads for functional tomographic imaging of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.; Suzuki, M.

    2014-02-01

    Finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis has been formulated for predicting time-resolved reflectance from an adult head model with brain grooves containing a non-scattering layer. Mean delay (MD) dependences on source detector separation (d) and time-resolved reflectance calculated using the FDTD analysis were compared with in vivo experiments of human heads. It is shown that the theoretical and experimental MD dependences on d and the time-resolved reflectance are well predicted by FDTD analysis. These results have shown that tomographic imaging of brain activities is promising, which improves depth sensitivities by enhancing the contribution of late photons in time-resolved systems.

  11. Structural determination of a photochemically active diplatinum molecule by time-resolved EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Renske M; Milne, Chris J; El Nahhas, Amal; Lima, Frederico A; Pham, Van-Thai; Best, Jonathan; Weinstein, Julia A; Borca, Camelia N; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2009-01-01

    Metallica: A large contraction of the Pt-Pt bond in the triplet excited state of the photoreactive [Pt(2)(P(2)O(5)H(2))(4)](4-) ion is determined by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (see picture). The strengthening of the Pt-Pt interaction is accompanied by a weakening of the ligand coordination bonds, resulting in an elongation of the platinum-ligand bond that is determined for the first time.

  12. Visualization of surface transformations during laser ablation of solids by femtosecond pump-probe time-resolved microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-García, Irene; Vadillo, José M.; Javier Laserna, J.

    2015-11-01

    A femtosecond time-resolved microscope (fs-TRM) based on pump-probe excitation has been used to follow the dynamic of the processes occurring during laser-matter interaction, from initial surface alterations to final solidification through transient melting. The time-resolved microscope described in the manuscript has been designed to allow a precise control of the excitation beam to cover ranges below and above the plasma formation energy, and a large temporal variation in the pump-probe delay to include the different timescales of the different processes occurring up to the plasma formation. The microscope has been demonstrated to be robust and allows the subpicosecond monitoring of laser ablation single-shot events, of importance in the analysis of ultra thin layers, or biological tissues. The fs-TRM excites (pump) the sample with 35-fs laser pulses at 800 nm and follows the processes by a second (probe) beam at 400 nm. The relative delay between both beams allows the acquisition of pictures with a temporal resolution of 200 fs up to 3 ns after the reaching of the pump pulse. In the ablative regime near the ablation threshold, transient surface reflectivity patterns (dynamic Newton fringes) are observed from a ps to ns time-scale. The timescale and number of such rings are affected by the fluence value. Significant differences between metals (Al, Cu and Sn), semiconductors (Si) and polymers (polytetrafluoroethylene and polyurethane) have been also observed in the transformation patterns.

  13. Recent progress in space- and time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. K. F.

    1990-10-01

    New diagnostic techniques have provided measurement of relatively gradient-free x-ray spectra from high-powered laser-produced plasmas. Simultaneously space- and time-resolved x-ray spectra were measured from a variety of microdot plasmas using an array of multiframe, imaging, electronically gated x-ray crystal spectrometers with 100 ps time resolution. A multiframed, multicolored gated x-ray pinhole camera provided measurement of the plasma uniformity. A four-frame holographic interferometer was used to measure the electron density profile. Conventional x-ray streaked crystal spectrographs, spatially resolved x-ray (film) spectrometer, and pinhole cameras supplemented these new diagnostics. The instruments allow detailed studies of both the population kinetics of highly charged ions in dense plasmas and the hydrodynamics of laser-produced plasmas for the first time. The new diagnostics are described including data from ongoing experiments. Work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by LLNL under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  14. Time-Resolved SAXS Spectra after Rapidly Mixing Anionic and Cationic Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Mayuko; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2006-05-05

    The temporal evolution of nano-structures in mixing the aqueous solutions of anionic and cationic surfactants was investigated by measuring time-resolved SAXS spectra. It is found that vesicles formed just after mixing annihilate to be followed by the lamella formation. The peak intensity due to the vesicle structure decays exponentially with an elapsing time. The peak intensity assigned to the lamella structure grows with a power law of time. The decay time of vesicle and the exponent of power function of time describing the lamella growth increase with NaCl concentration. These results indicate that the electrostatic interaction affects the stability of nano-structures.

  15. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  16. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-17

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  17. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach. PMID:26984634

  18. Hyperfast time-resolved spectroscopy of electron correlation in excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2007-06-01

    As a consequence of continuing developments in the science and technology of techniques that produce and control electromagnetic pulses with frequencies that are found in a broad part of the spectrum, from the ir to the soft X-rays, it is possible to have hyperfast pump-probe time delay spectroscopic techniques capable of time resolving the dynamics of various atomic and molecular systems involving excited states. In this context, it has been demonstrated via first principles solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (TDSE), that effects which are caused by strong electron correlations in excited states, including the process of autoionization and the formation of resonances, can be time-resolved on a time scale of attoseconds [1-3]. By extending the investigations to polyelectronic atoms, we have obtained new results for various time resolved processes associated with the photo-ejection of inner (2s) electrons and of two electrons (LM) from the thirteen electron atom of Aluminum and with the electron correlation beats in bound and autoionizind states of N^+3 and Al. The theory and computations account for the interference of direct double ionization, inner hole states and Auger decay [4]. [1] C. A. Nicolaides et al, J. Phys. B 35, L271 (2002). [2] Th. Mercouris et al, Phys. Rev. A 69, 032502 (2004). [3] Th. Mercouris, et al, Phys. Rev. A 75, 013407 (2007). [4] Th. Mercouris, Y. Komninos and C. A. Nicolaides, unpublished.

  19. Annexin A1 promotes timely resolution of inflammation in murine gout.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Izabela; Vago, Juliana P; Barroso, Livia C; Tavares, Luciana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Costa, Vivian V; Carneiro, Fernanda S; Ferreira, Tatiana P; Silva, Patricia M R; Amaral, Flávio A; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2017-03-01

    Gout is a self-limited inflammatory disease caused by deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in the joints. Resolution of inflammation is an active process leading to restoration of tissue homeostasis. Here, we studied the role of Annexin A1 (AnxA1), a glucocorticoid-regulated protein that has anti-inflammatory and proresolving actions, in resolution of acute gouty inflammation. Injection of MSU crystals in the knee joint of mice induced inflammation that was associated with expression of AnxA1 during the resolving phase of inflammation. Neutralization of AnxA1 with antiserum or blockade of its receptor with BOC-1 (nonselective) or WRW4 (selective) prevented the spontaneous resolution of gout. There was greater neutrophil infiltration after challenge with MSU crystals in AnxA1 knockout mice (AnxA1(-/-) ) and delayed resolution associated to decreased neutrophil apoptosis and efferocytosis. Pretreatment of mice with AnxA1-active N-terminal peptide (Ac2-26 ) decreased neutrophil influx, IL-1β, and CXCL1 production in periarticular joint. Posttreatment with Ac2-26 decreased neutrophil accumulation, IL-1β, and hypernociception, and improved the articular histopathological score. Importantly, the therapeutic effects of Ac2-26 were associated with increased neutrophils apoptosis and shortened resolution intervals. In conclusion, AnxA1 plays a crucial role in the context of acute gouty inflammation by promoting timely resolution of inflammation.

  20. Study of Saturn electrostatic discharges with high time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Mylostna, K.; Konovalenko, A.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Litvinenko, G.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2013-09-01

    Ground-based observations of SED (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges) with high time resolution are the next stage of extraterrestrial atmospheric processes study. Due to extremely high intensity of Saturn's storm J (2010) [1] we have obtained the records with high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio with the time resolution of 15 ns. It permitted us to investigate the microsecond structure of lightning and clearly distinguish SED in the presence of local interference in virtue of a dispersive delay of extraterrestrial planetary signals.