Science.gov

Sample records for resolve complex terrain

  1. Combining indirect observations and models to resolve spatiotemporal patterns of precipitation in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henn, Brian M.

    Mountain precipitation in the Western United States is critical for the water resources of the region, but resolving spatial and temporal patterns of precipitation in complex terrain is challenging due to lack of observations, measurement uncertainty and high spatial variability. We examine several gridded precipitation datasets over the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, and find that these widely-used products exhibit substantial variation in water-year total precipitation over different areas of the range. In addition, trends in precipitation and snow computed from different datasets vary substantially. Both findings suggest that further work is needed to better resolve spatial and temporal patterns of precipitation in complex terrain. Streamflow observations are widely made and reflect the basin's hydrologic response to precipitation input. We develop a methodology for inferring basin-mean precipitation using lumped hydrologic models and Bayesian model calibration, which infers water-year total precipitation given daily streamflow observations. We apply this approach to several basins around Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada in order to assess the sensitivity and robustness of inferred precipitation. We find that patterns of precipitation can be inferred from streamflow, both in terms of spatial and year-to-year variability. However, by using a small ensemble of hydrologic model structures to test the sensitivity of inferred precipitation, we also show that the absolute amounts of inferred precipitation are subject to significant uncertainty. Higher-elevation basins of the Sierra Nevada are hydrologically snow-dominated, and we hypothesize that the uncertainty in inferred precipitation can be reduced by calibrating the hydrologic model to both snow and streamflow observations. We leverage the recent availability of a high-resolution distributed snow dataset from the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) to determine basin-mean snow water equivalent

  2. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    simulations, on the other hand, are performed by numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes, which cannot handle the geometry of the urban landscape, but do provide a more complete representation of atmospheric physics. NWP codes typically use structured grids with terrain-following vertical coordinates, include a full suite of atmospheric physics parameterizations, and allow for dynamic synoptic scale lateral forcing through grid nesting. Terrain following grids are unsuitable for urban terrain, as steep terrain gradients cause extreme distortion of the computational cells. In this work, we introduce and develop an immersed boundary method (IBM) to allow the favorable properties of a numerical weather prediction code to be combined with the ability to handle complex terrain. IBM uses a non-conforming structured grid, and allows solid boundaries to pass through the computational cells. As the terrain passes through the mesh in an arbitrary manner, the main goal of the IBM is to apply the boundary condition on the interior of the domain as accurately as possible. With the implementation of the IBM, numerical weather prediction codes can be used to explicitly resolve urban terrain. Heterogeneous urban domains using the IBM can be nested into larger mesoscale domains using a terrain-following coordinate. The larger mesoscale domain provides lateral boundary conditions to the urban domain with the correct forcing, allowing seamless integration between mesoscale and urban scale models. Further discussion of the scope of this project is given by Lundquist et al. [2007]. The current paper describes the implementation of an IBM into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open source numerical weather prediction code. The WRF model solves the non-hydrostatic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and employs an isobaric terrain-following vertical coordinate. Many types of IB methods have been developed by researchers; a comprehensive review can be found in Mittal

  3. Cause Resolving of Typhoon Precipitation Using Principle Component Analysis under Complex Interactive Effect of Terrain, Monsoon and Typhoon Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Hsu, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study develops a novel methodology to resolve the cause of typhoon-induced precipitation using principle component analysis (PCA) and to develop a long lead-time precipitation prediction model. The discovered spatial and temporal features of rainfall are utilized to develop a state-of-the-art descriptive statistical model which can be used to predict long lead-time precipitation during typhoons. The time series of 12-hour precipitation from different types of invasive moving track of typhoons are respectively precede the signal analytical process to qualify the causes of rainfall and to quantify affected degree of each induced cause. The causes include: (1) interaction between typhoon rain band and terrain; (2) co-movement effect induced by typhoon wind field with monsoon; (3) pressure gradient; (4) wind velocity; (5) temperature environment; (6) characteristic distance between typhoon center and surface target station; (7) distance between grade 7 storm radius and surface target station; and (8) relative humidity. The results obtained from PCA can detect the hidden pattern of the eight causes in space and time and can understand the future trends and changes of precipitation. This study applies the developed methodology in Taiwan Island which is constituted by complex diverse terrain formation and height. Results show that: (1) for the typhoon moving toward the direction of 245° to 330°, Causes (1), (2) and (6) are the primary ones to generate rainfall; and (2) for the direction of 330° to 380°, Causes (1), (4) and (6) are the primary ones. Besides, the developed precipitation prediction model by using PCA with the distributed moving track approach (PCA-DMT) is 32% more accurate by that of PCA without distributed moving track approach, and the former model can effectively achieve long lead-time precipitation prediction with an average predicted error of 13% within average 48 hours of forecasted lead-time.

  4. Resolving extreme rainfall from space: a new class of algorithms for precipitation retrieval over radiometrically complex terrain and coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Ebtehaj, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The increasing availability of precipitation observations from the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) Mission, has fueled renewed interest in developing frameworks for accurate estimation of precipitation extremes especially over ungauged mountainous terrains and coastal regions to improve hydro-geological hazard prediction and control. Our recent research has shown that treating precipitation retrieval and data fusion/assimilation as inverse problems and using a regularized variational approach with the regularization term(s) selected to impose desired constraints on the solution, leads to improved representation of extremes. Here we present some new theoretical and computational developments which extend the ideas to a framework of retrieval via a regularized search within properly constructed data bases. We test the framework in several tropical storms over the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta region and over the Himalayas and compare the results with the standard retrieval algorithms currently used for operational purposes.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow Over Battlefield-scale Complex Terrain: Surface Fluxes From Resolved and Subgrid Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The large-eddy simulation (LES) tool has been used to study the transient characteristics of turbulent mixing in atmospheric ...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Numerical Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow Over Battlefield-scale Complex...ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Numerical Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow Over Battlefield

  6. Atmospheric modeling in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M. D.; Streit, G. E.

    1990-05-01

    Los Alamos investigators have developed several models which are relevant to modeling Mexico City air quality. The collection of models includes: meteorological models, dispersion models, air chemistry models, and visibility models. The models have been applied in several different contexts. They have been developed primarily to address the complexities posed by complex terrain. HOTMAC is the meteorological model which requires terrain and limited meteorological information. HOTMAC incorporates a relatively complete description of atmospheric physics to give good descriptions of the wind, temperature, and turbulence fields. RAPTAD is a dispersion code which uses random particle transport and kernel representations to efficiently provide accurate pollutant concentration fields. RAPTAD provides a much better description of tracer dispersion than do Gaussian puff models which fail to properly represent the effects of the wind profile near the surface. ATMOS and LAVM treat photochemistry and visibility respectively. ATMOS has been used to describe wintertime chemistry of the Denver brown cloud. Its description provided reasonable agreement with measurements for the high altitude of Denver. LAVM can provide both numerical indices or pictoral representations of visibility effects of pollutants. 15 refs., 74 figs.

  7. Mean Flow and Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    basin in the Geysers geothermal area in Cali- fornia. That study was part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program and involved...Terrain at Geysers , CAL.," Boundary-Layer Meteorology, V. 21, pp. 207-213, 1981. 3. Scientific Report 7 (ISSN 0112-2398), Measurements on a Thirty Metre

  8. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, KS; Larsen, GC; Menke, R.; Vasiljevic, N.; Angelou, N.; Feng, J.; Zhu, WJ; Vignaroli, A.; W, W. Liu; Xu, C.; Shen, WZ

    2016-09-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology.

  9. Resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, S. E.; Switzer, P.; Kowalik, W. S.; Lyon, R. J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate maximum likelihood technique employing a widely available discriminant analysis program is discussed that has been developed for resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements. The method uses all four channels of Landsat data simultaneously and does not require prior knowledge of the percentage of components in mixed pixels. It was tested in five cases that were chosen to represent mixtures of outcrop, soil and vegetation which would typically be encountered in geologic studies with Landsat data. For all five cases, the method proved to be superior to single band weighted average and linear regression techniques and permitted an estimate of the total area occupied by component terrains to within plus or minus 6% of the true area covered. Its major drawback is a consistent overestimation of the pixel component percent of the darker materials (vegetation) and an underestimation of the pixel component percent of the brighter materials (sand).

  10. Resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, S. E.; Switzer, P.; Kowalik, W. S.; Lyon, R. J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate maximum likelihood technique employing a widely available discriminant analysis program is discussed that has been developed for resolving the percentage of component terrains within single resolution elements. The method uses all four channels of Landsat data simultaneously and does not require prior knowledge of the percentage of components in mixed pixels. It was tested in five cases that were chosen to represent mixtures of outcrop, soil and vegetation which would typically be encountered in geologic studies with Landsat data. For all five cases, the method proved to be superior to single band weighted average and linear regression techniques and permitted an estimate of the total area occupied by component terrains to within plus or minus 6% of the true area covered. Its major drawback is a consistent overestimation of the pixel component percent of the darker materials (vegetation) and an underestimation of the pixel component percent of the brighter materials (sand).

  11. Resolving Extreme Rainfall from Space: A New Class of Algorithms for Precipitation Retrieval and Data Fusion/Assimilation with Emphasis on Extremes over Complex Terrain and Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ebtehaj, A.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of precipitation observations from the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) Mission, has fueled renewed interest in developing frameworks for accurate estimation of precipitation extremes especially over ungauged mountainous terrains and coastal regions to improve hydro-geological hazard prediction and control. Our recent research has shown that treating precipitation retrieval and data fusion/assimilation as inverse problems and using a regularized variational approach with the regularization term(s) selected to impose desired smoothness in the solution, leads to improved representation of extremes. Here we present some new theoretical and computational developments which extend the ideas to a model-agnostic framework of retrieval via a regularized search within properly constructed data bases. We test the framework in several tropical storms over the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta region and over the Himalayas and compare the results with the standard retrieval algorithms currently used for operational purposes.

  12. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  13. Nonturbulent dispersion processes in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fosberg; Douglas G. Fox; E.A. Howard; Jack D. Cohen

    1976-01-01

    Mass divergence influences on plume dispersion modify classic Gaussian calculations by as much as a factor of two in complex terrain. The Gaussian plume was derived in flux form to include this process.Authors' response to comments and criticism received following this publication:

  14. Carbon dioxide transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.; Stephens, B.; Guenther, A.; Anderson, D.E.; Monson, R.

    2004-01-01

    The nocturnal transport of carbon dioxide over complex terrain was investigated. The high carbon dioxide under very stable conditions flows to local low-ground. The regional drainage flow dominates the carbon dioxide transport at the 6 m above the ground and carbon dioxide was transported to the regional low ground. The results show that the local drainage flow was sensitive to turbulent mixing associated with local wind shear.

  15. Flows through forest canopies in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Belcher, S E; Finnigan, J J; Harman, I N

    2008-09-01

    Recent progress on boundary layer flow within and above tall forest canopies in complex terrain is reviewed from the perspective of developing methods to interpret carbon dioxide fluxes from tower measurements in real terrain. Two examples of complex terrain are considered in detail: a forest edge, which exemplifies nonuniform forests, and hilly terrain, which can lead to drainage currents at night. Dynamical arguments show that, when boundary layer winds approach a forest edge, the mean wind adjusts on a length scale of approximately 3L(c), where L(c) is the canopy drag length scale, which depends inversely on the leaf area density of the forest. Over a further distance that also scales on L(c), turbulence in the flow adjusts, and the mixing and transport in the canopy approaches the homogeneous limit. Even low hills change the neutral flow within and above the forest canopy substantially. When the canopy is tall, pressure gradients drive flow up both the upwind and downwind slopes of the hill, leading to an ejection of air out of the top of the canopy just downwind of the crest. This flow at the crest can then advect scalar out of the top of the forest, leading to large variations in the flux of scalar across the hill. At night, when the air near the ground cools and becomes stably stratified, turbulence within the canopy can collapse, even when the flow above the canopy remains turbulent. This leads to a decoupling of the air motions within the canopy from those above. The air above the canopy can then continue to pass up and over the hill, as it does in the neutral case, but at the same time, air within the canopy drains down the hill slopes as drainage currents. These analyses will help us understand when flux towers are reliably measuring the net ecosystem exchange and suggest ways of correcting the flux tower data in more complex situations.

  16. Atmospheric Flux Computations in Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.; Kopp, Fred J.; Orville, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The greatest challenges in applying atmospheric water budget expressions are in determining the divergence and evapotranspiration terms. The evapotranspiration problem is ubiquitous, and critical issues of spatial and temporal resolution commonly arise in establishing the divergence term. In complex terrain, further difficulties crop up in using typical data on atmospheric profiles of water vapor and wind to estimate the divergence term. Those difficulties are the subject of this paper; considerations related to topographic variations both along and normal to the flow direction are treated.

  17. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J.; Troldborg, N.; Sørensen, N. N.; Patton, E. G.; Sullivan, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates the positioning of the wake. This last finding is in contrast to what would happen in gentle terrain with no substantial increase of turbulent kinetic energy in the terrain induced wakes.

  18. Boundary Layer Measurements in Complex Terrain: Innsbruck-Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiperski, I.; Rotach, M. W.; Gohm, A.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary boundary layers in complex terrain remain one of the major challenges of today's boundary layer research. Our current knowledge of the characteristics of the turbulence structure and exchange processes in truly complex topography remains limited. Not only is there no suitable theory, it is not known if all the relevant processes such a theory should explain are accounted for. Meanwhile, the increasing resolution of both numerical weather prediction and regional climate models demands precisely such information for improving model performance. Except for a few recent field campaigns, limited both in time and focus, no measurement platform in highly complex terrain is available to date that would be able to provide a complete dataset of boundary layer information in sufficient complexity, resolution and covering all regimes of interest both for model validation and resolving the remaining scientific questions. The Dynamic Meteorology Group of the Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Innsbruck is presently setting up such a 'reference box', which aims to fill in this gap. It will consist of a combination of high-resolution long-term turbulence observations in an area in the vicinity of Innsbruck (hence the 'Innsbruck-Box') and high-resolution numerical modeling. Whereas the data provided by measurements will allow for improvements in process understanding and model validation, the numerical modeling will be used to fill the data gaps in areas where no measurements are possible or the current measurement techniques are inadequate. Also, numerical experiments using idealized terrain or settings can be performed in order to test hypotheses deduced from the observations. The Innsbruck-Box is designed to be a long-term reference platform for studying boundary layer processes in highly complex terrain with an integrated measurement approach. Sites are located in the Inn-Valley, an approximately East-West oriented valley in western Austria

  19. Predicting Potential Evaporation in Topographically Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohafkan, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Hamilton, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the water cycle in topographically complex terrain poses challenges for upscaling point-scale measurements of water and energy balance and for downscaling observations made from remote sensing or predictions made via global circulation models. This study evaluates hydrologic and climate data drawn from a spatially-distributed wireless sensor network at the Blue Oak Ranch Reserve near San Jose, California to investigate the influence of topographic variation, landscape position, and local ecology (vegetation) on one core component of the water balance: potential evaporation. High-resolution observations of solar radiation, ambient temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity are combined with canopy maps generated from LiDAR flyovers to develop spatially-distributed predictions of potential evaporation. These data are compared to estimates of EP based on inverse modeling of surface soil moisture data. Preliminary results suggest that the spatial structure of microclimate at Blue Oak Ranch Reserve is dominated by variations around the elevation gradient, with strong nocturnal inversions hypothesized to reflect the influence of the coastal marine layer. Estimates of EP based on the Penman-Monteith equation suggest that EP could vary by up to a factor of 5 across the site, with differences in vapor pressure deficit and canopy height largely responsible for this variability. The results suggest that a) large differences in the timing and magnitude of water stress could arise in topographically complex terrain due to localized differences in energy balance, and b) both localized and regional effects need to be accounted for when downscaling climate data over topographically complex sites. 2) Color map showing preliminary estimates of annual EP incorporating canopy information (spatially-distributed values of aerodynamic resistance and LAI) drawn from LiDAR imagery. The effect of the resistance on the dynamics is striking in its ability to

  20. Spectra over complex terrain in the surface layer

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, H.A.; Dutton, J.A.; Larko, D.; Lipschutz, R.; Stone, G.

    1982-09-01

    For design and control of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS), the spectral distribution of wind speeds over frequencies needs to be known as well as velocity variances. Velocity spectra and other velocity statistics are estimated over three types of complex terrain: on tops of hills or escarpments; on land a short distance downwind from a water body; and over rolling farm land. The most important characteristics of turbulence models over uniform terrain are summarized briefly. Theoretical aspects of spectral characteristics over complex terrain are discussed, followed by detailed observations over complex terrain and procedures for their estimation. A theory is presented for calculation of response of engineering systems to wind fluctuations. (LEW)

  1. Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, R.; Cederwall, R.T.; Stevens, D.; Street, R.

    2000-05-31

    One of the most important scenarios for atmospheric modelers is the stable boundary layer (SBL). Airborne material released near the ground will likely be trapped near the ground in high concentrations due to the reduced dispersion in the SBL. Hence the SBL is often the worst case scenario for studies of health impacts from routine or accidental release of toxic materials to the atmosphere. Unfortunately the SBL is very challenging to understand and model correctly. There is also a limited number of field studies with which to verify models, although recent studies (such as CASES-99) are promising. It is difficult for traditional Reynolds-averaged models of turbulence to capture the weak, spatially- and temporally-varying fluctuations that contribute to dispersion the SBL. Large-eddy simulation (LES) has become a promising approach study the SBL because much of the dynamical structure is explicitly resolved and allowed to develop according to the full equations of motion. The presence of topography further complicates the simulation of SBL flows. The drainage flows that develop as the surface cools must be resolved, along with their interaction with other drainage flows of varying scales and the main forcing (synoptic scale) flow. In this study, we have used LES techniques to simulate flows in complex terrain during the development of the SBL at night. We have begun to evaluate the effects of resolution on the simulations, though this effort is continuing at the time of this writing. Simulations are conducted for the area around Salt Lake City, where several field activities are planned for the future. The study will be extended to the small scale terrain associated with the CASES-99 experiment, and comparisons made with observations.

  2. Wind and Diffusion Modeling for Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Robert M.; Sontowski, John; Fry, Richard N., Jr.; Dougherty, Catherine M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    1998-10-01

    Atmospheric transport and dispersion over complex terrain were investigated. Meteorological and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentration data were collected and used to evaluate the performance of a transport and diffusion model coupled with a mass consistency wind field model. Meteorological data were collected throughout April 1995. Both meteorological and plume location and concentration data were measured in December 1995. The meteorological data included measurements taken at 11-15 surface stations, one to three upper-air stations, and one mobile profiler. A range of conditions was encountered, including inversion and postinversion breakup, light to strong winds, and a broad distribution of wind directions.The models used were the MINERVE mass consistency wind model and the SCIPUFF (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff) transport and diffusion model. These models were expected to provide and use high-resolution three-dimensional wind fields. An objective of the experiment was to determine if these models could provide emergency personnel with high-resolution hazardous plume information for quick response operations.Evaluation of the models focused primarily on their effectiveness as a short-term (1-4 h) predictive tool. These studies showed how they could be used to help direct emergency response following a hazardous material release. For purposes of the experiments, the models were used to direct the deployment of mobile sensors intended to intercept and measure tracer clouds.The April test was conducted to evaluate the performance of the MINERVE wind field generation model. It was evaluated during the early morning radiation inversion, inversion dissipation, and afternoon mixed atmosphere. The average deviations in wind speed and wind direction as compared to observations were within 0.4 m s1 and less than 10° for up to 2 h after data time. These deviations increased as time from data time increased. It was also found that deviations were greatest during

  3. Investigation of spectrally resolved actinic flux in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. E.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, J. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Rieder, H. E.; Simic, S.; Webb, A.; Weihs, P.

    2009-09-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV radiation. However for photochemical reactions and various biological processes actinic flux is more important. Therefore, three measurement campaigns had been conducted in alpine areas of Austria (Innsbruck and Hoher Sonnblick). The goal was to investigate the impact of alpine terrain in combination with snow cover on spectral actinic flux under clear sky conditions. This contribution uses the ground-based UV actinic flux measurements to evaluate two different calculation methods. The modified (with topography) 3-D radiative transfer model GRIMALDI was used to calculate the distribution of actinic flux at the ground for selected clear sky situations. To estimate the impact of 3-D effects on actinic flux, the measurement results are also compared with the output of 1-D-model (SDISORT) runs. Apart from border problems due to periodic boundary conditions the spatial distribution of actinic flux is well reproduced by the 3-D-model. Shadowing effects and increasing actinic flux with altitude are realistically reproduced in the calculated 3-D-radiation field.

  4. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, P H; Segalini, A

    2017-04-13

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  5. Synoptic Flow Interactions in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocut, C. M.; Silver, Z.; Wang, Y.; Creegan, E.; Felton, M.; Hoch, S.; Fernando, H. J.; Di Sabatino, S.; Leo, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Zsedrovits, T.; Pardyjak, E.; Huynh, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) conducted its second extensive field experiment at the Granite Mountain Atmospheric Science Testbed (GMAST), US Army Dugway Proving Grounds (DPG), Utah. Of particular interest to MATERHORN-X-2 were synoptic dominated conditions in which synoptic flows interacted with thermal circulations and the topography leading to modulations of the thermal circulations and external-flow generated lee and progressive waves and if the Froude number was low; eddies, large vortices, wakes and waves developed in the lee of Granite Mountain. To capture these phenomena, a suite of advanced instrumentation was used, which could characterize the upstream unmodified synoptic approach flow and identify the synoptic flow / mountain interactions. In addition to meteorological towers, Doppler LiDARs, placed at two locations to the east and in the lee of Granite Mountain were particularly useful, showing the horizontal spatial pattern and temporal evolution of the synoptic generated phenomena. WRF simulations were used to provide analysis guidance. This research was funded by Office of Naval Research Grant # N00014-11-1-0709 and the Air Force Weather Agency.

  6. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  7. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  8. Fluid Dynamics of Urban Atmospheres in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J. S.

    2010-01-01

    A majority of the world's urban centers are located in complex terrain, in which local airflow patterns are driven by pressure gradients and thermal forcing, while being strongly influenced by topographic effects and human (anthropogenic) activities. A paradigm in this context is a city located in a valley surrounded by mountains, slopes, and escarpments, in which the airflow is determined by terrain-induced perturbations to synoptic (background) flow, mesoscale thermal circulation (valley/slope flows) generated by local heating or cooling, and by their interaction with factitious (e.g., buildings and roads) and natural (e.g., vegetation and terrain) elements. The dynamics of airflows intrinsic to urban areas in complex terrain is reviewed here by employing idealized flow configurations to illustrate fundamental processes. Urban flows span a wide range of space and time scales and the emphasis here is on mesoscales (1-100 km). Basic fluid dynamics plays a central role in explaining observations of urban flow and in developing subgrid parameterizations for predictive models.

  9. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction

    PubMed Central

    Alfredsson, P. H.; Segalini, A.

    2017-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas—locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265020

  10. (Relatively) Simple Models of Flow in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter; Weng, Wensong; Salmon, Jim

    2013-04-01

    The term, "complex terrain" includes both topography and variations in surface roughness and thermal properties. The scales that are affected can differ and there are some advantages to modeling them separately. In studies of flow in complex terrain we have developed 2 D and 3 D models of atmospheric PBL boundary layer flow over roughness changes, appropriate for longer fetches than most existing models. These "internal boundary layers" are especially important for understanding and predicting wind speed variations with distance from shorelines, an important factor for wind farms around, and potentially in, the Great Lakes. The models can also form a base for studying the wakes behind woodlots and wind turbines. Some sample calculations of wind speed evolution over water and the reduced wind speeds behind an isolated woodlot, represented simply in terms of an increase in surface roughness, will be presented. Note that these models can also include thermal effects and non-neutral stratification. We can use the model to deal with 3-D roughness variations and will describe applications to both on-shore and off-shore situations around the Great Lakes. In particular we will show typical results for hub height winds and indicate the length of over-water fetch needed to get the full benefit of siting turbines over water. The linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference (MSFD) and non-linear (NLMSFD) models for surface boundary-layer flow over complex terrain have been extended to planetary boundary-layer flow over topography This allows for their use for larger scale regions and increased heights. The models have been applied to successfully simulate the Askervein hill experimental case and we will show examples of applications to more complex terrain, typical of some Canadian wind farms. Output from the model can be used as an alternative to MS-Micro, WAsP or other CFD calculations of topographic impacts for input to wind farm design software.

  11. Evaluation of a puff dispersion model in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, R.H. )

    1992-03-01

    California's Pacific Gas and Electric Company has many power plant operations situated in complex terrain, prominent examples being the Geysers geothermal plant in Lake and Sonoma Counties, and the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant in San Luis Obispo County. Procedures ranging from plant licensing to emergency response require a dispersion modeling capability in a complex terrain environment. This paper describes the performance evaluation of such a capability, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Modeling System (PGEMS), a fast response Gaussian puff model with a three-dimensional wind field generator. Performance of the model was evaluated for ground level and short stack elevated release on the basis of a special intensive tracer experiment in the complex coastal terrain surrounding the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant in San Luis Obispo County, California. The model performed well under a variety of meteorological and release conditions within the test region of 20-kilometer radius surrounding the nuclear plant, and turned in a superior performance in the wake of the nuclear plant, using a new wake correction algorithm for ground level and roof-vent releases a that location.

  12. Innovative Solutions for Pulsed Wind Lidar Accuracy in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquet, M.

    2010-12-01

    Accuracy of Lidar remote sensors for wind energy has been previously reported. Coherent Doppler lidars have shown very high correlation with calibrated cup anemometers in flat terrain, both onshore and offshore. However, in more complex terrain, not only more turbulent air flow but also loss of flow homogeneity occurs, and remote sensors measurement process needs to be closely examined. We compare and simulate cup’s point and lidar’s volume measurements to understand and explain for the two sensor’s response. We emphasize the main error term in the horizontal and vertical wind speed retrieval. Geometrical optimizations of pulsed Lidar measurement process are also investigated to get more reliable wind speed estimations, such as finding the right cone angle to reduce the error. We show our conclusions and results of the CFD simulation performed on a Spanish complex terrain case. We see that there is at least one possibility to strongly reduce the relative error between Lidar and anemometer measurements. Indeed, accessing to the vertical wind speed variations leads to a considerable improvement in the linear correlation and dispersion.

  13. Atmospheric transport in complex terrain at Los Alamos, Area G

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report documents the atmospheric dispersion used in the Area G Performance Assessment for off-site airborne dose calculations. Potential airborne contaminants from the mesa top disposal facility disperse in the complex terrain dominated by narrow mesas in parallel to narrow canyons. The dispersion is characterized by site-specific values of X/Q [(Ci/m{sup 3})/(Ci/s)] at each of two designated receptor locations, a {open_quote}maximum off-site dose{close_quote} location and a nearby population center (White Rock, NM). The values of X/Q in each of the sixteen wind sectors are first estimated with the CAP-88 computer code using 1992 annual meteorologic data from Area G and assuming an area source for release. This data captures the dominant wind direction on the mesa tops from the SSW. These dispersion parameters are assumed to apply to open, flat terrain and must be corrected for the complex mesa and canyon terrain terrain surrounding the Area G site. Additional meteorologic data has been collected over two years from six remote temporary meteorological stations operated on the mesas and in the canyons immediately around Area G. These data indicate that the wind flow in the canyons is exclusively bimodel, flowing up canyon during the day and down canyon at night. It is conservatively assumed that all ground level releases from Area G which blow out across an adjacent canyon become entrained in the canyon flow. This effectively combines the contaminant release for several sectors into a single canyon flow which is upstream during the day or downstream at night. This canyon channeling mechanism is implemented in the model by summing the wind sector dispersion factors over those sectors appropriate to the geometry for a release from Area G toward either adjacent canyon.

  14. Instability analysis on drainage flow over a complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, C.

    2007-12-01

    The turbulent transport processes that occur within canopies are extremely complex and have not been accurately represented in past models, especially for ecosystems with hilly or mountainous terrain. The stability analysis on the terrain-induced canopy flows is the key to understanding the introduction of pollutants into the atmosphere and the transfer of water from soil and vegetation to the atmosphere. We applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach to forest environments to simulate airflows within and above canopy. The results of the CFD experiments show three different dynamic regimes of topographic drainage flow that were simulated under different thermal-dynamic conditions: (1) Cold inflow induces drainage flow in the lower part of canopy and strong stratification of airflows within entire canopy; additionally, the model predicts that there is a super stable layer around the maximum LAD level, which is consistent with our canopy flow theory. This super stable layer minimizes vertical land-atmosphere exchange around the middle level of canopy. (2) Warm inflow causes the rapid flushing of land-atmosphere exchange at the location where two opposite air motions meet, this is called the 'chimney phenomenon'. (3) The oscillation of canopy flow occurs as the inflow temperature is close to the environmental temperature. These CFD simulations are based on fully derived thermal and fluid dynamic equations. In order to clearly understand the physical mechanisms for the transfer between the different dynamic regimes, I utilized the nonlinear dynamics approach to derive the analytical instability conditions of terrain-induced flows from the simplified thermal-hydro-mechanical equations. The analytical derivations are tested against the CFD simulations. These analytical conditions provide a better understanding of transport problem in ecosystem- atmosphere exchanges of water, carbon dioxide, and energy over complex terrain.

  15. Plume Dispersion Anomalies in a Nocturnal Urban Boundary Layer in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Dennis D.; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.; Rich, Jason D.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2008-11-01

    The URBAN 2000 experiments were conducted in the complex urban and topographical terrain in Salt Lake City in stable nighttime conditions. Unexpected plume dispersion often arose due to the interaction of complex terrain and mountain-valley flow dynamics, drainage flows, synoptic influences, and urban canopy affects, all within a nocturnal boundary layer. It was found that plume dispersion was strongly influenced by topography, that dispersion can be significantly different than what might be expected based upon the available wind data, and that it is problematic to rely on any one urban area wind measurement to predict or anticipate dispersion. Small-scale flows can be very important in dispersion and the potential effects of the larger scale, synoptically-driven flow field, and its interactions with the smaller scales, needs to be carefully considered. Some of the anomalies observed include extremely slow dispersion, complicated recirculation dispersion patterns in which plume transport was in directions opposed to the measured winds, and flow decoupling. Some of the plume dispersion anomalies could only be attributed to small-scale winds that were not resolved by the existing meteorological monitoring network. The results shown will make clear the difficulties in modeling or planning for emergency response to toxic releases in a nocturnal urban boundary layer within complex terrain.

  16. Capturing Wind Speed and Snow Accumulation Gradients across Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstral, A. H.; Marks, D. G.; Gurney, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Wind speeds vary dramatically over short distances in mountain settings. Snow distribution is strongly affected by these disparate winds with drifts containing meters of snow-water-equivalence (SWE) often found adjacent to windward slopes containing minimal amounts of SWE. The heterogeneous snow distribution effects runoff, soil moisture, and vegetation patterns. Capturing these gradients in models is difficult due to the inherent complexity of wind fields and a general lack of data from high elevation, wind-exposed locations. This study was conducted in the Reynolds Mountain East research basin in southwest Idaho, USA. The basin is uniquely instrumented with a network of automated wind and snow depth sensors that capture a large range of variability. Additional manual snow surveys were conducted twice a year that captured the full gradient of snow distribution present in the basin. This unique dataset formed the foundation for establishing relationships between the variables of interest and readily available terrain and vegetation data. A significant relationship between upwind terrain structure and wind speed was established and further validated at two other sites. Snow accumulation rates were related to wind speed and terrain structure. Computationally efficient methods for distributing wind speed and snow accumulation from single point measurements were established from these findings. The algorithms were used to derive the spatial forcing fields for a distributed mass and energy balance snow model with effective results.

  17. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  18. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  19. Evaluation of terrain complexity by autocorrelation. [geomorphology and geobotany

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The topographic complexity of various sections of the Ozark, Appalachian, and Interior Low Plateaus, as well as of the New England, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Ouachita, and Valley and Ridge Provinces of the Eastern United States were characterized. The variability of autocorrelation within a small area (7 1/2-ft quadrangle) to the variability at widely separated and diverse areas within the same physiographic region was compared to measure the degree of uniformity of the processes which can be expected to be encountered within a given physiographic province. The variability of autocorrelation across the eight geomorphic regions was compared and contrasted. The total study area was partitioned into subareas homogeneous in terrain complexity. The relation between the complexity measured, the geomorphic process mix implied, and the way in which geobotanical information is modified into a more or less recognizable entity is demonstrated. Sampling strategy is described.

  20. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains.

    PubMed

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  1. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  2. Meteorology and air quality modeling in complex terrain: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarrais, G.A.; Clark, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    Modeling air quality in complex terrain has been and remains to be a difficult task simply because of the difficulty in parameterizing the complex wind flow regimes. Due to the complex terrain, significant submesoscale forces are established to perturb the mesoscale wind field. This literature review summarizes over 250 studies of meteorology and air quality modeling in complex terrain for the benefit of those who wish to broaden their knowledge of the subject.

  3. Numerical simulation of the falling snow deposition over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Huang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Snow is one of the most dynamic natural elements on the Earth's surface, and the variations in its distribution in time and space profoundly affect the hydrological cycle, climate system, and ecological evolution as well as other natural processes. Most previous studies have paid less attention to the process determining the distribution of snow on the ground as a result of the effect of nonuniform mountain wind on the trajectories of snow particles. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the falling snow deposition process involving snow particles of mixed grain sizes over complex terrain. A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation code was used to predict the wind field by considering the fluid-solid coupling effect, and the Lagrangian particle tracking method was employed to track the movement of each tracking snow particle. The grid resolution and model parameters were determined by the best fit with the field experiment, and the coupling effect between snow particles and wind field was found to be nonnegligible when the drifting snow occurred. In general, the preferential deposition on a single ridge showed a tendency from windward slope toward leeward slope with the increasing advection, while it was hard to describe the snow distribution over complex terrains with a unified deposition model due to the interaction of surrounding topographies and different atmospheric stabilities, and the particle tracking approach was substantially suitable for this issue. Our study significantly improved the understanding of the evolution of snow distributions at high levels of resolution.

  4. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas.

    PubMed

    Mann, J; Angelou, N; Arnqvist, J; Callies, D; Cantero, E; Arroyo, R Chávez; Courtney, M; Cuxart, J; Dellwik, E; Gottschall, J; Ivanell, S; Kühn, P; Lea, G; Matos, J C; Palma, J M L M; Pauscher, L; Peña, A; Rodrigo, J Sanz; Söderberg, S; Vasiljevic, N; Rodrigues, C Veiga

    2017-04-13

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  5. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, J.; Angelou, N.; Arnqvist, J.; Callies, D.; Cantero, E.; Arroyo, R. Chávez; Courtney, M.; Cuxart, J.; Dellwik, E.; Gottschall, J.; Ivanell, S.; Kühn, P.; Lea, G.; Matos, J. C.; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Pauscher, L.; Peña, A.; Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Söderberg, S.; Vasiljevic, N.; Rodrigues, C. Veiga

    2017-03-01

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  6. Challenges to autonomous navigation in complex urban terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Karlsen, Robert E.; DiBerardino, Chip; Mottern, Edward; Kott, N. Joseph, III

    2012-06-01

    In the field of military Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV), military units are adapting their concept of operations to focus on their mission capabilities within populated cities and towns. These types of operations are referred to as MOUT (Military Operations on Urban Terrain). As more Soldiers seek to incorporate technology to enhance their mission capabilities, there then becomes a need for UGV systems to encompass an ability to autonomously navigate through urban terrains. Autonomous systems have the potential to increase Soldier safety by mitigating the risk of unnecessary enemy exposure during routine urban reconnaissance. This paper presents the development and methodology that the military has sought to increase mission capabilities by incorporating autonomy into manned/unmanned ground vehicles. The presented solution that has been developed through the Safe Operations of Unmanned systems for Reconnaissance in Complex Environments (SOURCE) Army Technology Objective (ATO) has the ability and has been tested to safely navigate through complex urban environments. This paper will also focus on the challenges the military has faced to develop the presented autonomous UGV.

  7. Surface fluxes in atmospheric boundary layer flows over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Interactions between the atmosphere and the land/water surface can be described by fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars. While predicting the atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) flows and modeling regional/global weather and climate, these surface fluxes need to be specified as boundary conditions. It is a common practice to use formulations based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory even for flows over a wide range of complex terrain, which maybe deviate significantly from the conditions of steady, fully-developed ABL flow, due to the knowledge gap for turbulent transport of fluxes across the interface. This work aims to provide insights for spatial distribution of the surface fluxes in ABL flows involving typical complex terrain cases, including surface roughness transition, steep topography and canopy patches. Results from wind-tunnel experiments will be presented to characterize the surface momentum and heat fluxes for different flow regimes and their correlation to the turbulent flow properties in thermally-stratified boundary layers. Application of the similarity theory to such cases is evaluated by comparing to the measurements. Ultimately, new knowledge of surface fluxes will help to improve parameterization of the surface-atmosphere interaction in numerical models.

  8. Evaluating the accuracy and representativeness of Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar winds in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, K.; Emmitt, G. D.; Greco, S.; De Wekker, S.

    2013-12-01

    An Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL) was flown during the MATERHORN experiment in October 2012. The ADWL was used to obtain profiles of u,v,w,σlos and aerosol structure between the surface and flight level (~2500m AGL). The lidar returns were processed to obtain a vertical resolution of 50m and a complete profile every 1.5km. The aircraft (Navy Twin Otter) was flown in a 'lawnmower' pattern near and over Granite Mountain located at the Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. Combining multiple Lines of Sight (LOS) measurements to construct a vertical profile in complex terrain presents several challenges that must be met before using these data in numerical models. In addition to the wind profiles obtained with a nadir conical scan, we pointed the beam straight down to obtain a direct measure of the vertical velocity of the air. With a precision of < 10 cm/s, mountain waves, katabatic flows and other complex terrain induced flow features are resolved and provide validation of model resolved flow features. Examples of ADWL profile grids will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the ADWL winds. We will also illustrate how we are making comparisons with numerical model wind fields (WRF) by using a forward operator with lidar LOS observations. Particular attention will be paid to interpreting the non-conventional ADWL's estimate(s) of turbulent kinetic energy.

  9. Intelligent mobility research for robotic locomotion in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, Michael; Beckman, Blake; Digney, Bruce; Vincent, Isabelle; Ricard, Benoit

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section of Defence R&D Canada - Suffield is best described by its mission statement, which is "to augment soldiers and combat systems by developing and demonstrating practical, cost effective, autonomous intelligent systems capable of completing military missions in complex operating environments." The mobility requirement for ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings must increase significantly if robotic technology is to augment human efforts in these roles and environments. The intelligence required for autonomous systems to operate in complex environments demands advances in many fields of robotics. This has resulted in large bodies of research in areas of perception, world representation, and navigation, but the problem of locomotion in complex terrain has largely been ignored. In order to achieve its objective, the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section is pursuing research that explores the use of intelligent mobility algorithms designed to improve robot mobility. Intelligent mobility uses sensing, control, and learning algorithms to extract measured variables from the world, control vehicle dynamics, and learn by experience. These algorithms seek to exploit available world representations of the environment and the inherent dexterity of the robot to allow the vehicle to interact with its surroundings and produce locomotion in complex terrain. The primary focus of the paper is to present the intelligent mobility research within the framework of the research methodology, plan and direction defined at Defence R&D Canada - Suffield. It discusses the progress and future direction of intelligent mobility research and presents the research tools, topics, and plans to address this critical research gap. This research will create effective intelligence to improve the mobility of ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings to assist the Canadian Forces in their future urban operations.

  10. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Wharton, S.; Irons, Z.; Qualley, G.

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  11. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  12. Large-Eddy Simulations of Flows in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation as a methodology for numerical simulation of turbulent flows was first developed to study turbulent flows in atmospheric by Lilly (1967). The first LES were carried by Deardorff (1970) who used these simulations to study atmospheric boundary layers. Ever since, LES has been extensively used to study canonical atmospheric boundary layers, in most cases flat plate boundary layers under the assumption of horizontal homogeneity. Carefully designed LES of canonical convective and neutrally stratified and more recently stably stratified atmospheric boundary layers have contributed significantly to development of better understanding of these flows and their parameterizations in large scale models. These simulations were often carried out using codes specifically designed and developed for large-eddy simulations of horizontally homogeneous flows with periodic lateral boundary conditions. Recent developments in multi-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric flows enable numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes such as ARPS (Chow and Street, 2009), COAMPS (Golaz et al., 2009) and Weather Research and Forecasting model, to be used nearly seamlessly across a wide range of atmospheric scales from synoptic down to turbulent scales in atmospheric boundary layers. Before we can with confidence carry out multi-scale simulations of atmospheric flows, NWP codes must be validated for accurate performance in simulating flows over complex or inhomogeneous terrain. We therefore carry out validation of WRF-LES for simulations of flows over complex terrain using data from Askervein Hill (Taylor and Teunissen, 1985, 1987) and METCRAX (Whiteman et al., 2008) field experiments. WRF's nesting capability is employed with a one-way nested inner domain that includes complex terrain representation while the coarser outer nest is used to spin up fully developed atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and thus represent accurately inflow to the inner domain. LES of a

  13. Underestimation of Monostatic Sodar Measurements in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Paul; O'Sullivan, J.; Archer, R.; Bradley, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations in complex terrain have found that remote sensing instrumentation commonly finds mean wind-speed differences when compared to cup anemometery. In many cases the difference is found to be an underestimation and varies from 2 to 9% depending on topology. We describe these differences in a theoretical sense for a five-beam sodar. An investigation is conducted on a New Zealand ridge with a five-beam sodar and three computational models, consisting of a potential flow model and two computational fluid dynamical simulations, OpenFOAM and the industry standard software WindSim. All models predict the difference to within 0.1-2.5%. A comparative assessment is made and it is found that, given the computing overheads, the potential flow model provides a good compromise in the prediction of mean wind-speed difference.

  14. Complex geomorphologic assemblage of terrains in association with the banded terrain in Hellas basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, X.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.; Thomas, N.; Grindrod, P. M.; Chojnacki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Hellas basin acts as a major sink for the southern highlands of Mars and is likely to have recorded several episodes of sedimentation and erosion. The north-western part of the basin displays a potentially unique Amazonian landscape domain in the deepest part of Hellas, called ;banded terrain;, which is a deposit characterized by an alternation of narrow band shapes and inter-bands displaying a sinuous and relatively smooth surface texture suggesting a viscous flow origin. Here we use high-resolution (HiRISE and CTX) images to assess the geomorphological interaction of the banded terrain with the surrounding geomorphologic domains in the NW interior of Hellas to gain a better understanding of the geological evolution of the region as a whole. Our analysis reveals that the banded terrain is associated with six geomorphologic domains: a central plateau named Alpheus Colles, plain deposits (P1 and P2), reticulate (RT1 and RT2) and honeycomb terrains. Based on the analysis of the geomorphology of these domains and their cross-cutting relationships, we show that no widespread deposition post-dates the formation of the banded terrain, which implies that this domain is the youngest and latest deposit of the interior of Hellas. Therefore, the level of geologic activity in the NW Hellas during the Amazonian appears to have been relatively low and restricted to modification of the landscape through mechanical weathering, aeolian and periglacial processes. Thermophysical data and cross-cutting relationships support hypotheses of modification of the honeycomb terrain via vertical rise of diapirs such as ice diapirism, and the formation of the plain deposits through deposition and remobilization of an ice-rich mantle deposit. Finally, the observed gradual transition between honeycomb and banded terrain suggests that the banded terrain may have covered a larger area of the NW interior of Hellas in the past than previously thought. This has implications on the understanding of

  15. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  16. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  17. Stability Impact on Wake Development in Moderately Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infield, D.; Zorzi, G.

    2017-05-01

    This paper uses a year of SCADA data from Whitelee Wind Farm near Glasgow to investigate wind turbine wake development in moderately complex terrain. Atmospheric stability measurements in terms of Richardson number from a met mast at an adjoining site have been obtained and used to assess the impact of stability on wake development. Considerable filtering of these data has been undertaken to ensure that all turbines are working normally and are well aligned with the wind direction. A group of six wind turbines, more or less in a line, have been selected for analysis, and winds within a 2 degree direction sector about this line are used to ensure, as far as possible, that all the turbines investigated are fully immersed in the wake/s of the upstream turbine/s. Results show how the terrain effects combine with the wake effects, with both being of comparable importance for the site in question. Comparison has been made with results from two commercial CFD codes for neutral stability, and reasonable agreement is demonstrated. Richardson number has been plotted against wind shear and turbulence intensity at a met mast on the wind farm that for the selected wind direction is not in the wake of any turbines. Good correlations are found indicating that the Richardson numbers obtained are reliable. The filtered data used for wake analysis were split according to Richardson number into two groups representing slightly stable to neutral, and unstable conditions. Very little difference in wake development is apparent. A greater difference can be observed when the data are separated simply by turbulence intensity, suggesting that, although turbulence intensity is correlated with stability, of the two it is the parameter that most directly impacts on wake development through mixing of ambient and wake flows.

  18. Objective high Resolution Analysis over Complex Terrain with VERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Steinacker, R.; Steiner, A.

    2012-04-01

    VERA (Vienna Enhanced Resolution Analysis) is a model independent, high resolution objective analysis of meteorological fields over complex terrain. This system consists of a special developed quality control procedure and a combination of an interpolation and a downscaling technique. Whereas the so called VERA-QC is presented at this conference in the contribution titled "VERA-QC, an approved Data Quality Control based on Self-Consistency" by Andrea Steiner, this presentation will focus on the method and the characteristics of the VERA interpolation scheme which enables one to compute grid point values of a meteorological field based on irregularly distributed observations and topography related aprior knowledge. Over a complex topography meteorological fields are not smooth in general. The roughness which is induced by the topography can be explained physically. The knowledge about this behavior is used to define the so called Fingerprints (e.g. a thermal Fingerprint reproducing heating or cooling over mountainous terrain or a dynamical Fingerprint reproducing positive pressure perturbation on the windward side of a ridge) under idealized conditions. If the VERA algorithm recognizes patterns of one or more Fingerprints at a few observation points, the corresponding patterns are used to downscale the meteorological information in a greater surrounding. This technique allows to achieve an analysis with a resolution much higher than the one of the observational network. The interpolation of irregularly distributed stations to a regular grid (in space and time) is based on a variational principle applied to first and second order spatial and temporal derivatives. Mathematically, this can be formulated as a cost function that is equivalent to the penalty function of a thin plate smoothing spline. After the analysis field has been divided into the Fingerprint components and the unexplained part respectively, the requirement of a smooth distribution is applied to the

  19. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Angelou, N.; Callies, D.; Cantero, E.; Arroyo, R. Chávez; Courtney, M.; Cuxart, J.; Dellwik, E.; Gottschall, J.; Ivanell, S.; Kühn, P.; Lea, G.; Matos, J. C.; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Peña, A.; Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Söderberg, S.; Vasiljevic, N.; Rodrigues, C. Veiga

    2017-01-01

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265025

  20. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A

    2010-05-12

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  1. Comparison of the Actuator Line Model with Fully Resolved Simulations in Complex Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihing, Pascal; Schulz, Christoph; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald

    2017-05-01

    In the present paper the actuator line method is compared with fully resolved wind turbine simulations in offshore and complex terrain applications. In such flow fields, which are characterized by non-homogeneous and unsteady velocity distributions in the rotor plane, unsteady aerodynamic effects are likely and it is unclear how these characterize the wake development and load behavior of the wind turbine. The wake properties and loads are therefore compared for the case of a 5 MW wind turbine operating in a typical maritime atmosphere and a 2.4 MW onshore turbine located at a complex terrain site downstream of an escarpment. It was found that the actuator line predicts the wake structure, wake deflection and wake deficit in good agreement with the fully resolved simulation. However, an overestimation of velocity fluctuations was observed.

  2. When can a high-resolution simulation over complex terrain be called LES?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, Joan

    2015-12-01

    The ceaseless rise of computational power leads to a continuous increase of the resolution of the numerical models of the atmosphere. It is found today that operational models are run at horizontal resolutions near 1 km whereas research exercises for flows over complex terrain use resolutions at the hectometer scale. Horizontal resolutions of 100 m or finer have been used to perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) for some specific regimes like, e.g., the atmospheric boundary-layer in idealized configurations. However, to use the name "Large-Eddy Simulation" implies to be able to resolve at least the largest turbulent energetic eddies, which is almost impossible to reach with resolutions of the order of 100m for a real case, where many different processes occur linked to different scales, many of them even smaller than 100 m. Therefore, LES is an inappropriate denomination for these numerical exercises, that may simply be called High-Resolution Mesoscale Simulations.

  3. Spatio-temporal modelling of lightning climatologies for complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Umlauf, Nikolaus; Zeileis, Achim; Mayr, Georg J.; Schulz, Wolfgang; Diendorfer, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    This study develops methods for estimating lightning climatologies on the day-1 km-2 scale for regions with complex terrain and applies them to summertime observations (2010-2015) of the lightning location system ALDIS in the Austrian state of Carinthia in the Eastern Alps. Generalized additive models (GAMs) are used to model both the probability of occurrence and the intensity of lightning. Additive effects are set up for altitude, day of the year (season) and geographical location (longitude/latitude). The performance of the models is verified by 6-fold cross-validation. The altitude effect of the occurrence model suggests higher probabilities of lightning for locations on higher elevations. The seasonal effect peaks in mid-July. The spatial effect models several local features, but there is a pronounced minimum in the north-west and a clear maximum in the eastern part of Carinthia. The estimated effects of the intensity model reveal similar features, though they are not equal. The main difference is that the spatial effect varies more strongly than the analogous effect of the occurrence model. A major asset of the introduced method is that the resulting climatological information varies smoothly over space, time and altitude. Thus, the climatology is capable of serving as a useful tool in quantitative applications, i.e. risk assessment and weather prediction.

  4. Power Curve Modeling in Complex Terrain Using Statistical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Wharton, S.; Clifton, A.; Qualley, G.; Miller, W.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional power output curves typically model power only as a function of the wind speed at the turbine hub height. While the latter is an essential predictor of power output, wind speed information in other parts of the vertical profile, as well as additional atmospheric variables, are also important determinants of power. The goal of this work was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding wind speed information at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model. Using data from a wind farm with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in California, we trained three statistical models, a neural network, a random forest and a Gaussian process model, to predict power output from various sets of aforementioned predictors. The comparison of these predictions to the observed power data revealed that considerable improvements in prediction accuracy can be achieved both through the addition of predictors other than the hub-height wind speed and the use of statistical models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was funded by Wind Uncertainty Quantification Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-069.

  5. Investigations into the Interaction of a Wind Turbine with Atmospheric Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Klein, L.; Weihing, P.; Lutz, Th

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the Delayed-Detached-Eddy-Simulations (DES) of a generic 2.4 MW wind turbine in a complex terrain site facing a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. The boundary layer is generated based on measurement data derived at the complex terrain site. Further, the process of data preparation as well as the numerical setup are described. In the results the impact of complex terrain on the flow field is shown and estimations on the influence on the turbine performance are made. Afterwards, simulations of the turbine facing atmospheric inflow in flat and complex terrain are presented. An increase of loads resulting from a speed-up caused by the terrain as well as a clear change in the power spectrum of the turbine become visible in complex terrain compared to flat terrain. This finding is in agreement with the estimations derived previously. Moreover, the impact of inclined inflow caused by the local terrain slope can be seen in the load distribution vs. the azimuth angle, amongst others.

  6. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  7. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  8. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  9. Verification of forecast ensembles in complex terrain including observation uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Manfred; Kloiber, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, verification means to verify a forecast (ensemble) with the truth represented by observations. The observation errors are quite often neglected arguing that they are small when compared to the forecast error. In this study as part of the MesoVICT (Mesoscale Verification Inter-comparison over Complex Terrain) project it will be shown, that observation errors have to be taken into account for verification purposes. The observation uncertainty is estimated from the VERA (Vienna Enhanced Resolution Analysis) and represented via two analysis ensembles which are compared to the forecast ensemble. For the whole study results from COSMO-LEPS provided by Arpae-SIMC Emilia-Romagna are used as forecast ensemble. The time period covers the MesoVICT core case from 20-22 June 2007. In a first step, all ensembles are investigated concerning their distribution. Several tests have been executed (Kolmogorov-Smirnov-Test, Finkelstein-Schafer Test, Chi-Square Test etc.) showing no exact mathematical distribution. So the main focus is on non-parametric statistics (e.g. Kernel density estimation, Boxplots etc.) and also the deviation between "forced" normal distributed data and the kernel density estimations. In a next step the observational deviations due to the analysis ensembles are analysed. In a first approach scores are multiple times calculated with every single ensemble member from the analysis ensemble regarded as "true" observation. The results are presented as boxplots for the different scores and parameters. Additionally, the bootstrapping method is also applied to the ensembles. These possible approaches to incorporating observational uncertainty into the computation of statistics will be discussed in the talk.

  10. Stochastic Cascade Dynamical Downscaling of Precipitation over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posadas, A.; Duffaut, L. E.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Carbajal, M.; Heidinger, H.; Quiroz, R.

    2013-12-01

    spatial and temporal variability of rainfall between the rainfall fields obtained from the rain gauge network and those generated by the simulation model. The potential advantages of this methodology are discussed.Stochastic Cascade Dynamical Downscaling of Precipitation over Complex Terrain

  11. Ecohydrological Implications of Contrasting Slope and Aspect in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Link, T. E.; Klos, P. Z.; Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how complex terrain affects ecohydrological processes is increasingly important as we attempt to understand how water and carbon fluxes are integrated across relatively large domains. Spatial variations of incoming solar radiation are well understood and quantified, but the understanding their impacts on ecohydrologic processes is primarily qualitative. We provide detailed, extensive data quantifying the effects of contrasting slope/aspect on the soil physical environment and document the implications of those differences on ecohydrological processes. The study site, Johnston Draw, is located in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed and CZO in southwest Idaho, USA (43° latitude). Johnston Draw flows over granitic bedrock nearly due east, resulting in steep (25 to 40°) side slopes oriented north-south. At the study elevation (1600 m) approximately 50% of the annual precipitation is snow. We measured meteorological variables, snow depth, soil water (SW) and temperature (ST) at three paired locations for two years. Each soil pair consisted of depth profiles from 5 cm to bedrock measured hourly which were supplemented with periodic extensive measurements. Hourly photographs were taken at two of the pairs for one year. Streamflow is monitored at the Johnston Draw outlet and precipitation was measured at stations at the topographic bottom and top of the watershed. Geophysical data were collected in a transect across both slopes. The ST was warmer all year on the south-facing slope, with a mean annual difference of 5°C. This ST difference is effectively equivalent to a 1000 m elevation difference in Reynolds Creek. Despite clear differences in evaporative demand and the timing of spring "green up", the timing of summer SW decline is similar on both slopes. Deeper soil on north-facing slopes resulted in more plant available water and a longer growing season, which is reflected in the vegetation. Geophysical data indicate much deeper weathering on the

  12. Consequence analysis for accidental releases of toxic substances in a complex terrain with shoreline in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, Y.S.; Oh, H.S.; Moon, K.C.

    1999-07-01

    Offsite consequences resulting from various scenarios involving release of toxic substances in the Yochon Industrial Estate located in the Yosu Peninsula with complex terrain and intricate shorelines are estimated using ALOHA (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres) and RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System). ALOHA analyses by assuming the worst-case release scenarios for selected chemicals in the worst-case and alternative meteorological conditions indicate the impact on several thousand people in the nearby area. RAMS simulation is performed in order to consider the influence of terrain and shoreline. Receptors behind the terrain, 5 to 6 km distant from the source, also show high concentration when the wind blows to the terrain as well as receptors in front of the terrain in the nearby area. With considering the diurnal variations of meteorological variables, it is predicted that complicated wind patterns with low speeds could cause high concentration over the entire area adjacent to the Estate.

  13. Accurate Wind Characterization in Complex Terrain Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Kosovic, B

    2009-09-30

    This paper describes an immersed boundary method (IBM) that facilitates the explicit resolution of complex terrain within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two different interpolation methods, trilinear and inverse distance weighting, are used at the core of the IBM algorithm. Functional aspects of the algorithm's implementation and the accuracy of results are considered. Simulations of flow over a three-dimensional hill with shallow terrain slopes are preformed with both WRF's native terrain-following coordinate and with both IB methods. Comparisons of flow fields from the three simulations show excellent agreement, indicating that both IB methods produce accurate results. However, when ease of implementation is considered, inverse distance weighting is superior. Furthermore, inverse distance weighting is shown to be more adept at handling highly complex urban terrain, where the trilinear interpolation algorithm breaks down. This capability is demonstrated by using the inverse distance weighting core of the IBM to model atmospheric flow in downtown Oklahoma City.

  14. The estimation of surface solar radiation considering the distortion of the cloud shadow on complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, X.

    2016-12-01

    Clouds and topography are the two most important factors that affect the surface radiation, and cloud shadows are also an important influencing factor to estimate the surface radiation with remote sensing method. Cloud and its shadow under different observation angle and the angle of the sun will lead to 3-D geometry effect. Furthermore, the terrain also has influence on downward solar radiation. At the same time, the cloud shadow distortion under complex terrain also should be taken into consideration in the estimation of radiation. So "coupling" the clouds and the terrain under the certain condition has the vital significance on estimating the surface radiation values. Cloud detection results of high resolution satellite data was used, according to the height of the cloud and satellite observation angle information the position of cloud on the image was corrected to get the true position of the cloud. To more accurately describe the shadow distortion caused by the terrain, a geometrical method was used to calculate the true position of cloud shadows on complex terrain. On the basis of the result after the calculation of shadows, downward surface solar radiation of the corresponding position was calculated based on some parametric methods for clear and cloudy sky respectively. Then, according to the mountain radiative transfer theory, DEM and albedo was employed in the topographic correction model for the downward surface solar radiation (DSSR) calculated above. Finally, we made some comparisons between cloud shadows on smooth surface and complex terrain as well as DSSR without any correction and with correction of terrain effect. The results showed that it is necessary to make these corrections on complex terrain. There were some big difference of the DSSR distribution and values before making correction.

  15. Comparison of Four Spatial Interpolation Methods for Estimating Soil Moisture in a Complex Terrain Catchment

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xueling; Fu, Bojie; Lü, Yihe; Sun, Feixiang; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Many spatial interpolation methods perform well for gentle terrains when producing spatially continuous surfaces based on ground point data. However, few interpolation methods perform satisfactorily for complex terrains. Our objective in the present study was to analyze the suitability of several popular interpolation methods for complex terrains and propose an optimal method. A data set of 153 soil water profiles (1 m) from the semiarid hilly gully Loess Plateau of China was used, generated under a wide range of land use types, vegetation types and topographic positions. Four spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary kriging, inverse distance weighting, linear regression and regression kriging were used for modeling, randomly partitioning the data set into 2/3 for model fit and 1/3 for independent testing. The performance of each method was assessed quantitatively in terms of mean-absolute-percentage-error, root-mean-square-error, and goodness-of-prediction statistic. The results showed that the prediction accuracy differed significantly between each method in complex terrain. The ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted methods performed poorly due to the poor spatial autocorrelation of soil moisture at small catchment scale with complex terrain, where the environmental impact factors were discontinuous in space. The linear regression model was much more suitable to the complex terrain than the former two distance-based methods, but the predicted soil moisture changed too sharply near the boundary of the land use types and junction of the sunny (southern) and shady (northern) slopes, which was inconsistent with reality because soil moisture should change gradually in short distance due to its mobility in soil. The most optimal interpolation method in this study for the complex terrain was the hybrid regression kriging, which produced a detailed, reasonable prediction map with better accuracy and prediction effectiveness. PMID:23372749

  16. Comparison of four spatial interpolation methods for estimating soil moisture in a complex terrain catchment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xueling; Fu, Bojie; Lü, Yihe; Sun, Feixiang; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Many spatial interpolation methods perform well for gentle terrains when producing spatially continuous surfaces based on ground point data. However, few interpolation methods perform satisfactorily for complex terrains. Our objective in the present study was to analyze the suitability of several popular interpolation methods for complex terrains and propose an optimal method. A data set of 153 soil water profiles (1 m) from the semiarid hilly gully Loess Plateau of China was used, generated under a wide range of land use types, vegetation types and topographic positions. Four spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary kriging, inverse distance weighting, linear regression and regression kriging were used for modeling, randomly partitioning the data set into 2/3 for model fit and 1/3 for independent testing. The performance of each method was assessed quantitatively in terms of mean-absolute-percentage-error, root-mean-square-error, and goodness-of-prediction statistic. The results showed that the prediction accuracy differed significantly between each method in complex terrain. The ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted methods performed poorly due to the poor spatial autocorrelation of soil moisture at small catchment scale with complex terrain, where the environmental impact factors were discontinuous in space. The linear regression model was much more suitable to the complex terrain than the former two distance-based methods, but the predicted soil moisture changed too sharply near the boundary of the land use types and junction of the sunny (southern) and shady (northern) slopes, which was inconsistent with reality because soil moisture should change gradually in short distance due to its mobility in soil. The most optimal interpolation method in this study for the complex terrain was the hybrid regression kriging, which produced a detailed, reasonable prediction map with better accuracy and prediction effectiveness.

  17. Evaluation of the Industrial Source Complex Short-Term model: dispersion over terrain.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah A

    2004-04-01

    Terrain around an air discharge source can have several influences on diffusion, the pattern of plume dispersion, the wind flow, and the turbulence characteristics. The Industrial Source Complex Short-Term (ISCST) model contains simple algorithms to attempt to account for the effects of terrain. The model has the ability to analyze concentrations in any type of terrain by using the terrain options available for running the model. In this study, the ISCST model was adopted to predict the concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in and around the Mina Al-Fahal refinery in Oman. The central purpose of the study was to examine the performance of the ISCST model in predicting SO2 concentrations under two different scenarios: (1) when flat terrain was assumed; and (2) when the terrain descriptions were addressed. The results of these two scenarios were validated against SO2 monitoring data. The comparison showed that the model underestimated the observed concentrations for the two scenarios. However, the predicted concentrations of SO2 in the absence of the terrain scenario were in better agreement with the observations. Furthermore, the predicted SO2 concentrations were found to be lower than the World Health Organization guideline values, with the maximum concentrations found to occur relatively close to the sources of emission.

  18. Terrain complexity characterization in the eastern coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Flores, G.; Nava-Sanchez, E. H.; Segovia Zavala, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    Terrain complexity is an important feature for geomorphological analysis and characterization, since it is associated with processes that control the landscape evolution, giving rise to geological formations of varying topographic complexity. In the geometrical sense, the terrain complexity depicts the shape of the landform surface or cross section, such as rugosity, curvature, fractal dimension, slope, aspect, etc. Moreover, the coastline complexity or indentation index has been used as an auxiliary parameter in coastline characterization. Currently, there are a variety of terrain and shoreline complexity indexes, derived from digital elevation models and digital coastlines, respectively, which usually are evaluated and interpreted independently. In this work the evaluation of these indexes was implemented in twenty watersheds of the eastern coast of the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. To evaluate the terrain complexity index, the slope, profile curvature and roughness were computed and weighted. For this purpose the digital elevation model of 30 m resolution, obtained from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI) was used. The coastline complexity was assessed based on the variability of angles of coastline segments, as are defined in the Global Self-consistent, Hierarchical, High-resolution Geography Database (GSHHG). Five classes were identified for each index, whose distribution was represented by digital cartography. In general, the gullies have the highest terrain complexity, while the lower values correspond to areas of alluvial fans and other areas of sedimentation close to the shoreline. The spatial distribution of these indexes could be useful to mapping terrain classification and as support to analyze geological and oceanographic processes that influence this region.

  19. Heuristic-driven graph wavelet modeling of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioacǎ, Teodor; Dumitrescu, Bogdan; Stupariu, Mihai-Sorin; Pǎtru-Stupariu, Ileana; Nǎpǎrus, Magdalena; Stoicescu, Ioana; Peringer, Alexander; Buttler, Alexandre; Golay, François

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel method for building a multi-resolution representation of large digital surface models. The surface points coincide with the nodes of a planar graph which can be processed using a critically sampled, invertible lifting scheme. To drive the lazy wavelet node partitioning, we employ an attribute aware cost function based on the generalized quadric error metric. The resulting algorithm can be applied to multivariate data by storing additional attributes at the graph's nodes. We discuss how the cost computation mechanism can be coupled with the lifting scheme and examine the results by evaluating the root mean square error. The algorithm is experimentally tested using two multivariate LiDAR sets representing terrain surface and vegetation structure with different sampling densities.

  20. Soil Temperature Variability in Complex Terrain measured using Distributed a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Link, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical environmental controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Rates of carbon cycling, mineral weathering, infiltration and snow melt are all influenced by Ts. Although broadly reflective of the climate, Ts is sensitive to local variations in cover (vegetative, litter, snow), topography (slope, aspect, position), and soil properties (texture, water content), resulting in a spatially and temporally complex distribution of Ts across the landscape. Understanding and quantifying the processes controlled by Ts requires an understanding of that distribution. Relatively few spatially distributed field Ts data exist, partly because traditional Ts data are point measurements. A relatively new technology, fiber optic distributed temperature system (FO-DTS), has the potential to provide such data but has not been rigorously evaluated in the context of remote, long term field research. We installed FO-DTS in a small experimental watershed in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in the Owyhee Mountains of SW Idaho. The watershed is characterized by complex terrain and a seasonal snow cover. Our objectives are to: (i) evaluate the applicability of fiber optic DTS to remote field environments and (ii) to describe the spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature in complex terrain influenced by a variable snow cover. We installed fiber optic cable at a depth of 10 cm in contrasting snow accumulation and topographic environments and monitored temperature along 750 m with DTS. We found that the DTS can provide accurate Ts data (+/- .4°C) that resolves Ts changes of about 0.03°C at a spatial scale of 1 m with occasional calibration under conditions with an ambient temperature range of 50°C. We note that there are site-specific limitations related cable installation and destruction by local fauna. The FO-DTS provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variability of Ts in a landscape. We found strong seasonal

  1. Design of a WSN for the Sampling of Environmental Variability in Complex Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Tardío, Miguel A.; Felicísimo, Ángel M.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ environmental parameter measurements using sensor systems connected to a wireless network have become widespread, but the problem of monitoring large and mountainous areas by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is not well resolved. The main reasons for this are: (1) the environmental variability distribution is unknown in the field; (2) without this knowledge, a huge number of sensors would be necessary to ensure the complete coverage of the environmental variability and (3) WSN design requirements, for example, effective connectivity (intervisibility), limiting distances and controlled redundancy, are usually solved by trial and error. Using temperature as the target environmental variable, we propose: (1) a method to determine the homogeneous environmental classes to be sampled using the digital elevation model (DEM) and geometric simulations and (2) a procedure to determine an effective WSN design in complex terrain in terms of the number of sensors, redundancy, cost and spatial distribution. The proposed methodology, based on geographic information systems and binary integer programming can be easily adapted to a wide range of applications that need exhaustive and continuous environmental monitoring with high spatial resolution. The results show that the WSN design is perfectly suited to the topography and the technical specifications of the sensors, and provides a complete coverage of the environmental variability in terms of Sun exposure. However these results still need be validated in the field and the proposed procedure must be refined. PMID:25412218

  2. Large eddy simulation for atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat and complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Stoellinger, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow over complex terrain with neutral stratification using the OpenFOAM-based simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA). The complete work flow to investigate the LES for the ABL over real complex terrain is described including meteorological-tower data analysis, mesh generation and case set-up. New boundary conditions for the lateral and top boundaries are developed and validated to allow inflow and outflow as required in complex terrain simulations. The turbulent inflow data for the terrain simulation is generated using a precursor simulation of a flat and neutral ABL. Conditionally averaged met-tower data is used to specify the conditions for the flat precursor simulation and is also used for comparison with the simulation results of the terrain LES. A qualitative analysis of the simulation results reveals boundary layer separation and recirculation downstream of a prominent ridge that runs across the simulation domain. Comparisons of mean wind speed, standard deviation and direction between the computed results and the conditionally averaged tower data show a reasonable agreement.

  3. Evaluation of flash-flood discharge forecasts in complex terrain using precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, D.; Warner, T.T.; Brandes, E.A.; Leavesley, G.H.; Sun, Jielun; Mueller, C.K.

    2001-01-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods produced by thunderstorm (convective) precipitation in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the precipitation distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds are generally small in size, and small position errors in the forecast or observed placement of the precipitation can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good precipitation estimates and predictions, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the precipitation-rate input data. Different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective precipitation will be applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado flash flood of July 1996, where over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the precipitation was exacerbated by the fact that a significant fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event. Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service's operational Weather Surveillance Radar-Doppler 1988 and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, research, dual-polarization radar, colocated to the east of Denver, are compared. In addition, very short range forecasts from a convection-resolving dynamic model, which is initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds, are compared with forecasts from an automated-algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate, and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data, have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the radar data and forecasts from the dynamic model and the automated algorithm could be operationally useful for input to surface

  4. An evaluation of three models designed for siting wind turbines in areas of complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.C.

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of three micrositing models to simulate the wind flow in complex terrain. One of these models, NOABL, is a mass-consistent model while the other two, MS3DJH/3R and BZ, are descendants of Jackson-Hunt (J-H) theory. All three models were applied to two areas of complex terrain, Askervein Hill in Scotland and Altamont Pass in California. Askervein Hill is an isolated hill of moderate slope surrounded by a flat plain. In marked contrast, the terrain of Altamont Pass is very complicated and is aptly described as being very hilly. Over each modeled area, wind measurements taken from a relatively dense network of anemometry were used to assess the performance of the models by comparing these data to the model-derived winds. 20 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Downscaling surface wind predictions from numerical weather prediction models in complex terrain with WindNinja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, Natalie S.; Forthofer, Jason M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Shannon, Kyle S.; Butler, Bret W.

    2016-04-01

    Wind predictions in complex terrain are important for a number of applications. Dynamic downscaling of numerical weather prediction (NWP) model winds with a high-resolution wind model is one way to obtain a wind forecast that accounts for local terrain effects, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and flows induced by local surface heating and cooling. In this paper we investigate the ability of a mass-consistent wind model for downscaling near-surface wind predictions from four NWP models in complex terrain. Model predictions are compared with surface observations from a tall, isolated mountain. Downscaling improved near-surface wind forecasts under high-wind (near-neutral atmospheric stability) conditions. Results were mixed during upslope and downslope (non-neutral atmospheric stability) flow periods, although wind direction predictions generally improved with downscaling. This work constitutes evaluation of a diagnostic wind model at unprecedented high spatial resolution in terrain with topographical ruggedness approaching that of typical landscapes in the western US susceptible to wildland fire.

  6. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kottmeier, C.; Kalthoff, N.; Barthlott, C.; Corsmeier, U.; Van Baelen, J.; Coulter, R.; Environmental Science Division; Inst. for Meteorology and Climate Research; Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Inst. of Physics and Meteorology

    2008-12-01

    Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study) that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i) surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii) surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii) mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analyzed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data) are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line, and the flow

  7. Mesoscale modeling study of severe convection over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Meng, Zhiyong; Zhu, Peijun; Su, Tao; Zhai, Guoqing

    2016-11-01

    Short squall lines that occurred over Lishui, southwestern Zhejiang Province, China, on 5 July 2012, were investigated using the WRF model based on 1°×1° gridded NCEP Final Operational Global Analysis data. The results from the numerical simulations were particularly satisfactory in the simulated radar echo, which realistically reproduced the generation and development of the convective cells during the period of severe convection. The initiation of this severe convective case was mainly associated with the uplift effect of mesoscale mountains, topographic convergence, sufficient water vapor, and enhanced low-level southeasterly wind from the East China Sea. An obvious wind velocity gradient occurred between the Donggong Mountains and the southeast coastline, which easily enabled wind convergence on the windward slope of the Donggong Mountains; both strong mid-low-level southwesterly wind and low-level southeasterly wind enhanced vertical shear over the mountains to form instability; and a vertical coupling relation between the divergence on the upper-left side of the Donggong Mountains and the convergence on the lower-left side caused the convection to develop rapidly. The convergence centers of surface streams occurred over the mountain terrain and updrafts easily broke through the lifting condensation level (LCL) because of the strong wind convergence and topographic lift, which led to water vapor condensation above the LCL and the generation of the initial convective cloud. The centers of surface convergence continually created new convective cells that moved with the southwest wind and combined along the Donggong Mountains, eventually forming a short squall line that caused severe convective weather.

  8. Evaluation of MODIS aerosol optical depth for semi­-arid environments in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, H.; Loria Salazar, S. M.; Panorska, A. K.; Arnott, W. P.; Barnard, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing to estimate spatially resolved ground level air pollutant concentrations is increasing due to advancements in remote sensing technology and the limited number of surface observations. Satellite retrievals provide global, spatiotemporal air quality information and are used to track plumes, estimate human exposures, model emissions, and determine sources (i.e., natural versus anthropogenic) in regulatory applications. Ground level PM2.5 concentrations can be estimated using columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS, where the satellite retrieval serves as a spatial surrogate to simulate surface PM2.5 gradients. The spatial statistical models and MODIS AOD retrieval algorithms have been evaluated for the dark, vegetated eastern US, while the semi-arid western US continues to be an understudied region with associated complexity due to heterogeneous emissions, smoke from wildfires, and complex terrain. The objective of this work is to evaluate the uncertainty of MODIS AOD retrievals by comparing with columnar AOD and surface PM2.5 measurements from AERONET and EPA networks. Data is analyzed from multiple stations in California and Nevada for three years where four major wildfires occurred. Results indicate that MODIS retrievals fail to estimate column-integrated aerosol pollution in the summer months. This is further investigated by quantifying the statistical relationships between MODIS AOD, AERONET AOD, and surface PM2.5 concentrations. Data analysis indicates that the distribution of MODIS AOD is significantly (p<0.05) different than AERONET AOD. Further, using the results of distributional and association analysis the impacts of MODIS AOD uncertainties on the spatial gradients are evaluated. Additionally, the relationships between these uncertainties and physical parameters in the retrieval algorithm (e.g., surface reflectance, Ångström Extinction Exponent) are discussed.

  9. Linking aboveground net primary productivity to soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    F.S. Peterson; K. Lajtha

    2013-01-01

    Factors influencing soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in complex terrain, where vegetation, climate, and topography vary over the scale of a few meters, are not well understood. We examined the spatial correlations of lidar and geographic information system-derived landscape topography, empirically measured soil...

  10. KRISSY: user's guide to modeling three-dimensional wind flow in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fosberg; Michael L. Sestak

    1986-01-01

    KRISSY is a computer model for generating three-dimensional wind flows in complex terrain from data that were not or perhaps cannot be collected. The model is written in FORTRAN IV This guide describes data requirements, modeling, and output from an applications viewpoint rather than that of programming or theoretical modeling. KRISSY is designed to minimize...

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  12. Using nocturnal cold air drainage flow to monitor ecosystem processes in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Thomas G. Pypker; Michael H. Unsworth; Alan C. Mix; William Rugh; Troy Ocheltree; Karrin Alstad; Barbara J. Bond

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents initial investigations of a new approach to monitor ecosystem processes in complex terrain on large scales. Metabolic processes in mountainous ecosystems are poorly represented in current ecosystem monitoring campaigns because the methods used for monitoring metabolism at the ecosystem scale (e.g., eddy covariance) require flat study sites. Our goal...

  13. Complex Burial and Exhumation of South Polar Cap Pitted Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. The two prominent bright stripes at the left/center of the image are covered with bright frost and thus create the illusion that they are sunlit from the lower left.

    The large pits, troughs, and 'swiss cheese' of the south polar residual cap appear to have been formed in the upper 4 or 5 layers of the polar material. Each layer is approximately 2 meters (6.6 feet) thick. Some Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images of this terrain show examples in which older pitted and eroded layers have been previously buried and are now being exhumed. The example shown here includes two narrow, diagonal slopes that trend from upper left toward lower right at the left/center portion of the frame. Along the bottoms of these slopes are revealed a layer that underlies them in which there are many more pits and troughs than in the upper layer. It is likely in this case that the lower layer formed its pits and troughs before it was covered by the upper layer. This observation suggests that the troughs, pits, and 'swiss cheese' features of the south polar cap are very old and form over long time scales.

    The picture is located near 84.6oS, 45.1oW, and covers an area 3 km by 5 km (1.9 x 3.1 mi) at a resolution of about 3.8 meters (12 ft) per pixel. The image was taken during southern spring on August 29, 1999.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  14. Some simple improvements to an emergency response model for use in complex coastal terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1992-06-01

    The MACHWIND model (Meyers 1989) is one of a group of models used to compute regional wind fields from tower wind data and/or vertical wind profiles. The wind fields are in turn used to calculate atmospheric diffusion, to guide emergency responses. MACHWIND has performed acceptably in uniform terrain under steady, well mixed conditions. However, extension of the model to more complex situations is problematic. In coastal, hilly terrain like that near Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in southern California, calculations of the wind field can be enhanced significantly by several modifications to the original code. This report highlights the structure of MACHWIND and details the enhancements that were implemented.

  15. Estimation of spatially distributed latent energy flux over complex terrain using a scanning water-vapor Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.I.; Eichinger, W.; Archuleta, J.; Cottingame, W.; Osborne, M.; Tellier, L.

    1995-09-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the critical variables in both water and energy balance models of the hydrological system. The hydrologic system is driven by the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, and as such is a spatially distributed process. Traditional techniques rely on point sensors to collect information that is then averaged over a region. The assumptions involved in spatially average point data is of limited value (1) because of limited sensors in the arrays, (2) the inability to extend and interpret the Measured scalars and estimated fluxes at a point over large areas in complex terrain, and (3) the limited understanding of the relationship between point measurements of spatial processes. Remote sensing technology offers the ability to collect detailed spatially distributed data. However, the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s volume-imaging, scanning water-vapor Raman lidar has been shown to be able to estimate the latent energy flux at a point. The extension of this capability to larger scales over complex terrain represents a step forward. This abstract Outlines the techniques used to estimate the spatially resolved latent energy flux. The following sections describe the site, model, data acquired, and lidar estimated latent energy ``map``.

  16. Numerical and Experimental Methods for Wake Flow Analysis in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Piccioni, Emanuele; Terzi, Ludovico

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and interpretation of the quality of wind farms power output is a non-trivial task, which poses at least three main challenges: reliable comprehension of free wind flow, which is stretched to the limit on very complex terrains, realistic model of how wake interactions resemble on the wind flow, awareness of the consequences on turbine control systems, including alignment patterns to the wind and, consequently, power output. The present work deals with an onshore wind farm in southern Italy, which has been a test case of IEA- Task 31 Wakebench project: 17 turbines, with 2.3 MW of rated power each, are sited on a very complex terrain. A cluster of machines is investigated through numerical and experimental methods: CFD is employed for simulating wind fields and power extraction, as well as wakes, are estimated through the Actuator Disc model. SCADA data mining techniques are employed for comparison between models and actual performances. The simulations are performed both on the real terrain and on flat terrain, in order to disentangle the effects of complex flow and wake effects. Attention is devoted to comparison between actual alignment patterns of the cluster of turbines and predicted flow deviation.

  17. An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Chow, F K; Mirocha, J D; Lundquist, K A

    2007-09-04

    Simulations of atmospheric flow through urban areas must account for a wide range of physical phenomena including both mesoscale and urban processes. Numerical weather prediction models, such as the Weather and Research Forecasting model (WRF), excel at predicting synoptic and mesoscale phenomena. With grid spacings of less than 1 km (as is required for complex heterogeneous urban areas), however, the limits of WRF's terrain capabilities and subfilter scale (SFS) turbulence parameterizations are exposed. Observations of turbulence in urban areas frequently illustrate a local imbalance of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), which cannot be captured by current turbulence models. Furthermore, WRF's terrain-following coordinate system is inappropriate for high-resolution simulations that include buildings. To address these issues, we are implementing significant modifications to the ARW core of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. First, we are implementing an improved turbulence model, the Dynamic Reconstruction Model (DRM), following Chow et al. (2005). Second, we are modifying WRF's terrain-following coordinate system by implementing an immersed boundary method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion papers detailing the improvements enabled by the DRM and the IBM approaches are also presented (by Mirocha et al., paper 13.1, and K.A. Lundquist et al., paper 11.1, respectively). This overview of the LLNL-UC Berkeley collaboration presents the motivation for this work and some highlights of our progress to date. After implementing both DRM and an IBM for buildings in WRF, we will be able to seamlessly integrate mesoscale synoptic boundary conditions with building-scale urban simulations using grid nesting and lateral boundary forcing. This multi-scale integration will enable high-resolution simulations of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities in

  18. Viewpoint tethering for remotely operated vehicles: effects on complex terrain navigation and spatial awareness.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Justin G; Lamb, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    The effect of viewpoint on the navigation of complex terrain and on spatial awareness was examined with the use of a simulated remotely operated vehicle. The ability to build terrain models in real time may soon allow remote vehicular control from any viewpoint. A virtual tether couples the viewpoint to the vehicle's position and orientation, but shows more of the terrain than a fully immersive egocentric display. In this sense, it provides visual momentum by providing a view that incorporates egocentric and exocentric qualities. For this study, 12 participants navigated a simulated vehicle across complex virtual terrain using five different display viewpoints: egocentric, dynamic tether, rigid tether, 3-D exocentric, and 2-D exocentric. While navigating, participants had to avoid being seen by simulated enemy units. After the navigation task, participants' spatial awareness was assessed using a recognition task. The tethered displays minimized the time during which the participant's vehicle was visible to enemy positions. The egocentric display was more effective than exocentric displays (2-D or 3-D) for navigation, and the exocentric displays were more effective than egocentric for time seen during navigation and the recognition task. The tethered displays produced intermediate results for navigation and recognition. Viewpoint tethering produced the most effective displays for minimizing time seen, but tethered displays were less effective than egocentric and exocentric displays for navigation and recognition, respectively. A tethered display is recommended for applications in which it is necessary to understand the relation of nearby locations to one's own location.

  19. Turbulence structure of the near-surface boundary layer in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfyri, Eleni; Rotach, Mathias Walter; Stiperski, Ivana; Bosveld, Fred; Lehner, Manuela; Obleitner, Friedrich

    2017-04-01

    Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) is evaluated in two cases: truly complex terrain (CT) and horizontally inhomogeneous and flat (HIF) terrain. CT data are derived from 5 measurement sites, which differ in terms of slope, orientation and surface roughness at the Inn Valley of Austria (i-Box) and HIF data come from one measurement site at the Cabauw experimental site (Netherlands). The applicability of the surface-layer, 'ideal' similarity relations is examined for both data-sets and the non-dimensional variances of temperature and humidity as a function of stability (z/L, where L is the Obukhov length) are compared for each type of terrain. Large deviations from the reference curves in case of temperature are observed in both CT and HIF, leading to the conclusion that these deviations are not due to the complex terrain but due to inappropriate near-neutral description of the reference curves. It is found here that the non-dimensional temperature variance exhibits a -1 slope in the near-neutral region, for both CT and HIF datasets. In addition, the constant-fluxes hypothesis of the MOST is evaluated at one i-Box site. It is found that only about 1% of the data show constant momentum, sensible and latent heat fluxes with height. Therefore, local scaling instead of surface layer scaling is being used in this study.

  20. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: executive summary. Technical progress report, FY-1979 through FY-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-08-01

    In 1978, the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Assistant Secretary for Environment in the Department of Energy developed a program aimed specifically at atmospheric studies in complex terrain - ASCOT. The ASCOT program was designed to develop the technology needed to assess atmospheric properties and the impact of energy sources on air quality in areas of complex terrain. The ASCOT team is composed of scientists from DOE national laboratories, other federal laboratories, and university programs. To initiate the program, each participating laboratory and university was asked to redirect funds into an area focusing on research that involved atmospheric boundary layer flow subject to interactions with complicated underlying terrain. The two broad objectives under which the program was organized are: to improve fundamental knowledge of transport and dispersion processes in complex terrain; and to utilize this improved insight into the physics of terrain dominated flows to provide a methodology for performing air quality assessments. The initial focus of the ASCOT program has been on the transport and dispersion of pollutants entrained in or near nocturnal drainage flows. This phenomenon was selected on the basis of its importance for transporting pollutants from energy related facilities to population or agricultural centers that are generally situated within valleys. The Geysers geothermal area in northern California, a large geothermal power producing region situated within the coastal-mountain range was chosen as the primary field experimental area. Three series of major field experiments were conducted in this area; while smaller scale studies were carried out at Rattlesnake Mountain near Richland, Washington, Corral Gulch in western Colorado, and on Parajarito Mountain near Los Alamos, New Mexico to evaluate cold air drainage on relatively simple slopes. 1 figure, 4 tables.

  1. Experimental characterization of atmospheric diffusion in complex terrain with land-sea interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.M.; Otamendi, E.; Alonso, L.A.; Ureta, I.

    1987-07-01

    The body of information presented in this paper is directed to scientists working in atmospheric dispersion research and model development. Two years of field measurements in the coastal area of Bilbao in northern Spain show that the diffusion behavior in this complex terrain can be classified into several well defined patterns, which correspond to certain meteorological conditions. The approach taken has been the systematic use of SO/sub 2/ remote sensors (COSPEC) and ground level monitors in moving platforms which are used to follow and document the flow of the air mass. Results to date show that complex reentry cycles can occur and that synoptically different flows may be indistinguishable by wind sensors at ground level (affected by channeling), and yet result in totally different observed pollution levels by a fixed monitoring network (affected by topographical effects). These results are being used to parameterize the cause-effect relationships and guide the modeling efforts in this area of complex terrain.

  2. Reference evapotranspiration from coarse-scale and dynamically downscaled data in complex terrain: Sensitivity to interpolation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Courtenay; Khatri, Krishna B.; Kochanski, Adam K.; Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate whether dynamically downscaled high resolution (4-km) climate data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provide physically meaningful additional information for reference evapotranspiration (E) calculation compared to the recently published GridET framework that uses interpolation from coarser-scale simulations run at 32-km resolution. The analysis focuses on complex terrain of Utah in the western United States for years 1985-2010, and comparisons were made statewide with supplemental analyses specifically for regions with irrigated agriculture. E was calculated using the standardized equation and procedures proposed by the American Society of Civil Engineers from hourly data, and climate inputs from WRF and GridET were debiased relative to the same set of observations. For annual mean values, E from WRF (EW) and E from GridET (EG) both agreed well with E derived from observations (r2 = 0.95, bias < 2 mm). Domain-wide, EW and EG were well correlated spatially (r2 = 0.89), however local differences ΔE =EW -EG were as large as +439 mm year-1 (+26%) in some locations, and ΔE averaged +36 mm year-1. After linearly removing the effects of contrasts in solar radiation and wind speed, which are characteristically less reliable under downscaling in complex terrain, approximately half the residual variance was accounted for by contrasts in temperature and humidity between GridET and WRF. These contrasts stemmed from GridET interpolating using an assumed lapse rate of Γ = 6.5 K km-1, whereas WRF produced a thermodynamically-driven lapse rate closer to 5 K km-1 as observed in mountainous terrain. The primary conclusions are that observed lapse rates in complex terrain differ markedly from the commonly assumed Γ = 6.5 K km-1, these lapse rates can be realistically resolved via dynamical downscaling, and use of constant Γ produces differences in E of order as large as 102 mm year-1.

  3. Water allocation for agriculture complex terrain under changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putu Santikayasa, I.; Perdinan; Basit, Rizki Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The current water resources management in Indonesia requires the government to pay more attention on sustainable water management. Agriculture as the highest water demand in the country need better water management as the impact of future changing climate. Furthermore, the water managers as well as policy makers may require integrating the climate change assessment into water resources allocation policy and management. Agropolitan in Malang district, East java – Indonesia is an agriculture which is characterized by complex agricultural system and was assigned as a case study. The supply-demand water allocation approach was applied on allocating water to different water users under current and future climatic condition. Both climate and the changing nature of water demand have affected the development and evolution of water allocation. The result shows that the water supply is expected to decrease under future climate comparing with the current condition. Furthermore, it is required to incorporate the future climate information on design the future water policy and management to reduce the adverse impact of changing climate. This study also suggested policy actions as recommendation to better manage current climate variability as well as future uncertainty from climate change impacts on water allocation and resources management.

  4. Representativeness of Lidar Wind Measurements over Moderately Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Brewer, A.; Choukulkar, A.; Banta, R. M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Clack, C.; Carroll, B.; Delgado, R.; Lee, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent Doppler lidars can provide accurate horizontal and vertical information on profiles of wind flow variables such as wind speed, direction, and turbulence at high spatial resolutions. Such measurements are well suited to understanding physical processes within the boundary layer and validating wind forecast models. However, interpreting the differences between measurements and model outputs is challenging without a proper understanding of the spatial representativeness of the measurements. This paper presents analysis of measurements from several lidars obtained during the Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory site from June 23—July 14, 2014.Data collected by two scanning Doppler lidars and 2 wind profiling lidars over moderately complex in Northern Colorado (about 25 km East of the Rocky Mountains) near the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory are used to determine the representativeness of wind profile measurements as a function of spatial footprint (defined by retrieval technique used) and spatial separation. In addition to the analysis of the representativeness of measured wind profiles, the paper discusses the sensitivity and accuracy of a commercial lidar (Leosphere 200S) data comparing to the NOAA High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL). Examples of wind profiles will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the measured winds.

  5. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L.; Fajen, Brett R.

    2017-01-01

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker’s center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision. PMID:28739912

  6. Using Topographic Engineering to Achieve Dominance in Urban and Complex Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Information dominance and dominant maneuver are harder to achieve in urban and complex terrain, but there are measures we can take to give our soldiers important advantages. Engineer solutions include physical measures to interdict threat forces, such as countermine operations and emplacement of barriers, as well as command and control (C2) measures that can enhance our information dominance . This article focuses on how the topographic engineering component of information dominance helps achieve dominant maneuver in urban and

  7. Investigation of Microphysical Parameters within Winter and Summer Type Precipitation Events over Mountainous [Complex] Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, James R.; Bossert, James E.

    1997-12-31

    In this study we investigate complex terrain effects on precipitation with RAMS for both in winter and summer cases from a microphysical perspective. We consider a two dimensional east-west topographic cross section in New Mexico representative of the Jemez mountains on the west and the Sangre de Cristo mountains on the east. Located between these two ranges is the Rio Grande Valley. In these two dimensional experiments, variations in DSDs are considered to simulate total precipitation that closely duplicate observed precipitation.

  8. An Evaluation of Satellite Retrievals of Snowfall in Regions of Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, K. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Kulie, M.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N.

    2013-12-01

    Snowfall in regions of complex terrain plays an important role in the global hydrologic cycle, and can have major physical and social implications ranging from water resource management, to flash flooding, to climate change impacts. Due to the diversity of impacts that can result from snowfall, the ability to directly observe and measure snowfall in real-time is of great importance. However, the physical limitations of ground-based radars particularly in complex terrain and the lack of spatially complete measurement networks in mountainous regions make high-resolution ground-based snowfall observations a challenging task. Spaceborne satellite retrievals of snowfall such as those that will be made possible by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission offer the ability to make high spatial and temporal resolution measurements that are otherwise not possible using traditional ground-based methods. This study seeks to investigate the skill level of current spaceborne snowfall products over the complex terrain of the Rocky Mountains in the western United States. Satellite derived snowfall products from measurements obtained via instruments including the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), EOS Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E), and GCOM-W1 Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) are evaluated using ground-based observations such as the Natural Resources Conservation Service Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) data and the NCEP Stage IV data. Satellite derived snowfall variables including snowfall rate and snow water equivalent are compared to ground-based observations to determine the overall accuracy and skill level of current satellite derived snowfall products in the region of interest. An analysis is also done to determine how the accuracy and skill level change based on varying snowfall regimes such as light, moderate, and heavy snowfall events. The knowledge gained will be used to determine how satellite derived snowfall

  9. Analysis on Turbulent Flows using Large-eddy Simulation on the Seaside Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamio, T.; Iida, M.; Arakawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is the Large-eddy Simulation (LES) of the turbulent wind on the complex terrain, and the first results of the simulation are described. The authors tried to apply the LES code, which was developed as an atmospheric simulator in Japan Agency for the Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), to the wind prediction for the wind energy. On the wind simulation, the highest problem would be the boundary conditions, and the case in this paper was simplified one. The case study in this paper is the west wind on a complex terrain site, which is the wind from sea for the site. The steady flow was employed for the inlet condition, because the wind on the sea is the low turbulent wind, and almost all the turbulence would be generated by the roughness of the ground surface. The wall function was employed as the surface condition on the ground surface. The computational domain size was about 8 × 3 × 2.5 km3, and the minimum cell size was about 10 × 10 × 3 m3. The computational results, the vertical profile of the averaged wind speed and the turbulence intensity, agreed with the measurement by the meteorological masts. Moreover, the authors tried the analysis of the turbulence characteristics. The power spectrum density model, and the cross spectrum analyses gave the knowledge of the turbulent characteristics on the complex terrain and the hints for the domain and grid of the numerical analysis.

  10. Transferability of a Three-Dimensional Air Quality Model between Two Different Sites in Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Rolf

    1989-07-01

    The three-dimensional, diagnostic, particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model MATHEW/ADPIC is used to test its transferability from one site in complex terrain to another with different characteristics, under stable nighttime drainage flow conditions. The two sites were subject to extensive drainage flow tracer experiments under the multilaboratory Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program: the first being a valley in the Geysers geothermal region of northern California, and the second a canyon in western Colorado. The domain in each case is approximately 10 × 10 km. The 1980 Geysers model evaluation is only quoted. The 1984 Brush Creek model evaluation is described in detail.Results from comparing computed with measured concentrations from a variety of tracer releases indicate that 52% of the 4531 samples from five experiments in Brush Creek and 50% of the 831 samples from four experiments in the Geysers agreed within a factor of 5. When an angular 10° uncertainty, consistent with anemometer reliability limits in complex terrain, was allowed to be applied to the model results, model performance improved such that 78% of samples compared within a factor of 5 for Brush Creek and 77% for the Geysers. Looking at the range of other factors of concentration ratios, results indicate that the model is satisfactorily transferable without tuning it to a specific site.

  11. Improved quantitative precipitation estimation over complex terrain using cloud-to-ground lightning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minjarez-Sosa, Carlos Manuel

    Thunderstorms that occur in areas of complex terrain are a major severe weather hazard in the intermountain western U.S. Short-term quantitative estimation (QPE) of precipitation in complex terrain is a pressing need to better forecast flash flooding. Currently available techniques for QPE, that utilize a combination of rain gauge and weather radar information, may underestimate precipitation in areas where gauges do not exist or there is radar beam blockage. These are typically very mountainous and remote areas, that are quite vulnerable to flash flooding because of the steep topography. Lightning has been one of the novel ways suggested by the scientific community as an alternative to estimate precipitation over regions that experience convective precipitation, especially those continental areas with complex topography where the precipitation sensor measurements are scarce. This dissertation investigates the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning and precipitation associated with convection with the purpose of estimating precipitation- mainly over areas of complex terrain which have precipitation sensor coverage problems (e.g. Southern Arizona). The results of this research are presented in two papers. The first, entitled Toward Development of Improved QPE in Complex Terrain Using Cloud-to-Ground Lighting Data: A case Study for the 2005 Monsoon in Southern Arizona, was published in the Journal of Hydrometeorology in December 2012. This initial study explores the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning occurrences and multi-sensor gridded precipitation over southern Arizona. QPE is performed using a least squares approach for several time resolutions (seasonal---June, July and August---24 hourly and hourly) and for a 8 km grid size. The paper also presents problems that arise when the time resolution is increased, such as the spatial misplacing of discrete lightning events with gridded precipitation and the need to define a "diurnal day" that is

  12. Automated algorithm for mapping regions of cold-air pooling in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Jessica D.; Pepin, Nicholas; Rochford, Caitlin

    2008-11-01

    In complex terrain, air in contact with the ground becomes cooled from radiative energy loss on a calm clear night and, being denser than the free atmosphere at the same elevation, sinks to valley bottoms. Cold-air pooling (CAP) occurs where this cooled air collects on the landscape. This article focuses on identifying locations on a landscape subject to considerably lower minimum temperatures than the regional average during conditions of clear skies and weak synoptic-scale winds, providing a simple automated method to map locations where cold air is likely to pool. Digital elevation models of regions of complex terrain were used to derive surfaces of local slope, curvature, and percentile elevation relative to surrounding terrain. Each pixel was classified as prone to CAP, not prone to CAP, or exhibiting no signal, based on the criterion that CAP occurs in regions with flat slopes in local depressions or valleys (negative curvature and low percentile). Along-valley changes in the topographic amplification factor (TAF) were then calculated to determine whether the cold air in the valley was likely to drain or pool. Results were checked against distributed temperature measurements in Loch Vale, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado; in the Eastern Pyrenees, France; and in Yosemite National Park, Sierra Nevada, California. Using CAP classification to interpolate temperatures across complex terrain resulted in improvements in root-mean-square errors compared to more basic interpolation techniques at most sites within the three areas examined, with average error reductions of up to 3°C at individual sites and about 1°C averaged over all sites in the study areas.

  13. The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI): Insights to understanding air pollution in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu; Jaffe, Dan; Burley, Joel

    2015-10-15

    The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI) was established to better understand O3 concentrations in the Western United States (US). The major working hypothesis for development of the sampling network was that the sources of O3 to Nevada are regional and global. Within the framework of this overarching hypothesis, we specifically address two conceptual meteorological hypotheses: (1) The high elevation, complex terrain, and deep convective mixing that characterize Nevada, make this state ideally located to intercept polluted parcels of air transported into the US from the free troposphere; and (2) site specific terrain features will influence O3 concentrations observed at surface sites. Here, the impact of complex terrain and site location on observations are discussed. Data collected in Nevada at 6 sites (1385 to 2082 m above sea level (asl)) are compared with that collected at high elevation sites in Yosemite National Park and the White Mountains, California. Average daily maximum 1-hour concentrations of O3 during the first year of the NVROI ranged from 58 to 69 ppbv (spring), 53 to 62 ppbv (summer), 44 to 49 ppbv (fall), and 37 to 45 ppbv (winter). These were similar to those measured at 3 sites in Yosemite National Park (2022 to 3031 m asl), and at 4 sites in the White Mountains (1237 to 4342 m asl) (58 to 67 ppbv (summer) and 47 to 58 ppbv (fall)). Results show, that in complex terrain, collection of data should occur at high and low elevation sites to capture surface impacts, and site location with respect to topography should be considered. Additionally, concentrations measured are above the threshold reported for causing a reduction in growth and visible injury for plants (40 ppbv), and sustained exposure at high elevation locations in the Western USA may be detrimental for ecosystems.

  14. 9A.5 An Immersed Boundary Method for Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K

    2008-08-06

    Most mesoscale numerical models use terrain-following coordinates to accommodate complex terrain. Terrain-following or sigma coordinates conform to the bottom topography and the coordinate lines gradually become smoother and flatter with distance from the ground. With very steep terrain, the coordinate lines retain a signature of the underlying surface shape even very far away from the ground. Coordinate transformations are introduced into the discretized equations and produce numerical truncation errors in addition to those associated with the chosen discretization scheme. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the truncation error arising from terrain-following coordinates. Schar et al. [2002] proposed a modified sigma coordinate in which grid distortion due to small scale terrain features decays with height more rapidly than distortion caused by large scale features. The modified coordinate flattens quickly with height and improves the accuracy of the solution. Klemp et al. [2003] investigated the errors that arise when numerical treatment of the metric terms is inconsistent with the discretization of other terms in the governing equations. Distortion seen in topographically induced gravity waves was reduced with consistent numerical treatment. Adcroft et al. [1997] used a shaved cell approach to represent topography on a Cartesian grid. This method eliminates grid distortion, but introduces complications in the numerical solution at the ground because the computational cells must be modified (shaved) where they intersect the topography. Here we introduce an alternative griding technique for flow over complex terrain using an immersed boundary method (IBM) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. With this method, the terrain surface intersects the grid, and variables are adjusted near the immersed boundary so that the flow is diverted by the boundary. Grid distortion and the associated truncation errors are thus avoided. Additionally, the

  15. Comparison of Different Measurement Techniques and a CFD Simulation in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Christoph; Hofsäß, Martin; Anger, Jan; Rautenberg, Alexander; Lutz, Thorsten; Cheng, Po Wen; Bange, Jens

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with a comparison of data collected by measurements and a simulation for a complex terrain test site in southern Germany. Lidar, met mast, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements of wind speed and direction and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data are compared to each other. The site is characterised regarding its flow features and the suitability for a wind turbine test field. A Delayed-Detached-Eddy- Simulation (DES) was employed using measurement data to generate generic turbulent inflow. A good agreement of the wind profiles between the different approaches was reached. The terrain slope leads to a speed-up, a change of turbulence intensity as well as to flow angle variations.

  16. Contributions by Wave Propagation Laboratory to EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) complex-terrain model-development project. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) participated in the Environmental Protection Agency's Complex Terrain Model Development Project, whose objective is development of numerical air-quality models valid in complex terrain. Particular attention was given to impaction of elevated plumes on high terrain during stable (nocturnal) conditions. WPL operated a plume-mapping lidar, acoustic sounders (some with Doppler capability), sonic anemometers, a tethered sonde, and crosswind optical anemometers. Measurements were usually displayed in real time for experimental guidance and later processed with quality assurance for quantitative analysis. A synopsis of data acquisition and archiving is given for each experiment, including a review of the results of scientific analyses already completed.

  17. Final Report of the Grant: ''Vertical Transport and Mixing in Complex Terrain Airsheds''

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Joseph Harindra; Anderson, James; Boyer, Don; Berman, Neil

    2004-12-29

    Stable stratification associated with nocturnal thermal circulation in areas of complex terrain leads to interesting and important phenomena that govern local meteorology and contaminant dispersion. Given that most urban areas are in complex topography, understanding and prediction of such phenomena are of immediate practical importance. This project dealt with theoretical, laboratory, numerical and field experimental studies aimed at understanding stratified flow and turbulence phenomena in urban areas, with particular emphasis on flow, turbulence and contaminant transport and diffusion in such flows. A myriad of new results were obtained and some of these results were used to improve the predictive capabilities of the models.

  18. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  19. A Spatially - Resolved Study of the GRB 020903 Host Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, Mallory; Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-01-01

    The host complex of GRB 020903 is one of only a few long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB) environments where spatially-resolved observations are possible. It may also be the only known GRB host consisting of multiple interacting components, as well as an active galactic nucleus. We were granted 4.5 hours of observing time on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (South) to obtain spatially resolved spectra of the GRB 020903 host complex. Using long-slit observations at two different position angles we were able to obtain optical spectra of the four main regions of the GRB host, with a spectral range of 3600 - 9000 Å. From this data we discern the redshift of each region to confirm that they comprise a single interacting system at an approximate redshift of z ~ 0.251. We also measure the metallicity, star formation rate, and young stellar population age of each region to create a spatially-resolved map of these parameters for the larger host complex. Based on the distribution of these characteristics we determine whether the localized GRB explosion site is representative of the host complex as a whole, or localized in a metal-poor or strongly star-forming region. Lastly, we consider the dynamics and past interactions of the host complex, studying the strongest emission lines for signs of potential inflows or outflows through each region.

  20. For wind turbines in complex terrain, the devil is in the detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Julia; Mann, Jakob; Berg, Jacob; Parvu, Dan; Kilpatrick, Ryan; Costache, Adrian; Chowdhury, Jubayer; Siddiqui, Kamran; Hangan, Horia

    2017-09-01

    The cost of energy produced by onshore wind turbines is among the lowest available; however, onshore wind turbines are often positioned in a complex terrain, where the wind resources and wind conditions are quite uncertain due to the surrounding topography and/or vegetation. In this study, we use a scale model in a three-dimensional wind-testing chamber to show how minor changes in the terrain can result in significant differences in the flow at turbine height. These differences affect not only the power performance but also the life-time and maintenance costs of wind turbines, and hence, the economy and feasibility of wind turbine projects. We find that the mean wind, wind shear and turbulence level are extremely sensitive to the exact details of the terrain: a small modification of the edge of our scale model, results in a reduction of the estimated annual energy production by at least 50% and an increase in the turbulence level by a factor of five in the worst-case scenario with the most unfavorable wind direction. Wind farm developers should be aware that near escarpments destructive flows can occur and their extent is uncertain thus warranting on-site field measurements.

  1. Numerical investigation into effects of complex terrain on spatial and temporal variability of precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, J.R.; Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    This study is part of an ongoing research effort at Los Alamos to understand the hydrologic cycle at regional scales by coupling atmospheric, land surface, river channel, and groundwater models. In this study the authors examine how local variation of heights of the two mountain ranges representative of those that surround the Rio Grande Valley affects precipitation. The lack of observational data to adequately assess precipitation variability in complex terrain, and the lack of previous work has prompted this modeling study. Thus, it becomes imperative to understand how the local terrain affects snow accumulations and rainfall during winter and summer seasons respectively so as to manage this valuable resource in this semi-arid region. While terrain is three dimensional, simplifying the problem to two dimensions can provide some valuable insight into topographic effects that may exist at various transects across the Rio Grande Valley. The authors induce these topographic effects by introducing variations in heights of the mountains and the width of the valley using an analytical function for the topography. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is used to examine these effects.

  2. Simulation of tracer dispersion from elevated and surface releases in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, J. F.; Cremades, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    A new version of an advanced mesoscale dispersion modeling system for simulating passive air pollutant dispersion in the real atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL), is presented. The system comprises a diagnostic mass-consistent meteorological model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LADISMO). The former version of LADISMO, developed according to Zannetti (Air pollution modelling, 1990), was based on the Monte Carlo technique and included calculation of higher-order moments of vertical random forcing for convective conditions. Its ability to simulate complex flow dispersion has been stated in a previous paper (Hernández et al. 1995, Atmospheric Environment, 29A, 1331-1341). The new version follows Thomson's scheme (1984, Q. Jl Roy. Met. Soc.110, 1107-1120). It is also based on Langevin equation and follows the ideas given by Brusasca et al. (1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723) and Anfossi et al. (1992, Nuovo Cemento 15c, 139-158). The model is used to simulate the dispersion and predict the ground level concentration (g.l.c.) of a tracer (SF 6) released from both an elevated source ( case a) and a ground level source ( case b) in a highly complex mountainous terrain during neutral and synoptically dominated conditions ( case a) and light and apparently stable conditions ( case b). The last case is considered as being a specially difficult task to simulate. In fact, few works have reported situations with valley drainage flows in complex terrains and real stable atmospheric conditions with weak winds. The model assumes that nearly calm situations associated to strong stability and air stagnation, make the lowest layers of PBL poorly diffusive (Brusasca et al., 1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723). Model results are verified against experimental data from Guardo-90 tracer experiments, an intensive field campaign conducted in the Carrion river valley (Northern Spain) to study atmospheric diffusion within a steep walled valley in mountainous

  3. Sandia National Laboratories ASCOT (atmospheric studies in complex terrain) field experiment, September 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, R. O.

    1982-04-01

    During the period September 8 through September 25, 1980, Sandia National Laboratories, Division 4774, participated in a series of experiments held in the Geysers area of California. These experiments, aimed at providing data on nighttime drainage flow in complex terrain, were intended to provide a reliable basis for mathematical fow modeling. Tracers were released at several points on a valley rim and sampled by a large number of stations at ground level. Sandia's contribution was to make it possible to derive vertical tracer profiles. This was done by taking air samples from a captive balloon at chosen altitudes between the surface and 450 meters above ground.

  4. A numerical study on the flow upstream of a wind turbine in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer Forsting, A. R.; Bechmann, A.; Troldborg, N.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of a wind turbine with the upstream flow-field in complex and flat terrain is studied using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations with a two equation turbulence closure. The complex site modelled is Perdigao (Portugal), where a turbine is located on one of two parallel running ridges. Simulating various wind directions with and without rotor, the impact of the rotor on the flow-field upstream is determined. This is compared and related to simulations with sheared and uniform inflow. The induction zones forming for these two inflows agree to such an extent, that shear could be interpreted as linear perturbation to the uniform inflow solution. However, for complex terrain this is not the case, as it is highly dependant on flow features caused by the topography and their interaction with the rotor. Separation in the lee of the ridge plays a crucial role, as it dictates the wind turbine wake trajectory which in turn governs the orientation of the induction zone.

  5. Simulation of radioactive plume gamma dose over a complex terrain using Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, P T; Venkatesan, R; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    FLEXPART-WRF is a versatile model for the simulation of plume dispersion over a complex terrain in a mesoscale region. This study deals with its application to the dispersion of a hypothetical air borne gaseous radioactivity over a topographically complex nuclear site in southeastern France. A computational method for calculating plume gamma dose to the ground level receptor is introduced in FLEXPART using the point kernel method. Comparison with another similar dose computing code SPEEDI is carried out. In SPEEDI the dose is calculated for specific grid sizes, the lowest available being 250 m, whereas in FLEXPART it is grid independent. Spatial distribution of dose by both the models is analyzed. Due to the ability of FLEXPART to utilize the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological variables as input, particularly the height of the PBL, the simulated dose values were higher than SPEEDI estimates. The FLEXPART-WRF in combination with point kernel dose module gives a more realistic picture of plume gamma dose distribution in a complex terrain, a situation likely under accidental release of radioactivity in a mesoscale range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complex landslide terrain in the Kamienne Mountains, Middle Sudetes, SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoń, Piotr; Pánek, Tomáš; Malik, Ireneusz; Hrádecký, Jan; Owczarek, Piotr; Šilhán, Karel

    2010-12-01

    Dense forest hides a complex landslide terrain in the Kamienne Mountains, a part of the Sudetes range in Central Europe. Combined geomorphological, geophysical and dendrochronological research was carried out in three representative localities in order to decipher patterns of landslide evolution, to determine the extent of slope deformations, and to assess the contemporary activity of landslide terrain. Field mapping revealed the very complex nature of slope failures, both in space and time. Deep-seated sliding was the principal type of movement, and was followed by rock wall retreat by fall in the depletion zone and earthflows in the toe area. Electric resistivity survey proved useful in constraining geometry of landslide units and suggests an occurrence of underground voids in the Lesista landslide area. Dendrochronological research focused on tree-ring reduction, reaction wood, wound and scar analysis that helped to unravel the pattern of debris supply and movement subsequent to the main events, which includes free fall, talus creep, and sliding over snow cover. Today, landslide complexes are at different stages of evolution. Whereas in some places the activity has been largely completed, in others we have found the evidence for failure surfaces ready to accommodate movement. Hence, although some landslides may be relict, it is unjustified to extend this notion to all signs of hillslope instability in the area.

  7. Evaluation of the GPM IMERG precipitation estimates over complex terrain in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, S.; Kirstetter, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Natural hazards due to weather extremes represent a significant threat to people and property in mountainous regions. In situ data to characterize precipitation are usually scarce in complex terrain and the impact of extreme precipitation events is often less known and anticipated than in other areas. Moreover, precipitation over complex terrain is often highly variable even over very small scales so reliable precipitation estimates remain a challenge. Satellite remote sensing can provide improved spatial coverage of precipitation estimates, yet their accuracy depends strongly on the complex interaction between weather and topography so the estimates are generally characterized by significant biases compared to ground measurements. We evaluate the Integrated Multi-Satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM IMERG) precipitation product over mountain regions in the continental United States through comparison with an operational QPE dataset from the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS). The high space (1 km) and time (2 min) resolution of MRMS allows to investigate the GPM IMERG precipitation estimates across different spatial and temporal scales. The results show the ability of GPM IMERG with respect to estimating precipitation rates and detecting precipitation extremes in mountainous regions.

  8. Lidar Descriptions of Mixing-Layer Thickness Characteristics in a Complex Terrain/Coastal Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, James L.; Smith, Ted B.

    1991-05-01

    Airborne lidar and supplementary measurements made during a major study of air chemistry in southern California (SCCCAMP 1985) provided a rare opportunity to examine atmospheric boundary-layer structure in a coastal area with complex terrain. This structure results from a combination of daytime heating or convection in the boundary layer (CBL), the intrusion of a marine layer into the inland areas, the thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formed within the marine onshore flow, inland growth of the TIBL, interactions of the CBL and the TIBL, and airflow interactions with terrain features.Measurements showed offshore mixing-layer thicknesses during SCCCAMP to be quite uniform spatially and day to day at 100-200 m. Movement of this layer onshore occurred readily with terrain that sloped gradually upward (e.g., to 300 m MSL at 50 km inland), but was effectively blocked by a 400-500 m high coastal ridge. In the higher terrain beyond the coastal ridge, aerosol layers aloft were often created as a result of deep convection and of a combination of onshore flow and heated, upslope airflow activity. Such aerosol layers can extend far offshore when embedded in reverse circulations aloft.The forward boundary of the marine layer was quite sharp, resembling a miniature cold front. Within the marine layer the onshore flow initiates a TIBL at the coastline, which increases in depth with distance inland due to roughness and convective influences. A coherent marine layer with imbedded TIBL was maintained for inland distances of 20-50 km, depending on terrain. Intense heating occurred inland prior to the arrival and undercutting by the marine front. The resulting, effective mixing layer increased in thickness from a few hundred meters to nearly two kilometers in a very short distance.Comparisons of a representative, physically based TIBL and convective mixing-layer models with observed data indicate that they generally do a credible job of estimating the depth of the marine layer

  9. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  10. Dispersion of particles in complex terrain: comparisons between WRF LES and simulations using different PBL schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L.; Kosovic, B.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Rasmussen, R.

    2015-12-01

    A key process in wintertime orographic cloud seeding using ground-based generators is the dispersion of silver iodide particles released from the generators in the mountainous area. The dispersion features determine the targeting efficiency and ultimately the seeding effect on the ground under favorable seeding conditions. Previous field experiments showed that the silver iodide plumes were narrow (spread angle was around 20 degrees) and were confined within the mountainous boundary layer (usually lower than 1 km AGL). The numerical simulation of the particle dispersion in complex terrain using weather models is challenging due to the stable atmosphere in winter, the unresolved terrain-flow interaction, and the inherent numerical diffusion close to the source point in the Eulerian framework. A recent study by Xue et al. (2014) showed that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the particle dispersion in complex terrain with grid spacing of 100 m could reproduce most observed features while simulations using PBL schemes with 500 m grid spacing had difficulty reproducing the vertical dispersion. This study will simulate the same case using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in LES mode and with several PBL schemes. The differences between the LES-simulated dispersion results and the PBL results will be analyzed and presented. Especially, the difference attributed to the unrepresented sub-grid scale (SGS) topography information in the PBL will be studied in detail. The ultimate goal of this study is to incorporate the dispersion due to turbulent kinetic energy induced by SGS topography into the existing PBL schemes to better simulate the process in mountainous regions.

  11. Topoclimate effects on growing season length and montane conifer growth in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D. M.; Barnard, H. R.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-05-01

    Spatial variability in the topoclimate-driven linkage between forest phenology and tree growth in complex terrain is poorly understood, limiting our understanding of how ecosystems function as a whole. To characterize the influence of topoclimate on phenology and growth, we determined the start, end, and length of the growing season (GSstart, GSend, and GSL, respectively) using the correlation between transpiration and evaporative demand, measured with sapflow. We then compared these metrics with stem relative basal area increment (relative BAI) at seven sites among elevation and aspects in a Colorado montane forest. As elevation increased, we found shorter GSL (-50 d km-1) due to later GSstart (40 d km-1) and earlier GSend (-10 d km-1). North-facing sites had a 21 d shorter GSL than south-facing sites at similar elevations (i.e. equal to 200 m elevation difference on a given aspect). Growing season length was positively correlated with relative BAI, explaining 83% of the variance. This study shows that topography exerts strong environmental controls on GSL and thus forest growth. Given the climate-related dependencies of these controls, the results presented here have important implications for ecosystem responses to changes in climate and highlight the need for improved phenology representation in complex terrain.

  12. Topoclimate effects on growing season length and montane conifer growth in complex terrain

    DOE PAGES

    Barnard, David M.; Barnard, H. R.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-05-23

    Spatial variability in the topoclimate-driven linkage between forest phenology and tree growth in complex terrain is poorly understood, limiting our understanding of how ecosystems function as a whole. To characterize the influence of topoclimate on phenology and growth, we determined the start, end, and length of the growing season (GSstart, GSend, and GSL, respectively) using the correlation between transpiration and evaporative demand, measured with sapflow. We then compared these metrics with stem relative basal area increment (relative BAI) at seven sites among elevation and aspects in a Colorado montane forest. As elevation increased, we found shorter GSL (–50 d km–1)more » due to later GSstart (40 d km–1) and earlier GSend (–10 d km–1). North-facing sites had a 21 d shorter GSL than south-facing sites at similar elevations (i.e. equal to 200 m elevation difference on a given aspect). Growing season length was positively correlated with relative BAI, explaining 83% of the variance. This study shows that topography exerts strong environmental controls on GSL and thus forest growth. Here, given the climate-related dependencies of these controls, the results presented here have important implications for ecosystem responses to changes in climate and highlight the need for improved phenology representation in complex terrain.« less

  13. Lagrangian stochastic dispersion model simulations of tracer data in nocturnal flows over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhar, Ashok K.; Rao, K. Shankar

    A three-dimensional Lagrangian stochastic dispersion model (LSDM), which has been formulated to predict dispersion in three-dimensional nocturnal flows over complex terrain, is described. The model uses a Langevin equation in the lateral direction and a pure random-walk equation in the vertical direction. The performance of the model has been evaluated using the U.S. Department of Energy's ASCOT tracer databases collected during the 1984 field study in the Brush Creek valley in western Colorado, and the 1991 field study near the Rocky Flats Plant northwest of Denver. Both field experiments were performed in complex terrain regions where three-dimensional drainage flows were observed at night. The input wind fields and turbulence parameters required by the Lagrangian stochastic dispersion model are derived from meteorological data collected during the tracer experiments. The model-predicted concentrations are extensively compared with the corresponding observed concentrations. Several statistical measures calculated to quantitatively assess the performance of the model are presented. The agreement between the predicted and observed concentrations is satisfactory.

  14. Perception and mobility research at Defence R&D Canada for UGVs in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, Michael; Collier, Jack; Beckman, Blake; Digney, Bruce; Vincent, Isabelle

    2007-04-01

    The Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section at Defence R&D Canada - Suffield envisions autonomous systems contributing to decisive operations in the urban battle space. In this vision, teams of unmanned ground, air, and marine vehicles, and unattended ground sensors will gather and coordinate information, formulate plans, and complete tasks. The mobility requirement for ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings must increase significantly if robotic technology is to augment human efforts in military relevant roles and environments. In order to achieve its objective, the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section is pursuing research that explores the use of intelligent mobility algorithms designed to improve robot mobility. Intelligent mobility uses sensing and perception, control, and learning algorithms to extract measured variables from the world, control vehicle dynamics, and learn by experience. These algorithms seek to exploit available world representations of the environment and the inherent dexterity of the robot to allow the vehicle to interact with its surroundings and produce locomotion in complex terrain. However, a disconnect exists between the current state-of-the-art in perception systems and the information required for novel platforms to interact with their environment to improve mobility in complex terrain. The primary focus of the paper is to present the research tools, topics, and plans to address this gap in perception and control research. This research will create effective intelligence to improve the mobility of ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings to assist the Canadian Forces in their future urban operations.

  15. A GIS-based model for estimating regional potential evapotranspiration in complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin-yao; Yang, Yong-hui; Hao, Xiao-hua

    2009-07-01

    The estimation of regional reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is crucial for agricultural water assessment. Traditional methods based on point-specific ET0 from meteorological stations are not suitable for complex terrains. Advances of GIS technology provide such possibility. For very complex terrains, however, topography can have considerable effect on meteorological factors such as air temperature and solar radiation. In this paper, spatially distributed daily ET0 was estimated by FAO Penman-Monteith equation, while the effect of topography on meteorological factors was taken into consideration. This was achieved through spatial interpolation of maximum and minimum air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity and sunshine hours. Solar radiation was modeled at grid level by adjusting the effect of specific site conditions prior to estimating ET0. To test the reliability and applicability of the model, spatial distribution of ET0 (resolution 90 × 90 m) was generated for taking Fengning County of North China as an example. There was a good agreement between the site conditions and model simulated ET0. This study demonstrates the possibility of incorporating topography in the estimation of ET0.

  16. Impact of spatial heterogeneity of meteorological forcing on soil moisture redistribution over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Simoni, S.; Parlange, M.

    2010-09-01

    An experiment was designed in order to capture the spatial heterogeneity of meteorological variables over a complex terrain. The study area is located in the suisse Alps, close to the Gd-St-Bernard pass, in the upper part of the Val de Ferret. The catchment has a total area of 20 km2 and the altitude ranges from 1777 m to 3206 m. Steep complex terrain, covered with snow from November to May and deep gullies are the main features of the study area. 15 meteorological stations equipped with soil sensors (moisture, suction and temperature) were deployed into a network spread over the study area to capture the heterogeneity of the meteorological forcing relevant to evapotranspiration processes and its impact on soil moisture distribution. A soil characterization was also carried out to complement the understanding of soil moisture redistribution processes. Results assess that soil water content heterogeneity is highly affected not only by spatial variability of soil characteristics and morphology but also of precipitation.

  17. The role of microphysical processes on the mesoscale simulation over the complex terrain, the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, R. K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Connolly, P.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the four different cloud microphysical schemes (WSM3, WSM6, Morrison double moment and Lin scheme) within the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), as part of simulations of mesoscale weather systems across complex terrain in the Nepalese Himalayas. The Himalayas is characterized by a complex and rugged topography, with altitudes varying e.g. 70m in Southeastern Nepal, to the highest peak of the world, 8850m (Mt. Everest), and which extends from West to East covering many South and Central Asian countries: Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Myanmar. Circulation in such a complex environment is complicated due to obstruction of flows by mountain ranges which in turn have wide ranging effects on cloud and rain formation and distribution. Monsoon rain is intrinsically linked to people’s daily life across the South Asia since more than 80% people depend on agriculture and majority of the agricultural systems are rainfall dependent. Modeling of the key microphysical process in this complex terrain provides insight into the general understanding of the processes and their spatial patterns, however there are many uncertainties in general. These uncertainties are even more pronounced when such models are applied to the complex terrain characteristic of the Himalayas. Numerical experiments are designed using the WRF model, with three nested domains (27, 9 and 3 km grid spacing). The performance of the four categories of microphysical schemes is examined in model experiments for (i) monsoon onset, (ii) monsoon decay and (iii) winter rainfall. The simulated results are compared with limited observed meteorological parameters such as rainfall, temperature, wind speed and wind direction, from ground-based meteorological stations situated within the high resolution (3km x 3km) domain. Results show that a) Simulated rainfall is very sensitive to the chosen microphysical scheme with rainfall

  18. Estimation of wind shear components over complex terrain, and their removal to enhance wind profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, S.; Vallès, B.

    2010-09-01

    Wind profiles over complex terrain are currently impossible to obtain at requisite accuracy via remote sensing or flow models. We propose a new approach in which, in each sampled height plane, the 3 wind components (u, v, w) and their horizontal shear components (du/dx, du/dy, dv/dx, dv/dy, dw/dx, dw/dy) are estimated from a 9-beam ground-based remote-sensing system. Based on simulations and error-propagation, we show that this characterization of the spatially complex wind field to first order will allow improved estimation of (u, v, w). The effects of temporal fluctuations due to spatial coherence are also discussed. Planned field investigations and coupled CFD data interpretations are described.

  19. Performance of Precipitation Algorithms During IPHEx and Observations of Microphysical Characteristics in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlingis, J. M.; Gourley, J. J.; Kirstetter, P.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kalogiros, J. A.; Anagnostou, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Intensive Observation Period (IOP) for the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), part of NASA's Ground Validation campaign for the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission satellite took place from May-June 2014 in the Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina. The National Severe Storms Laboratory's mobile dual-pol X-band radar, NOXP, was deployed in the Pigeon River Basin during this time and employed various scanning strategies, including more than 1000 Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans in coordination with another radar and research aircraft. Rain gauges and disdrometers were also positioned within the basin to verify precipitation estimates and estimation of microphysical parameters. The performance of the SCOP-ME post-processing algorithm on NOXP data is compared with real-time and near real-time precipitation estimates with varying spatial resolutions and quality control measures (Stage IV gauge-corrected radar estimates, Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor System Quantitative Precipitation Estimates, and CMORPH satellite estimates) to assess the utility of a gap-filling radar in complex terrain. Additionally, the RHI scans collected in this IOP provide a valuable opportunity to examine the evolution of microphysical characteristics of convective and stratiform precipitation as they impinge on terrain. To further the understanding of orographically enhanced precipitation, multiple storms for which RHI data are available are considered.

  20. Comparison of atmospheric transport calculations over complex terrain using a mobile profiling system and rawinsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Robert M.; Cogan, James; Sontowski, John; Dougherty, Catherine M.; Fry, Richard N., Jr.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2000-12-01

    A comparison of atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations over complex terrain was investigated using a mobile profiling system (MPS) versus standard meteorological balloons. Meteorological and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentration data were collected and used to evaluate the performance of a transport and diffusion model coupled with a mass consistency wind field model. Meteorological data were collected throughout April 1995, and parts of August 1995. Both meteorological and concentration data were measured in December 1995. Once the models were validated, the comparison of performance with different upper-air data were accomplished. The models used included the SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated Puff) transport and diffusion model and the MINERVE mass consistency wind model. Evaluation of the models was focused primarily on their effectiveness as a short-term (one to four hours) predictive tool. These studies showed how the combination of weather and transport models could be used to help direct emergency response following a hazardous material release. The models were used in tandem to direct the deployment of mobile sensors intended to intercept and measure tracer clouds. The MINERVE model was validated for the specific terrain of interest using April 1995 data. The capability of SCIPUFF driven by realistic three-dimensional wind fields generated by MINERVE is demonstrated using data collected in December 1995.

  1. Accuracy of retrieving temperature and humidity profiles by ground-based microwave radiometry in truly complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, G.; Stiperski, I.; Pospichal, B.; Rotach, M. W.

    2015-03-01

    Within the Innsbruck Box project, a ground-based microwave radiometer (RPG-HATPRO) was operated in the Inn Valley (Austria), in very complex terrain, between September 2012 and May 2013 to obtain temperature and humidity vertical profiles of the full troposphere with a specific focus on the valley boundary layer. The profiles obtained by the radiometer with different retrieval algorithms based on different climatologies, are compared to local radiosonde data. A retrieval that is improved with respect to the one provided by the manufacturer, based on better resolved data, shows a significantly smaller root mean square error (RMSE), both for the temperature and humidity profiles. The improvement is particularly substantial at the heights close to the mountaintop level and in the upper troposphere. Lower level inversions, common in an alpine valley, are resolved to a satisfactory degree. On the other hand, upper level inversions (above 1200 m) still pose a significant challenge for retrieval. For this purpose, specialized retrieval algorithms were developed by classifying the radiosonde climatologies into specialized categories according to different criteria (seasons, daytime, nighttime) and using additional regressors (e.g., measurements from mountain stations). The training and testing on the radiosonde data for these specialized categories suggests that a classification of profiles that reproduces meaningful physical characteristics can yield improved targeted specialized retrievals. A really new and very promising method of improving the profile retrieval in a mountain region is adding further information in the retrieval, such as the surface temperature at fixed levels along a topographic slope or from nearby mountain tops.

  2. Accuracy of retrieving temperature and humidity profiles by ground-based microwave radiometry in truly complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, G.; Stiperski, I.; Pospichal, B.; Rotach, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Within the Innsbruck Box project, a ground-based microwave radiometer (RPG-HATPRO) was operated in the Inn Valley (Austria), in very complex terrain, between September 2012 and May 2013 to obtain temperature and humidity vertical profiles of the full troposphere with a specific focus on the valley boundary layer. In order to assess its performance in a deep alpine valley, the profiles obtained by the radiometer with different retrieval algorithms based on different climatologies are compared to local radiosonde data. A retrieval that is improved with respect to the one provided by the manufacturer, based on better resolved data, shows a significantly smaller root mean square error (RMSE), both for the temperature and humidity profiles. The improvement is particularly substantial at the heights close to the mountaintop level and in the upper troposphere. Lower-level inversions, common in an alpine valley, are resolved to a satisfactory degree. On the other hand, upper-level inversions (above 1200 m) still pose a significant challenge for retrieval. For this purpose, specialized retrieval algorithms were developed by classifying the radiosonde climatologies into specialized categories according to different criteria (seasons, daytime, nighttime) and using additional regressors (e.g., measurements from mountain stations). The training and testing on the radiosonde data for these specialized categories suggests that a classification of profiles that reproduces meaningful physical characteristics can yield improved targeted specialized retrievals. A novel and very promising method of improving the profile retrieval in a mountainous region is adding further information in the retrieval, such as the surface temperature at fixed levels along a topographic slope or from nearby mountaintops.

  3. High-resolution dust modelling over complex terrains in West Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Vendrell, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The present work demonstrates the impact of model resolution in dust propagation in a complex terrain region such as West Asia. For this purpose, two simulations using the NMMB/BSC-Dust model are performed and analysed, one with a high horizontal resolution (at 0.03° × 0.03°) and one with a lower horizontal resolution (at 0.33° × 0.33°). Both model experiments cover two intense dust storms that occurred on 17-20 March 2012 as a consequence of strong northwesterly Shamal winds that spanned over thousands of kilometres in West Asia. The comparison with ground-based (surface weather stations and sunphotometers) and satellite aerosol observations (Aqua/MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI) shows that despite differences in the magnitude of the simulated dust concentrations, the model is able to reproduce these two dust outbreaks. Differences between both simulations on the dust spread rise on regional dust transport areas in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman. The complex orography in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman (with peaks higher than 3000 m) has an impact on the transported dust concentration fields over mountain regions. Differences between both model configurations are mainly associated to the channelization of the dust flow through valleys and the differences in the modelled altitude of the mountains that alters the meteorology and blocks the dust fronts limiting the dust transport. These results demonstrate how the dust prediction in the vicinity of complex terrains improves using high-horizontal resolution simulations.

  4. Eddy-Covariance Flux Measurements in the Complex Terrain of an Alpine Valley in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Zeeman, Matthias J.; Eugster, Werner

    2008-06-01

    We measured the surface energy budget of an Alpine grassland in highly complex terrain to explore possibilities and limitations for application of the eddy-covariance technique, also for CO2 flux measurements, at such non-ideal locations. This paper focuses on the influence of complex terrain on the turbulent energy measurements of a characteristic high Alpine grassland on Crap Alv (Alp Weissenstein) in the Swiss Alps during the growing season 2006. Measurements were carried out on a topographic terrace with a slope of 25◦ inclination. Flux data quality is assessed via the closure of the energy budget and the quality flag method used within the CarboEurope project. During 93% of the time the wind direction was along the main valley axis (43% upvalley and 50% downvalley directions). During the transition times of the typical twice daily wind direction changes in a mountain valley the fraction of high and good quality flux data reached a minimum of ≈50%, whereas during the early afternoon ≈70% of all records yielded good to highest quality (CarboEurope flags 0 and 1). The overall energy budget closure was 74 ± 2%. An angular correction for the shortwave energy input to the slope improved the energy budget closure slightly to 82 ± 2% for afternoon conditions. In the daily total, the measured turbulent energy fluxes are only underestimated by around 8% of net radiation. In summary, our results suggest that it is possible to yield realistic energy flux measurements under such conditions. We thus argue that the Crap Alv site and similar topographically complex locations with short-statured vegetation should be well suited also for CO2 flux measurements.

  5. Measurement of Landscape-scale Fluxes in the Complex Terrain of a Rocky Mountain Subalpine Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, R. K.; Turnipseed, A.; Sun, J.; Anderson, D.; Yi, C.; Burns, S.; Lamb, B.; Schimel, D.

    2007-12-01

    For the past eight years, we have made observations using various approaches, including eddy covariance, mass-balance budgeting of advective fluxes, dispersion of SF6 tracer, and energy-budget closure to evaluate landscape-scale fluxes of CO2, H2O and energy in a complex mountain landscape in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. We discovered that daytime energy budget closure using eddy covariance fluxes balanced by available net radiation was better than 84% on a half-hourly basis in both winter and summer, and approached complete closure at surface friction velocities (u*) greater than 1 m s-1. Co-spectral analysis indicated that contributions from advective fluxes and low-frequency flux contributions were likely responsible for the lack of daytime energy budget closure at lower u*. Using multiple towers dispersed across a restricted (0.25 km2) footprint of the landscape we discovered that the highest nighttime CO2 concentrations occur at the lowest point (stream channel), due to the forces of gravitational drainage flows, that the downslope drainage of high-CO2 air is broken up gradually in the late morning when within canopy turbulence increases, and that there is likely photosynthetic assimilation of 'pooled' CO2 the next morning when upslope flows develop due to mountainside warming. Studies of nighttime dispersion of released SF6 tracer showed that the nighttime drainage flows are restricted to a relatively shallow layer of air beneath the canopy, with little vertical mixing. We used the multiple towers to estimate the contributions to the local CO2 budget by horizontal and vertical advective fluxes (driven by the nighttime drainage flows) and found that compared to traditional methods of correcting eddy covariance derived CO2 budgets on flat terrain, the complex terrain in at the Niwot Ridge site can induce an average 10% error in monthly cumulative net ecosystem exchange (NEE), which is amplified to a 65% error in cumulative NEE across six years. Thus, the

  6. Intercomparison of terrain-following coordinate transformation and immersed boundary methods in large-eddy simulation of wind fields over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiannong; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of complex terrain, especially steep terrain, in the simulation of wind fields remains a challenge. It is well known that the terrain-following coordinate transformation method (TFCT) generally used in atmospheric flow simulations is restricted to non-steep terrain with slope angles less than 45 degrees. Due to the advantage of keeping the basic computational grids and numerical schemes unchanged, the immersed boundary method (IBM) has been widely implemented in various numerical codes to handle arbitrary domain geometry including steep terrain. However, IBM could introduce considerable implementation errors in wall modeling through various interpolations because an immersed boundary is generally not co-located with a grid line. In this paper, we perform an intercomparison of TFCT and IBM in large-eddy simulation of a turbulent wind field over a three-dimensional (3D) hill for the purpose of evaluating the implementation errors in IBM. The slopes of the three-dimensional hill are not steep and, therefore, TFCT can be applied. Since TFCT is free from interpolation-induced implementation errors in wall modeling, its results can serve as a reference for the evaluation so that the influence of errors from wall models themselves can be excluded. For TFCT, a new algorithm for solving the pressure Poisson equation in the transformed coordinate system is proposed and first validated for a laminar flow over periodic two-dimensional hills by comparing with a benchmark solution. For the turbulent flow over the 3D hill, the wind-tunnel measurements used for validation contain both vertical and horizontal profiles of mean velocities and variances, thus allowing an in-depth comparison of the numerical models. In this case, TFCT is expected to be preferable to IBM. This is confirmed by the presented results of comparison. It is shown that the implementation errors in IBM lead to large discrepancies between the results obtained by TFCT and IBM near the surface

  7. Numerical simulations of windblown dust over complex terrain: the Fiambalá Basin episode in June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingari, Leonardo A.; Collini, Estela A.; Folch, Arnau; Báez, Walter; Bustos, Emilce; Soledad Osores, María; Reckziegel, Florencia; Alexander, Peter; Viramonte, José G.

    2017-06-01

    On 13 June 2015, the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) warned the Buenos Aires VAAC about a possible volcanic eruption from the Nevados Ojos del Salado volcano (6879 m), located in the Andes mountain range on the border between Chile and Argentina. A volcanic ash cloud was detected by the SEVIRI instrument on board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites from 14:00 UTC on 13 June. In this paper, we provide the first comprehensive description of this event through observations and numerical simulations. Our results support the hypothesis that the phenomenon was caused by wind remobilization of ancient pyroclastic deposits (ca. 4.5 ka Cerro Blanco eruption) from the Bolsón de Fiambalá (Fiambalá Basin) in northwestern Argentina. We have investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of aerosols and the emission process over complex terrain to gain insight into the key role played by the orography and the condition that triggered the long-range transport episode. Numerical simulations of windblown dust were performed using the ARW (Advanced Research WRF) core of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model (WRF-ARW) and FALL3D modeling system with meteorological fields downscaled to a spatial resolution of 2 km in order to resolve the complex orography of the area. Results indicate that favorable conditions to generate dust uplifting occurred in northern Fiambalá Basin, where orographic effects caused strong surface winds. According to short-range numerical simulations, dust particles were confined to near-ground layers around the emission areas. In contrast, dust aerosols were injected up to 5-6 km high in central and southern regions of the Fiambalá Basin, where intense ascending airflows are driven by horizontal convergence. Long-range transport numerical simulations were also performed to model the dust cloud spreading over northern Argentina. Results of simulated vertical particle column mass were compared with the MSG-SEVIRI retrieval

  8. Wind Power Forecasting techniques in complex terrain: ANN vs. ANN-CFD hybrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Mana, Matteo; Burlando, Massimiliano; Meißner, Cathérine; Piccioni, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    Due to technology developments, renewable energies are becoming competitive against fossil sources and the number of wind farms is growing, which have to be integrated into power grids. Therefore, accurate power forecast is needed and often operators are charged with penalties in case of imbalance. Yet, wind is a stochastic and very local phenomenon, and therefore hard to predict. It has a high variability in space and time and wind power forecast is challenging. Statistical methods, as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), are often employed for power forecasting, but they have some shortcomings: they require data sets over several years and are not able to capture tails of wind power distributions. In this work a pure ANN power forecast is compared against a hybrid method, based on the combination of ANN and a physical method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The validation case is a wind farm sited in southern Italy in a very complex terrain, with a wide spread turbine layout.

  9. Magellan observations of Alpha Regio - Implications for formation of complex ridged terrains on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Decharon, Annette; Beratan, Kathi K.; Smrekear, Suzanne E.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The deformational features that make up the complex ridged terrain (CRT) of Alpha Regio are characterized, and observations of these features and their interpretations are used to evaluate quantitative models for the formation of Alpha Regio. In particular, two models are considered: a hotspot or mantle plume model and a coldspot or mantle downwelling model. Based on an analysis of the observed morphology of structures, their distribution, superposition and crosscutting relationships, and Magellan altimetry, a sequence of deformational events is suggested, and the observed topography, tectonics, and volcanism are compared with the predictions of the hotspot and coldspot models. It is found that a number of observations are more consistent with the downwelling than a hotspot model. This is particularly true of margin-parallel compressional features near the plains-CRT boundary in much of Alpha Regio.

  10. Advanced airborne Doppler Wind Lidar signal processing for observations in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmitt, G. D.; Godwin, K.

    2014-10-01

    An airborne Doppler Wind Lidar has been used in several atmospheric boundary layer field experiments over the past decade. These experiments have taken place in California (Salinas Valley and the Monterey Peninsula), Arizona (Yuma Proving Grounds), and Utah (Dugway Proving Grounds). A primary objective of these field experiments was to compare model predicted winds in mountainous areas with wind observations obtained from the lidar measurements. To accomplish this, there is a basic challenge to determine when a comparison is valid in space and time. Here we have introduced the case for combining 12 pint step stare scans (conical) with near nadir stares to better represent the vertical air motions in complex terrain. We have also described a new scanning pattern that allows for LOS intersections for desired altitudes such as a ridge line or a valley floor.

  11. Magellan observations of Alpha Regio - Implications for formation of complex ridged terrains on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Decharon, Annette; Beratan, Kathi K.; Smrekear, Suzanne E.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The deformational features that make up the complex ridged terrain (CRT) of Alpha Regio are characterized, and observations of these features and their interpretations are used to evaluate quantitative models for the formation of Alpha Regio. In particular, two models are considered: a hotspot or mantle plume model and a coldspot or mantle downwelling model. Based on an analysis of the observed morphology of structures, their distribution, superposition and crosscutting relationships, and Magellan altimetry, a sequence of deformational events is suggested, and the observed topography, tectonics, and volcanism are compared with the predictions of the hotspot and coldspot models. It is found that a number of observations are more consistent with the downwelling than a hotspot model. This is particularly true of margin-parallel compressional features near the plains-CRT boundary in much of Alpha Regio.

  12. Simulating pollutant transport in complex terrain with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szintai, B.; Kaufmann, P.; Rotach, M. W.

    2009-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) are among the most sophisticated tools to simulate atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, and are widely used in emergency response systems. In these systems, LPDMs should be coupled with a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, which provides information from the mean wind as well as from the turbulence state of the atmosphere. Mean wind can directly be used from the NWP model, while turbulence characteristics have to be parameterized by a so-called meteorological pre-processor. In most cases, to diagnose turbulence variables, meteorological pre-processors use similarity theory approaches, which are based on turbulence datasets over flat and homogeneous surface. However, turbulence structure in complex terrain, such as in steep and narrow Alpine valleys, can be substantially different from flat conditions. In this study a new scaling approach from Weigel et al. (2007), based on measurements and model simulations of the Riviera Project in the framework of the Mesoscale Alpine Program (MAP), is investigated with respect to pollutant dispersion. In the Riviera Project, analysis of turbulence measurements in a steep and narrow Alpine valley showed that daytime profiles of Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) scale very well if the convective velocity scale w* is obtained from the sunlit eastern slope rather than from the surface directly under the measured profiles. This scaling behaviour was also reproduced by high-resolution Large Eddy Simulation runs. To improve the performance of the dispersion model in complex terrain, this new scaling approach is introduced in the meteorological pre-processor of the LPDM and results are validated with a real tracer experiment. For the evaluation of the dispersion model, the TRANSALP tracer experiment is used. During this experiment passive tracers were released and detected in an Alpine valley in Southern Switzerland on two days in October 1989. To simulate this case the operational

  13. Comparison of two air temperature gridding methods over complex terrain in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guoping; Sun, Zhian; Qiu, Xinfa; Zeng, Yan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Changjie

    2017-08-01

    This paper evaluates the monthly mean air temperature over complex terrain in China determined using two methods: Australian National University spline and GridMet_Climate_Temperature (grid meteorological and climatic temperature (GMCT)) models. It is found that the macroscopic patterns of the temperature distributions by the two methods are very similar. The comparison of modelled temperatures with observations from 40 verification stations shows that both methods have the same value of total mean absolute bias errors (MABE) of 0.43 °C. Since the observational data used are from meteorological observational stations which are located on horizontal flat and open areas, these evaluation results only represent those on the flat open areas. In order to evaluate the effects of topographical factors on the temperature, a concept of relief amplitude is defined. The temperatures are grouped according to range of the relief amplitudes, and variation of temperature with relief amplitudes is worked out. It is found that the temperature difference between the two models varies significantly with relief amplitudes. The averaged maximum difference can be as large as 12 °C in January when the relief amplitude is greater than 700 m. The reasons for the temperature difference are investigated, and they are due to the effects of topographical slopes and aspects. One model (GMCT) includes these effects while the other does not. The evaluation results demonstrate that it is necessary to include the effects of topographical factors in the model simulation in order to produce realistic temperature distributions in the complex terrain areas. The distributions of temperature on the northern and southern slopes are determined using the GMCT model, and the results show that the temperatures on the southern slopes are clearly greater than those of the northern slopes, especially in winter. These results can be used as a guide for the reasonable and sustainable utilization of heat

  14. Parameter Measurement and Estimation at Variable Scales: Example of Soil Temperature in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The issue of matching measurement scale to application scale is long standing and frequently revisited with advances in instrumentation and computing power. In the past we have emphasized the importance of understanding the dominant processes and amount and nature of parameter variability when addressing these issues. Landscape-scale distribution of carbon and carbon fluxes is a primary focus of the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (RC CZO). Soil temperature (Ts) is a critical parameter of generally unknown variability. Estimates of Ts are often based on air temperature (Ta), but it is understood that other factors control Ts, especially in complex terrain, where solar radiation may be a major driver. Data were collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), which is 240 km2 in extent and covers a 1000 m elevation range. We used spatially extensive Ts data to evaluate correlations with Ta (915 m elevation gradient) on aspect neutral sites with similar vegetative cover. Effects of complex terrain were evaluated using a combination of fixed point measurements, fiber optic distributed temperature sensing and periodic, spatially distributed point measurements. We found that Ts over the elevation gradient followed Ta closely. However, within small subwatersheds with uniform Ta, Ts may be extremely variable, with a standard deviation of 8° C. This was strongly related to topographically associated land surface units (LSU's) and highly seasonal. Within LSU variability was generally low while there were seasonally significant differences between LSU's. The mean annual soil temperature difference between LSU's was greater than that associated with the 915 m elevation gradient. The seasonality of Ts variability was not directly related to solar radiation effects but rather to variations in cover. Scaling Ts requires high resolution accounting of topography in this environment. Spatial patterns of soil carbon at the RCEW are consistent with this.

  15. Payette River Basin Project: Improving Operational Forecasting in Complex Terrain through Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blestrud, D.; Kunkel, M. L.; Parkinson, S.; Holbrook, V. P.; Benner, S. G.; Fisher, J.

    2015-12-01

    Idaho Power Company (IPC) is an investor owned hydroelectric based utility, serving customers throughout southern Idaho and eastern Oregon. The University of Arizona (UA) runs an operational 1.8-km resolution Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model for IPC, which is incorporated into IPC near and real-time forecasts for hydro, solar and wind generation, load servicing and a large-scale wintertime cloud seeding operation to increase winter snowpack. Winter snowpack is critical to IPC, as hydropower provides ~50% of the company's generation needs. In efforts to improve IPC's near-term forecasts and operational guidance to its cloud seeding program, IPC is working extensively with UA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to improve WRF performance in the complex terrain of central Idaho. As part of this project, NCAR has developed a WRF based cloud seeding module (WRF CS) to deliver high-resolution, tailored forecasts to provide accurate guidance for IPC's operations. Working with Boise State University (BSU), IPC is conducting a multiyear campaign to validate the WRF CS's ability to account for and disperse the cloud seeding agent (AgI) within the boundary layer. This improved understanding of how WRF handles the AgI dispersion and fate will improve the understanding and ultimately the performance of WRF to forecast other parameters. As part of this campaign, IPC has developed an extensive ground based monitoring network including a Remote Area Snow Sampling Device (RASSD) that provides spatially and temporally discrete snow samples during active cloud seeding periods. To quantify AgI dispersion in the complex terrain, BSU conducts trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS on the RASSD sampled snow to provide measurements (at the 10-12 level) of incorporated AgI, measurements are compare directly with WRF CS's estimates of distributed AgI. Modeling and analysis results from previous year's research and plans for coming seasons will be presented.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Modelling of Flow over Complex Terrain: The Bolund Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Boris; Chaudhari, Ashvinkumar; Aubrun, Sandrine; van Beeck, Jeroen; Hämäläinen, Jari; Hellsten, Antti

    2016-02-01

    In the wind-energy sector, wind-power forecasting, turbine siting, and turbine-design selection are all highly dependent on a precise evaluation of atmospheric wind conditions. On-site measurements provide reliable data; however, in complex terrain and at the scale of a wind farm, local measurements may be insufficient for a detailed site description. On highly variable terrain, numerical models are commonly used but still constitute a challenge regarding simulation and interpretation. We propose a joint state-of-the-art study of two approaches to modelling atmospheric flow over the Bolund hill: a wind-tunnel test and a large-eddy simulation (LES). The approach has the particularity of describing both methods in parallel in order to highlight their similarities and differences. The work provides a first detailed comparison between field measurements, wind-tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. The systematic and quantitative approach used for the comparison contributes to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each model and, therefore, to their enhancement. Despite fundamental modelling differences, both techniques result in only a 5 % difference in the mean wind speed and 15 % in the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The joint comparison makes it possible to identify the most difficult features to model: the near-ground flow and the wake of the hill. When compared to field data, both models reach 11 % error for the mean wind speed, which is close to the best performance reported in the literature. For the TKE, a great improvement is found using the LES model compared to previous studies (20 % error). Wind-tunnel results are in the low range of error when compared to experiments reported previously (40 % error). This comparison highlights the potential of such approaches and gives directions for the improvement of complex flow modelling.

  17. The Potential Utility of High Resolution Ensemble Sensitivities During Weak Flow in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, J.; Wile, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent expansion in availability of re-locatable near-surface atmospheric observing sensors introduces the question of where placement maximizes gain in forecast accuracy. Here the potential for ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is examined for high-resolution (Δx=4 km) predictions in complex terrain. The primary objective is to determine whether a mesoscale ESA applied at these scales is useful for identifying potential observing locations in weak flow. ESA can be inaccurate when the underlying assumptions of linear dynamics (and Gaussian statistics) are violated, or when the sensitivity cannot be robustly sampled. A case study of a fog event at the Salt Lake City airport (KSLC) provides a useful period for examining these issues, with the additional influence of complex terrain. A realistic upper-air observing network is used in perfect-model ensemble data assimilation experiments, providing the statistics for ESA. Results show that water vapor mixing ratios over KSLC are sensitive to temperature on the first model layer tens of km away, 6 h prior to verification and prior to the onset of fog. Sensitivity 12 h prior is weaker but leads to qualitatively similar results. Temperatures are shown to be a predictor of inversion strength in the Salt Lake basin; the ESA predicts southerly flow and strengthened inversions with warmer temperatures in a few locations. Simple linearity tests show that small perturbations do not lead to the expected forecast change, but larger perturbations do, suggesting that noise can dominate a small perturbation. Assimilating a perfect observation at the maximum sensitivity location produces forecasts more closely agreeing with the ESA. Sampling error evaluation show that similar conclusions can be reached with ensembles as small as 48 members, but smaller ensembles do not produce accurate sensitivity estimates.

  18. Measurements of thermal updraft intensity over complex terrain using American white pelicans and a simple boundary-layer forecast model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shannon, H.D.; Young, G.S.; Yates, M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Seegar, W.

    2003-01-01

    An examination of boundary-layer meteorological and avian aerodynamic theories suggests that soaring birds can be used to measure the magnitude of vertical air motions within the boundary layer. These theories are applied to obtain mixed-layer normalized thermal updraft intensity over both flat and complex terrain from the climb rates of soaring American white pelicans and from diagnostic boundary-layer model-produced estimates of the boundary-layer depth zi and the convective velocity scale w*. Comparison of the flatland data with the profiles of normalized updraft velocity obtained from previous studies reveals that the pelican-derived measurements of thermal updraft intensity are in close agreement with those obtained using traditional research aircraft and large eddy simulation (LES) in the height range of 0.2 to 0.8 zi. Given the success of this method, the profiles of thermal vertical velocity over the flatland and the nearby mountains are compared. This comparison shows that these profiles are statistically indistinguishable over this height range, indicating that the profile for thermal updraft intensity varies little over this sample of complex terrain. These observations support the findings of a recent LES study that explored the turbulent structure of the boundary layer using a range of terrain specifications. For terrain similar in scale to that encountered in this study, results of the LES suggest that the terrain caused less than an 11% variation in the standard deviation of vertical velocity.

  19. Measurements of thermal intensity over complex terrain using American white pelicans and a simple boundary layer forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Harlan Donald

    2001-11-01

    An examination of boundary layer meteorological and avian aerodynamic theories suggests that soaring birds can be used to measure the magnitude of vertical air motions within the boundary layer. These theories are applied to obtain mixed layer normalized thermal updraft intensity over both flat and complex terrain from the climb rates of soaring American White Pelicans and from diagnostic boundary layer model-produced estimates of the boundary layer depth zi and the convective velocity scale w*. Comparison of the flatland data with the profiles of normalized updraft velocity obtained from previous studies reveals that the pelican-derived measurements of thermal intensity are in close agreement with those obtained using traditional research aircraft and large eddy simulation (LES) in the height range of 0.2 to 0.8 zi. Given the success of this method, the profiles of thermal vertical velocity over the flatland and the nearby mountains are compared. This comparison shows that these profiles are statistically indistinguishable over this height range, indicating that the profile for thermal intensity varies little over this sample of complex terrain. These observations support the findings of a recent LES study that explored the turbulent structure of the boundary layer using a range of terrain specifications. For terrain similar in scale to that encountered in this study, results of this LES suggest that this terrain caused less than an 11% variation in the standard deviation of vertical velocity.

  20. Measurements Of Thermal Updraft Intensity Over Complex Terrain Using American White Pelicans And A Simple Boundary-Layer Forecast Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Harlan D.; Young, George S.; Yates, Michael A.; Fuller, Mark R.; Seegar, William S.

    An examination of boundary-layer meteorological and avian aerodynamic theories suggests that soaring birds can be used to measure the magnitude of vertical air motions within the boundary layer. These theories are applied to obtain mixed-layer normalized thermal updraft intensity over both flat and complex terrain from the climb rates of soaring American white pelicans and from diagnostic boundary-layer model-produced estimates of the boundary-layer depth zi and the convective velocity scale w*. Comparison of the flatland data with the profiles of normalized updraft velocity obtained from previous studies reveals that the pelican-derived measurements of thermal updraft intensity are in close agreement with those obtained using traditional research aircraft and large eddy simulation (LES) in the height range of 0.2 to 0.8 zi. Given the success of this method, the profiles of thermal vertical velocity over the flatland and the nearby mountains are compared. This comparison shows that these profiles are statistically indistinguishable over this height range, indicating that the profile for thermal updraft intensity varies little over this sample of complex terrain. These observations support the findings of a recent LES study that explored the turbulent structure of the boundary layer using a range of terrain specifications. For terrain similar in scale to that encountered in this study, results of the LES suggest that the terrain caused less than an 11% variation in the standard deviation of vertical velocity.

  1. Complex structure of spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, F.; Ferré, A.; Hort, O.; Dubrouil, A.; Quintard, L.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Burgy, F.; Mével, E.; Mairesse, Y.; Constant, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the spatiospectral coupling appearing in the spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra generated in gases. When ionization is weak, harmonic generation in the far field often exhibits rings surrounding a central spot centered on each odd harmonics in the spatiospectral domain. The nature of these structures is debated. They could stem from interferences between the emission of short and long trajectories, or could be the signature of the temporal and spatial dependence of the longitudinal phase matching of long trajectories (Maker fringes). We conducted spectrally and spatially resolved measurements of the harmonic spectra as a function of pressure, intensity, and ellipticity. In addition, we performed calculations where only a single emission plane is included (i.e., omitting deliberately the longitudinal phase matching), reproducing the features experimentally observed. This study has been completed by the spatiospectral coupling when strong ionization occurs leading to complex patterns which have been compared to calculations using the same model and also show good agreement. We conclude that many spatiospectral structures of the harmonic spectrum can be interpreted in terms of spatial and temporal transverse coherence of the emitting medium without resorting to longitudinal phase matching or quantum phase interference between short and long trajectories.

  2. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  3. Inferring the contribution of advection to total ecosystem scalar fluxes over a tall forest in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    K. Novick; S. Brantley; C. Ford Miniat; J. Walker; J.M. Vose

    2014-01-01

    Multiple data streams from a new flux tower located in complex and heterogeneous terrain at theCoweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (North Carolina, USA) were integrated to identify periods of advectiveflow regimes. Drainage flows were expected a priori, due to the location of the measurement site at thebase of a long, gently-sloping valley. Drainage flow was confirmed by...

  4. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  5. Seasonal differences in SO2 ground-level impacts from a power plant plume on complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Palau, J L; Meliá, J; Segarra, D; Pérez-Landa, G; Santa-Cruz, F; Millán, M M

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the seasonal differences in SO2 ground-level fumigations from a power plant situated on very complex terrain in the Iberian Peninsula within the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB). The study area extends more than 80 km around the power plant on very complex semi-arid terrain. Considering different plume-rise schemes, by experimentation and modelling this study attempts to characterise the seasonal differences in both the plume footprint 80 km around the power plant and the turbulent regime (diurnal or nocturnal) driving the main contribution to the accumulated plume footprints at different distances from the power plant within a complex terrain region. Two markedly different SO2 ground-level distributions around the power plant are presented for the typical summer and winter dispersive scenarios in the area. Simulations show that the SO2 footprint of a plume being advected more than 450 m above ground level in complex terrain is highly dependent on the prevailing meteorological conditions and on the mesoscale perturbations of the synoptic flows within the lower layers of the troposphere. The results obtained show how on complex terrain, despite seasonal meteorological differences and under stable dispersive conditions, the simulated mechanical turbulence leeward of the mountain ranges reproduces highly concentrated SO2 fumigations on the ground more than 50 km away from the power plant. Besides, under summer convective activity, plume fumigations have been successfully simulated less than 15 km from the power plant. In conclusion, this study shows how measurements from air quality networks together with information obtained from atmospheric transport and diffusion models are able to characterise different transport scenarios. This is a clear advantage for the end-users and decision-makers who manage and optimise the regional air quality networks.

  6. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-25

    High resolution numerical simulation can provide insight into important physical processes that occur within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The present work employs large eddy simulation (LES) using the Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model, with the LES domain nested within mesoscale simulation, to simulate real conditions in the convective PBL over an area of complex terrain. A multiple nesting approach has been used to downsize the grid spacing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). A careful selection of grid spacing in the WRF Meso domain has been conducted to minimize artifacts in the WRF-LES solutions. The WRF-LES results have been evaluated with in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia BasinWind Energy Study (CBWES). Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function (PDF) of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and data. Furthermore, the WRF-LES variables show a great deal of variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. The WRF-LES results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day. In addition to basic studies related to boundary-layer meteorology, results from these simulations can be used in other applications, such as studying wind energy resources, atmospheric dispersion, fire weather etc.

  7. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  8. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  9. Imposing land-surface fluxes at an immersed boundary for improved simulations of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2008-06-05

    Boundary layer flows are greatly complicated by the presence of complex terrain which redirects mean flow and alters the structure of turbulence. Surface fluxes of heat and moisture provide additional forcing which induce secondary flows, or can dominate flow dynamics in cases with weak mean flows. Mesoscale models are increasingly being used for numerical simulations of boundary layer flows over complex terrain. These models typically use a terrain-following coordinate transformation, but these introduce numerical errors over steep terrain. An alternative is to use an immersed boundary method which alleviates errors associated with the coordinate transformation by allowing the terrain to be represented as a surface which arbitrarily passes through a Cartesian grid. This paper describes coupling atmospheric physics models to an immersed boundary method implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in previous work [Lundquist et al., 2007]. When the immersed boundary method is used, boundary conditions must be imposed on the immersed surface for velocity and scalar surface fluxes. Previous algorithms, such as those used by Tseng and Ferziger [2003] and Balaras [2004], impose no-slip boundary conditions on the velocity field at the immersed surface by adding a body force to the Navier-Stokes equations. Flux boundary conditions for the advection-diffusion equation have not been adequately addressed. A new algorithm is developed here which allows scalar surface fluxes to be imposed on the flow solution at an immersed boundary. With this extension of the immersed boundary method, land-surface models can be coupled to the immersed boundary to provide realistic surface forcing. Validation is provided in the context of idealized valley simulations with both specified and parameterized surface fluxes using the WRF code. Applicability to real terrain is illustrated with a fully coupled two-dimensional simulation of the Owens Valley in California.

  10. Wind Resource Assessment in Complex Terrain with a High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Karin; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda; Dorninger, Manfred; Zauner, Rudolf; Fink, Martin

    2014-05-01

    A crucial step in planning new wind farms is the estimation of the amount of wind energy that can be harvested in possible target sites. Wind resource assessment traditionally entails deployment of masts equipped for wind speed measurements at several heights for a reasonably long period of time. Simplified linear models of atmospheric flow are then used for a spatial extrapolation of point measurements to a wide area. While linear models have been successfully applied in the wind resource assessment in plains and offshore, their reliability in complex terrain is generally poor. This represents a major limitation to wind resource assessment in Austria, where high-altitude locations are being considered for new plant sites, given the higher frequency of sustained winds at such sites. The limitations of linear models stem from two key assumptions in their formulation, the neutral stratification and attached boundary-layer flow, both of which often break down in complex terrain. Consequently, an accurate modeling of near-surface flow over mountains requires the adoption of a NWP model with high horizontal and vertical resolution. This study explores the wind potential of a site in Styria in the North-Eastern Alps. The WRF model is used for simulations with a maximum horizontal resolution of 800 m. Three nested computational domains are defined, with the innermost one encompassing a stretch of the relatively broad Enns Valley, flanked by the main crest of the Alps in the south and the Nördliche Kalkalpen of similar height in the north. In addition to the simulation results, we use data from fourteen 10-m wind measurement sites (of which 7 are located within valleys and 5 near mountain tops) and from 2 masts with anemometers at several heights (at hillside locations) in an area of 1600 km2 around the target site. The potential for wind energy production is assessed using the mean wind speed and turbulence intensity at hub height. The capacity factor is also evaluated

  11. Topographic Controls on the Thickness of Mobile Regolith and Total Soil Organic Carbon in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Crosby, B. T.; Godsey, S.; Parsons, S.

    2016-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions comprise over 40% of the terrestrial ecosystems on Earth and are considered to be one of the most susceptible to environmental change. Estimating the amount and distribution of soil carbon in these regions is challenging due to their high degree of spatial heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a total soil carbon model using curvature, thickness of mobile regolith (TMR), and aspect in order to predict the distribution of soil carbon across complex terrain within a semi-arid environment. We excavated 45 randomly selected soil pits vertically down to saprolite to acquire TMR, in a first order watershed within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory located in Southwestern Idaho. TMR varied as an inverse linear function of curvature (r2 value = 0.89) and was shown to be predicable across lithology and ecosystems. Soil thicknesses were plotted against total soil carbon for both the north and south-facing aspects. A quadratic polynomial function fit well with r2 values of 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Across the watershed, total soil carbon on the north-facing aspect was 7,172 Mg C or 54% of the total soil carbon, despite comprising only 37% of the total land area. South-facing aspect totaled 6,115 Mg C, or 46% of the total soil carbon. If samples were collected to a maximum thickness of 1 m or 0.3 m and extrapolated using kriging techniques (which is typical of other inventories and models) total soil carbon has the potential to under- and overestimate carbon as much as 50% to 133% and 26% to 1167% with aspect and microtopography, respectively. By requiring sampling down to saprolite, our model has the potential to provide more accurate total carbon pools than other models. Our findings indicate that a significant amount of carbon is stored deep in a part of the critical zone that may be less sensitive to loss but leads to an underestimation of total soil carbon stores on complex terrain.

  12. Influence of Microclimate on Semi-Arid Montane Conifer Forest Sapflux Velocity in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirouin, K. R.; Barnard, D. M.; Barnard, H. R.

    2016-12-01

    Microclimate variation in complex terrain is key to our understanding of large-scale climate change effects on montane ecosystems. Modern climate models forecast that semi-arid montane ecosystems in the western United States are to experience increases in temperature, number of extreme drought events, and decreases in annual snowpack, all of which will potentially influence ecosystem water, carbon, and energy balances. In this study, we developed response curves that describe the relationships between stem sapflux velocity, air temperature (Tair), incoming solar radiation (SWin), soil temperature (Tsoil), and soil moisture content (VWC) in sites of Pinus contorta and Pinus ponderosa distributed along an elevation and aspect gradient in the montane zone of the Central Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA. Among sites we found sapflux velocity to be significantly correlated with all four environmental factors (p < 0.05), but most strongly with SWin and Tair. The response of sapflux velocity to SWin was logarithmic, whereas the response to Tair indicated a peak sapflux velocity at a site-specific temperature that declined with increasing Tair. Sapflux velocity also increased with increasing VWC, but decreased with increasing Tsoil. At south-facing sites, the initial increase in the logarithmic response curve for SWin leveled off at 150-250 W m-2, whereas for north-facing sites it leveled off at 50-125 W m-2. While the differences in the SWin response between aspects could be due to species physiological differences, the highest elevation south-facing P. contorta site behaved similarly to the south-facing P. ponderosa, suggesting that environmental drivers may dominate the response. In response to Tair, peak sapflux velocity occurred at 12-13 degrees C at all sites except the mid-slope north-facing P. contorta site, which also had the lowest Tsoil. The responses of stem sapflux velocity to climate drivers indicate that forest transpiration is regulated by microclimate

  13. Performance and evaluation of a coupled prognostic model TAPM over a mountainous complex terrain industrial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N.; Triantafyllou, Athanasios G.; Albanis, Triantafyllos A.; Sakkas, Vasileios; Garas, Stelios

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric modeling is considered an important tool with several applications such as prediction of air pollution levels, air quality management, and environmental impact assessment studies. Therefore, evaluation studies must be continuously made, in order to improve the accuracy and the approaches of the air quality models. In the present work, an attempt is made to examine the air pollution model (TAPM) efficiency in simulating the surface meteorology, as well as the SO2 concentrations in a mountainous complex terrain industrial area. Three configurations under different circumstances, firstly with default datasets, secondly with data assimilation, and thirdly with updated land use, ran in order to investigate the surface meteorology for a 3-year period (2009-2011) and one configuration applied to predict SO2 concentration levels for the year of 2011.The modeled hourly averaged meteorological and SO2 concentration values were statistically compared with those from five monitoring stations across the domain to evaluate the model's performance. Statistical measures showed that the surface temperature and relative humidity are predicted well in all three simulations, with index of agreement (IOA) higher than 0.94 and 0.70 correspondingly, in all monitoring sites, while an overprediction of extreme low temperature values is noted, with mountain altitudes to have an important role. However, the results also showed that the model's performance is related to the configuration regarding the wind. TAPM default dataset predicted better the wind variables in the center of the simulation than in the boundaries, while improvement in the boundary horizontal winds implied the performance of TAPM with updated land use. TAPM assimilation predicted the wind variables fairly good in the whole domain with IOA higher than 0.83 for the wind speed and higher than 0.85 for the horizontal wind components. Finally, the SO2 concentrations were assessed by the model with IOA varied from 0

  14. Spatial assessment of atmosphere-ecosystem exchanges via micrometeorological measurements and footprint modelling over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Lüers, Johannes; Foken, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Anthropogenic impacts on natural and managed ecosystems have increased seriously during recent years. Ecosystem functions are modified as a result, which have an apparent influence on ecosystem services. TERRECO, a joint activity of the University of Bayreuth, Kangwon National University in Korea, and Korean Forest Research Institute, focuses the goal on building a bridge between ecosystem performance in mountainous terrain and derived ecosystem services that are critical for human well being. As a sub-program of TERRECO, our study is concentrated in Haean-Myun Catchment, an intensively used landscape within the Soyang Lake watershed including Soyang Lake Reservoir, and a sub-catchment of the Han River system which drains 26% of the land surface of South Korea. The aim of our study is to better understand the energy and matter exchange above farmlands (rice fields and/or dry crops) during the whole growing period including monsoon seasons in such a complex terrain as Haean Basin in Korea. To determine reliable evaporation and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and to determine reliable information about near surface atmospheric stratification conditions, including convective events in Haean Basin, an eddy covariance complex (USA-1, LI-7500) will be installed above a typical farmland in Haean Basin to collect the 3D wind vector, water vapor and carbon dioxide concentration. It will be running at a sampling frequency of 20 Hz continuously, from late April to October in 2010. A post-processing software packages called TK2 will be used to obtain reliable sensible and latent heat and carbon dioxide fluxes with a high standard in data quality. Ongoing Footprint analysis will give an opportunity to track the spatial contribution of the surrounding land uses to the observed heat and CO2 fluxes helping to interpret the data. Useful data will be picked out to determine the variability of the stratification of the near surface boundary atmospheric layer to better understand the

  15. Mesoscale ensemble sensitivity analysis for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    Ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is emerging as a viable alternative to adjoint sensitivity. Several open issues face ESA for forecasts dominated by mesoscale phenomena, including (1) sampling error arising from finite-sized ensembles causing over-estimated sensitivities, and (2) violation of linearity assumptions for strongly nonlinear flows. In an effort to use ESA for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain, we present results from experiments designed to address these open issues. Sampling error in ESA arises in two places. First, when hypothetical observations are introduced to test the sensitivity estimates for linearity. Here the same localization that was used in the filter itself can be simply applied. Second and more critical, localization should be considered within the sensitivity calculations. Sensitivity to hypothetical observations, estimated without re-running the ensemble, includes regression of a sample of a final-time (forecast) metric onto a sample of initial states. Derivation to include localization results in two localization coefficients (or factors) applied in separate regression steps. Because the forecast metric is usually a sum, and can also include a sum over a spatial region and multiple physical variables, a spatial localization function is difficult to specify. We present results from experiments to empirically estimate localization factors for ESA to test hypothetical observations for mesoscale data assimilation in complex terrain. Localization factors are first derived for an ensemble filter following the empirical localization methodology. Sensitivities for a fog event over Salt Lake City, and a Colorado downslope wind event, are tested for linearity by approximating assimilation of perfect observations at points of maximum sensitivity, both with and without localization. Observation sensitivity is then estimated, with and without localization, and tested for linearity. The validity of the

  16. Comparison of Measured and WRF-LES Turbulence Statistics in a Real Convective Boundary Layer over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. K.; Berg, L. K.; Kosovic, B.; Mirocha, J. D.; Pekour, M. S.; Shaw, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    Resolving the finest turbulent scales present in the lower atmosphere using numerical simulations helps to study the processes that occur in the atmospheric boundary layer, such as the turbulent inflow condition to the wind plant and the generation of the wake behind wind turbines. This work employs several nested domains in the WRF-LES framework to simulate conditions in a convectively driven cloud free boundary layer at an instrumented field site in complex terrain. The innermost LES domain (30 m spatial resolution) receives the boundary forcing from two other coarser resolution LES outer domains, which in turn receive boundary conditions from two WRF-mesoscale domains. Wind and temperature records from sonic anemometers mounted at two vertical levels (30 m and 60 m) are compared with the LES results in term of first and second statistical moments as well as power spectra and distributions of wind velocity. For the two mostly used boundary layer parameterizations (MYNN and YSU) tested in the WRF mesoscale domains, the MYNN scheme shows slightly better agreement with the observations for some quantities, such as time averaged velocity and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE). However, LES driven by WRF-mesoscale simulations using either parameterization have similar velocity spectra and distributions of velocity. For each component of the wind velocity, WRF-LES power spectra are found to be comparable to the spectra derived from the measured data (for the frequencies that are accurately represented by WRF-LES). Furthermore, the analysis of LES results shows a noticeable variability of the mean and variance even over small horizontal distances that would be considered sub-grid scale in mesoscale simulations. This observed statistical variability in space and time can be utilized to further analyze the turbulence quantities over a heterogeneous surface and to improve the turbulence parameterization in the mesoscale model.

  17. Multiscale Precipitation Processes Over Mountain Terrain - Landform and Vegetation Controls of Microphysics and Convection in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Wilson, A. M.; Sun, X.; Duan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent precipitation observations in mountainous regions do not exhibit the classical orographic enhancement with elevation, especially where fog and multi-layer clouds are persistent. The role of landform in modulating moisture convergence patterns and constraining the thermodynamic environment that supports the development of complex vertical structures of clouds and precipitation is discussed first using observations and model results from the IPHEx (Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment) field campaign in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). Analysis of the complex spatial heterogeneity of precipitation microphysics in the SAM suggests that seeder-feeder interactions (SFI) among stratiform precipitation, low level clouds (LLC), and fog play a governing role on the diurnal and seasonal cycles of observed precipitation regimes. Further, in the absence of synoptic-scale forcing, results suggest that evapotranspiration makes a significant contribution to the moisture budget in the lower atmosphere, creating super-saturation conditions favorable to CCN activation, LLC formation, and light rainfall. To investigate the role of evapotranspiration on the diurnal cycle of mountain precipitation further, range-scale modeling studies were conducted in the Central Andes. Specifically, high resolution WRF simulations for realistic and quasi-idealized ET withdrawal case-studies show that evapotranspiration fluxes modulated by landform govern convective activity in the lower troposphere, including cloud formation and precipitation processes that account for daily precipitation amounts as high as 50-70% depending on synoptic conditions and season. These studies suggest multiscale vegetation controls of orographic precipitation processes via atmospheric instability on the one hand, and low level super-saturation and local microphysics on the other. A conceptual model of multiscale interactions among vegetation, landform and moist processes over complex

  18. Resolving cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests

    PubMed Central

    Hendrichs, Jorge; Vera, M. Teresa; De Meyer, Marc; Clarke, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    scientifically valid names. Molecular and pheromone markers are now available to distinguish Bactrocera dorsalis from Bactrocera carambolae. Ceratitis FAR Complex (Ceratitis fasciventris, Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis rosa) – Morphology, morphometry, genetic, genomic, pheromone, cuticular hydrocarbon, ecology, behaviour, and developmental physiology data provide evidence for the existence of five different entities within this fruit fly complex from the African region. These are currently recognised as Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis fasciventris (F1 and F2), Ceratitis rosa and a new species related to Ceratitis rosa (R2). The biological limits within Ceratitis fasciventris (i.e. F1 and F2) are not fully resolved. Microsatellites markers and morphological identification tools for the adult males of the five different FAR entities were developed based on male leg structures. Zeugodacus cucurbitae (formerly Bactrocera (Zeugodacus) cucurbitae) – Genetic variability was studied among melon fly populations throughout its geographic range in Africa and the Asia/Pacific region and found to be limited. Cross-mating studies indicated no incompatibility or sexual isolation. Host preference and genetic studies showed no evidence for the existence of host races. It was concluded that the melon fly does not represent a cryptic species complex, neither with regard to geographic distribution nor to host range. Nevertheless, the higher taxonomic classification under which this species had been placed, by the time the CRP was started, was found to be paraphyletic; as a result the subgenus Zeugodacus was elevated to genus level. PMID:26798252

  19. Resolving cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests.

    PubMed

    Hendrichs, Jorge; Vera, M Teresa; De Meyer, Marc; Clarke, Anthony R

    2015-01-01

    names. Molecular and pheromone markers are now available to distinguish Bactrocera dorsalis from Bactrocera carambolae. Ceratitis FAR Complex (Ceratitis fasciventris, Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis rosa) - Morphology, morphometry, genetic, genomic, pheromone, cuticular hydrocarbon, ecology, behaviour, and developmental physiology data provide evidence for the existence of five different entities within this fruit fly complex from the African region. These are currently recognised as Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis fasciventris (F1 and F2), Ceratitis rosa and a new species related to Ceratitis rosa (R2). The biological limits within Ceratitis fasciventris (i.e. F1 and F2) are not fully resolved. Microsatellites markers and morphological identification tools for the adult males of the five different FAR entities were developed based on male leg structures. Zeugodacus cucurbitae (formerly Bactrocera (Zeugodacus) cucurbitae) - Genetic variability was studied among melon fly populations throughout its geographic range in Africa and the Asia/Pacific region and found to be limited. Cross-mating studies indicated no incompatibility or sexual isolation. Host preference and genetic studies showed no evidence for the existence of host races. It was concluded that the melon fly does not represent a cryptic species complex, neither with regard to geographic distribution nor to host range. Nevertheless, the higher taxonomic classification under which this species had been placed, by the time the CRP was started, was found to be paraphyletic; as a result the subgenus Zeugodacus was elevated to genus level.

  20. Topographic Shading in the WRF Model with the Immersed Boundary Method: Implementation, Validation, and Application to Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, R. S.; Lundquist, K. A.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.

    2016-12-01

    In mountainous terrain, the diurnal variations of the surface sensible heat flux can lead to thermally-driven upslope and downslope flows during the daytime and nighttime, respectively. Topographic shading may influence these flows by limiting incoming solar radiation and creating large spatiotemporal inhomogeneities in the surface sensible heat flux. It is especially important to include topographic shading in high-resolution models of thermally-driven slope flows because of the effects it may have on flow development. In this work, the topographic shading algorithm in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is coupled with the immersed boundary method (IBM). The IBM was originally implemented in WRF by Lundquist et al. (2010, 2012), and removes the restrictions on terrain slope that are associated with WRF's traditional terrain-following vertical coordinate, permitting high-resolution atmospheric simulations over complex terrain. The topographic shading implementation is validated by comparing shadow location, land-surface fluxes, and temperature and velocity fields between idealized WRF simulations both with and without the IBM. Following validation, the topographic shading implementation is tested in a realistic simulation of Granite Mountain, Utah, where topographic shading is known to affect downslope flow development in the evening (Fernando et al. 2015). The horizontal resolution of the model is 50 m and the vertical resolution is approximately 10 m near the surface, which would be infeasible in a standard WRF model with terrain-following coordinates due to large local slope values reaching roughly 55 degrees. The development of downslope flows after local sunset in the model is discussed and shown to be consistent with field observations from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) project.

  1. The effects of synoptical weather pattern and complex terrain on the formation of aerosol events in the Greater Taipei area.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Wang, Chu-Fang; Chang, E-E; Lee, Chung-Te

    2008-07-25

    The aerosol in the Taipei basin is difficult to transport outward under specific weather patterns owing to complex terrain blocking. In this study, seven weather patterns are identified from synoptic weather maps for aerosol events, which occurred from March 2002 to February 2005. Among the identified weather patterns, High Pressure Peripheral Circulation (HPPC), Warm area Ahead of a cold Front (WAF), TYPhoon (TYP), Pacific High Pressure system stretching westerly (PHP), Weak High Pressure system (WHP), and Weak Southern Wind (WSW) are related to terrain blocking. The remaining pattern is High Pressure system Pushing (HPP). The classification of the pollution origin of the air masses shows that 15% of event days were contributed by long-range transport (LRT), 20% by local pollution (LP), and 65% by LRT/LP mix. Terrain blocking causes aerosol accumulation from high atmospheric stability and weak winds occurring under HPPC, TYP, and PHP weather patterns when the Taipei basin is situated on the lee side of the Snow Mountains Chain (SMC). Terrain blocking also occurs when the Taipei basin is situated on the upwind of SMC and Mt. Da-Twen under WAF and WSW patterns. To study the variation of aerosol properties under the mixed influence of terrain and pollution origin, we conducted a field observation simultaneously at the urban, suburban, and background sites in the Greater Taipei area from April 14 to 23, 2004. Terrain blocking plays an important role in aerosol accumulation in the stagnant environment when the Taipei basin is on the lee side of SMC. On the other hand, the PM(2.5) sulfate level is stable with a fraction of 30% in PM(2.5) during the observation period at the urban (25%-33%) and background (25%-41%) sites. It indicates that background PM(2.5) sulfate is high on the West Pacific in winter.

  2. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  3. On the energy balance closure and net radiation in complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Niedrist, Georg; Scholz, Katharina; Tomelleri, Enrico; Zhao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In complex, sloping terrain, horizontal measurements of net radiation are not reflective of the radiative energy available for the conductive and convective heat exchange of the underlying surface. Using data from a grassland site on a mountain slope characterised by spatial heterogeneity in inclination and aspect, we tested the hypothesis that a correction of the horizontal net radiation measurements which accounts for the individual footprint contributions of the various surfaces to the measured sensible and latent heat eddy covariance fluxes will yield more realistic slope-parallel net radiation estimates compared to a correction based on the average inclination and aspect of the footprint. Our main result is that both approaches led to clear, but very similar improvements in the phase between available energy and the sum of the latent and sensible heat fluxes. As a consequence the variance in the sum of latent and sensible heat flux explained by available radiation improved by >10 %, while energy balance closure improved only slightly. This is shown to be mainly due to the average inclination and aspect corresponding largely with the inclination and aspect of the main flux source area in combination with a limited sensitivity of the slope correction to small angular differences in, particularly, inclination and aspect. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of the present approach and future research directions. PMID:28066093

  4. Dispersion of TSP and PM(10) emissions from quarries in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Dmitry; Stern, Eli; Broday, David M

    2016-01-15

    This study evaluates AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion calculations of particulate matter emissions from stone quarries in two mountainous regions against TSP and PM10 measurements, using both observational and WRF-modeled meteorological data. Due to different model parameterization, AERMOD dispersion predictions were in better agreement with the measured concentrations than those obtained by CALPUFF. As expected, the smaller the distance between the meteorological station, the source (quarry) and the receptors, the better the predictions of both AERMOD and CALPUFF. In contrast, using in-situ wind field obtained by runs of the WRF meteorological model for the complex terrain study area provided, in general, less accurate dispersion estimates than when using (even remote) meteorological observations. In particular, using the three-dimensional WRF-modeled wind field within CALPUFF did not provide any advantage over using the two-dimensional wind field, which is the common procedure of AERMOD and CALPUFF. Dry deposition was more significant for ambient concentration estimation in AERMOD than in CALPUFF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrologic Simulations in Complex Terrain Conditioned on Different Precipitation Inputs During IPHEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E. N.; Erlingis, J. M.; Vergara, H. J.; Gourley, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    An Intensive Observation Period for the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), part of NASA's Ground Validation campaign for the newly launched Global Precipitation Measurement Mission took place from May-June 2014 in the Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina. As part of the experiment, the National Severe Storms Laboratory's (NSSL) mobile dual-pol X-band radar, NOXP, was deployed in the Pigeon River Basin (PRB). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of different post-processing algorithms of NOXP data with the suite of observation platforms within the IPHEx domain. In addition, the impact of standard precipitation datasets (Stage IV gauge-corrected radar estimates, Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor System Quantitative Precipitation Estimates, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42V7 rainfall, CMORPH, WRF, etc.) on the performance of the CREST hydrologic model at small basin scales in complex terrain will be examined. Hydrologic simulations using a version of CREST with a priori parameters were conducted in the three small catchments within the PRB previously studied by Tao and Barros (2013): the Cataloochee Creek Basin, the East Fork Pigeon River Basin, and the West Fork Pigeon River Basin.

  6. A Dispersion Model Evaluation Study for Real-Time Application in Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiato, F.

    1991-08-01

    A few tracer experiments were carried out in autumn 1984 and summer 1985 at the Lago Brasimone site, on the Appennini Mountains approximately 50 km south of Bologna with the purpose assessing the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants under drainage flow conditions. The three-dimensional transport and diffusion model MATHEW/ADPIC (M/A) has been applied to selected tracer and meteorological data with the aim of assessing the model performance under complex terrain and meteorological conditions, and its sensitivity to input data available in real-time applications. Boundary layer input parameters were derived through standard algorithms based on tethersonde and pilot balloon measurements. Model simulations of the most significant tracer experiments have been assessed by means of several evaluation criteria, and the sensitivity to some input data has been investigated. The results show that if a limited spatial uncertainty in the computed concentration pattern is taken into account, M/A provides a good agreement with observed concentrations. The quality of the results is very sensitive to the presence of wind measurements where the deviation of the flow due to the shape of the valley is observed.

  7. Lagrangian dispersion modeling of vehicular emissions from a highway in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Oettl, Dietmar; Sturm, Peter Johann; Pretterhofer, Gerhard; Bacher, Michael; Rodler, Johannes; Almbauer, Raimund Alfons

    2003-10-01

    Transit traffic through the Austrian Alps is of major concern in government policy. Pollutant burdens resulting from such traffic are discussed widely in Austrian politics and have already led to measures to restrict traffic on transit routes. In the course of an environmental assessment study, comprehensive measurements were performed. These included air quality observations using passive samplers, a differential optical absorption spectroscopy system, a mobile and a fixed air quality monitoring station, and meteorological observations. As was evident from several previous studies, dispersion modeling in such areas of complex terrain and, moreover, with frequent calm wind conditions, is difficult to handle. Further, in the case presented here, different pollutant sources had to be treated simultaneously (e.g., road networks, exhaust chimneys from road tunnels, and road tunnel portals). No appropriate system for modeling all these factors has so far appeared in the literature. A prognostic wind field model coupled with a Lagrangian dispersion model is thus presented here and is designed to treat all these factors. A comparison of the modeling system with results from passive samplers and from a fixed air quality monitoring station proved the ability of the model to provide reasonable figures for concentration distributions along the A10.

  8. A physically-based hybrid framework to estimate daily-mean surface fluxes over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2016-06-01

    In this study we developed and examined a hybrid modeling approach integrating physically-based equations and statistical downscaling to estimate fine-scale daily-mean surface turbulent fluxes (i.e., sensible and latent heat fluxes) for a region of southern California that is extensively covered by varied vegetation types over a complex terrain. The selection of model predictors is guided by physical parameterizations of surface flux used in land surface models and analysis showing net shortwave radiation that is a major source of variability in the surface energy budget. Through a structure of multivariable regression processes with an application of near-surface wind estimates from a previous study, we successfully reproduce dynamically-downscaled 3 km resolution surface flux data. The overall error in our estimates is less than 20 % for both sensible and latent heat fluxes, while slightly larger errors are seen in high-altitude regions. The major sources of error in estimates include the limited information provided in coarse reanalysis data, the accuracy of near-surface wind estimates, and an ignorance of the nonlinear diurnal cycle of surface fluxes when using daily-mean data. However, with reasonable and acceptable errors, this hybrid modeling approach provides promising, fine-scale products of surface fluxes that are much more accurate than reanalysis data, without performing intensive dynamical simulations.

  9. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) project conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA Program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. This volume contains the Appendices, which include listings of the FORTRAN code and Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide. 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Kevin R.

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  11. Modeling snowpack evolution in complex terrain and forested Central Rockies: A model inter-comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Barlage, M. J.; Tewari, M.; Rasmussen, R.; Bao, Y.; Jin, J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Livneh, B.; Lin, C.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Niu, G.; Wen, L.; Yang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and amount of spring snowmelt runoff in mountainous regions are critical for water resources and managements. Correctly capturing the snow-atmospheric interactions (through albedo and surface energy partitioning) is also important for weather and climate models. This study developed a unique, integrated data set including one-year (2007-2008) snow water equivalent (SWE) observations from 112 SNOTEL sites in the Colorado Headwaters region, 2004-2008 observations (surface heat fluxes, radiation budgets, soil temperature and moisture) from two AmeriFlux sites (Niwot Ridge and GLEES), MODIS snow cover, and river discharge. These observations were used to evaluate the ability of six widely-used land-surface/snow models (Noah, Noah-MP, VIC, CLM, SAST, and LEAF-2) in simulating the seasonal evolution of snowpacks in central Rockies. The overarching goals of this community undertaking are to: 1) understand key processes controlling the evolution of snowpack in this complex terrain and forested region through analyzing field data and various components of snow physics in these models, and 2) improve snowpack modeling in weather and climate models. This comprehensive data set allowed us to address issues that had not been possible in previous snow-model inter-comparison investigations (e.g., SnowMIPs). For instance, models displayed a large disparity in treating radiation and turbulence processes within vegetation canopies. Some models with an overly simplified tree-canopy treatment need to raise snow albedo helped to retain snow on the ground during melting phase. However, comparing modeled radiation and heat fluxes to long-term observations revealed that too-high albedo reduced 75% of solar energy absorbed by the forested surface and resulted in too-low surface sensible heat and longwave radiation returned to the atmosphere, which could be a crucial deficiency for coupled weather and climate models. Large differences were found in simulated SWE by the six LSMs

  12. Weather, Topoclimate, and Phenology: Population Dynamics of Checkerspot Butterflies in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2008-12-01

    The pathways leading from climate and weather to the distribution and abundance of organisms need to be clarified as rapid climate change affects ecosystems. This presentation describes population dynamics of the threatened Bay checkerspot butterfly, Euphydryas editha bayensis, in topographically complex habitat and demonstrates how weather and topoclimate drives those dynamics through phenology of butterflies and larval hostplants. We sampled densities of postdiapause larvae at sites in a 100 ha reserve, stratified by Mar 21 potential insolation, to estimate numbers and microdistribution of larvae. Larval numbers ranged from 27,000 to 900,000 over the 24-year study (1985-2008). Four consecutive drought years from 1987 to 1990 led to a 96% decrease in numbers, and sharp declines were observed following warmer than average growing seasons. Changes in larval numbers were negatively correlated to mean growing season temperatures (r2 = 0.36, p < 0.02), and the best stepwise regression model included April temperature, and November and April rainfall (r2 = 0.57, p < 0.001). Changes in the microdistribution of larvae cross the topoclimatic gradient was correlated with change in numbers (r2 = 0.41, p < 0.01) -- when larval numbers increased, the distribution of larvae shifted towards warmer slopes, and when numbers decreased, the distribution shifted toward cooler slopes. Larval densities were least variable on cooler slopes, indicating that cooler slopes provided core habitat and refugia from warm temperatures. The length of the phenological window between peak flight and hostplant senescence predicted population response (r2 = 0.44, p < 0.005). Hostplant senescence patterns across slopes - plants remain green for 4 or more weeks later on cool N-facing slopes than on warm S-facing slopes - explains microdistributional shifts. Many species depend on phenological coincidence with host resources, and occupy complex terrain as well, and these patterns and mechanisms may be

  13. Spatial estimation of daily precipitation in regions with complex relief and scarce data using terrain orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Lina Mabel; Gironás, Jorge; Fernández, Bonifacio

    2014-09-01

    Precipitation is the most relevant variable in the hydrological cycle which drives continental hydrologic processes. Its spatial occurrence and behavior are complex and its daily estimation is hard in poorly gauged regions where the topography is highly irregular. Several interpolation methods are available for this purpose, but their performance is quite uncertain. This study develops a spatial interpolation method for daily precipitation that considers both spatial discontinuities and the influence of topography. The method first identifies the precipitation occurrence in each grid-cell as a function of measurements in surrounding rain gauges, and then uses daily elevation vs. precipitation linear regressions throughout the grid-cells where precipitation occurrence is identified. These regressions are classified according to the terrain orientation with respect to the prevailing wind direction. The method was evaluated using categorical statistics that quantify the skill to identify the precipitation occurrence/non-occurrence, and goodness-of-fit statistics to evaluate the error and efficiency. The methodology was compared against inverse distance weighted and simple regression methods, which were implemented considering both continuous and discontinuous precipitation fields. The new method better simulates the occurrence of precipitation, whereas traditional methods applied without considering the spatial discontinuity of precipitation tend to overestimate the frequency of the rainfall events, and thus the magnitude of precipitation at the basin scale. When spatial discontinuity is considered, traditional methods improve their performance and are comparable to the proposed method. Overall, the new method increases the number of days in which elevation vs. precipitation linear regression can be used, thus improving the spatial representation of precipitation in areas with complex relief.

  14. Modeling Spatial Patterns of Traffic-Related Air Pollutants in Complex Urban Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Zwack, Leonard M.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between traffic emissions and mobile-source air pollutant concentrations is highly variable over space and time and therefore difficult to model accurately, especially in urban settings with complex terrain. Regression-based approaches using continuous real-time mobile measurements may be able to characterize spatiotemporal variability in traffic-related pollutant concentrations but require methods to incorporate temporally varying meteorology and source strength in a physically interpretable fashion. Objective We developed a statistical model to assess the joint impact of both meteorology and traffic on measured concentrations of mobile-source air pollutants over space and time. Methods In this study, traffic-related air pollutants were continuously measured in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York (USA), which is affected by traffic on a large bridge and major highway. One-minute average concentrations of ultrafine particulate matter (UFP), fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)], and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured using a mobile-monitoring protocol. Regression modeling approaches to quantify the influence of meteorology, traffic volume, and proximity to major roadways on pollutant concentrations were used. These models incorporated techniques to capture spatial variability, long- and short-term temporal trends, and multiple sources. Results We observed spatial heterogeneity of both UFP and PM2.5 concentrations. A variety of statistical methods consistently found a 15–20% decrease in UFP concentrations within the first 100 m from each of the two major roadways. For PM2.5, temporal variability dominated spatial variability, but we observed a consistent linear decrease in concentrations from the roadways. Conclusions The combination of mobile monitoring and regression analysis was able to quantify local source contributions relative to background while

  15. Geolocation of man-made reservoirs across terrains of varying complexity using GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mixon, D.M.; Kinner, D.A.; Stallard, R.F.; Syvitski, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) is one of the world's most comprehensive databases of reservoir sedimentation rates, comprising nearly 6000 surveys for 1819 reservoirs across the continental United States. Sediment surveys in the database date from 1904 to 1999, though more than 95% of surveys were entered prior to 1980, making RESIS largely a historical database. The use of this database for large-scale studies has been limited by the lack of precise coordinates for the reservoirs. Many of the reservoirs are relatively small structures and do not appear on current USGS topographic maps. Others have been renamed or have only approximate (i.e. township and range) coordinates. This paper presents a method scripted in ESRI's ARC Macro Language (AML) to locate the reservoirs on digital elevation models using information available in RESIS. The script also delineates the contributing watersheds and compiles several hydrologically important parameters for each reservoir. Evaluation of the method indicates that, for watersheds larger than 5 km2, the correct outlet is identified over 80% of the time. The importance of identifying the watershed outlet correctly depends on the application. Our intent is to collect spatial data for watersheds across the continental United States and describe the land use, soils, and topography for each reservoir's watershed. Because of local landscape similarity in these properties, we show that choosing the incorrect watershed does not necessarily mean that the watershed characteristics will be misrepresented. We present a measure termed terrain complexity and examine its relationship to geolocation success rate and its influence on the similarity of nearby watersheds. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Air quality forecasts at kilometer scale grid over Spanish complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pay, M. T.; Martínez, F.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    CALIOPE-AQFS represents the current state-of-the-art in air quality forecasting systems running at high resolution over high performance computing platforms. It provides 48 h forecast of main pollutants over Spain at 4 km horizontal resolution, and over the most populated areas with complex terrains in Spain (Barcelona, Madrid and Andalucia domains) at 1 km. Increased horizontal resolution from 4 km to 1 km over the aforementioned domains leads to finer texture and more realistic concentration maps, justified by the increase of NO2/O3 spatial correlation coefficients from 0.79/0.69 (4 km) to 0.81/0.73 (1 km). High resolution emissions using the bottom-up HERMESv2.0 model are essential to improve the model performance when increasing resolution at urban scale, but it is not sufficient. Decreasing grid spacing does not reveal the expected improvement on hourly statistics, decreasing NO2 bias only in ~ 2 μg m-3 and increasing O3 bias in ~ 1 μg m-3. The grid effect is less pronounced for PM10 because part of its mass consists of secondary aerosols which are less affected by a decreasing grid size in contrast to the locally emitted primary components. The resolution increase has the highest impact over Barcelona, where air flow is mainly controlled by mesoscale phenomena and a lower PBL. Despite the merits and potential uses of the 1 km simulation, the limitations of current model formulations do not allow confirming their expected superiority close to highly urbanized areas and large sources. Future work should combine high grid resolution with techniques that decrease subgrid variability and models that consider urban morphology and thermal parameters.

  17. Modeling spatial patterns of traffic-related air pollutants in complex urban terrain.

    PubMed

    Zwack, Leonard M; Paciorek, Christopher J; Spengler, John D; Levy, Jonathan I

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between traffic emissions and mobile-source air pollutant concentrations is highly variable over space and time and therefore difficult to model accurately, especially in urban settings with complex terrain. Regression-based approaches using continuous real-time mobile measurements may be able to characterize spatiotemporal variability in traffic-related pollutant concentrations but require methods to incorporate temporally varying meteorology and source strength in a physically interpretable fashion. We developed a statistical model to assess the joint impact of both meteorology and traffic on measured concentrations of mobile-source air pollutants over space and time. In this study, traffic-related air pollutants were continuously measured in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York (USA), which is affected by traffic on a large bridge and major highway. One-minute average concentrations of ultrafine particulate matter (UFP), fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)], and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured using a mobile-monitoring protocol. Regression modeling approaches to quantify the influence of meteorology, traffic volume, and proximity to major roadways on pollutant concentrations were used. These models incorporated techniques to capture spatial variability, long- and short-term temporal trends, and multiple sources. We observed spatial heterogeneity of both UFP and PM2.5 concentrations. A variety of statistical methods consistently found a 15-20% decrease in UFP concentrations within the first 100 m from each of the two major roadways. For PM2.5, temporal variability dominated spatial variability, but we observed a consistent linear decrease in concentrations from the roadways. The combination of mobile monitoring and regression analysis was able to quantify local source contributions relative to background while accounting for physically interpretable parameters. Our

  18. Testing the PRISM Temperature Model in Complex Terrain: Implications for Mountain Ecohydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, S.; Daly, C.; Millar, C.

    2015-12-01

    Studies in mountainous terrain related to ecology and hydrology often use interpolated climate products because of a lack of local observations. One dataset frequently used to develop plot-to-watershed scale climatologies is the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model) temperature model. Benefits of this approach include geographically-weighted station observations and topographic positioning modifiers, which become important factors for predicting temperature in complex topography. Because of the paucity of long-term climate records in mountain environments, validation of PRISM algorithms across diverse regions remains challenging, with end users instead relying on atmospheric relationships derived in sometimes distant geographic settings. Recent developments of the PRISM model have increased temporal resolution capability from monthly to daily, which in turn has allowed a reasonable test of PRISM performance during a single season at distributed points across a large watershed. Presented are results from testing instrumental observations of daily max/min temperature on 16 sites in the Walker Basin, CA-NV, located on open woodland slopes ranging from 1967 to 3111 m in elevation. Individual site MAE varies from 1.34 to 4.22 C with better performance observed during summertime as opposed to winter. We observe a consistent bias in minimum temperatures for all seasons across all sites, with bias in maximum temperatures varying with season. Model error for minimum is associated strongly with elevation, whereas model error for maximum is associated with topographic radiative indices (solar exposure and heat loading). These results indicate that actual temperature conditions across open mountain woodland slopes are more heterogeneous than interpolated models (such as PRISM) indicate, which in turn impacts prediction/modeling of landscape processes such as ecological niches, bioclimatic refugia, and snow hydrology.

  19. Geolocation of man-made reservoirs across terrains of varying complexity using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixon, David M.; Kinner, David A.; Stallard, Robert F.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2008-10-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) is one of the world's most comprehensive databases of reservoir sedimentation rates, comprising nearly 6000 surveys for 1819 reservoirs across the continental United States. Sediment surveys in the database date from 1904 to 1999, though more than 95% of surveys were entered prior to 1980, making RESIS largely a historical database. The use of this database for large-scale studies has been limited by the lack of precise coordinates for the reservoirs. Many of the reservoirs are relatively small structures and do not appear on current USGS topographic maps. Others have been renamed or have only approximate (i.e. township and range) coordinates. This paper presents a method scripted in ESRI's ARC Macro Language (AML) to locate the reservoirs on digital elevation models using information available in RESIS. The script also delineates the contributing watersheds and compiles several hydrologically important parameters for each reservoir. Evaluation of the method indicates that, for watersheds larger than 5 km 2, the correct outlet is identified over 80% of the time. The importance of identifying the watershed outlet correctly depends on the application. Our intent is to collect spatial data for watersheds across the continental United States and describe the land use, soils, and topography for each reservoir's watershed. Because of local landscape similarity in these properties, we show that choosing the incorrect watershed does not necessarily mean that the watershed characteristics will be misrepresented. We present a measure termed terrain complexity and examine its relationship to geolocation success rate and its influence on the similarity of nearby watersheds.

  20. Complex ridged terrain-related ridge belts on Venus: Global distribution and classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toermaenen, T.

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-six features were identified in a global survey of complex ridged terrain (CRT)-related ridge belts. Nonrandom aerial distribution was observed with all of the CRT-related ridge belts located to the north of 20 deg S and increasing in number towards the north. In the equatorial highlands the only concentration of CRT-related ridge belts occurs along N and NE Ovda Regio and western Thetis Regio. Major areas of CRT devoid of related ridge belts (Beta, Phoebe, Alpha Regiones, and northern Lada Terra) are regions dominated by rifting, fractures, coronae, and volcanic features. A noticeable concentration of ridge belts is located within a region 20 deg S - 80 deg N, 0 deg - 150 deg E. Three classes of CRT-related ridge belts were defined: (1) ridge belts directly in contact with CRT margins, (2) ridge belts located apart from the CRT boundary, but whose shape and strike are affected by CRT, and (3) ridge belts terminating against a margin of CRT. There does not appear to be any relation between ridge belt class and type of CRT margin. Some of the class 2 and 3 belts of the 20 deg S - 80 deg N, 0 deg - 150 deg E region seem to be continuations of adjacent elongated blocks of CRT and could reflect the hypothesized basement of tessera-like material. Majority of class 1 and 2 ridge belts within this region parallel N of NE boundaries of large CRT plateaus of arc-like arrangements of tesserae. These relationships show that this region was dominated by compressional stresses oriented perpendicular to the CRT boundaries, in N-S/NE-SW direction.

  1. Scalar Transport and Dispersion in Complex Terrain within a High Resolution Mass-Consistent Wind Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Edburg, S. L.; Lamb, B.; Forthofer, J.

    2012-12-01

    In areas of complex terrain, fine-scale changes in topography or vegetation substantially alter the flow field, and in turn, the transport and dispersion of air pollutants, pheromones, or other scalars. Thus, accurate modeling of scalar transport in complex topography requires accurate prediction of the flow field at a high spatial resolution. Mesoscale weather models typically operate on horizontal grids of 4 km or larger and are not capable of handling the effects of sub-grid complex terrain, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and enhanced surface roughness from vegetation. In this paper we describe a scalar transport algorithm (advection and turbulent diffusion) used with WindNinja, a high-resolution mass-consistent wind model. WindNinja operates on a terrain-following coordinate system with a hexahedral cell mesh that grows in vertical size with height above the ground. A variational calculus approach is used in WindNinja that results in fast run times on the order of one minute for a 50 km x 50 km domain and 100 m horizontal resolution. The advection-diffusion algorithm uses a first order closure scheme for turbulent diffusion, where diffusivities are parameterized based on mixing length theory and modified as a function of atmospheric stability. We initialize WindNinja simulations with output from mesoscale weather forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to capture the large-scale atmospheric flows and stability conditions. Model performance is evaluated against field data collected under a range of conditions at different locations including a multi-day continuous tracer gas dispersion experiment in an orchard located on rolling terrain in eastern Washington and a post-wildfire PM10 monitoring campaign in SE Idaho. The combination of fast run times, low computational demands, and explicit treatment of terrain and vegetation at a high spatial resolution are expected

  2. Domain-averaged snow depth over complex terrain from flat field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Nora; van Herwijnen, Alec

    2017-04-01

    Snow depth is an important parameter for a variety of coarse-scale models and applications, such as hydrological forecasting. Since high-resolution snow cover models are computational expensive, simplified snow models are often used. Ground measured snow depth at single stations provide a chance for snow depth data assimilation to improve coarse-scale model forecasts. Snow depth is however commonly recorded at so-called flat fields, often in large measurement networks. While these ground measurement networks provide a wealth of information, various studies questioned the representativity of such flat field snow depth measurements for the surrounding topography. We developed two parameterizations to compute domain-averaged snow depth for coarse model grid cells over complex topography using easy to derive topographic parameters. To derive the two parameterizations we performed a scale dependent analysis for domain sizes ranging from 50m to 3km using highly-resolved snow depth maps at the peak of winter from two distinct climatic regions in Switzerland and in the Spanish Pyrenees. The first, simpler parameterization uses a commonly applied linear lapse rate. For the second parameterization, we first removed the obvious elevation gradient in mean snow depth, which revealed an additional correlation with the subgrid sky view factor. We evaluated domain-averaged snow depth derived with both parameterizations using flat field measurements nearby with the domain-averaged highly-resolved snow depth. This revealed an overall improved performance for the parameterization combining a power law elevation trend scaled with the subgrid parameterized sky view factor. We therefore suggest the parameterization could be used to assimilate flat field snow depth into coarse-scale snow model frameworks in order to improve coarse-scale snow depth estimates over complex topography.

  3. Improving Radar QPE's in Complex Terrain for Improved Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Streubel, D. P.; Reynolds, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) is extremely challenging in regions of complex terrain due to a combination of issues related to sampling. In particular, radar beams are often blocked or scan above the liquid precipitation zone while rain gauge density is often too low to properly characterize the spatial distribution of precipitation. Due to poor radar coverage, rain gauge networks are used by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers as the principal source for QPE across the western U.S. The California Nevada River Forecast Center (CNRFC) uses point rainfall measurements and historical rainfall runoff relationships to derive river stage forecasts. The point measurements are interpolated to a 4 km grid using Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data to develop a gridded 6-hour QPE product (hereafter referred to as RFC QPE). Local forecast offices can utilize the Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) software to improve local QPE’s and thus local flash flood monitoring and prediction. MPE uses radar and rain gauge data to develop a combined QPE product at 1-hour intervals. The rain gauge information is used to bias correct the radar precipitation estimates so that, in situations where the rain gauge density and radar coverage are adequate, MPE can take advantage of the spatial coverage of the radar and the “ground truth” of the rain gauges to provide an accurate QPE. The MPE 1-hour QPE analysis should provide better spatial and temporal resolution for short duration hydrologic events as compared to 6-hour analyses. These hourly QPEs are then used to correct radar derived rain rates used by the Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction (FFMP) software in forecast offices for issuance of flash flood warnings. Although widely used by forecasters across the eastern U.S., MPE is not used extensively by the NWS in the west. Part of the reason for the lack of use of MPE across the west is that there has

  4. KASCADE2017 - An experimental study of thermal circulations and turbulence in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardyjak, Eric; Dupuy, Florian; Durand, Pierre; Gunawardena, Nipun; Hedde, Thierry; Rubin, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The KASCADE (KAtabatic winds and Stability over CAdarache for Dispersion of Effluents) 2017 experiment was conducted during winter 2017 with the overarching objective of improving prediction of dispersion in complex terrain during stable atmospheric conditions. The experiment builds on knowledge gathered during the first KASCADE experiment conducted in 2013 (Duine et al., 2016), which provided detailed observations of the vertical structure of the atmosphere during stable conditions. In spite of this improved understanding, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the near-surface horizontal spatial and temporal variability of winds and thermodynamic variables. For this specific campaign, the general aim has been to use a large number of sensors to improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal development, evolution and breakdown of topographically driven flows. KASCADE 2017 consisted of continuous observations, which were broadened during ten Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) conducted in the Cadarache Valley located in south-eastern France from January through March 2017. The Cadarache Valley is a relatively small valley (6 km x 1 km) with modest slopes and elevation differences between the valley floor and nearby peaks ( 100 m). The valley is embedded in the larger Durance Valley drainage system leading to multi-scale flow interactions. During the winter, winds are light and stably stratified leading to thermal circulations as well as complex near-surface atmospheric layering that impacts dispersion of contaminants. The continuously operating instrumentation deployed included mean near surface (2-m) and sub-surface observations from 12 low-cost Local Energy-budget Measurement Stations (LEMS), four sonic anemometer masts, one full surface flux station, sodar measurements at two locations, wind and temperature measurements from a tall 110 m tower, and two additional met stations. During IOPs, additional deployments included a low-cost tethered balloon

  5. The influence of surface characteristics on lapse rates and temperature profiles in areas of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, N. C.; Pike, G.; Fower, D.; Schaefer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Temperatures near the ground are often decoupled from free-air equivalents, particularly in areas of complex relief and at high latitudes where cold air drainage occurs particularly when radiation balances become negative. This means that it is hard to predict spatial patterns of surface temperature in such regions. In this study several years of intensive field measurements in complex terrain in northern Finland (Kevo) and Sweden (Abisko) allow detailed examination of the interaction between land surface characteristics (including cryosphere), vegetation, and local/micro-climate in mountain basins. Temperature and vapour pressure were measured every 30 minutes for 5 years (2007-2012) at 60 sites at Kevo and for a winter season (September-June) at 52 sites in Abisko, ranging over 300/600 metres of elevation respectively. In Finland lapse rates vary considerably both seasonally and diurnally, the relative importance of seasonal and diurnal forcing changing throughout the year. The results show intense (up to +80 °C/km) and persistent inversion events during the winter months (NDJ) which are broken up by mechanical effects since there is no diurnal cycle. In the transition from winter into spring (FMA) these inversions still occur but increasing radiation imposes a diurnal pattern on their formation and destruction. As snow cover peaks in spring the interaction between surface albedo, land cover and radiation serves to amplify the diurnal cycle in lapse rates. Daytime lapse rates peak in spring because of an increase in albedo with elevation as dark trees give way to reflective snow. At night inversions rapidly reform. Summer lapse rates are modified (usually weakened) by the presence of open water at low elevations. In Abisko similar processes are shown to be at work, although since the valley system is more open and at a larger spatial scale, the range of lapse rate variability is slightly less and the influence of surface characteristics more subdued. Taken

  6. A New Methodology For Estimating CO2 Advective Fluxes In Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Canepa, E.; Georgieva, E.; Kerschbaumer, G.; Minerbi, S.; Seufert, G.

    2007-12-01

    A key problem in using the eddy correlation (EC) technique for estimating the carbon dioxide Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of terrestrial ecosystems is the potential bias caused by advective fluxes of CO2. Advective fluxes are often not considered since they are difficult to identify and to quantify, especially in complex mountainous terrain with highly variable wind patterns and drainage flows. We propose a methodology to estimate these fluxes based on a full 3-Dimensional (3D) approach applied to the topographically complex alpine forest site of Renon (1736 m a.s.l.). This is an aerodynamic method based on the computation of advective fluxes across the aerial faces of a control volume including the plant ecosystem. Data used for the computation of CO2 advective fluxes were collected during an extensive field campaign performed in 2005 in the framework of CarboEurope-IP research project. Vertical profiles of wind, air temperature and CO2 concentration have been measured at five towers and a spatial interpolation was performed in order to get 3D fields of such variables. The frame of reference used was orthogonal and the vertical direction was parallel to the gravity. Each anemometer was aligned in this frame of reference and no rotations were applied to the wind velocity components. The analysis of the 3D fields of wind velocity, CO2 mixing ratio and air density highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of CO2 source/sink strength and the strong de-coupling between air flow below and above the canopy during stable nights. The total CO2 advection calculated using the proposed methodology exhibited prevailing positive values during the night-time period. Advective fluxes estimated during windy nights were of the same magnitude and sign of vertical turbulent flux measured above canopy by the EC technique. This observation suggests that the friction velocity correction routinely applied to night-time periods may not be efficient at the Renon site. During light windy nights

  7. Impact of Different Topographic Corrections on Prediction Accuracy of Foliage Projective Cover (fpc) in a Topographically Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ediriweera, S.; Pathirana, S.; Danaher, T.; Nichols, D.; Moffiet, T.

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative retrieval of land surface biological parameters (e.g. foliage projective cover [FPC] and Leaf Area Index) is crucial for forest management, ecosystem modelling, and global change monitoring applications. Currently, remote sensing is a widely adopted method for rapid estimation of surface biological parameters in a landscape scale. Topographic correction is a necessary pre-processing step in the remote sensing application for topographically complex terrain. Selection of a suitable topographic correction method on remotely sensed spectral information is still an unresolved problem. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of topographic corrections on the prediction of FPC in hilly terrain using an established regression model. Five established topographic corrections [C, Minnaert, SCS, SCS+C and processing scheme for standardised surface reflectance (PSSSR)] were evaluated on Landsat TM5 acquired under low and high sun angles in closed canopied subtropical rainforest and eucalyptus dominated open canopied forest, north-eastern Australia. The effectiveness of methods at normalizing topographic influence, preserving biophysical spectral information, and internal data variability were assessed by statistical analysis and by comparing field collected FPC data. The results of statistical analyses show that SCS+C and PSSSR perform significantly better than other corrections, which were on less overcorrected areas of faintly illuminated slopes. However, the best relationship between FPC and Landsat spectral responses was obtained with the PSSSR by producing the least residual error. The SCS correction method was poor for correction of topographic effect in predicting FPC in topographically complex terrain.

  8. An evaluation of WRF's ability to reproduce the surface wind over complex terrain based on typical circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, P. A.; Dudhia, J.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Montávez, J. P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Vilã-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Muñoz-Roldán, A.

    2013-07-01

    The performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to reproduce the surface wind circulations over complex terrain is examined. The atmospheric evolution is simulated using two versions of the WRF model during an over 13 year period (1992 to 2005) over a complex terrain region located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula. A high horizontal resolution of 2km is used to provide an accurate representation of the terrain features. The multiyear evaluation focuses on the analysis of the accuracy displayed by the WRF simulations to reproduce the wind field of the six typical wind patterns (WPs) identified over the area in a previous observational work. Each pattern contains a high number of days which allows one to reach solid conclusions regarding the model performance. The accuracy of the simulations to reproduce the wind field under representative synoptic situations, or pressure patterns (PPs), of the Iberian Peninsula is also inspected in order to diagnose errors as a function of the large-scale situation. The evaluation is accomplished using daily averages in order to inspect the ability of WRF to reproduce the surface flow as a result of the interaction between the synoptic scale and the regional topography. Results indicate that model errors can originate from problems in the initial and lateral boundary conditions, misrepresentations at the synoptic scale, or the realism of the topographic features.

  9. Section Height Determination Methods of the Isotopographic Surface in a Complex Terrain Relief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syzdykova, Guldana D.; Kurmankozhaev, Azimhan K.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for determining the vertical interval of isotopographic surfaces on rugged terrain was developed. The method is based on the concept of determining the differentiated size of the vertical interval using spatial-statistical properties inherent in the modal characteristic, the degree of variability of apical heights and the chosen map…

  10. Modeling wind speed and snow accumulation gradients across complex terrain from typically collected meteorological data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mountain winds exhibit strong gradients over short distances due to the influence of terrain. In winter, the acceleration of wind over wind-exposed slopes and its consequent deceleration over lee slopes strongly influences snow distribution. The heterogeneous snow distribution effects soil moistur...

  11. Empirical downscaling of daily minimum air temperature at very fine resolutions in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Zachary A. Holden; John T. Abatzoglou; Charles H. Luce; L. Scott Baggett

    2011-01-01

    Available air temperature models do not adequately account for the influence of terrain on nocturnal air temperatures. An empirical model for night time air temperatures was developed using a network of one hundred and forty inexpensive temperature sensors deployed across the Bitterroot National Forest, Montana. A principle component analysis (PCA) on minimum...

  12. Measuring and modeling CO2 and H2O fluxes in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Brian L. McGlynn

    2008-01-01

    The feedbacks between the water and the carbon cycles are of critical importance to global carbon balances. Forests and forest soils in northern latitudes are important carbon pools because of their potential as sinks for atmospheric carbon. However there are significant unknowns related to the effects of hydrologic variability, mountainous terrain, and landscape...

  13. Implications of Small-Scale Flow Features to Modeling Dispersion over Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, R. M.; Olivier, L. D.; Gudiksen, P. H.; Lange, R.

    1996-03-01

    Small-scale, topographically forced wind systems often have a strong influence on flow over complex terrain. A problem is that these systems are very difficult to measure, because of their limited spatial and temporal extent. They can be important, however, in the atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. For example, a nocturnal exit jet-a narrow stream of cold air-which flowed from Eldorado Canyon at the interface between the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado plains near the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), swept over RFP for about 3 h in the middle of the night of 4 5 February 1991. It extended in depth from a few tens of meters to approximately 800 m above the ground. Because the jet was so narrow (2 km wide), it was poorly sampled by the meteorological surface mesonet, but it did prove to have an effect on the dispersion of tracer material released from RFP, producing a secondary peak in measured concentration to the southeast of RFP. The existence and behavior of the jet was documented by Environment Technology Laboratoy's Doppler lidar system, a scanning, active remote-sensing system that provides fine-resolution wind measurements. The lidar was deployed as a part of a wintertime study of flow and dispersion in the RFP vicinity during February 1993.The MATHEW-ADPIC atmospheric dispersion model was run using the case study data from this night. It consists of three major modules: an interpolation scheme; MATHEW, a diagnostic wind-flow algorithm that calculates a mass-consistent interpolated flow; and ADPIC, a diffusion algorithm. The model did an adequate job of representing the main lobe of the tracer transport, but the secondary lobe resulting from the Eldorado Canyon exit jet was absent from the model result. Because the jet was not adequately represented in the input data, it did not appear in the modeled wind field. Thus, the effects of the jet on the transport of tracer material were not properly simulated by the diagnostic model.

  14. Air quality forecasts on a kilometer-scale grid over complex Spanish terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pay, M. T.; Martínez, F.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    The CALIOPE Air Quality Forecast System (CALIOPE-AQFS) represents the current state of the art in air quality forecasting systems of high-resolution running on high-performance computing platforms. It provides a 48 h forecast of NO2, O3, SO2, PM10, PM2.5, CO, and C6H6 at a 4 km horizontal resolution over all of Spain, and at a 1 km horizontal resolution over the most populated areas in Spain with complex terrains (the Barcelona (BCN), Madrid (MAD) and Andalusia (AND) domains). Increased horizontal resolution from 4 to 1 km over the aforementioned domains leads to finer textures and more realistic concentration maps, which is justified by the increase in NO2/O3 spatial correlation coefficients from 0.79/0.69 (4 km) to 0.81/0.73 (1 km). High-resolution emissions using the bottom-up HERMESv2.0 model are essential for improving model performance when increasing resolution on an urban scale, but it is still insufficient. Decreasing grid spacing does not reveal the expected improvement in hourly statistics, i.e., decreasing NO2 bias by only ~ 2 μg m-3 and increasing O3 bias by ~ 1 μg m-3. The grid effect is less pronounced for PM10, because part of its mass consists of secondary aerosols, which are less affected than the locally emitted primary components by a decreasing grid size. The resolution increase has the highest impact over Barcelona, where air flow is controlled mainly by mesoscale phenomena and a lower planetary boundary layer (PBL). Despite the merits and potential uses of the 1-km simulation, the limitations of current model formulations do not allow confirmation of their expected superiority close to highly urbanized areas and large emissions sources. Future work should combine high grid resolutions with techniques that decrease subgrid variability (e.g., stochastic field methods), and also include models that consider urban morphology and thermal parameters.

  15. The potential for observation network design with mesoscale ensemble sensitivities in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcoat, K. H.; Hacker, J.; Doyle, J.

    2011-12-01

    Observation network design requires some framework for sensitivity studies. The goal is to place observations where they will reduce forecast error. We use uncertainty estimates from our best forecast models as an indicator of forecast error. The first step is then to find initial-state perturbations that reduce forecast uncertainty by minimizing a user-dependent norm. Adjoint models have helped meet this challenge for decades. An adjoint propagates a model state backward along a tangent linear approximation of a forecast model trajectory, and can therefore be used in conjunction with a forward propagator to minimize a cost function defined by forecast uncertainty. Within the limitations of model inadequacy and the tangent linear approximation, including diffusive and highly nonlinear phenomenon, adjoints can effectively identify initial-time perturbations yielding sensitivity in the forecast. More recently, ensemble sensitivities have emerged as a powerful alternative to adjoint models. Under the conditions of Gaussian statistics and an infinite ensemble, lagged covariances from an ensemble can be used equivalently to an adjoint model to give the least-squares minimization of a given cost function. One practical advantage is that costly development and maintenance of tangent linear and adjoint models are avoided. Ensemble sensitivities have been shown to be an effective alternative to adjoint models. They have been used successfully to diagnose predictors of forecast error in synoptic storms, extratropical transition, and developing hurricanes. Because they rely on lagged covariances from a finite-sized ensemble, they are subject to sampling error and spurious covariances. Their efficacy for high-resolution forecasts in mountainous environments has not been thoroughly explored. We present results from experiments designed to establish the potential for ensemble sensitivity computations with a high resolution mesoscale model (grid spacing 4 km) in complex terrain

  16. Modeling of extreme dust pollution in the complex terrain of the Dead Sea Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Rieger, Daniel; Metzger, Jutta; Starobinets, Boris; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Heike; Schaettler, Ulrich; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Alpert, Pinhas; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    surface dust concentration was reached in the western part of the valley. Therefore, our study indicates the difficulties in using satellite-based AOD for initializing dust concentration within numerical forecast systems over a region with complex terrain. Numerical model experiments with different domains and dust sources (both local and remote ones) permitted us to quantify the contribution of various source regions to the pronounced maximum of dust AOD in the Dead Sea valley. Specifically, the model showed that 30% of the maximum dust AOD stems from local emissions and about 70% from more remote ones from the upwind side of the Judean Mountains.

  17. Flux-Variance Similarity in Complex Terrain and Its Sensitivity to Different Methods of Treating Non-stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, Nevio; Večenaj, Željko; De Wekker, Stephan F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Various criteria have been developed to remove non-stationarity in turbulence time series, though it remains unclear how the choice of the stationarity criterion affects similarity functions in the framework of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. To investigate this, we use stationary datasets that result from applying five common criteria to remove non-stationarity in turbulence time series from the Terrain-Induced Rotor EXperiment conducted in Owens Valley, California. We determine the form of the flux-variance similarity functions and the scatter around these similarity functions for all five stationary datasets. Data were collected at two valley locations and one slope location using 34-m flux towers with six levels of turbulence measurements. Our results show (i) systematic differences from previously found near-neutral values of the parameters in the flux-variance similarity functions over flat terrain, indicating a larger anisotropy of the flow over complex than over flat terrain, (ii) a reduction of this anisotropy when stationary data are used, with the amount of reduction depending on the stationarity criterion, (iii) a general reduction in scatter around the similarity functions when using stationary data but more so for stable than for unstable stratification, and for valley locations than for the slope location, and (iv) a weak variation with height of near-neutral values of parameters in the flux-variance similarity functions.

  18. The Utility of Remotely-Sensed Land Surface Temperature from Multiple Platforms For Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, T.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    for testing distributed hydrologic models in regions of complex terrain with seasonal changes in land surface conditions.

  19. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  20. Image-based terrain modeling with thematic mapper applied to resolving the limit of Holocene Lake expansion in the Great Salt Lake Desert, Utah, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merola, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scanner records reflected solar energy from the earth's surface in six wavelength regions, or bands, and one band that records emitted energy in the thermal region, giving a total of seven bands. Useful research was extracted about terrain morphometry from remote sensing measurements and this information is used in an image-based terrain model for selected coastal geomorphic features in the Great Salt Lake Desert (GSLD). Technical developments include the incorporation of Aerial Profiling of Terrain System (APTS) data in satellite image analysis, and the production and use of 3-D surface plots of TM reflectance data. Also included in the technical developments is the analysis of the ground control point spatial distribution and its affects on geometric correction, and the terrain mapping procedure; using satellite data in a way that eliminates the need to degrade the data by resampling. The most common approach for terrain mapping with multispectral scanner data includes the techniques of pattern recognition and image classification, as opposed to direct measurement of radiance for identification of terrain features. The research approach in this investigation was based on an understanding of the characteristics of reflected light resulting from the variations in moisture and geometry related to terrain as described by the physical laws of radiative transfer. The image-based terrain model provides quantitative information about the terrain morphometry based on the physical relationship between TM data, the physical character of the GSLD, and the APTS measurements.

  1. Modelling of a Zonda wind event in a complex terrain region using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, R. P.; Cremades, P. G.; Lakkis, G.; Allende, D. G.; Santos, R.; Puliafito, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    The air quality modeling in a regional scale requires the coupling to Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, mainly when a high spatial and temporal resolution is required, such as in those cases related to large pollutants emissions episodes or extreme weather events. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) is a last generation NWP model which computes temperature, pressure, humidity and wind fields in high spatial and temporal resolution. In order to perform simulations in complex terrain regions, WRF must be locally configured to obtain a proper representation of the physical processes, and an independent validation must be performed, both under common and extreme conditions. Once the local configuration is obtained, a full atmospheric chemistry modeling can be performed by means of WRF-Chem. In this work a mesoescale event of Zonda wind (similar to Foehn and Chinook winds) affecting the topographically complex mountainous region of Mendoza (Argentina) on February 15th, 2007 is represented using WRF. The model results are compared to the Argentine National Weather Service (SMN) observations at "El Plumerillo" station (WMO #87418), showing a good performance. A description of the local model configuration and most important physical parameterizations selected for the simulations is given, including the improvement of the default resolution of land use and land cover (LULC) fields. The high resolution modeling domain considered is centered at the city of Mendoza (32° 53' South, 68° 50' West), it extends 200 km N/S × 160 km E/W and includes a 3-nested domain downscaling of 36, 12 and 4 km resolution, respectively. The results for the Zonda wind episode show a very good performance of the model both in spatial and temporal scales. The temporal dew point variation (the physical variable that best describes the Zonda wind) shows a good agreement with the measured values, with a sharp decrease of 20 °C (from 16 °C to -4 °C) in 3 hours. A full 3-D regional

  2. Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-10

    scenario and run the underlying models. Through the process of data layering, the model domain, sources, and results—including the calculated wind-vector...advection, diffusion, and deposition calculations . Figure 4.2 shows the linkages of these dust-dispersion models within DUSTRAN. CALMET...interface CALMET, CALPUFF, and CALGRID to routinely available terrain elevation and land-use datasets for use in model calculations . A post-processing

  3. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  4. N cycle and retention of croplands in complex terrain, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettering, J.; Arnhold, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Lee, B.; Lindner, S.; Ok, Y.; Ruidisch, M.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The aims of our research are to gain a deeper understanding of processes and interactions in agricultural ecosystems as well as to make a contribution to sustainable agricultural production in changing environments. While crop production is highly desirable, negative effects include high input of nutrients, greater erosion rates, removal of nutrients and carbon in harvests, and decreases in the quality of soil organic matter. The field sites of this project are located in Haean basin in the central part of Korea, just south of the demilitarized zone. Intensive land use with high levels of fertilization together with distinctive erosion during the summer monsoon can be found on site. One part of this study focuses on general fertilizer budgets at catchment scale as well as on detailed information about the dynamics and pathways of nitrogen in soil-plant systems on upland slopes. These balances of elements and their fluxes are the main background information in soil-plant studies. The integrative approach of a general budget is based on a large spatial allocation of the field sites, different management types (conventional, organic), and on several typical crops of the Haean basin. In this project, various perspectives are combined (i.e. insects, weed, crops, nutrients). This allows representative conclusions for the entire catchment as well as for the modeling. The approach of a detailed N cycle uses an integrated experimental strategy within run-off plots. Charred biomass and synthetic polymers were additionally applied in these run-off plots to determine whether these additives can contribute significantly to sustainable farming methods in such complex terrain. Within this integrative approach, each treatment was tested for erosion prevention, soil hydrological parameters and flow systems, nutrient balances, as well as plant growth and yields. Finally, best agricultural management practices for sustainable land use of sloping uplands will be suggested. The methods

  5. Satellite-based solar radiation mapping over complex terrain: Validation in the Alps and possible improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Mariapina; Stoeckli, Reto; Tetzlaff, Anke; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Zardi, Dino; Petitta, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    . Consequently it is recommended to include in the clear-sky model more accurate input than the currently used monthly climatologies of aerosol and the operational 1 day forecast of column water vapor amount from the ECMWF model ouptut. References [1] K. V. Khlopenkov And A. P. Trishchenko, "SPARC: New Cloud, Snow, and Cloud Shadow Detection Scheme for Historical 1-km AVHHR Data over Canada", Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 24, pp. 322-343, 2007. [2] R.W. Müller, C. Matsoukas, A. Gratzki, H.D. Behr, R. Hollmann. "The CM-SAF operational scheme for the satellite based retrieval of solar surface irradiance - A LUT based eigenvector hybrid approach", Remote Sensing of Environment, 113, pp.1012-1024, 2009. [3] R. Stöckli (in prep.). "Supplementing Heliosat for physically-based surface radiation retrieval in complex terrain."

  6. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the OpenFOAM-based Flow Solver of the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Sang, L.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver such that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with somepreliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simply set of hills.

  7. A modification of the moving point test method for nighttime eddy flux filtering on hilly and complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Malla Thakuri, B.; Kim, J.; Chun, J. H.; Cho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Nighttime correction of CO2 flux is one of the most important and challenging tasks in eddy covariance measurements over a complex mountainous terrain. There are two types of widely used methods for nighttime correction: u* filtering method and advection based filtering method. The most popular method is the u* filtering method that estimates the parameters of the ecosystem respiration function using the observed nighttime CO2 flux when u* is higher than a threshold, above which the dependency of the nighttime CO2 flux on u* fades away. The u* filtering method cannot be used at sites where the u* threshold cannot be identified and/or the drainage flow is developed at night, resulting in an underestimation of the CO2 flux. For overcoming that, the advection based method was developed for hilly terrain sites affected by drainage flow using the observed CO2 flux data from near sunset, when nighttime advection effect has not yet manifested. Gwangneung deciduous and coniferous sites in Korea are typical sites situated in hilly and complex terrain where the aforementioned methods are difficult to apply correctly because the filters' assumptions are violated. In this study, we propose a modified moving point test method (i.e., an automated statistical method for determining the u* threshold based on an iterative approach using a moving window for u*) using moving windows for `time' as well as u*, which can determine the `timing when CO2 drainage is generated' as well as the u* threshold for application of nighttime correction to the sites. Acknowledgment. This work was funded by the Weather Information Service Engine Program of the Korea Meteorological Administration under Grant KMIPA-2012-0001.

  8. Complex terrain alters temperature and moisture limitations of forest soil respiration across a semiarid to subalpine gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Barnard, H.R.; Adams, H.R.; Burns, M.A.; Gallo, E.; Brooks, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Forest soil respiration is a major carbon (C) flux that is characterized by significant variability in space and time. We quantified growing season soil respiration during both a drought year and a nondrought year across a complex landscape to identify how landscape and climate interact to control soil respiration. We asked the following questions: (1) How does soil respiration vary across the catchments due to terrain-induced variability in moisture availability and temperature? (2) Does the relative importance of moisture versus temperature limitation of respiration vary across space and time? And (3) what terrain elements are important for dictating the pattern of soil respiration and its controls? Moisture superseded temperature in explaining watershed respiration patterns, with wetter yet cooler areas higher up and on north facing slopes yielding greater soil respiration than lower and south facing areas. Wetter subalpine forests had reduced moisture limitation in favor of greater seasonal temperature limitation, and the reverse was true for low-elevation semiarid forests. Coincident climate poorly predicted soil respiration in the montane transition zone; however, antecedent precipitation from the prior 10 days provided additional explanatory power. A seasonal trend in respiration remained after accounting for microclimate effects, suggesting that local climate alone may not adequately predict seasonal variability in soil respiration in montane forests. Soil respiration climate controls were more strongly related to topography during the drought year highlighting the importance of landscape complexity in ecosystem response to drought.

  9. Enhanced method for multiscale wind simulations over complex terrain for wind resource assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Maradiaga, A.; Benoit, R.; Masson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the natural variability of the wind, it is necessary to conduct thorough wind resource assessments to determine how much energy can be extracted at a given site. Lately, important advancements have been achieved in numerical methods of multiscale models used for high resolution wind simulations over steep topography. As a contribution to this effort, an enhanced numerical method was devised in the mesoscale compressible community (MC2) model of the Meteorological Service of Canada, adapting a new semi-implicit scheme with its imbedded large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for mountainous terrain. This implementation has been verified by simulating the neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain and a Gaussian ridge. These preliminary results indicate that the enhanced MC2-LES model reproduces efficiently the results reported by other researchers who use similar models with more sophisticated sub-grid scale turbulence schemes. The proposed multiscale method also provides a new wind initialization scheme and additional utilities to improve numerical accuracy and stability. The resulting model can be used to assess the wind resource at meso- and micro-scales, reducing significantly the wind speed overestimation in mountainous areas.

  10. Downscaling 20th century flooding events in complex terrain (Switzerland) using the WRF regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Ulla; Gómez Navarro, Juan Jose; Franke, Jörg; Brönnimann, Stefan; Cattin, Réne

    2016-04-01

    Switzerland has experienced a number of severe precipitation events during the last few decades, such as during the 14-16 November of 2002 or during the 21-22 August of 2005. Both events, and subsequent extreme floods, caused fatalities and severe financial losses, and have been well studied both in terms of atmospheric conditions leading to extreme precipitation, and their consequences [e.g. Hohenegger et al., 2008, Stucki et al., 2012]. These examples highlight the need to better characterise the frequency and severity of flooding in the Alpine area. In a larger framework we will ultimately produce a high-resolution data set covering the entire 20th century to be used for detailed hydrological studies including all atmospheric parameters relevant for flooding events. In a first step, we downscale the aforementioned two events of 2002 and 2005 to assess the model performance regarding precipitation extremes. The complexity of the topography in the Alpine area demands high resolution datasets. To achieve a sufficient detail in resolution we employ the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model (WRF). A set of 4 nested domains is used with a 2-km resolution horizontal resolution over Switzerland. The NCAR 20th century reanalysis (20CR) with a horizontal resolution of 2.5° serves as boundary condition [Compo et al., 2011]. First results of the downscaling the 2002 and 2005 extreme precipitation events show that, compared to station observations provided by the Swiss Meteorological Office MeteoSwiss, the model strongly underestimates the strength of these events. This is mainly due to the coarse resolution of the 20CR data, which underestimates the moisture fluxes during these events. We tested driving WRF with the higher-resolved NCEP reanalysis and found a significant improvement in the amount of precipitation of the 2005 event. In a next step we will downscale the precipitation and wind fields during a 6-year period 2002-2007 to investigate and

  11. Airborne Lidar-Based Estimates of Tropical Forest Structure in Complex Terrain: Opportunities and Trade-Offs for REDD+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. Results: We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (approx. 20 returns/sq m) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 +/-0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8/sq m, 4/sq m, 2/sq m and 1/sq m) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4/sq m, the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg/ha in predicted aboveground biomass. Conclusions: Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  12. Airborne Lidar-Based Estimates of Tropical Forest Structure in Complex Terrain: Opportunities and Trade-Offs for REDD+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. Results: We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (approx. 20 returns/sq m) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 +/-0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8/sq m, 4/sq m, 2/sq m and 1/sq m) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4/sq m, the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg/ha in predicted aboveground biomass. Conclusions: Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  13. Airborne lidar-based estimates of tropical forest structure in complex terrain: opportunities and trade-offs for REDD+

    PubMed

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C; Cook, Bruce D; Shimabukuro, Yosio E

    2015-12-01

    Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (~20 returns m(-2)) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 ± 0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8 m(-2), 4 m(-2), 2 m(-2) and 1 m(-2)) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4 m(-2), the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg ha(-1) in predicted aboveground biomass. Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  14. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkens, Matthew J.

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H)2L (Cp* = (CH3)5C5, L = PPh3, Ph = C6H5) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO)2 to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  15. Source speciation resolving hydrochemical complexity of coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Sonkamble, Sahebrao; Chandra, Subash; Ahmed, Shakeel; Rangarajan, R

    2014-01-15

    There is a growing concern of seawater intrusion to freshwater aquifers due to groundwater overexploitation in the eastern coastal belt of Southern India. The problem becomes complex in the regions where industrial effluents are also contaminating the freshwater aquifers. In order to understand the hydrochemical complexity of the system, topographic elevation, static water level measurements, major ion chemistry, ionic cross plots, water type contours and factor analysis were applied for 144 groundwater samples of shallow and deep sources from Quaternary and Tertiary coastal aquifers, located within the industrial zone of 25 km(2) area near Cuddalore, Southern India. The ionic cross plots indicates dissolution of halite minerals from marine sources and seawater mixing into inland aquifers up to the level of 9.3%. The factor analysis explains three significant factors totaling 86.3% of cumulative sample variance which includes varying contribution from marine, industrial effluent and freshwater sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reversed graph embedding resolves complex single-cell trajectories.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaojie; Mao, Qi; Tang, Ying; Wang, Li; Chawla, Raghav; Pliner, Hannah A; Trapnell, Cole

    2017-10-01

    Single-cell trajectories can unveil how gene regulation governs cell fate decisions. However, learning the structure of complex trajectories with multiple branches remains a challenging computational problem. We present Monocle 2, an algorithm that uses reversed graph embedding to describe multiple fate decisions in a fully unsupervised manner. We applied Monocle 2 to two studies of blood development and found that mutations in the genes encoding key lineage transcription factors divert cells to alternative fates.

  17. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotach, Mathias; Gohm, Alexander; Lang, Moritz; Leukauf, Daniel; Stiperski, Ivana; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between 'the earth's surface' and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit) assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative) and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (sub)meso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models). In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (sub)meso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective - so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  18. The biomechanics of walking shape the use of visual information during locomotion over complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L.; Fajen, Brett R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how visual information is used to control stepping during locomotion over terrain that demands precision in the placement of the feet. More specifically, we sought to determine the point in the gait cycle at which visual information about a target is no longer needed to guide accurate foot placement. Subjects walked along a path while stepping as accurately as possible on a series of small, irregularly spaced target footholds. In various conditions, each of the targets became invisible either during the step to the target or during the step to the previous target. We found that making targets invisible after toe off of the step to the target had little to no effect on stepping accuracy. However, when targets disappeared during the step to the previous target, foot placement became less accurate and more variable. The findings suggest that visual information about a target is used prior to initiation of the step to that target but is not needed to continuously guide the foot throughout the swing phase. We propose that this style of control is rooted in the biomechanics of walking, which facilitates an energetically efficient strategy in which visual information is primarily used to initialize the mechanical state of the body leading into a ballistic movement toward the target foothold. Taken together with previous studies, the findings suggest the availability of visual information about the terrain near a particular step is most essential during the latter half of the preceding step, which constitutes a critical control phase in the bipedal gait cycle. PMID:25788704

  19. The biomechanics of walking shape the use of visual information during locomotion over complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L; Fajen, Brett R

    2015-03-18

    The aim of this study was to examine how visual information is used to control stepping during locomotion over terrain that demands precision in the placement of the feet. More specifically, we sought to determine the point in the gait cycle at which visual information about a target is no longer needed to guide accurate foot placement. Subjects walked along a path while stepping as accurately as possible on a series of small, irregularly spaced target footholds. In various conditions, each of the targets became invisible either during the step to the target or during the step to the previous target. We found that making targets invisible after toe off of the step to the target had little to no effect on stepping accuracy. However, when targets disappeared during the step to the previous target, foot placement became less accurate and more variable. The findings suggest that visual information about a target is used prior to initiation of the step to that target but is not needed to continuously guide the foot throughout the swing phase. We propose that this style of control is rooted in the biomechanics of walking, which facilitates an energetically efficient strategy in which visual information is primarily used to initialize the mechanical state of the body leading into a ballistic movement toward the target foothold. Taken together with previous studies, the findings suggest the availability of visual information about the terrain near a particular step is most essential during the latter half of the preceding step, which constitutes a critical control phase in the bipedal gait cycle. © 2015 ARVO.

  20. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  1. Using High Resolution Regional Climate Models to Quantify the Snow Albedo Feedback in a Region of Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letcher, T.; Minder, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution regional climate models are used to characterize and quantify the snow albedo feedback (SAF) over the complex terrain of the Colorado Headwaters region. Three pairs of 7-year control and pseudo global warming simulations (with horizontal grid spacings of 4, 12, and 36 km) are used to study how the SAF modifies the regional climate response to a large-scale thermodynamic perturbation. The SAF substantially enhances warming within the Headwaters domain, locally as much as 5 °C in regions of snow loss. The SAF also increases the inter-annual variability of the springtime warming within Headwaters domain under the perturbed climate. Linear feedback analysis is used quantify the strength of the SAF. The SAF attains a maximum value of 4 W m-2 K-1 during April when snow loss coincides with strong incoming solar radiation. On sub-seasonal timescales, simulations at 4 km and 12 km horizontal grid-spacing show good agreement in the strength and timing of the SAF, whereas a 36km simulation shows greater discrepancies that are tired to differences in snow accumulation and ablation caused by smoother terrain. An analysis of the regional energy budget shows that transport by atmospheric motion acts as a negative feedback to regional warming, damping the effects of the SAF. On the mesoscale, this transport causes non-local warming in locations with no snow. The methods presented here can be used generally to quantify the role of the SAF in other regional climate modeling experiments.

  2. Validation of solar radiation surfaces from MODIS and reanalysis data over topographically complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Todd A. Schroeder; Robbie Hember; Nicholas C. Coops; Shunlin Liang

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of incoming shortwave solar radiation (SW) has significant influence on the productive capacity of forest vegetation. Models that estimate forest productivity require accurate and spatially explicit radiation surfaces that resolve both long- and short-term temporal climatic patterns and that account for topographic variability of the land...

  3. Quantifying the added value of convection-permitting climate simulations in complex terrain: a systematic evaluation of WRF over the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Ramchandra; Hasson, Shabeh ul; Gerlitz, Lars; Schickhoff, Udo; Scholten, Thomas; Böhner, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Mesoscale dynamical refinements of global climate models or atmospheric reanalysis have shown their potential to resolve intricate atmospheric processes, their land surface interactions, and subsequently, realistic distribution of climatic fields in complex terrains. Given that such potential is yet to be explored within the central Himalayan region of Nepal, we investigate the skill of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with different spatial resolutions in reproducing the spatial, seasonal, and diurnal characteristics of the near-surface air temperature and precipitation as well as the spatial shifts in the diurnal monsoonal precipitation peak over the Khumbu (Everest), Rolwaling, and adjacent southern areas. Therefore, the ERA-Interim (0.75°) reanalysis has been dynamically refined to 25, 5, and 1 km (D1, D2, and D3) for one complete hydrological year (October 2014-September 2015), using the one-way nested WRF model run with mild nudging and parameterized convection for the outer but explicitly resolved convection for the inner domains. Our results suggest that D3 realistically reproduces the monsoonal precipitation, as compared to its underestimation by D1 but overestimation by D2. All three resolutions, however, overestimate precipitation from the westerly disturbances, owing to simulating anomalously higher intensity of few intermittent events. Temperatures are generally reproduced well by all resolutions; however, winter and pre-monsoon seasons feature a high cold bias for high elevations while lower elevations show a simultaneous warm bias. Unlike higher resolutions, D1 fails to realistically reproduce the regional-scale nocturnal monsoonal peak precipitation observed in the Himalayan foothills and its diurnal shift towards high elevations, whereas D2 resolves these characteristics but exhibits a limited skill in reproducing such a peak on the river valley scale due to the limited representation of the narrow valleys at 5 km resolution

  4. Using the δ13C of ecosystem respiration to monitor ecosystem metabolism of entire watersheds in complex terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pypker, T. G.; Hauck, M.; Sulzman, E. W.; Unsworth, M. H.; Mix, A. C.; Kayler, Z.; Conklin, D.; Kennedy, A.; Barnard, H.; Phillips, C.; Bond, B. J.

    2007-12-01

    Complex terrain presents formidable challenges to ecosystem studies. Valleys, steep slopes, and windswept ridges impose wide variations in microclimate, soil properties, and plant communities; this variability greatly hinders strategies for systematic sampling and up-scaling. Our recent work in a deeply incised watershed (20 to 33° slopes) in Oregon's Cascade Mountains suggested the possibility of using the δ13CO2 of ecosystem respiration (δ13CER) in mountainous ecosystems as a tool to monitor seasonal and interannual variations in physiological processes in vegetation of entire watersheds. We demonstrated that nocturnal cold air drainage is persistent, occurs on greater than 80% of summer nights and is well mixed. Furthermore, nighttime air samples collected from the base of the watershed contain a representative sample of respired CO2 from most of the watershed. We also found that on most clear nights the range of CO2 concentrations over a single night is sufficient for using the Keeling Plot approach to determine the carbon isotopic composition of δ13CER. The goals of the current study were to determine if variations in δ13CER were correlated to environmental variables and could be used to predict expected variations in canopy-average stomatal conductance ( gs). As reported by other researchers, changes in δ13CER were significantly correlated to measured soil matric potential (ψm) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) measured on the same day and six days earlier, respectively. Midday gs was estimated using a simple hydraulic model with only ψm and VPD as predictive variables. Midday gs from zero and five days earlier were correlated to δ13CER. To examine direct relationships between δ13CER and recent gs, we used models relating isotope discrimination to stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level to estimate values of stomatal conductance ("gs-I") that would be expected if respired CO2 were derived entirely from recent photosynthate

  5. Coupled snow dynamics, soil moisture, and soil temperatures in complex terrain of a semi-arid mountainous watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, S.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; McNamara, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-elevation regions characterized by transient or relatively brief seasonal snow covers are likely to experience large hydrologic impacts from warming trends as these regions transition from snow to rain-dominated precipitation in winter. These regions in the western United States are often comprised of complex terrain, including a range of slopes, aspects, elevation, vegetation, geology, and soils over multiple scales. How snow dynamics (e.g. distribution and timing) are coupled with soil moisture and soil temperature in complex terrain is a topic that needs to be explored in order to better understand how climate variations and trends will alter the hydrologic states and fluxes in these mid-elevation transition zones. To address this question, automated hydrometeorological stations were installed in Johnston Draw, a subbasin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho. In addition to long-term precipitation records for the area, individual meteorological stations were installed on opposing north and south-facing slopes in the drainage at 50 meter elevation intervals, from 1550 to 1750 m amsl. Each station provides air temperature and vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, snow depth, and a profile of soil moisture and temperature at 5cm, 20cm, 35cm, and 50 cm depths, with some profiles extending to approximately 2 m where soils are deepest. Prior to a major mid-winter melt event in January 2011 snow depths averaged 45 cm on north-facing slopes and only 3 cm on south-facing slopes. Soil moisture was depleted near the surface and soil temperatures were just above freezing at all elevations and aspects. In mid-January, air temperatures rapidly increased from below freezing to daily averages from 3-6 °C for six consecutive days, coupled with very high wind speeds, and followed by a pulse of increased streamflow. This event completely ablated the snowpack on south-facing slopes and reduced the snowpack depth on north-facing slopes by 24 cm

  6. Wind speed and wind power short and medium range predictions for complex terrain using artificial neural networks and ensemble calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, Irene; Papazek, Petrina; Kann, Alexander; Wang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Reliable predictions of wind speed and wind power are vital for balancing the electricity network. Within the last two decades the amount of energy stemming from renewable sources increased substantially relying heavily on the prevailing synoptic conditions. Especially for regions with complex terrain and forested surfaces providing reliable predictions is a challenging task. Forecasts in the nowcasting as well as in the (two) day-ahead range are thus essential for the network balancing. Predictions of wind speed and wind power from the nowcasting to the +72-hour forecast range using NWP models in regions with complex terrain need a suitable horizontal, vertical and temporal resolution (e.g. 10 - 15 minute forecasts for the Nowcasting range) requiring high performance computing. To be able to provide sub-hourly to hourly forecasts different approaches such as model output statistics (MOS) or artificial neural networks (ANN) - including feed forward recurrent neural networks, fuzzy logic, particle swarm optimizations - are needed as computational costs are too high. To represent the forecast uncertainties additional probabilistic ensemble predictions are required increasing the computational needs. Ensemble prediction systems account for errors and uncertainties in the initial and boundary conditions, parameterizations, numeric, etc. Due to the underestimation of model and sampling errors ensemble predictions tend to be underdispersive and biased. They lack, too, sharpness and reliability. These shortcomings can be accounted for using statistical post-processing methods such as the non-homogeneous Gaussian regression (NGR) to calibrate an ensemble. These calibrated ensembles provide forecasts in the medium range for any arbitrary location where observations are available. In this study an ANN is used to provide forecasts for the nowcasting and medium-range with sub-hourly to hourly predictions for different Austrian sites, including high alpine sites as well as low

  7. Wind power forecasting for a real onshore wind farm on complex terrain using WRF high resolution simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángel Prósper Fernández, Miguel; Casal, Carlos Otero; Canoura Fernández, Felipe; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo

    2017-04-01

    Regional meteorological models are becoming a generalized tool for forecasting wind resource, due to their capacity to simulate local flow dynamics impacting wind farm production. This study focuses on the production forecast and validation of a real onshore wind farm using high horizontal and vertical resolution WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model simulations. The wind farm is located in Galicia, in the northwest of Spain, in a complex terrain region with high wind resource. Utilizing the Fitch scheme, specific for wind farms, a period of one year is simulated with a daily operational forecasting set-up. Power and wind predictions are obtained and compared with real data provided by the management company. Results show that WRF is able to yield good wind power operational predictions for this kind of wind farms, due to a good representation of the planetary boundary layer behaviour of the region and the good performance of the Fitch scheme under these conditions.

  8. One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

  9. Application of a mesoscale model with 4DDA to the complex terrain near Tooele, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cosdtigan, K.R.; Flicker, D.G.; Lee, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    The Tooele Army Depot South Area is located in the high, broad Rush Valley of North-Central Utah. The valley is approximately 1560 m above sea level and roughly 20 Ion across from East to West and 45 km long from North to South. It is surrounded on three sides by mountain ranges with the Oquirrh Mountains to the East, the Stansbury and Onaqui Mountains to the West, and the Sheep Rock and East Tintic Mountains to the South. These mountain ranges include peaks from about 2400 m to 3350 m MSL. A somewhat shorter barrier (2000 m South Mountain) exists on the North end of the valley and the lowest passes are on the north and east sides. Further to the North lies Tooele Valley and the Great Salt Lake. Another significant lake is in the adjacent valley to the east of Rush Valley and the small Rush Lake is at the North end of Rush Valley. The combination of the topography and the lakes leads to interesting local meteorology affected by slope and valley flows and lake breezes for Atmospheric Circulations) for operational use in this area. The nudging scheme takes advantage of an extensive network of local observations in the valley. At the depot there are seven surface observing stations and a 30 m tower, which collect wind, temperature, and humidity data, and Tooele County has recently installed a network of about 25 additional surface stations throughout Rush and Tooele Valleys and on some of the surrounding higher terrain.

  10. Mixing Induced By Slope and Valley Flow Collisions in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J.; Hocut, C. M.; Zhong, Q.; Hoch, S.; Leo, L.; Di Sabatino, S.; Pardyjak, E.; Whiteman, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    A fascinating observation made during the fall 2012 field campaign of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) was the collision of slope and valley flows that led to powerful but spasmodic turbulence generating events. The contributions of these collisions to overall basin (meso) scale mixing were studied using the MATERHORN field data as well as laboratory measurements conducted under controlled conditions using counter flowing gravity currents. The collisions cause localized shear layers and Kelvin Helmholtz billowing, which, together with turbulence generated by impingement of fronts on one another, generate a turbulence field that decays rapidly under local stable stratification. Buoyancy fluxes measured using these events are parameterized in terms of a suitably defined Richardson number and dimensionless geometric parameters. The time and lengthscales of initial turbulence as well as its decay time scale are measured and quantified using governing parameters. Mechanisms responsible for the recurrence of collision events are elicited based on data from a large number of flux towers, remote sensors and infrared cameras located in the domain of observations.

  11. Simple sensors for performing useful tasks autonomously in complex outdoor terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Erann; Behar, Albert; Desai, Rajiv; Ivlev, Robert V.; Loch, John L.; Miller, David P.

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes the control system for Rocky IV, a prototype microrover designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept for a low-cost scientific mission to Mars. Rocky IV uses a behavior-based control architecture which implements a large variety of functions displaying various degrees of autonomy, from completely autonomous long-duration conditional sequences of actions to very precisely described actions resembling classical AI operators. The control system integrates information from infrared proximity sensors, proprioceptive encoders which report on the state of the articulation of the rover's suspension system and other mechanics, a homing beacon, a magnetic compass, and contact sensors. In addition, significant functionality is implemented as 'virtual sensors', computed values which are presented to the system as if they were sensors values. The robot is able to perform a variety of useful tasks, including soil sample collection, removal of surface weathering layers from rocks, spectral imaging, instrument deployment, and sample return, under realistic mission- like conditions in Mars-like terrain.

  12. Visual regulation of gait: Zeroing in on a solution to the complex terrain problem.

    PubMed

    Barton, Sean L; Matthis, Jonathan S; Fajen, Brett R

    2017-10-01

    We examine the theoretical understanding of visual gait regulation that has emerged from decades of research since the publication of Lee, Lishman, and Thompson's (1982) classic study of elite long jumpers. The first round of research identified specific informational variables, parameters of the action system, and laws of control that capture the coupling of perception and action in this context, but left unanswered important questions about why visual information is sampled in an intermittent manner and how the strategies that actors adopt ensure stability and energetic efficiency. More recent developments lead to a refined view according to which visual information is used at a specific phase of the gait cycle to modify the parameters that govern the passive dynamics of the body. We then present the results of a new experiment designed to test the prediction that when the terrain offers multiple foothold options for a given step, walkers' choices will be constrained by a strong preference for not interfering with the natural, ballistic movement of the body throughout the single support phase of that step. The findings are consistent with this prediction and support a view of visual gait regulation that is concordant with contemporary accounts of how actors use both active and passive modes of control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Effects of complex terrain on atmospheric flow: dividing streamline observations and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael; Fernando, Harindra; di Sabatino, Silvana; Leo, Laura; University of Notre Dame Team

    2013-11-01

    As part of the MATERHORN field campaign on atmospheric flow in mountainous terrain, the dividing streamline concept for stratified flow over obstacles was investigated using smoke flow visualization and meteorological measurements. At small Froude numbers (Fr < 1), a stratified flow approaching a mountain either possesses enough kinetic energy to pass over the summit or else flow around the sides, with dividing streamlines separating the two scenarios. An isolated northwestern peak of the Granite Mountain, approximately 60 m in height, was used for the study. Incoming flow velocities and temperature profiles were measured upstream using sonic anemometers and thermocouples mounted on a 32 m tower, while onsite measurements were taken with portable weather stations. Sufficiently strong stratification was developed around 3:00AM GMT, with Froude numbers in the range for dividing streamlines to exist. In the first trial, suitably placed red smoke releases were used and in another trial white smoke was released from a 25 m crane. In both cases well-defined dividing streamlines were observed and its vertical location was at a height about half of the mountain height, which is consistent with theoretical results based on Shepard's formula. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) grant number N00014-11-1-0709.

  14. Spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide from two geothermal power plants in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsdottir, S.; Gardarsson, S. M.; Andradottir, H. O.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns have arisen about the health impact and odor annoyance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions associated with geothermal power production. Measurements have been made at stationary measuring stations in inhabited areas but little is known about the spatial behavior of the H2S plumes. This study presents field measurements of the spatial distribution of the ground concentration of H2S within a 30 km radius of two geothermal power plants during 20 distinct events spanning one year. The results showed that high H2S concentration was correlated with high air stability, low wind speed and absence of precipitation. The odor threshold (11 μg m-3) was exceeded in all events. The instantaneous measurements exceeded the 24-h average national health limit (50 μg m-3) up to 26 km from the power plants. The shape of the measured plumes at the same location was similar between events, indicating repeated patterns in plume distribution. Convergence of plumes was observed due to spatial variability in wind direction. Plumes were found to follow mountain passes and accumulate alongside a mountain range. AERMOD modeling demonstrated that narrower plumes with higher concentration can be expected for smoother terrain, such as lakes, consistent with measurements.

  15. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets.

    PubMed

    Latysh, Natalie E; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  16. Spatial and seasonal variabilities of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentration and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liyin L.; Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Risk, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical processes driving the spatial variability of soil CO2 production and flux are well studied, but little is known about the variability in the spatial distribution of the stable carbon isotopes that make up soil CO2, particularly in complex terrain. Spatial differences in stable isotopes of soil CO2 could indicate fundamental differences in isotopic fractionation at the landscape level and may be useful to inform modeling of carbon cycling over large areas. We measured the spatial and seasonal variabilities of the δ13C of soil CO2 (δS) and the δ13C of soil CO2 flux (δP) in a subalpine forest ecosystem located in the Rocky Mountains of Montana. We found consistently more isotopically depleted values of δS and δP in low and wet areas of the landscape relative to steep and dry areas. Our results suggest that the spatial patterns of δS and δP are strongly mediated by soil water and soil respiration rate. More interestingly, our analysis revealed different temporal trends in δP across the landscape; in high landscape positions δP became more positive, whereas in low landscape positions δP became more negative with time. These trends might be the result of differential dynamics in the seasonality of soil moisture and its effects on soil CO2 production and flux. Our results suggest concomitant yet independent effects of water on physical (soil gas diffusivity) and biological (photosynthetic discrimination) processes that mediate δS and δP and are important when evaluating the δ13C of CO2 exchanged between soils and the atmosphere in complex terrain.

  17. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, Natalie E.; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  18. Variability of precipitation in complex terrain and the investigation of representativeness of measurements for the Matre catchment area, Western Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjerdal, M.; Reuder, J.; Villanger, F.

    2009-04-01

    Orography is strongly affecting precipitation. Especially over complex terrain, the precipitation fields can show high spatial variability even over very small scales. Along the Western coast of Norway with its large precipitation amounts of up to above 3000 mm per year, an improved understanding of the spatial precipitation patterns is of large socio-economic impact, as it can improve both the prediction of floods and landslides and the water management for hydro power plants. The producers of hydroelectric power continuously want the water resources to be utilized in the best suited way. Control and supervision of the water resources are therefore of the utmost economic importance. To get an overview over the water resource situation, it is essential to know about the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. In cooperation with the Norwegian power company BKK, 20 HOBO rain gauges and two Aanderaa weather stations have been deployed between 22 and 898 meters above sea level in the catchment area for the Matre water system in Western Norway in the period May - October 2009. The main purpose of the project is to investigate the horizontal variability and the altitude dependence of precipitation in complex terrain under different synoptic conditions in this catchment area. Moreover, the representativeness of a few single point measurements on the total precipitation amount of the whole catchment area has been addressed. The total amount of precipitation recorded by the 20 rain gauges during the deployment period ranges between 535 mm and 1190 mm, which indicate the large variability within the catchment area. Analysis of the data with respect to wind direction shows that 75 % of the total precipitation amount during the measurement period arrives when the wind direction is S - SW. During a high precipitation event, which will be investigated in more detail, amounts of precipitation between 58 mm - 121 mm within a 24-hour period have been observed during a

  19. In situ monitoring and machine modeling of snowpack evolution in complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolik, J.; Skalka, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that snowpack evolution depends on variety of landscape conditions including tree cover, slope, wind exposure, etc. In this presentation we report on methods that combine modern in-situ sensor technologies with machine learning-based algorithms to obtain improved models of snowpack evolution. Snowcloud is an embedded data collection system for snow hydrology field research campaigns that leverages distributed wireless sensor network technology to provide data at low cost and high spatial-temporal resolution. The system is compact thus allowing it to be deployed readily within dense canopies and/or steep slopes. The system has demonstrated robustness for multiple-seasons of operation thus showing it is applicable to not only short-term strategic monitoring but extended studies as well. We have used data collected by Snowcloud deployments to develop improved models of snowpack evolution using genetic programming (GP). Such models can be used to augment existing sensor infrastructure to obtain better areal snow depth and snow-water equivalence estimations. The presented work will discuss three multi-season deployments and present data (collected at 1-3 hour intervals and a multiple locations) on snowdepth variation throughout the season. The three deployment sites (Eastern Sierra Mountains, CA; Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH; and Sulitjelma, Norway) are varied not only geographically but also terrain-wise within each small study area (~2.5 hectacre). We will also discuss models generated by inductive (GP) learning, including non-linear regression techniques and evaluation, and how short-term Snowcloud field campaigns can augment existing infrastructure.

  20. Vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents above complex terrain - Influence of a mesoscale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Florian; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Meixner, Franz; Weigel, Ralf; Sprenger, Michael; Lelieveld, Jos

    2014-05-01

    Measurements in and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are essential to fully understand the exchange and transport processes between the PBL and the free troposphere (FT). Here we discuss the impact of a mesoscale system on the local trace gas and particle distribution above the PBL over hilly terrain. During the field campaign PARADE (PArticles and RAdicals: Diel observations of the impact of urban and biogenic Emissions) in August and September 2011 measurements were conducted at the Taunus Observatory on Mount "Kleiner Feldberg (KF)" (825 m asl.), about 20 km northwest of Frankfurt am Main in Germany. For the vertical composition of the lowest 3000 m, high-resolution measurements were performed using 174 radio soundings. The measurements are complemented by continuous boundary layer observations of a ceilometer and a variety of reactive tracers (CO, NOx, O3, VOCs) on the mountain top. In addition, aircraft measurements of CO2, CO, O3, temperature, humidity and aerosol number concentration and size distribution were performed during the first week of September. The PBL height varied during the measurement campaign between 1 and 2.5 km. The variations are due to very changeable weather, synoptic fronts as well as local phenomena such as low clouds and fog. The analysis of the data from different instruments shows good agreement in determining the boundary layer height under windless high pressure conditions, as well as with certain restrictions on cloudy and windy days. Based on the PBL investigation, the aircraft-based trace gas measurements were used to identify transport and exchange processes between the free atmosphere and the boundary layer, additionally supported with high-resolution backward-trajectories initialized every 10 seconds along the flight track, based on the wind fields from the COSMO-EU model. On 2 September 2011 we observed an enhanced particle number concentration and low ozone in the free troposphere at two flights around KF. Local

  1. Tethys Terrains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-19

    Tethys trailing side shows two terrains that tell a story of a rough past. To the north up, in image is older, rougher terrain, while to the south is new material dubbed mooth plains by scientists. This image was taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  2. Does complex terrain matter for global terrestrial ecosystem models? Forest ecosystem dynamics in the White Mountains, NH. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, M. C.; Richardson, A. D.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    in valley-bottoms. A failure to include the effects of complex terrain is shown to result in a non-trivial overestimation of the net carbon sink. The model is then applied at a regional scale to forecast forest change under climate change scenarios. The addition of complex terrain is shown to buffer the effects of climate change on regional carbon fluxes. This effect occurs because climate change effects differ not only in magnitude but also in direction at a landscape-scale.

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of Dynamic Subfilter Scale Models in WRF for Improved Large-Eddy Simulation over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkil, G.; Mirocha, J.

    2009-12-01

    Performance of dynamic subfilter scale (SFS) models for predicting turbulent flow statistics in Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of atmospheric boundary layers is evaluated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model. Dynamic SFS models compute the Smagorinsky constant in the eddy viscosity equation as a function of both space and time, thereby improving the prediction of atmospheric flows over complex geometries such as those frequently encountered in wind parks. Several dynamic models are evaluated and compared with other SFS stress models over idealized simple and complex terrain surfaces, and under various forcing scenarios, including neutral, stable and unstable conditions. Various approaches to augmenting the dynamic SFS stresses near the surface are also examined, including a hybrid RANS/LES simulations where RANS is used in thin boundary region above the surface, with LES used above. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-416486

  4. A Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference 3-D Model of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow over Complex Terrain and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, W.; Taylor, P. A.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the early linear and Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference (MSFD and NLMSFD) models, a 3-D non-linear model of planetary boundary-layer flow (NLMSFD-PBL) was developed to study neutral PBL flow over complex terrain. The model assumes upwind or zero-order profiles of mean and turbulence variables about which perturbation quantities are calculated due to the effects of the terrain. In early models, the mean zero-order wind profile was assumed to be a simple logarithmic surface-layer profile and Reynolds stresses were constant throughout the depth of the model domain. This formally limits the applications of model to the surface-layer flow. The new model utilizes the results of early 1-D planetary boundary layer model of Weng and Taylor as the zero-order or upstream profiles of mean and turbulent quantities. The limitations associated with the original MSFD/NLMSFD model (e.g. logarithmic wind profile and constant shear stress layer) are relaxed. The effect of earth's rotation is also included in the model. Model results for planetary boundary-layer flow over complex terrain are discussed, particularly, the flow over Askervein hill - the site of a detailed and much referenced field study of flow over hills in the 1980s. This type of modelling of flow over complex terrain has important applications for wind energy resource assessment and wind farm design.

  5. Tactical Maneuvering and Calculated Risks: Independent Child Migrants and the Complex Terrain of Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denov, Myriam; Bryan, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Similar to refugees in general, independent child migrants are frequently constructed in academic and popular discourse as passive and powerless or as untrustworthy and potentially threatening. Such portrayals fail to capture how these youth actively navigate the complex experiences of forced migration. Drawing on interviews with independent child…

  6. Modeling and measuring the nocturnal drainage flow in a high-elevation, subalpine forest with complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, C.; Monson, Russell K.; Zhai, Z.; Anderson, D.E.; Lamb, B.; Allwine, G.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Burns, Sean P.

    2005-01-01

    The nocturnal drainage flow of air causes significant uncertainty in ecosystem CO2, H2O, and energy budgets determined with the eddy covariance measurement approach. In this study, we examined the magnitude, nature, and dynamics of the nocturnal drainage flow in a subalpine forest ecosystem with complex terrain. We used an experimental approach involving four towers, each with vertical profiling of wind speed to measure the magnitude of drainage flows and dynamics in their occurrence. We developed an analytical drainage flow model, constrained with measurements of canopy structure and SF6 diffusion, to help us interpret the tower profile results. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed profiles of wind speed, leaf area density, and wind drag coefficient. Using theory, we showed that this one-dimensional model is reduced to the widely used exponential wind profile model under conditions where vertical leaf area density and drag coefficient are uniformly distributed. We used the model for stability analysis, which predicted the presence of a very stable layer near the height of maximum leaf area density. This stable layer acts as a flow impediment, minimizing vertical dispersion between the subcanopy air space and the atmosphere above the canopy. The prediction is consistent with the results of SF6 diffusion observations that showed minimal vertical dispersion of nighttime, subcanopy drainage flows. The stable within-canopy air layer coincided with the height of maximum wake-to-shear production ratio. We concluded that nighttime drainage flows are restricted to a relatively shallow layer of air beneath the canopy, with little vertical mixing across a relatively long horizontal fetch. Insight into the horizontal and vertical structure of the drainage flow is crucial for understanding the magnitude and dynamics of the mean advective CO2 flux that becomes significant during stable nighttime conditions and are typically missed during measurement of the

  7. Analysis and Modeling of Complex Geomorphic Systems: Technique Development, Data Collection, and Application to Rangeland Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Einstein, H., 1937, Bedload transport as a probability problem: Mitteilung der. Einstein, H.A., 1950. The Bed Load Function for Sediment Transport in...16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This report describes the results of a four-year, multi-faceted investigation into the physics of sediment transport ...modeling complex land-surface systems, and in particular the applicability of stochastic transport theory and fractional calculus; and (2) use numerical

  8. Luminescent trimethoprim-polyaminocarboxylate lanthanide complex conjugates for selective protein labeling and time-resolved bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, D. Rajasekhar; Pedró Rosa, Laura E.; Miller, Lawrence W.

    2011-01-01

    Labeling proteins with long-lifetime emitting lanthanide (III) chelate reporters enables sensitive, time-resolved luminescence bioaffinity assays. Heterodimers of trimethoprim (TMP) covalently linked to various cs124-sensitized, polyaminocarboxylate chelates stably retain lanthanide ions and exhibit quantum yields of europium emission up to 20% in water. A time-resolved, luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) assay showed that TMP-polyaminocarboxylates bind to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (eDHFR) fusion proteins with nanomolar affinity in purified solutions and in bacterial lysates. The ability to selectively impart terbium or europium luminescence to fusion proteins in complex physiological mixtures bypasses the need for specific antibodies and simplifies sample preparation. PMID:21619068

  9. Assessing regression kriging for its ability to represent precipitation fields over complex terrain using different gauging network densities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, Ioannis; Grillakis, Manolis; Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Seiradakis, Kostantinos

    2015-04-01

    Distributed hydrological modeling require spatially continuous precipitation data of high quality. However, precipitation is usually measured locally at a limited number of stations. Especially in areas of complex terrain, where the topography plays key role in the precipitation process, the gauging network is usually sparse or malfunction. The need of reliable precipitation data has led to the development of various spatial interpolation techniques specially designed for precipitation. Methodologies that can combine precipitation data to secondary information have been developed improving the skill of the interpolation. Regression kriging is an interpolation methodology which uses variable point values by combining a regression approach with a geostatistical approach (i.e. measuring spatial autocorrelation by kriging). The methodology is simple to use and has been already implemented in R and ArcGIS environments, thus it has a wider board of potential users. The methodology is assessed for its ability to represent precipitation fields in various precipitation station densities. Moreover, the results of Regression Kriging interpolation are compared to other interpolation techniques such as IDW, Kriging, Natural neighbor and spline, implemented in ArcGIS toolbox.

  10. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DOE PAGES

    Belu, Radian; Koracin, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction weremore » modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.« less

  11. Hot Air Balloon Experiments to Measure the Break-up of the Nocturnal Drainage Flow in Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, N. S.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Colomer, J.; Levy, M.; Zieren, L.

    1997-11-01

    In order to extend our understanding of the thermally driven atmospheric winds and their influence on pollutant transport, a hot air balloon experiment was conducted over a four day period in June, 1997 near Nogales, Arizona. The focus was on the early morning break-up of the stable down-slope and down-valley flow and the establishment of a convective boundary layer near the surface in the absence of synoptic winds. Temperature, elevation, position and particulate matter concentration were measured aloft and temperature gradient and wind velocity were measured at ground level. The wind velocity within the stable layer was generally less than 1.5 m/s. Just above the stable layer (about 300 meters above the valley) the wind shifted leading to an erosion of the stable layer from above. Surface heating after sunrise created a convective layer which rose from the ground until the stable layer was destroyed. Examples of temperature fluctuation measurements at various elevations during the establishment of the convective flow will be presented. Implications of results for turbulence parameterizations needed for numerical models of wind fields in complex terrain will be discussed.

  12. Analysis of the long-term surface wind variability over complex terrain using a high spatial resolution WRF simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Pedro A.; González-Rouco, J. Fidel; Montávez, Juan P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Dudhia, J.

    2013-04-01

    This work uses a WRF numerical simulation from 1960 to 2005 performed at a high horizontal resolution (2 km) to analyze the surface wind variability over a complex terrain region located in northern Iberia. A shorter slice of this simulation has been used in a previous study to demonstrate the ability of the WRF model in reproducing the observed wind variability during the period 1992-2005. Learning from that validation exercise, the extended simulation is herein used to inspect the wind behavior where and when observations are not available and to determine the main synoptic mechanisms responsible for the surface wind variability. A principal component analysis was applied to the daily mean wind. Two principal modes of variation accumulate a large percentage of the wind variability (83.7%). The first mode reflects the channeling of the flow between the large mountain systems in northern Iberia modulated by the smaller topographic features of the region. The second mode further contributes to stress the differentiated wind behavior over the mountains and valleys. Both modes show significant contributions at the higher frequencies during the whole analyzed period, with different contributions at lower frequencies during the different decades. A strong relationship was found between these two modes and the zonal and meridional large scale pressure gradients over the area. This relationship is described in the context of the influence of standard circulation modes relevant in the European region like the North Atlantic Oscillation, the East Atlantic pattern, East Atlantic/Western Russia pattern, and the Scandinavian pattern.

  13. Landscape variability of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentrations and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Liang, Liyin; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to understand how physical and biological processes mediate the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Numerous studies have described fundamental relationships between environmental variables, the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated sugars in plants, litter, soil carbon, or recently respired CO2. However, studies that examine the landscape scale variability of the 13C content of forest soils are lacking. We report on measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of soil CO2 concentrations (δ13CC) and flux (δ13CJ) across a subalpine forest of the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana, United States. Our analysis demonstrates that soil moisture and the lateral redistribution of soil water are strong predictors of the spatial variability of both δ13CC and δ13CJ at the watershed scale. Our analysis suggests that there are concomitant yet independent effects of soil water on physical (i.e., soil gas diffusivity) and biological (i.e., photosynthetic activity) processes that mediate the 13C composition of forest soils. We show systematic spatial variability in the δ13C of forest soils at the landscape scale that can be useful to accurately predict and model land-atmosphere CO2 exchange over complex terrain.

  14. Horizontal heat fluxes over complex terrain computed using a simple mixed-layer model and a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Fujio; Kuwagata, Tuneo

    1995-02-01

    The thermally induced local circulation over a periodic valley is simulated by a two-dimensional numerical model that does-not include condensational processes. During the daytime of a clear, calm day, heat is transported from the mountainous region to the valley area by anabatic wind and its return flow. The specific humidity is, however, transported in an inverse manner. The horizontal exchange rate of sensible heat has a horizontal scale similarity, as long as the horizontal scale is less than a critical width of about 100 km. The sensible heat accumulated in an atmospheric column over an arbitrary point can be estimated by a simple model termed the uniform mixed-layer model (UML). The model assumes that the potential temperature is both vertically and horizontally uniform in the mixed layer, even over the complex terrain. The UML model is valid only when the horizontal scale of the topography is less than the critical width and the maximum difference in the elevation of the topography is less than about 1500 m. Latent heat is accumulated over the mountainous region while the atmosphere becomes dry over the valley area. When the horizontal scale is close to the critical width, the largest amount of humidity is accumulated during the late afternoon over the mountainous region. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Evaluation of REMTECH PA-2 phased array SODAR performance in Complex Terrain using in-situ turbulence instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.R.; Catizone, P.A.; Hoffnagle, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    The introduction of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model Plus Algorithms for Unstable Situations (CTDMPLUS model) by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created a need for detailed vertical profiles of wind speed, direction and turbulence for regulatory modeling. Most EPA models use only a single level of wind data, assume wind direction within the boundary layer is uniform and extrapolate wind speed based on logarithmic profiles. CTDMPLUS offers a more realistic paradigm for transport and dispersion in the boundary layer by utilizing measured wind profiles if available. Profile data used by CTDMPLUS must include the layer in which the plume is dispersing. For tall stack, heated effluent plume, the profile must extend to heights of several hundred meters above stack top. Doppler SOund Detection And Ranging (SODAR) systems provide a cost effective method for collecting the profile data. While EPA has approved the use of mean wind speed and direction data from SODARs for regulatory modeling purposes, the use of turbulence data has not been unconditionally accepted. In order to use turbulence data from a SODAR, the user must obtain concurrence from the agency that the turbulence data are acceptable and may be required to demonstrate that the data are reliable. This paper presents the results of a SODAR data evaluation project.

  16. Evaluation of the diurnal variation of near-surface temperature and winds from WRF numerical simulations over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Pace, C.; Pu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Near-surface atmospheric conditions, especially the temperature and winds, are characterized by their diurnal variations. Accurate representation and forecast of the diurnal variations are the essential components of numerical modeling and weather prediction. However, it is commonly challenging to accurately simulate and predict diurnal variations of near-surface atmospheric conditions over complex terrain, especially over the mountainous areas. In this study we evaluate the diurnal variation of near-surface temperature and winds from the numerical simulations generated by mesoscale community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The model simulated surface temperature at 2-meter height and winds at 10-meter height are compared with these observations from surface mesonet observations in several different weather scenarios (winter inversion, cold front and low-level jet etc.) over the Inter-mountain West of US. Preliminary results show large discrepancies between model generated diurnal variations and observations in some cases. The mechanism and causes of these differences are further investigated. Implications of these results for model improvement and data assimilation are also discussed.

  17. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 1. Overview, technical description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) program conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah, and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide, and Volume 2 contains the Appendices which include listings of the FORTRAN code. 51 refs., 31 figs., 35 tabs.

  18. Ecosystem function in complex mountain terrain: Combining models and long-term observations to advance process-based understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, William R.; Knowles, John F.; Blanken, Peter D.; Swenson, Sean C.; Suding, Katharine N.

    2017-04-01

    Abiotic factors structure plant community composition and ecosystem function across many different spatial scales. Often, such variation is considered at regional or global scales, but here we ask whether ecosystem-scale simulations can be used to better understand landscape-level variation that might be particularly important in complex terrain, such as high-elevation mountains. We performed ecosystem-scale simulations by using the Community Land Model (CLM) version 4.5 to better understand how the increased length of growing seasons may impact carbon, water, and energy fluxes in an alpine tundra landscape. The model was forced with meteorological data and validated with observations from the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research Program site. Our results demonstrate that CLM is capable of reproducing the observed carbon, water, and energy fluxes for discrete vegetation patches across this heterogeneous ecosystem. We subsequently accelerated snowmelt and increased spring and summer air temperatures in order to simulate potential effects of climate change in this region. We found that vegetation communities that were characterized by different snow accumulation dynamics showed divergent biogeochemical responses to a longer growing season. Contrary to expectations, wet meadow ecosystems showed the strongest decreases in plant productivity under extended summer scenarios because of disruptions in hydrologic connectivity. These findings illustrate how Earth system models such as CLM can be used to generate testable hypotheses about the shifting nature of energy, water, and nutrient limitations across space and through time in heterogeneous landscapes; these hypotheses may ultimately guide further experimental work and model development.

  19. Energy transfer in photosystem I. Time resolved fluorescence of the native photosystem I complex and its core complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Tjus, Staffan E.; Andersson, Bertil; Gillbro, Tomas

    1995-05-01

    Energy transfer within isolated spinach photosystem I (PS I) complexes with different antenna size were studied using time-resolved picosecond and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. In both the native PS I complexes and the PS I core complexes lacking the outer chlorophyll a/ b antenna we observed a fast dominating emission component ≈ 35 ps at room temperature which is associated with the trapping process by the reaction centre. In the native PS I complex there also appears a 120 ps component which was not observed in the PS I core complex. This component most likely represents an energy transfer from low energy pigments in the light-harvesting complex I antenna and into the core. Due to a very fast energy equilibration (< 10 ps) it was not possible to resolve the energy transfer at room temperature. At 77 K, however, it was possible to follow the energy transfer from F690 to F720 with a transfer time of ≈ 35 ps within the native PS I complex and slightly longer, 78 ps, in the PS I core complex. The native PS I complex also exhibited in the region 700-740 nm a 102 ps component which originates from F720 and represents energy transfer from F720 to P700 at 77 K. At low temperatures the PS I core complex exhibited a component of 161 ps which is associated with F720 and has the same function as the 102 ps component of the native PS I complex. We conclude that the F720 emission originates from pigments in the core antenna system. This emission also increases at low temperature. In the native PS I complex there is an initial increase in the F720 emission as the temperature is lowered but at 77 K the F735 emission originating from LHC I dominates.

  20. The Temperature Gradient and Transition Timescales as a Function of Topography in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, C. W.; Hoch, S. W.; Pardyjak, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large portions of the Earth's surface are covered by mountainous areas, and understanding atmospheric flow over these regions is critical for weather prediction, (micro)climatological research, and dispersion modeling. Complex interactions between the topographic features, the synoptic forcing and the buoyant forcing drive flow patterns and flow regime transitions. As a part of the MATTERHORN field experiment, Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology was used to measure the vertical temperature gradient on an east facing slope across a 2km transect of granite ridge in the Utah west desert, from the base of the mountain to the middle slope. Thus, the temperature gradient is sampled above a wide range of topographic features, from valley formations to ridges, and over a wide range of slope and aspect angles. The relationship between these landforms and the timescales of morning and evening transitions is explored and presented.

  1. SToRM: A Model for Unsteady Surface Hydraulics Over Complex Terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model is based on an unstructured cellcentered finite volume formulation and a nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. The model’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of the model is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of historic significance in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013.

  2. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zald, Harold S.J.; Spies, Thomas A.; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J.; Olsen, Keith A.; Steel, E. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  3. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA.

    PubMed

    Zald, Harold S J; Spies, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J; Olsen, Keith A; Steel, E Ashley

    2016-04-15

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  4. Fibre Optics Distributed Temperature Sensing for EcoHydrological Characterization of a Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, Francesco; Krause, Stefan; Chalari, Athena; Mondanos, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Being able to properly monitor the heat and water dynamics in the soil vadose zone is crucial to the ecohydrological characterization of any field site. Point sensors may provide accurate measurements of temperature and soil moisture but offering a spatial footprint limited to few centimeters, dramatically reducing the amount of information that can be obtained, in particular about the spatial variability and directions of the soil heat and water fluxes. Fibre Optics Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS) demonstrated to be a very promising, cost effective and non invasive technique for heat and moisture distributed monitoring from small (centimeters) to large (kilometers) spatial scales. A permanent installation aiming at monitoring the long time and large space-scale soil moisture and temperature variations in the shallow soil is going to be realized in two areas presenting different vegetation (trees and low grass, respectively) and inclined transects in a forest close to the Birmingham area. FO cable is going to be buried at different depths by mean of a plow and both active (monitor cooling rates of a heated cable) and passive (e.g. Fourier or Dynamic Harmonic Regression analysis to diurnal and seasonal temperature trends) FO-DTS techniques will be used to constantly monitor and quantify the soil water and heat traces. The ability of FO-DTS to provide reliable information about moisture and heat dynamics in this complex environment affected by the variability of many natural factors (e.g. precipitation, presence or absence of deep vegetation, diurnal/seasonal atmospheric forcing, orography) will be exploited. A detailed description of this complex and unique installation will be provided, along with a presentation of the preliminary results of the FO-DTS measurements. Particular emphasis to the comparison between both the initial state and the differences in diurnal moisture and temperature regimes between the two areas (due to the difference in vegetation

  5. Comparing model-based predictions of a wind turbine wake to LiDAR measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Andrew; Jones, Paddy; Boyce, Dean; Bowman, Neil

    2013-04-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to the measurement of wind characteristics offers great potential to accurately predict the atmospheric boundary layer flow (ABL) and its interactions with wind turbines. An understanding of these interactions is important for optimizing turbine siting in wind farms and improving the power performance and lifetime of individual machines. In particular, Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can be used to remotely measure the wind characteristics (speed, direction and turbulence intensity) approaching a rotor. This information can be utilised to improve turbine lifetime (advanced detection of incoming wind shear, wind veer and extreme wind conditions, such as gusts) and optimise power production (improved yaw, pitch and speed control). LiDAR can also make detailed measurements of the disturbed wind profile in the wake, which can damage surrounding turbines and reduce efficiency. These observational techniques can help engineers better understand and model wakes to optimize turbine spacing in large wind farms, improving efficiency and reducing the cost of energy. NEL is currently undertaking research to measure the disturbed wind profile in the wake of a 950 kW wind turbine using a ZephIR Dual Mode LiDAR at its Myres Hill wind turbine test site located near Glasgow, Scotland. Myres Hill is moderately complex terrain comprising deep peat, low lying grass and heathers, localised slopes and nearby forest, approximately 2 km away. Measurements have been obtained by vertically scanning at 10 recorded heights across and above the rotor plane to determine the wind speed, wind direction and turbulence intensity profiles. Measurement stations located at various rotor diameters downstream of the turbine were selected in an attempt to capture the development of the wake and its recovery towards free stream conditions. Results of the measurement campaign will also highlight how the wake behaves as a result of sudden gusts

  6. Control of ozone precursors in a complex industrial terrain by using multiscale-nested air quality models with fine spatial resolution (1 km2).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Pedro; Parra, René; Baldasano, José M

    2005-08-01

    The location of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula (NEIP) in the northwestern Mediterranean basin, the presence of the Pyrenees mountain range (with altitudes > 3000 m), and the influence of the Mediterranean Sea and the large valley canalization of Ebro river induce an extremely complicated structure for the dispersion of photochemical pollutants. Air pollution studies in very complex terrains such as the NEIP require high-resolution modeling for resolving the very complex dynamics of flows. To deal with the influence of larger-scale transport, however, high-resolution models have to be nested in larger models to generate appropriate initial and boundary conditions for the finer resolution domains. This article shows the results obtained through the utilization of the MM5-EMICAT2000-CMAQ multiscale-nested air quality model relating the sensitivity regimes for ozone (O3)-nitrogen oxides (NOx)-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an area of high geographical complexity, like the industrial area of Tarragona, located in the NEIP. The model was applied with fine temporal (one-hour) and spatial resolution (cells of 24 km, 2 km, and 1 km) to represent the chemistry and transport of tropospheric O3 and other photochemical species with respect to different hypothetical scenarios of emission controls and to quantify the influence of different emission sources in the area. Results indicate that O3 chemistry in the industrial domain of Tarragona is strongly sensitive to VOCs; the higher percentages of reduction for ground-level O3 are achieved when reducing by 25% the emissions of industrial VOCs. On the contrary, reductions in the industrial emissions of NOx contribute to a strong increase in hourly peak levels of O3. At the same time, the contribution of on-road traffic and biogenic emissions to ground-level O3 concentrations in the area is negligible with respect to the pervasive weight of industrial sources. This analysis provides an assessment of the effectiveness of

  7. Use of Geostationary Satellite Imagery to Estimate Convective Precipitation Over Complex Terrain in the Western United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    imagery when terrain influences were included. This technique may be useful for real-time estimates of convective precipitation amounts and has potential for application to flash flood forecasting in the western United States.

  8. Ozone distribution in the lower troposphere over complex terrain in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguel, Rodrigo J.; Mancilla, Carlos A.; Rondanelli, Roberto; Leiva, Manuel A.; Morales, Raúl G. E.

    2013-04-01

    Observations were performed in 12 communities of Central Chile in order to determine the horizontal gradients of ozone in the Santiago Basin and surrounding valleys. Higher ozone mixing ratios were found northeast of the Santiago Basin and included east of the Aconcagua Valley ( 70 km from Santiago) suggesting that photochemical pollution produced in Santiago is capable of passing through the Chacabuco mountain chain ( 1.3 km) and have impact downwind from the regions with the largest NOx and VOC emissions. To complement existing surface observations, ozonesonde and tethersonde campaigns were performed in the Santiago Basin and the Aconcagua Valley. The results suggest ozone can accumulate in layers aloft (e.g., >102 ppb at 2 km) similarly to layers observed in complex topography coastal regions like Southern California. Layers of significant ozone concentrations having a near surface origin were observed above the mixed layer and below the subsidence inversion base. We propose that the ozone in this residual layer can be transported large distances (at least to 70 km) to further penetrate into the local environment under conditions of a well-mixed boundary layer.

  9. Feasibility of Estimating Snow Depth in Complex Terrain Using Satellite Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Stoll, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Satellite retrievals of snow depth and water equivalent (SWE) are critical for monitoring watershed scale processes around the world. However, the problem is especially challenging in mountainous regions where complex heterogeneities limit the utility of low resolution satellite sensors. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) collected surface elevation data along near-repeat reference transects over land areas from 2003-2009. Although intended for monitoring ice caps and sea ice, the seven year global GLAS data base has provided unprecedented opportunity to test the capability of satellite lidar technology for estimating snow depth over land. GLAS single track and low repeat frequency does not provide data sufficient for operational estimates. However, its comparatively small footprint size of -65 m and its database of seasonal repeat observations during both snow and no-snow conditions have been sufficient to evaluate the potential of spacebased lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth. Recent analysis of ICESat elevations in the Uinta Mountains in NE Utah provide encouraging results for watershed scale estimates of snow depth. Research reported here focuses on the sensitivity of several versions of an ICESat snow depth algorithm to a range of landscape types defined by vegetation cover, slope and roughness. Results are compared to available SNOTEL data.

  10. Time-domain solver in curvilinear coordinates for outdoor sound propagation over complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The current work aims at developing a linearized Euler equations solver in curvilinear coordinates to account for the effects of topography on sound propagation. In applications for transportation noise, the propagation environment as well as the description of acoustic sources is complex, and time-domain methods have proved their capability to deal with both atmospheric and ground effects. First, equations in curvilinear coordinates are examined. Then time-domain boundary conditions initially proposed for a Cartesian coordinate system are implemented in the curvilinear solver. Two test cases dealing with acoustic scattering by an impedance cylinder in a two-dimensional geometry and by an impedance sphere in a three-dimensional geometry are considered to validate the boundary conditions. Accurate solutions are obtained for both rigid and impedance surfaces. Finally, the solver is used to examine a typical outdoor sound propagation problem. It is shown that it is well-suited to study coupled effects of topography, mixed impedance ground and meteorological conditions.

  11. Integrated sensor and observation network for quantifying the fate and transport of water in a complex mountain terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, A. L.; Miller, S. N.; Paige, G. B.; Kelleners, T. J.; Ohara, N.; Holbrook, W.

    2013-12-01

    Determining an accurate water balance in mountainous landscapes with changing management and land cover due to disturbance has proven to be a significant challenge to hydrologists. We constructed a nested, heavily instrumented watershed monitoring system in the Snowy Range Mountains of southeastern Wyoming to better quantify the fate and transport of water in a region consisting of complex subsurface geology that contributes to poorly defined surface/groundwater interactions. Further complicating the water balance calculation is that the watershed is impacted by mountain pine beetle tree mortality, which affects evapotranspiration and the local energy balance. The nested watershed study includes four meteorological stations within a zero-order watershed where inputs and outputs can be quantified to a high degree of accuracy using soil moisture, snow water equivalence, geochemistry, and atmospheric data. Ten stream gaging stations and three shallow groundwater wells have been placed along three tributaries that expand out to the main stem of the North Fork of the Laramie River near Centennial, Wyoming. Surface water isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen are analyzed weekly at each gaging station. Significant or non-linear changes in streamflow at gaging stations in the downstream direction relative to the contributing watershed characteristics are used in conjunction with stream temperature and isotope data to identify gaining or losing stream sections. Near surface geophysical techniques will be used to help quantify subsurface structure and better understand surface and groundwater fluxes. Results from our study will provide insight into hydrological processes in complex terrain and better inform water resource managers of the consequences of land cover change in the region.

  12. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, Till H. M.; Lyon, Steve W.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Troch, Peter A.

    2010-11-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in mountainous catchments. Given economical considerations, a long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement of a small number of rain gauges to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for the Sabino Canyon catchment near Tucson, Arizona, USA, given its complex topography and dominant storm track pattern. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate all possible configurations of a "practical" network having from one to four rain gauges. A multicriteria design strategy is used to guide rain gauge placement, by simultaneously minimizing the residual percent bias and maximizing the coefficient of correlation between the estimated and true mean areal rainfall and minimizing the normalized spatial mean squared error between the estimated and true spatiotemporal rainfall distribution. The performance of the optimized rain gauge network was then compared against randomly designed network ensembles by evaluating the quality of streamflows predicted using the Kinematic Runoff and Erosion (KINEROS2) event-based rainfall-runoff model. Our results indicate that the multicriteria strategy provided a robust design by which a sparse but accurate network of rain gauges could be implemented for semiarid basins such as the one studied.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulations of Atmospheric Flows Over Complex Terrain Using the Immersed-Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yulong; Liu, Heping

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric flow over complex terrain, particularly recirculation flows, greatly influences wind-turbine siting, forest-fire behaviour, and trace-gas and pollutant dispersion. However, there is a large uncertainty in the simulation of flow over complex topography, which is attributable to the type of turbulence model, the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence parametrization, terrain-following coordinates, and numerical errors in finite-difference methods. Here, we upgrade the large-eddy simulation module within the Weather Research and Forecasting model by incorporating the immersed-boundary method into the module to improve simulations of the flow and recirculation over complex terrain. Simulations over the Bolund Hill indicate improved mean absolute speed-up errors with respect to previous studies, as well an improved simulation of the recirculation zone behind the escarpment of the hill. With regard to the SGS parametrization, the Lagrangian-averaged scale-dependent Smagorinsky model performs better than the classic Smagorinsky model in reproducing both velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. A finer grid resolution also improves the strength of the recirculation in flow simulations, with a higher horizontal grid resolution improving simulations just behind the escarpment, and a higher vertical grid resolution improving results on the lee side of the hill. Our modelling approach has broad applications for the simulation of atmospheric flows over complex topography.

  14. New conformal mapping for adaptive resolving of the complex singularities of Stokes wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Dyachenko, Sergey A.; Silantyev, Denis A.

    2017-06-01

    A new highly efficient method is developed for computation of travelling periodic waves (Stokes waves) on the free surface of deep water. A convergence of numerical approximation is determined by the complex singularities above the free surface for the analytical continuation of the travelling wave into the complex plane. An auxiliary conformal mapping is introduced which moves singularities away from the free surface thus dramatically speeding up numerical convergence by adapting the numerical grid for resolving singularities while being consistent with the fluid dynamics. The efficiency of that conformal mapping is demonstrated for the Stokes wave approaching the limiting Stokes wave (the wave of the greatest height) which significantly expands the family of numerically accessible solutions. It allows us to provide a detailed study of the oscillatory approach of these solutions to the limiting wave. Generalizations of the conformal mapping to resolve multiple singularities are also introduced.

  15. Time-Resolved Surface-Enhanced Coherent Sensing of Nanoscale Molecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hua, Xia; Wang, Kai; Jha, Pankaj K.; Munusamy, Elango; Wheeler, Steven E.; Welch, George; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale real-time molecular sensing requires large signal enhancement, small background, short detection time and high spectral resolution. We demonstrate a new vibrational spectroscopic technique which satisfies all of these conditions. This time-resolved surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (tr-SECARS) spectroscopy is used to detect hydrogen-bonded molecular complexes of pyridine with water in the near field of gold nanoparticles with large signal enhancement and a fraction of a second collection time. Optimal spectral width and time delays of ultrashort laser pulses suppress the surface-enhanced non-resonant background. Time-resolved signals increase the spectral resolution which is limited by the width of the probe pulse and allow measuring nanoscale vibrational dephasing dynamics. This technique combined with quantum chemistry simulations may be used for the investigation of complex mixtures at the nanoscale and surface environment of artificial nanostructures and biological systems. PMID:23189240

  16. Periglacial complexes in Utopia Planitia: rimless, tiered depressions, (clastically) sorted and unsorted polygonised terrain and an ice-rich mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, Richard; Conway, Susan; Gallagher, Colman; Dohm, James; Clifford, Stephen M.; Williams, Jean-pierre

    2016-10-01

    We report the spatial and possible genetic-relationship at the mid-latitudes of Utopia Planitia (45-500N 115-1200E), Mars, of: (a) metre to decametre deep, rimless, tiered depressions; terrain that exhibits (b) (clastically) sorted and (c) unsorted (small-sized) polygons; and, (d) a very youthful, ice-rich mantle. We show that these individual landscape features are separated stratigraphically, this being presented to the Mars community for the first time, and suggest that the stratigraphical separation of these features could be the result of boundary conditions and formation processes that have varied much more widely than has been thought hitherto. In cold-climate and non-glacial regions such as the Yamal Peninsula of eastern Russia and the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands of northern Canada, landscape assemblages comprised of similar features are referenced as "ice complexes" and are indicative of periglacialism on two fronts: first, the presence of "ice-rich" permafrost or permafrost comprised of "excess ice", i.e. "permafrost" whose pore space is exceeded by the "water ice" within that body of sediment; and, second, antecedently or currently active freeze-thaw cycling, minimally, to the full depth of the "ice-complex" depressions. In the Dry Valleys of the Antarctic, where the atmospheric aridity and cold-temperatures approach those of Mars, ice-vapour diffusion and adsorption cycles are cited as the means by which the near-surface, permafrost, i.e. ≤1m deep, has become ice-cemented. However, the metre to decametre depths of the "ice-complex" depressions on Earth and the morphologically-similar ones on Mars lie beyond the vertical reach of the Antarctic diffusion and adsorption cycles, both empirically and theoretically. By deduction, this points to the freeze-thaw cycling of water to depth, fostered either by exogenic or endogenic means, perhaps playing a more important role in the formation of the possible Martian "ice complexes" than might be expected were

  17. Evaluation of AERMOD and CALPUFF for predicting ambient concentrations of total suspended particulate matter (TSP) emissions from a quarry in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Dmitry; Broday, David M; Stern, Eli

    2013-08-01

    Concentrations of particulate emissions from a quarry located in hilly terrain were calculated by two common atmospheric dispersion models, AERMOD and CALPUFF. Evaluation of these models for emissions from quarries/open pit mines that are located in complex topography is missing from the literature. Due to severe uncertainties in the input parameters, numerous scenarios were simulated and model sensitivity was studied. Model results were compared among themselves, and to measured total suspended particulate (TSP). For a wide range of meteorological and topographical conditions studied, AERMOD predictions were in a better agreement with the measurements than those obtained by CALPUFF. The use of AERMOD's "Open pit" tool seems unnecessary when accurate digital topographic data are available. Onsite meteorological data are shown to be crucial for reliable dispersion calculations in complex terrain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methodological approach in determination of small spatial units in a highly complex terrain in atmospheric pollution research: the case of Zasavje region in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Kukec, Andreja; Boznar, Marija Z; Mlakar, Primoz; Grasic, Bostjan; Herakovic, Andrej; Zadnik, Vesna; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana; Farkas, Jerneja; Erzen, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The study of atmospheric air pollution research in complex terrains is challenged by the lack of appropriate methodology supporting the analysis of the spatial relationship between phenomena affected by a multitude of factors. The key is optimal design of a meaningful approach based on small spatial units of observation. The Zasavje region, Slovenia, was chosen as study area with the main objective to investigate in practice the role of such units in a test environment. The process consisted of three steps: modelling of pollution in the atmosphere with dispersion models, transfer of the results to geographical information system software, and then moving on to final determination of the function of small spatial units. A methodology capable of designing useful units for atmospheric air pollution research in highly complex terrains was created, and the results were deemed useful in offering starting points for further research in the field of geospatial health.

  19. The endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions by a nick and counternick mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; Noguchi, Eishi; Shanahan, Paul; Russell, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Functional studies strongly suggest that the Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions (HJs) in fission yeast, but in vitro it preferentially cleaves flexible three-way branched structures that model replication forks or 3' flaps. Here we report that a nicked HJ is the preferred substrate of endogenous and recombinant Mus81-Eme1. Cleavage occurs specifically on the strand that opposes the nick, resulting in resolution of the structure into linear duplex products. Resolving cuts made by the endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex on an intact HJ are quasi-simultaneous, indicating that Mus81-Eme1 resolves HJs by a nick and counternick mechanism, with a large rate enhancement of the second cut arising from the flexible nature of the nicked HJ intermediate. Recombinant Mus81-Eme1 is ineffective at making the first cut. We also report that HJs accumulate in a DNA polymerase alpha mutant that lacks Mus81, providing further evidence that the Mus81-Eme1 complex targets HJs in vivo.

  20. Terrain mechanical parameters online estimation for lunar rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Cui, Pingyuan; Ju, Hehua

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a new method for terrain mechanical parameters estimation for a wheeled lunar rover. First, after deducing the detailed distribution expressions of normal stress and sheer stress at the wheel-terrain interface, the force/torque balance equations of the drive wheel for computing terrain mechanical parameters is derived through analyzing the rigid drive wheel of a lunar rover which moves with uniform speed in deformable terrain. Then a two-points Guass-Lengendre numerical integral method is used to simplify the balance equations, after simplifying and rearranging the resolve model are derived which are composed of three non-linear equations. Finally the iterative method of Newton and the steepest descent method are combined to solve the non-linear equations, and the outputs of on-board virtual sensors are used for computing terrain key mechanical parameters i.e. internal friction angle and press-sinkage parameters. Simulation results show correctness under high noises disturbance and effectiveness with low computational complexity, which allows a lunar rover for online terrain mechanical parameters estimation.

  1. Saturation sampling for spatial variation in multiple air pollutants across an inversion-prone metropolitan area of complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterizing intra-urban variation in air quality is important for epidemiological investigation of health outcomes and disparities. To date, however, few studies have been designed to capture spatial variation during select hours of the day, or to examine the roles of meteorology and complex terrain in shaping intra-urban exposure gradients. Methods We designed a spatial saturation monitoring study to target local air pollution sources, and to understand the role of topography and temperature inversions on fine-scale pollution variation by systematically allocating sampling locations across gradients in key local emissions sources (vehicle traffic, industrial facilities) and topography (elevation) in the Pittsburgh area. Street-level integrated samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3) were collected during morning rush and probable inversion hours (6-11 AM), during summer and winter. We hypothesized that pollution concentrations would be: 1) higher under inversion conditions, 2) exacerbated in lower-elevation areas, and 3) vary by season. Results During July - August 2011 and January - March 2012, we observed wide spatial and seasonal variability in pollution concentrations, exceeding the range measured at regulatory monitors. We identified elevated concentrations of multiple pollutants at lower-elevation sites, and a positive association between inversion frequency and NO2 concentration. We examined temporal adjustment methods for deriving seasonal concentration estimates, and found that the appropriate reference temporal trend differs between pollutants. Conclusions Our time-stratified spatial saturation approach found some evidence for modification of inversion-concentration relationships by topography, and provided useful insights for refining and interpreting GIS-based pollution source indicators for Land Use Regression modeling. PMID:24735818

  2. Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site--a complex terrain condition.

    PubMed

    Tóta, Julio; Fitzjarrald, David Roy; da Silva Dias, Maria A F

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras--ZF2--02°36'17.1'' S, 60°12'24.4'' W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO(2) concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO(2) sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO(2)) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO(2) into those estimates.

  3. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    PubMed Central

    Tóta, Julio; Roy Fitzjarrald, David; da Silva Dias, Maria A. F.

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates. PMID:22619608

  4. Saturation sampling for spatial variation in multiple air pollutants across an inversion-prone metropolitan area of complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Shmool, Jessie Lc; Michanowicz, Drew R; Cambal, Leah; Tunno, Brett; Howell, Jeffery; Gillooly, Sara; Roper, Courtney; Tripathy, Sheila; Chubb, Lauren G; Eisl, Holger M; Gorczynski, John E; Holguin, Fernando E; Shields, Kyra Naumoff; Clougherty, Jane E

    2014-04-16

    Characterizing intra-urban variation in air quality is important for epidemiological investigation of health outcomes and disparities. To date, however, few studies have been designed to capture spatial variation during select hours of the day, or to examine the roles of meteorology and complex terrain in shaping intra-urban exposure gradients. We designed a spatial saturation monitoring study to target local air pollution sources, and to understand the role of topography and temperature inversions on fine-scale pollution variation by systematically allocating sampling locations across gradients in key local emissions sources (vehicle traffic, industrial facilities) and topography (elevation) in the Pittsburgh area. Street-level integrated samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3) were collected during morning rush and probable inversion hours (6-11 AM), during summer and winter. We hypothesized that pollution concentrations would be: 1) higher under inversion conditions, 2) exacerbated in lower-elevation areas, and 3) vary by season. During July - August 2011 and January - March 2012, we observed wide spatial and seasonal variability in pollution concentrations, exceeding the range measured at regulatory monitors. We identified elevated concentrations of multiple pollutants at lower-elevation sites, and a positive association between inversion frequency and NO2 concentration. We examined temporal adjustment methods for deriving seasonal concentration estimates, and found that the appropriate reference temporal trend differs between pollutants. Our time-stratified spatial saturation approach found some evidence for modification of inversion-concentration relationships by topography, and provided useful insights for refining and interpreting GIS-based pollution source indicators for Land Use Regression modeling.

  5. Modeling SF{sub 6} plume dispersion in complex terrain and meteorology with a limited data set

    SciTech Connect

    Schalk, W.W. III

    1996-10-01

    Early actions of emergency responders during hazardous material releases are intended to assess contamination and potential public exposure. As measurements are collected, an integration of model calculations and measurements can assist to better understand the situation. This study applied a high resolution version of the operational 3-D numerical models used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to a limited meteorological and tracer data set to assist in the interpretation of the dispersion pattern on a 140 km scale. The data set was collected from a tracer release during the morning surface inversion and transition period in the complex terrain of the Snake River Plain near Idaho Falls, Idaho in November 1993 by the United States Air Force. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine model input parameters that best represented the study environment. These studies showed that mixing and boundary layer heights, atmospheric stability, and rawinsonde data are the most important model input parameters affecting wind field generation and tracer dispersion. Numerical models and limited measurement data were used to interpret dispersion patterns through the use of data analysis, model input determination, and sensitivity studies. Comparison of the best-estimate calculation to measurement data showed that model results compared well with the aircraft data, but had moderate success with the few surface measurements taken. The moderate success of the surface measurement comparison, may be due to limited downward mixing of the tracer as a result of the model resolution determined by the domain size selected to study the overall plume dispersion. 8 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Atmospheric and dispersion modeling in areas of highly complex terrain employing a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The results of this study indicate that the current data assimilation technique can have a positive impact on the mesoscale flow fields; however, care must be taken in its application to grids of relatively fine horizontal resolution. Continuous FDDA is a useful tool in producing high-resolution mesoscale analysis fields that can be used to (1) create a better initial conditions for mesoscale atmospheric models and (2) drive transport models for dispersion studies. While RAMS is capable of predicting the qualitative flow during this evening, additional experiments need to be performed to improve the prognostic forecasts made by RAMS and refine the FDDA procedure so that the overall errors are reduced even further. Despite the fact that a great deal of computational time is necessary in executing RAMS and LPDM in the configuration employed in this study, recent advances in workstations is making applications such as this more practical. As the speed of these machines increase in the next few years, it will become feasible to employ prognostic, three-dimensional mesoscale/transport models to routinely predict atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, even to highly complex terrain. For example, the version of RAMS in this study could be run in a ``nowcasting`` model that would continually assimilate local and regional observations as soon as they become available. The atmospheric physics in the model would be used to determine the wind field where no observations are available. The three-dimensional flow fields could be used as dynamic initial conditions for a model forecast. The output from this type of modeling system will have to be compared to existing diagnostic, mass-consistent models to determine whether the wind field and dispersion forecasts are significantly improved.

  7. Terrain Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A highlight of the IMAX film, Blue Planet, is a 100-second computer- generated animation of a flight and earthquake simulation along California's San Andreas Fault. Created by the VESA group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the sequence required the development of a technique to make possible terrain rendering of very large digital images. An image mosaic of California constructed from Landsat data made this possible. An advanced pyramidal terrain rendering technique was developed, significantly reducing the necessary time involved in transferring the Landsat data to film. The new technique has also enabled NASA to develop new perspective rendering technologies in order to cope with anticipated increased remote sensor data.

  8. Resolving the complexity of the human genome using single-molecule sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Huddleston, John; Dennis, Megan Y; Sudmant, Peter H; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Antonacci, Francesca; Surti, Urvashi; Sandstrom, Richard; Boitano, Matthew; Landolin, Jane M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-01-29

    The human genome is arguably the most complete mammalian reference assembly, yet more than 160 euchromatic gaps remain and aspects of its structural variation remain poorly understood ten years after its completion. To identify missing sequence and genetic variation, here we sequence and analyse a haploid human genome (CHM1) using single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing. We close or extend 55% of the remaining interstitial gaps in the human GRCh37 reference genome--78% of which carried long runs of degenerate short tandem repeats, often several kilobases in length, embedded within (G+C)-rich genomic regions. We resolve the complete sequence of 26,079 euchromatic structural variants at the base-pair level, including inversions, complex insertions and long tracts of tandem repeats. Most have not been previously reported, with the greatest increases in sensitivity occurring for events less than 5 kilobases in size. Compared to the human reference, we find a significant insertional bias (3:1) in regions corresponding to complex insertions and long short tandem repeats. Our results suggest a greater complexity of the human genome in the form of variation of longer and more complex repetitive DNA that can now be largely resolved with the application of this longer-read sequencing technology.

  9. Quantifying evaporation and transpiration fluxes of an Eucalyptus woodland in complex terrain with varying tree cover using the Maximum Entropy Production model of evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Jurado, H. A.; Guan, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.; Simmons, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    The measurement of evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes in areas with complex terrain and non-uniform vegetation cover pose a challenge to traditional techniques with fetch constraints, such as the Eddy Covariance method. In this study, we report the results of a field monitoring design based on the Maximum Entropy Production model of ET (MEP-ET), that quantifies evaporation and transpiration from soil and vegetation respectively, using a limited number of measurements of temperature, humidity and net radiation above soil and canopies. Following the MEP-ET model requirements we instrumented a catchment with complex terrain and native vegetation (Eucalyptus leucoxylon) in South Australia. We deployed vertical-through-canopy and near-soil temperature and humidity transects in two opposing slopes (north and south facing) with contrasting canopy cover and understory conditions to measure tree transpiration from 2 eucalyptus trees and soil evaporation of the area under their canopies. We compare the results with transpiration measurements from sapflow data on the same trees and soil evaporation estimates with the Bowen Ratio Energy Balance (BREB) method. Our results show good agreement between the MEP-ET derived transpiration and evaporation and the sapflow transpiration and BREB evaporation estimates, respectively. Using a LiDAR derived canopy cover we upscale the MEP-ET fluxes on each slope and explore the effect of terrain and vegetation cover on the partition of ET and the water budgets across the catchment.

  10. Static and time-resolved spectroscopic studies of low-symmetry Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, A.E.; McCusker, J.K.

    1999-09-02

    The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of a series of four Ru{sup II} polypyridyl complexes are reported. Compounds of the form [Ru(dmb){sub x}(dea){sub 3{minus}x}]{sup 2+} (x = 0--3), where dmb is 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine and dea is 4,4{prime}-bis(diethylamino)-2,2{prime}-bipyridine, have been prepared and studied using static and time-resolved electronic and vibrational spectroscopies as a prelude to femtosecond spectroscopic studies of excited-state dynamics. Static electronic spectra in CH{sub 3}CN solution reveal a systematic shift of the MLCT absorption envelope from a maximum of 458 nm in the case of [Ru(dmb){sub 3}]{sup 2+} to 518 nm for [Ru(dea){sub 3}]{sup 2+} with successive substitutions of dea for dmb, suggesting a dea-based chromophore as the lowest-energy species. However, analysis of static and time-resolved emission data indicates an energy gap ordering of [Ru(dmb){sub 3}]{sup 2+} > [Ru(dmb){sub 2}(dea)]{sup 2+} > [Ru(dea){sub 3}]{sup 2+} > [Ru(dmb)(DEA){sub 2}]{sup 2+}, at variance with the electronic structures inferred from the absorption spectra. Nanosecond time-resolved electronic absorption and time-resolved step-scan infrared data are used to resolve this apparent conflict and confirm localization of the long-lived {sup 3}MLCT state on dmb in all three complexes where this ligand is present, thus making the dea-based excited state unique to [Ru(dea){sub 3}]{sup 2+}. Electrochemical studies further reveal the origin of this result, where a strong influence of the dea ligand on the oxidative Ru{sup II/III} couple, due to {pi} donation from the diethylamino substituent, is observed. The electronic absorption spectra are then reexamined in light of the now well-determined excited-state electronic structure. The results serve to underscore the importance of complete characterization of the electronic structures of transition metal complexes before embarking on ultrafast studies of their excited-state properties.

  11. F0 discrimination interference: Effects of resolved tone complexes and noise on fundamental frequency discrimination of unresolved complex tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gockel, Hedwig; Carlyon, Robert P.; Plack, Christopher J.

    2003-04-01

    F0 discrimination of a 400-ms complex tone with only unresolved components (``target'') was investigated in the absence and presence of a synchronously gated resolved complex tone (``interferer''). The target and the interferer were bandpass filtered from 1375-15000 Hz and 125-625 Hz, respectively. In a 2I-2AFC task, listeners indicated the interval containing the target with the higher pitch. The nominal F0 of the target was 88 Hz; that of the interferer was constant across the two intervals and was either 88 Hz or increased by various amounts. Although the target and interferer were in well-separated frequency regions, performance (percent correct) dropped by about 16% when the interferer's F0 was 88 Hz. The impairment was halved when the interferer's F0 was 10% higher than that of the target, and almost eliminated when it was 30% higher. Increasing the level of a 1375-Hz low-pass-filtered noise, gated synchronously with the target and the interferer (F0 equaled 88 Hz), improved performance, further demonstrating that the deterioration produced by the resolved complex was not due to peripheral masking. The results are consistent with a form of across-frequency interference at the level of pitch perception. [Work supported by EPSRC Grant GR/R65794/01.

  12. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    Treesearch

    Harold S.J. Zald; Thomas A. Spies; Rupert Seidl; Robert J. Pabst; Keith A. Olsen; Ashley Steel

    2016-01-01

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and...

  13. Analytical estimation of solid angle subtended by complex well-resolved surfaces for infrared detection studies.

    PubMed

    Mahulikar, Shripad P; Potnuru, Santosh K; Kolhe, Pankaj S

    2007-08-01

    The solid angle (Omega) subtended by the hot power-plant surfaces of a typical fighter aircraft, on the detector of an infrared (IR) guided missile, is analytically obtained. The use of the parallel rays projection method simplifies the incorporation of the effect of the optical blocking by engine surfaces, on Omega-subtended. This methodology enables the evaluation of the relative contribution of the IR signature from well-resolved distributed sources, and is important for imaging infrared detection studies. The complex 3D surface of a rear fuselage is projected onto an equivalent planar area normal to the viewing aspect, which would give the same Omega-subtended.

  14. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, B. J.; Peterson, K.; McKane, R.; Lajtha, K.; Quandt, D. J.; Allen, S. T.; Sell, S.; Daly, C.; Harmon, M. E.; Johnson, S. L.; Spies, T.; Sollins, P.; Abdelnour, A. G.; Stieglitz, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site situated in Oregon’s central-western Cascade Range. Decades of long-term measurements and intensive research have revealed influences of topography on vegetation patterns, disturbance history, and hydrology. More recent research has shown surprising interactions between microclimates and synoptic weather patterns due to cold air drainage and pooling in mountain valleys. Using these data and insights, in addition to a recent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) reconnaissance and a small sensor network, we are employing process-based models, including “SPA” (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere, developed by Mathew Williams of the University of Edinburgh), and “VELMA” (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Alternatives, developed by Marc Stieglitz and colleagues of the Georgia Institute of Technology) to focus on two important features of mountainous landscapes: heterogeneity (both spatial and temporal) and connectivity (atmosphere-canopy-hillslope-stream). Our research questions include: 1) Do fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity result in emergent properties at the basin scale, and if so, what are they? 2) How does connectivity across ecosystem components affect system responses to climate variability and change? Initial results show that for environmental drivers that elicit non-linear ecosystem responses on the plot scale, such as solar radiation, soil depth and soil water content, fine-scale spatial heterogeneity may produce unexpected emergent properties at larger scales. The results from such modeling experiments are necessarily a function of the supporting algorithms. However, comparisons based on models such as SPA and VELMA that operate at much different spatial scales

  15. Application of a K-Nearest Neighbor Simulator for Seasonal Precipitation Prediction in a Semiarid Region with Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wanli; Liu, Yubao; Descomes, Gael; Ge, Ming; Warner, Tom; Swerdlin, Scott; Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Kunin, Pavel; Givati, Amir

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal precipitation prediction has significant societal and economic impact, particularly for arid and semiarid regions. Current seasonal predictions generally rely on general circulation models (GCMs), which have coarse resolution (~300km). The GCM forecasts provide overall guidance in terms of large and synoptic scale perspectives, but are lack of regional and local details and accuracy that are needed by hydrological applications and water resources planning and management. On the other hand, high-resolution (~10s km) limited-area models have their own issues for operational seasonal forecasting due to unavailability of reliable large-scale drivers and unaffordable computational costs. Thus statistical and dynamical downscaling techniques have emerged to overcome scale mismatch between GCM products and regional (and local) application needs. In this study, a K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) simulator is used to derive local precipitations based on NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) seasonal forecasts and historic rainfall observations. The KNN algorithm is an analog-type approach that queries days within a specified temporal window similar to a given weather feature vector in a GCM forecast. K nearest neighbors is then rank-weighted to derive daily precipitation with the historic observed precipitations. This study focuses on the semiarid area along the southeastern Mediterranean coast. This region is strongly influenced by the Mediterranean climate and complex terrain. Annual precipitation displays strong seasonality and spatial variability. Enhanced seasonal precipitation prediction with local details would benefit the regional hydrological service. Archived CFS seasonal forecasts (1981-2009, and up to 9 months ahead of the initials) are built as our database for weather pattern matching, and observed daily precipitations at stations within the region are compiled from different sources to minimize errors and missing in the observations. Four variables (500 h

  16. Vegetation-hydrology dynamics in complex terrain of semiarid areas: 2. Energy-water controls of vegetation spatiotemporal dynamics and topographic niches of favorability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Bras, Rafael L.; Vivoni, Enrique R.

    2008-03-01

    Ecosystems of dry climates are a particularly interesting subject for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics occurring on the complex terrain of a semiarid area characteristic of central New Mexico. The study employs a mechanistic model of coupled interactions to construct a set of numerical experiments carried out for two small-scale synthetic domains that exhibit particular hillslope curvatures. The linkages between terrain attributes and patterns of C4 grass productivity and water balance components are examined for three generic soil types. It is argued that in conditions of negligible moisture exchange, aspect and slope are the key determinants of both the hydrologic behavior and the degree of site "favorability" to vegetation. Certain topographic locations are more favorable to vegetation, as compared to a flat horizontal surface not influenced by lateral effects. These locations are associated with sites of northerly aspect with surface slopes within a narrow range of magnitudes. Contributions from both rainfall and radiation forcings are discussed to explain the existence of these topographic niches. The sensitivity of results is investigated by modifying the dominant mechanism of lateral water transfer. Two additional controlling topographic features are explored, corresponding to the contiguous and global terrain convergence levels. It is argued that their effects on vegetation-hydrology dynamics at a given location are characteristically superimposed with the impact of site-specific terrain attributes. Furthermore, the results lead to a conceptual relationship linking vegetation-hydrology quantities at different landscape locations.

  17. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  19. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  20. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scatteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, D.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Gericke, D. O.; Bachmann, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Barbrel, B.; Blažević, A.; Carroll, D. C.; Cayzac, W.; Döppner, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Frank, A.; Frydrych, S.; Gamboa, E. J.; Gauthier, M.; Göde, S.; Granados, E.; Gregori, G.; Hartley, N. J.; Kettle, B.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Notley, M. M.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Ravasio, A.; Riley, D.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Schumaker, W.; Siegenthaler, K.; Spindloe, C.; Wagner, F.; Wünsch, K.; Glenzer, S. H.; Roth, M.; Falcone, R. W.

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  1. Combining ground-based microwave radiometer and the AROME convective scale model through 1DVAR retrievals in complex terrain: an Alpine valley case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Pauline; Cimini, Domenico; De Angelis, Francesco; Canut, Guylaine; Unger, Vinciane; Guillot, Remi; Tzanos, Diane; Paci, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    retrievals were found to catch deep near-surface temperature inversions very well. Larger errors were observed in cloudy conditions due to the difficulty of ground-based MWRs to resolve high level inversions that are still challenging. Finally, 1DVAR retrievals were optimized for the analysis of the IOPs by using radiosondes as backgrounds in the 1DVAR algorithm instead of the AROME forecasts. A significant improvement of the retrievals in cloudy conditions and below 1000 m in clear-sky conditions was observed. From this study, we can conclude that MWRs are expected to bring valuable information into numerical weather prediction models up to 3 km in altitude both in clear-sky and cloudy-sky conditions with the maximum improvement found around 500 m. With an accuracy between 0.5 and 1 K in RMSE, our study has also proven that MWRs are capable of resolving deep near-surface temperature inversions observed in complex terrain during highly stable boundary layer conditions.

  2. An examination of the relationships between selected ground properties and Landsat MSS data in an area of complex terrain in southern Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the method and results of a study which involved an examination of the statistical relationships between selected ground properties and Landsat MSS data, and whose aim was to assess the applicability of Landsat data to surface cover mapping in areas characterized by high-frequency spatial variations of surface cover type over small areas. The results indicate that by systematic ground data collection it is possible to understand the basic relationships between ground properties and Landsat sensor data in areas of complex surface cover and terrain, and to classify the cover types.

  3. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution: Part I - examination of analysis nudging and all PBL schemes associated with LSMs in meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-02-01

    Meteorological variables such as temperature, wind speed, wind directions, and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have critical implications for air quality simulations. Sensitivity simulations with five different PBL schemes associated with three different Land Surface Models (LSMs) were conducted to examine the impact of meteorological variables on the predicted ozone concentrations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.5 with local perspective. Additionally, the nudging analysis for winds was adopted with three different coefficients to improve the wind fields in the complex terrain at 4-km grid resolution. The simulations focus on complex terrain having valley and mountain areas at 4-km grid resolution. The ETA M-Y (Mellor-Yamada) and G-S (Gayno-Seaman) PBL schemes are identified as favorite options and promote O 3 formation causing the higher temperature, slower winds, and lower mixing height among sensitivity simulations in the area of study. It is found that PX (Pleim-Xiu) simulation does not always give optimal meteorological model performance. We also note that the PBL scheme plays a more important role in predicting daily maximum 8-h O 3 than land surface models. The results of nudging analysis for winds with three different increased coefficients' values (2.5, 4.5, and 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1) over seven sensitivity simulations show that the meteorological model performance was enhanced due to improved wind fields, indicating the FDDA nudging analysis can improve model performance considerably at 4-km grid resolution. Specifically, the sensitivity simulations with the coefficient value (6.0 × 10 -4) yielded more substantial improvements than with the other values (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4). Hence, choosing the nudging coefficient of 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 for winds in MM5 may be the best choice to improve wind fields as an input, as well as, better model performance of CMAQ in the complex terrain area. As a result, a finer grid resolution is

  4. Short-term emergency response planning and risk assessment via an integrated modeling system for nuclear power plants in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Weng, Yu-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Short-term predictions of potential impacts from accidental release of various radionuclides at nuclear power plants are acutely needed, especially after the Fukushima accident in Japan. An integrated modeling system that provides expert services to assess the consequences of accidental or intentional releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere has received wide attention. These scenarios can be initiated either by accident due to human, software, or mechanical failures, or from intentional acts such as sabotage and radiological dispersal devices. Stringent action might be required just minutes after the occurrence of accidental or intentional release. To fulfill the basic functions of emergency preparedness and response systems, previous studies seldom consider the suitability of air pollutant dispersion models or the connectivity between source term, dispersion, and exposure assessment models in a holistic context for decision support. Therefore, the Gaussian plume and puff models, which are only suitable for illustrating neutral air pollutants in flat terrain conditional to limited meteorological situations, are frequently used to predict the impact from accidental release of industrial sources. In situations with complex terrain or special meteorological conditions, the proposing emergency response actions might be questionable and even intractable to decisionmakers responsible for maintaining public health and environmental quality. This study is a preliminary effort to integrate the source term, dispersion, and exposure assessment models into a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) to tackle the complex issues for short-term emergency response planning and risk assessment at nuclear power plants. Through a series model screening procedures, we found that the diagnostic (objective) wind field model with the aid of sufficient on-site meteorological monitoring data was the most applicable model to promptly address the trend of local wind field patterns

  5. Time-resolved homo-FRET studies of biotin-streptavidin complexes.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Nardo, Luca; Rigler, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching that is notably useful for characterizing properties of biomolecules and/or their interactions. Here we study water-solutions of Biotin-Streptavidin complexes, in which Biotin is labeled with a rigidly-bound fluorophore that can interact by Förster resonance energy transfer with the fluorophores labeling the other, up to three, Biotins of the same complex. The fluorophore, Atto550, is a Rhodamine analogue. We detect the time-resolved fluorescence decay of the fluorophores with an apparatus endowed with single-photon sensitivity and temporal resolution of ~30ps. The decay profiles we observe for samples containing constant Biotin-Atto550 conjugates and varying Streptavidin concentrations are multi-exponential. Each decay component can be associated with the rate of quenching exerted on each donor by each of the acceptors that label the other Biotin molecules, depending on the binding site they occupy. The main features that lead to this result are that (i) the transition dipole moments of the up-to-four Atto550 fluorophores that label the complexes are fixed as to both relative positions and mutual orientations; (ii) the fluorophores are identical and the role of donor in each Biotin-Streptavidin complex is randomly attributed to the one that has absorbed the excitation light (homo-FRET). Obviously the high-temporal resolution of the excitation-detection apparatus is necessary to discriminate among the fluorescence decay components.

  6. Impact of resolution on regional climate modeling in the source region of Yellow River with complex terrain using RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pinhong; Tang, Jianping; Wang, Shuyu; Wu, Jian; Niu, Xiaorui; Kang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents results from a 20-year (1990-2009) simulation by RegCM3 with both 45- and 15-km horizontal resolutions. The research focuses on the source region of Yellow River and its surrounding area, which is located on the northeast edge of the Tibetan Plateau with its very complex topography. Driven by the ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis data, RegCM3 displays reasonable ability to reproduce the spatial patterns, annual cycles, and the interannual variabilities of regional surface climate, though the model shows wet and cold bias. The model's performance is more close to observation for the source region of Yellow River than the other part of the analysis region, and the application of high resolution of 15 km demonstrates better skill with less bias for mean climate and larger correlation coefficients for interannual variability at most stations. However, the high-resolution simulation shows little advantage for reproducing the variations of precipitation and surface air temperature with altitude. The RegCM3 model also generally reproduces the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of surface climate and, consequently, the occurrence of climatic extremes and extreme indices. The simulation with high resolution again proves to be more reliable to generate climatic extremes over complex terrain of the source region of the Yellow River, related to its better representation of complex terrain and local processes.

  7. An Analysis of Unique Aerial Photographs of Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Downwind of Complex Terrain Along the California Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, B. M.; Herbster, C. G.; Mosher, F. R.

    2013-12-01

    Unique aerial photographs of atmospheric eddies in marine stratocumulus clouds downwind of complex terrain along the California coast are presented and analyzed. While satellite imagery of similar eddies have appeared in the scientific literature since the 1960's, it is believed that these are the first close-up photographs of such eddies, taken from an airplane, to appear in publication. Two photographs by a commercial pilot, flying California coastal routes, are presented: one from July 16, 2006 downwind of Santa Cruz Island, a 740 m peak bordering the Santa Barbara Channel off the California coast; and one from September 12, 2006 near Grover Beach, California, downwind of a headland containing the San Luis Range, a region of complex terrain near San Luis Obispo, California, with ridges ranging approximately from 240 to 550 m elevation. Both eddies occurred in the lee of inversion-penetrating terrain, and were marked by a cyclonic vortex in the clouds with a striking cloud-free 'eye' feature roughly 3 km in diameter. The Santa Cruz Island eddy was 25 km in length and 9-10 km in width, while the Grover Beach eddy was 17 km in length and had a width of 9 km, placing it in the meso-gamma scale of atmospheric features. GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) imagery for both cases was obtained and help to define the lifecycle and motions of the eddies captured in the snapshots. Relevant meteorological observations for the Santa Cruz Island eddy were not located, but in-situ observations from the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) pier, and the San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District, made possible a more detailed examination of the Grover Beach eddy and its structure. Additionally, we offer speculation on an eddy formation mechanism consistent with the satellite and in-situ observations described in this presentation, and hypotheses from the literature on low Froude number, continuously

  8. The strength of contributions from topography mismatch and measurement filtering to simulated net ecosystem exchange in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B.; Desai, A. R.; Stephens, B. B.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Global scale carbon cycle inverse models provide invaluable information for the construction of empirically based carbon budgets based on in situ measurements. In landscapes of predominantly smooth topography inverse carbon cycle models are useful for diagnosing the magnitude and climate sensitivity of different regional carbon sinks. However, in landscapes of predominately complex topography inversion model results come with strong caveats for two reasons: 1) Coarse gridding of model topography can lead the model to sample observations at elevations far above the model surface, and 2) Transport wind fields over smoothed model representations of mountain regions are not always sufficiently resolved to inform the model about the source region for assimilated measurements. The uncertainty contributed by incorrect winds and topography mismatches (e.g., differences between the actual measurement elevation and model surface on the order of 1,000 m) is thought to be smaller for higher resolution regional inversion models (e.g., Gockede et al., 2010; Schuh et al. 2010), but these uncertainties are not well constrained for larger scale inversion systems (e.g., Peters et al., 2010), which are one of few ways for determining the relative priority of regional sinks. In this work we examine the effects on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for a global scale inversion system when 1) topography mismatches are ameliorated, and 2) subset observations consistent with model resolution are used rather than observation-based subsets. Our focus is to use an example inversion model system, CarbonTracker (Peters et al., 2007; 2010), driven by CO2 mixing ratio measurements, including the RACCOON Network in the United States Mountain West (raccoon.ucar.edu), to quantify and compare the contribution to NEE from tower elevation mismatches and filtering strategies across biomes and and in terms of forecast skill (model data mismatch). We further compare our results to the differences in NEE over

  9. Miranda's Geologic History (variety of terrain)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Miranda reveals a complex geologic history in this view, acquired by Voyager 2 on Jan. 24, 1986, around its close approach to the Uranian moon. At least three terrain types of different age and geologic style are evident at this resolution of about 700 meters (2,300 feet). Visible in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image are, from left: (1) an apparently ancient, cratered terrain consisting of rolling, subdued hills and degraded medium-sized craters (2) a grooved terrain with linear valleys and ridges developed at the expense of, or replacing, the first terrain type: and (3) a complex terrain seen along the terminator, in which intersecting curvilinear ridges and troughs are abruptly truncated by the linear, grooved terrain. Voyager scientists believe this third terrain type is intermediate in age between the first two. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Miranda's Geologic History (variety of terrain)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Miranda reveals a complex geologic history in this view, acquired by Voyager 2 on Jan. 24, 1986, around its close approach to the Uranian moon. At least three terrain types of different age and geologic style are evident at this resolution of about 700 meters (2,300 feet). Visible in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image are, from left: (1) an apparently ancient, cratered terrain consisting of rolling, subdued hills and degraded medium-sized craters (2) a grooved terrain with linear valleys and ridges developed at the expense of, or replacing, the first terrain type: and (3) a complex terrain seen along the terminator, in which intersecting curvilinear ridges and troughs are abruptly truncated by the linear, grooved terrain. Voyager scientists believe this third terrain type is intermediate in age between the first two. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Complexes Bound to a Dinuclear Metal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Durr, Christopher B.

    2012-06-01

    Compounds of the form M2L2L'2, where M2 is a quadruply bonded metal center (M = Mo or W) and L and L' are conjugated organic ligands, are known to show interesting photophysical properties and exhibit intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions throughout the visible spectrum. Recently, we have modified one of the ligands to incorporate a transition metal carbonyl complex bound to an organic moiety. Following excitation into the MLCT band, the vibrational modes of the organometallic ligand can be observed by fs time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. This allows for a visualization of where the electron density resides in the excited states, which provides useful information for designing new materials that could later be incorporated into solar devices.

  12. Martian terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, Harold; Chapman, M. G.; Davis, P. A.; Dial, A. L., Jr.; Strobell, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Terrain studies of candidate landing sites for a future rover/sample-return mission to Mars are being conducted to evaluate the geologic and trafficability aspects of each site. An optimum site should have geologic units of widely diverse ages and chemical compositions occurring in close enough proximity and in smooth enough terrain so that a roving vehicle of limited traverse ability (+ or - 100 km) could collect representative samples. In FY 1986, geologic maps were compiled at 1:500,000 and 1:2 million scales of the Mangala Valles, Kasei Valles, Chasma Boreale (north polar), and Planum Australe (south polar) areas, and a study was begun of the topography and surface roughness characteristics of the Mangala Valles site. Geologic mapping has been greatly facilitated by specially enhanced, high-resolution Viking photographs, which clarify stratigraphic relations of units unrecognized earlier. Photoclinometric profiles of topographic features provide width and depth measurements of four classes of channels, the thickness of some volcanic units, and the throw on some faults. Estimates of the surface roughness of units are calculated using a newly developed USGS computer program and using measurements derived from Earth-based radar.

  13. Simulation of detailed wind flow over a high complex terrain using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD_NIMR_SNU, for the support of micrositing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Jean; Koo, Hae-Jung; Cho, Kyoungmi; Rang Kim, Kyu; Byon, Jaeyoung; Seo, Beom-Keun

    2010-05-01

    In order to encourage wind energy industry in Korea, it is required to develop accurate and detailed wind information. Although 1 km- high resolution wind maps over the Korean Peninsula had been developed, the determination of the wind conditions at the intended site of the wind turbines remains an important task that cannot be solved by means of the available large-scale wind maps alone. Especially, wind has a large spatial variability over highly complex terrain. To quantify mean wind and turbulence characteristics in any planning area for the installation of wind turbines, a CFD model can be used. We used CFD_NIMR_SNU, which has developed by National Institute of Meteorological Research and Seoul National University since 2004. It has a capability of calculating thermodynamic equations for the support of locally driven wind fields. In this study, the characteristics of spatial wind and turbulent flow ware analyzed using the CFD_NIMR_SNU in a complex terrain area, which has a plan for installing wind power plants. Results from this study, the topographic effects were shown well on mean wind fields. Especially, the maximum wind speed was observed over the mountain area, and turbulent kinetic energy is more uniform at higher altitude. In the future, to improve the boundary conditions and to validate to CFD model, coupling of CFD with meso- scale numerical models such as WRF will be explored.

  14. WRF Improves Downscaled Precipitation During El Niño Events over Complex Terrain in Northern South America: Implications for Deforestation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendón, A.; Posada, J. A.; Salazar, J. F.; Mejia, J.; Villegas, J.

    2016-12-01

    Precipitation in the complex terrain of the tropical Andes of South America can be strongly reduced during El Niño events, with impacts on numerous societally-relevant services, including hydropower generation, the main electricity source in Colombia. Simulating rainfall patterns and behavior in such areas of complex terrain has remained a challenge for regional climate models. Current data products such as ERA-Interim and other reanalysis and modelling products generally fail to correctly represent processes at scales that are relevant for these processes. Here we assess the added value to ERA-Interim by dynamical downscaling using the WRF regional climate model, including a comparison of different cumulus parameterization schemes. We found that WRF improves the representation of precipitation during the dry season of El Niño (DJF) events using a 1996-2014 observation period. Further, we use these improved capability to simulate an extreme deforestation scenario under El Niño conditions for an area in the central Andes of Colombia, where a big proportion of the country's hydropower is generated. Our results suggest that forests dampen the effects of El Niño on precipitation. In synthesis, our results illustrate the utility of regional modelling to improve data sources, as well as their potential for predicting the local-to-regional effects of global-change-type processes in regions with limited data availability.

  15. Integrating Map Algebra and Statistical Modeling for Spatio- Temporal Analysis of Monthly Mean Daily Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) over a Complex Terrain.

    PubMed

    Evrendilek, Fatih

    2007-12-12

    This study aims at quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of monthly mean dailyincident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over a vast and complex terrain such asTurkey. The spatial interpolation method of universal kriging, and the combination ofmultiple linear regression (MLR) models and map algebra techniques were implemented togenerate surface maps of PAR with a grid resolution of 500 x 500 m as a function of fivegeographical and 14 climatic variables. Performance of the geostatistical and MLR modelswas compared using mean prediction error (MPE), root-mean-square prediction error(RMSPE), average standard prediction error (ASE), mean standardized prediction error(MSPE), root-mean-square standardized prediction error (RMSSPE), and adjustedcoefficient of determination (R²adj.). The best-fit MLR- and universal kriging-generatedmodels of monthly mean daily PAR were validated against an independent 37-year observeddataset of 35 climate stations derived from 160 stations across Turkey by the Jackknifingmethod. The spatial variability patterns of monthly mean daily incident PAR were moreaccurately reflected in the surface maps created by the MLR-based models than in thosecreated by the universal kriging method, in particular, for spring (May) and autumn(November). The MLR-based spatial interpolation algorithms of PAR described in thisstudy indicated the significance of the multifactor approach to understanding and mappingspatio-temporal dynamics of PAR for a complex terrain over meso-scales.

  16. Influence of the diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of the microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalets, Ivan V.; Korolevych, Vladimir Y.; Khalchenkov, Alexander V.; Ievdin, Ievgen A.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2013-11-01

    The impact of diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain conditions was investigated. The extensive radiological and meteorological data set collected at the site of the research reactor of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Canada had been compared with the results of calculations of the Local Scale Model Chain of the EU nuclear emergency response system JRODOS. The diagnostic wind field model based on divergence minimizing procedure and the atmospheric dispersion model RIMPUFF were used in calculations. Taking into account complex topography features with the use of diagnostic wind field model improved the results of calculations. For certain months, the level of improvement of the normalized mean squared error reached the factor of 2. For the whole simulation period (January-July, 2007) the level of improvement by taking into account terrain features with the diagnostic wind field model was about 9%. The use of diagnostic wind field model also significantly improved the fractional bias of the calculated results. Physical analysis of the selected cases of atmospheric dispersion at the CRL site had been performed.

  17. Photometric Properties of Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annex, Andrew; Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini images reveal in exquisite detail the complex and varied terrains within the geologically active south pole of Enceladus. The region is dominated by four parallel rifts or sulci, informally known as tiger stripes, from which plumes comprised primarily of water vapor erupt [1,2]. The rich data set of Cassini images acquired at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 km/pixel) and a variety of viewing and illumination geometries enables the quantitative analysis of surface scattering properties through disk-resolved photometry. Here we investigate the photometric properties of individual terrain units [3] through fits of the Hapke photometric model [4] to data acquired in the clear (CL1 CL2), UV3, GRN, and IR3 filters, centered at 0.61, 0.34, 0.57, and 0.93 μm, respectively. Terrain units include the tiger stripe smooth and platy plank formations, tiger stripe medial dorsum structures, relict tiger stripe structures, south pole funiscular (ropy) plains, south pole lateral fold-and-wedge formations, and the south pole reticulated plains. Despite the constant, ubiquitous infall of plume particles onto the surface, differences in scattering properties, texture, and albedo among terrain units can be discerned. Work supported by NASA's Cassini Data Analysis Program. [1] Porco et al. 2006 Science 311, 1393-1401. [2] Hansen et al. 2008 Nature 456, 477-479. [3] Spencer et al. 2009 in Saturn from Cassini-Huygens (M. K. Dougherty et al. Eds.) 683-724. [4] Hapke 2002 Icarus 157, 523-534.

  18. Etched Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 June 2003

    This stunning THEMIS visible image was acquired in 'etched terrain' near the south pole of Mars. In several places in this image there are large areas with many dark spots. These spots have been noticed to appear and disappear as the seasons progress on Mars. As the southern hemisphere of Mars gets warmer, carbon dioxide frost present in this terrain sublimates, leaving behind the dark spots.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -73.5, Longitude 351.3 East (8.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-10-31

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicted dual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up new possibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broad range of multi-enzyme complexes.

  20. Demonstration of complex-conjugate-resolved harmonic Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Vakhtin, Andrei B; Peterson, Kristen A; Kane, Daniel J

    2007-06-20

    Complex-conjugate-resolved Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, where the quadrature components of the interferogram are obtained by simultaneous acquisition of the first and second harmonics of the phase-modulated interferogram, is applied to multisurface test targets and biological samples. The method provides efficient suppression of the complex-conjugate, dc, and autocorrelation artifacts. A complex-conjugate rejection ratio as high as 70 dB is achieved.

  1. Measurement of complex ultrashort laser pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lina

    This thesis contains three components of research: a detailed study of the performance of Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for measuring complex ultrashort laser pulses, a new method for measuring the arbitrary polarization state of an ultrashort laser pulse using Tomographic Ultrafast Retrieval of Transverse Light E-fields (TURTLE) technique, and new approach for measuring two complex pulses simultaneously using PG blind FROG. In recent decades, many techniques for measuring the full intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses have been proposed. These techniques include: Spectral Interferometry (SI)[1], Temporal Analysis by Dispersing a Pair of Light E-Field (TADPOLE)[2], Spectral Phase Interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER)[3], and Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG)[4]. Each technique is actually a class of techniques that includes different variations on the original idea, such as SEA-SPIDER[5], ZAP SPIDER[6] are two variations of SPIDER. But most of these techniques for measuring ultrashort laser pulses either do not yield the complete time-dependent intensity and phase (e.g., autocorrelation), can at best only measure simple pulses (e.g., SPIDER), or need well characterized reference pulse. In this thesis, we compare the performance of three versions of FROG: second-harmonic-generation (SHG) FROG, polarization-gate (PG) FROG, and cross-correlation FROG (XFROG), the last of which requires a well-characterized reference pulse. We found that the XFROG algorithm converged in all cases and required only one initial guess. The PG FROG algorithm converged for 99% of the moderately complex pulses that we tried, and for over 95% of the most complex pulses (TBP ˜ 100). And the SHG FROG algorithm converged for 95% of the pulses that we tried and for over 80% of the most complex pulses. After some analysis, we found that noise filtering and adding more sampling points to the FROG trace solved the non-converging problems and we

  2. Numerical Prediction of Cold Season Fog Events over Complex Terrain: the Performance of the WRF Model During MATERHORN-Fog and Early Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhaoxia; Chachere, Catherine N.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    A field campaign to study cold season fog in complex terrain was conducted as a component of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program from 07 January to 01 February 2015 in Salt Lake City and Heber City, Utah, United States. To support the field campaign, an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to produce real-time forecasts and model evaluation. This paper summarizes the model performance and preliminary evaluation of the model against the observations. Results indicate that accurately forecasting fog is challenging for the WRF model, which produces large errors in the near-surface variables, such as relative humidity, temperature, and wind fields in the model forecasts. Specifically, compared with observations, the WRF model overpredicted fog events with extended duration in Salt Lake City because it produced higher moisture, lower wind speeds, and colder temperatures near the surface. In contrast, the WRF model missed all fog events in Heber City, as it reproduced lower moisture, higher wind speeds, and warmer temperatures against observations at the near-surface level. The inability of the model to produce proper levels of near-surface atmospheric conditions under fog conditions reflects uncertainties in model physical parameterizations, such as the surface layer, boundary layer, and microphysical schemes.

  3. A Mesoscale Model-Based Climatography of Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Characteristics over the Complex Terrain of North-Western Utah.

    PubMed

    Serafin, Stefano; De Wekker, Stephan F J; Knievel, Jason C

    Nocturnal boundary-layer phenomena in regions of complex topography are extremely diverse and respond to a multiplicity of forcing factors, acting primarily at the mesoscale and microscale. The interaction between different physical processes, e.g., drainage promoted by near-surface cooling and ambient flow over topography in a statically stable environment, may give rise to special flow patterns, uncommon over flat terrain. Here we present a climatography of boundary-layer flows, based on a 2-year archive of simulations from a high-resolution operational mesoscale weather modelling system, 4DWX. The geographical context is Dugway Proving Ground, in north-western Utah, USA, target area of the field campaigns of the MATERHORN (Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program) project. The comparison between model fields and available observations in 2012-2014 shows that the 4DWX model system provides a realistic representation of wind speed and direction in the area, at least in an average sense. Regions displaying strong spatial gradients in the field variables, thought to be responsible for enhanced nocturnal mixing, are typically located in transition areas from mountain sidewalls to adjacent plains. A key dynamical process in this respect is the separation of dynamically accelerated downslope flows from the surface.

  4. Toward a Reduced Complexity Channel Resolving Model for Sedimentary Delta Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Edmonds, D. A.; Paola, C.

    2010-12-01

    Predicting styles of delta growth in restoration areas is a challenge as we try to restore impacted coastlines. Cellular and rule-based reduced complexity models offer a worthwhile means of uncovering key dynamics in delta morphodynamics without the need to fully solve the governing transport equations. In terms of modeling sedimentary delta building processes a critical ingredients is accounting for the formation and bifurcation of channels; phenomena that can be related to the formation of levees and mouth-bars. To that end, we have developed a reduced complexity model that uses a simplified shallow-water solver to study channel formation, mouth bar deposition, and delta development under different forcings. Under the assumption that the flow has a very low Froude Number (Fr2<<1), the inertia term is dropped out and only the gravitational term and friction term remain in the momentum equation. The coupled mass conservation equation becomes a non-linear diffusive equation, which is linearized by a Kirchhoff transformation. Directional diffusivity is added to this system to compensate the loss of inertia and promote spreading of the turbulent jet. We test the reduced model against flow over Gaussian-shaped bumps of various heights. Comparison of results from this model with results from a full scale commercial code (Delft3D) show a satisfactory agreement on the critical mouth bar height needed to divert flow around the bar. Based on the same diffusive equation, we develop a low-Froude water-routing method for reduced complexity morphodynamics models. The preliminary results show that the method is capable of producing reasonable channel forms and mouth bar formation, and provides a good starting point for development of a channel resolving delta building model.

  5. Evaluation of the TMPA-3B42 precipitation product using a high-density rain gauge network over complex terrain in northeastern Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.; Lopez-Moreno, Juan I.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA)-3B42 version 7 product is assessed over north-eastern Iberia, a region with considerable topographical gradients and complexity. Precipitation characteristics from a dense network of 656 rain gauges, spanning the period from 1998 to 2009, are used to evaluate TMPA-3B42 estimates on a daily scale. A set of accuracy estimators, including the relative bias, mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and Spearman coefficient was used to evaluate the results. The assessment indicates that TMPA-3B42 product is capable of describing the seasonal characteristics of the observed precipitation over most of the study domain. In particular, TMPA-3B42 precipitation agrees well with in situ measurements, with MAE less than 2.5 mm.day- 1, RMSE of 6.4 mm.day- 1 and Spearman correlation coefficients generally above 0.6. TMPA-3B42 provides improved accuracies in winter and summer, whereas it performs much worse in spring and autumn. Spatially, the retrieval errors show a consistent trend, with a general overestimation in regions of low altitude and underestimation in regions of heterogeneous terrain. TMPA-3B42 generally performs well over inland areas, while showing less skill in the coastal regions. A set of skill metrics, including a false alarm ratio [FAR], frequency bias index [FBI], the probability of detection [POD] and threat score [TS], is also used to evaluate TMPA performance under different precipitation thresholds (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mm.day- 1). The results suggest that TMPA-3B42 retrievals perform well in specifying moderate rain events (5-25 mm.day- 1), but show noticeably less skill in producing both light (< 1 mm.day- 1) and heavy rainfall thresholds (more than 50 mm.day- 1). Given the complexity of the terrain and the associated high spatial variability of precipitation in north-eastern Iberia, the results reveal that TMPA-3B42 data provide

  6. A high accuracy broadband measurement system for time resolved complex bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Malhotra, A; Ardelt, G; Ryschka, M

    2014-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements are useful tools in biomedical engineering and life science. Bioimpedance is the electrical impedance of living tissue and can be used in the analysis of various physiological parameters. Bioimpedance is commonly measured by injecting a small well known alternating current via surface electrodes into an object under test and measuring the resultant surface voltages. It is non-invasive, painless and has no known hazards. This work presents a field programmable gate array based high accuracy broadband bioimpedance measurement system for time resolved bioimpedance measurements. The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances under test in a frequency range of about 10-500 kHz with excitation currents from 10 µA to 5 mA. The overall measurement uncertainties stay below 1% for the impedance magnitude and below 0.5° for the phase in most measurement ranges. Furthermore, the described system has a sample rate of up to 3840 impedance spectra per second. The performance of the bioimpedance measurement system is demonstrated with a resistor based system calibration and with measurements on biological samples.

  7. Complex conjugate resolved heterodyne swept source optical coherence tomography using coherence revival

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Nankivil, Derek; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a simple and low-cost technique for resolving the complex conjugate ambiguity in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) that is applicable to many swept source OCT (SSOCT) systems. First, we review the principles of coherence revival, wherein an interferometer illuminated by an external cavity tunable laser (ECTL) exhibits interference fringes when the two arms of the interferometer are mismatched by an integer multiple of the laser cavity length. Second, we report observations that the spectral interferogram obtained from SSOCT systems employing certain ECTLs are automatically phase modulated when the arm lengths are mismatched this way. This phase modulation results in a frequency-shifted interferogram, effectively creating an extended-depth heterodyne SSOCT system without the use of acousto-optic or electro-optic modulators. We suggest that this phase modulation may be caused by the ECTL cavity optical pathlength varying slightly over the laser sweep, and support this hypothesis with numerical simulations. We also report on the successful implementation of this technique with two commercial swept source lasers operating at 840nm and 1040nm, with sweep rates of 8kHz and 100kHz respectively. The extended imaging depth afforded by this technique was demonstrated by measuring the sensitivity fall-off profiles of each laser with matched and mismatched interferometer arms. The feasibility of this technique for clinical systems is demonstrated by imaging the ocular anterior segments of healthy human volunteers. PMID:22435108

  8. Complex conjugate resolved heterodyne swept source optical coherence tomography using coherence revival.

    PubMed

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Nankivil, Derek; Izatt, Joseph A

    2012-03-01

    We describe a simple and low-cost technique for resolving the complex conjugate ambiguity in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) that is applicable to many swept source OCT (SSOCT) systems. First, we review the principles of coherence revival, wherein an interferometer illuminated by an external cavity tunable laser (ECTL) exhibits interference fringes when the two arms of the interferometer are mismatched by an integer multiple of the laser cavity length. Second, we report observations that the spectral interferogram obtained from SSOCT systems employing certain ECTLs are automatically phase modulated when the arm lengths are mismatched this way. This phase modulation results in a frequency-shifted interferogram, effectively creating an extended-depth heterodyne SSOCT system without the use of acousto-optic or electro-optic modulators. We suggest that this phase modulation may be caused by the ECTL cavity optical pathlength varying slightly over the laser sweep, and support this hypothesis with numerical simulations. We also report on the successful implementation of this technique with two commercial swept source lasers operating at 840nm and 1040nm, with sweep rates of 8kHz and 100kHz respectively. The extended imaging depth afforded by this technique was demonstrated by measuring the sensitivity fall-off profiles of each laser with matched and mismatched interferometer arms. The feasibility of this technique for clinical systems is demonstrated by imaging the ocular anterior segments of healthy human volunteers.

  9. Vector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Lai, Simon S M; Yu, Alfred C H

    2014-09-01

    Achieving non-invasive, accurate and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded on three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results indicated that by using three transmit angles and three receive angles (-10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (-10°, 0°, +10°) and of different sizes (dilated diameter: 2.2, 4.4 and 6.3 mm; steady flow rate: 2.5 mL/s). The practical merit of VPI was further illustrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2-Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using a nominal frame rate of 416 fps or 2.4-ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcations (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part I: A Comparison of Rainfall Estimates from Radar, and Very Short Range Rainfall Simulations from a Dynamic Model and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Brandes, Edward A.; Sun, Juanzhen; Yates, David N.; Mueller, Cynthia K.

    2000-06-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods caused by convective rainfall in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the rainfall distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds generally are small in size, and position errors in the placement of the rainfall can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good rainfall estimates, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the rainfall-rate input data. In part 1 of this study, different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective rainfall are applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood of July 1996, during which over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the rainfall was exacerbated by the fact that a considerable fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event.Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, dual-polarization radar, collocated east of Denver, Colorado, were compared. Very short range simulations from a convection-resolving dynamic model that was initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds were compared with simulations from an automated algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the dynamic model and automated algorithms both produce simulations that could be useful operationally for input to surface-hydrologic models employed for flood warning. Part 2 of this study, reported in a companion paper, describes

  11. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. ); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. )

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  12. Assessment of the ARW-WRF model over complex terrain: the case of the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanzadeh, Iman; Bonnardot, Valérie; Sturman, Andrew; Quénol, Hervé; Zawar-Reza, Peyman

    2016-07-01

    Global warming has implications for thermal stress for grapevines during ripening, so that wine producers need to adapt their viticultural practices to ensure optimum physiological response to environmental conditions in order to maintain wine quality. The aim of this paper is to assess the ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to accurately represent atmospheric processes at high resolution (500 m) during two events during the grapevine ripening period in the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa. Two case studies were selected to identify areas of potentially high daytime heat stress when grapevine photosynthesis and grape composition were expected to be affected. The results of high-resolution atmospheric model simulations were compared to observations obtained from an automatic weather station (AWS) network in the vineyard region. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the ability of the WRF model to reproduce spatial and temporal variations of meteorological parameters at 500-m resolution. The model represented the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological variables very well, with an average model air temperature bias of 0.1 °C, while that for relative humidity was -5.0 % and that for wind speed 0.6 m s-1. Variation in model performance varied between AWS and with time of day, as WRF was not always able to accurately represent effects of nocturnal cooling within the complex terrain. Variations in performance between the two case studies resulted from effects of atmospheric boundary layer processes in complex terrain under the influence of the different synoptic conditions prevailing during the two periods.

  13. Assessment of the ARW-WRF model over complex terrain: the case of the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanzadeh, Iman; Bonnardot, Valérie; Sturman, Andrew; Quénol, Hervé; Zawar-Reza, Peyman

    2017-08-01

    Global warming has implications for thermal stress for grapevines during ripening, so that wine producers need to adapt their viticultural practices to ensure optimum physiological response to environmental conditions in order to maintain wine quality. The aim of this paper is to assess the ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to accurately represent atmospheric processes at high resolution (500 m) during two events during the grapevine ripening period in the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa. Two case studies were selected to identify areas of potentially high daytime heat stress when grapevine photosynthesis and grape composition were expected to be affected. The results of high-resolution atmospheric model simulations were compared to observations obtained from an automatic weather station (AWS) network in the vineyard region. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the ability of the WRF model to reproduce spatial and temporal variations of meteorological parameters at 500-m resolution. The model represented the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological variables very well, with an average model air temperature bias of 0.1 °C, while that for relative humidity was -5.0 % and that for wind speed 0.6 m s-1. Variation in model performance varied between AWS and with time of day, as WRF was not always able to accurately represent effects of nocturnal cooling within the complex terrain. Variations in performance between the two case studies resulted from effects of atmospheric boundary layer processes in complex terrain under the influence of the different synoptic conditions prevailing during the two periods.

  14. Probing Reaction Dynamics of Transition-Metal Complexes in Solution via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Khalil, Munira; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-05-02

    We report the first time-resolved soft x-ray measurements of solvated transition-metal complexes. L-edge spectroscopy directly probes dynamic changes in ligand-field splitting of 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition, and mediated by changes in ligand-bonding.

  15. Snakeskin Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-24

    In this extended color image of Pluto taken by NASA New Horizons spacecraft, rounded and bizarrely textured mountains, informally named the Tartarus Dorsa, rise up along Pluto's day-night terminator and show intricate but puzzling patterns of blue-gray ridges and reddish material in between. This view, roughly 330 miles (530 kilometers) across, combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) on July 14, 2015, and resolves details and colors on scales as small as 0.8 miles (1.3 kilometers). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19957

  16. Dalmatian Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2003

    An example of dalmatian terrain near the south pole. The bright material is polar ice and the dark spots dark sands that are appearing in depressions where the ice has defrosted to reveal underlying material. Interestingly, there is an almost continuous dark band around the edges of many of the depressions. This could be a clue to the nature of the sand deposits in polar regions. The sand forms dunes in a range of sizes and shapes. Near the top of the image the dunes shrink until they are smaller than the 18 m pixels of the THEMIS camera and seem to disappear into the surrounding ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -66.6, Longitude 36 East (324 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Coupling fast all-season soil strength land surface model with weather research and forecasting model to assess low-level icing in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sines, Taleena R.

    Icing poses as a severe hazard to aircraft safety with financial resources and even human lives hanging in the balance when the decision to ground a flight must be made. When analyzing the effects of ice on aviation, a chief cause for danger is the disruption of smooth airflow, which increases the drag force on the aircraft therefore decreasing its ability to create lift. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) is a collaboratively created, flexible model designed to run on distributed computing systems for a variety of applications including forecasting research, parameterization research, and real-time numerical weather prediction. Land-surface models, one of the physics options available in the WRF-ARW, output surface heat and moisture flux given radiation, precipitation, and surface properties such as soil type. The Fast All-Season Soil STrength (FASST) land-surface model was developed by the U.S. Army ERDC-CRREL in Hanover, New Hampshire. Designed to use both meteorological and terrain data, the model calculates heat and moisture within the surface layer as well as the exchange of these parameters between the soil, surface elements (such as snow and vegetation), and atmosphere. Focusing on the Presidential Mountain Range of New Hampshire under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Icing Assessments in Cold and Alpine Environments project, one of the main goals is to create a customized, high resolution model to predict and assess ice accretion in complex terrain. The purpose of this research is to couple the FASST land-surface model with the WRF to improve icing forecasts in complex terrain. Coupling FASST with the WRF-ARW may improve icing forecasts because of its sophisticated approach to handling processes such as meltwater, freezing, thawing, and others that would affect the water and energy budget and in turn affect icing forecasts. Several transformations had to take place in order

  18. Environmental drivers of spatial patterns of topsoil nitrogen and phosphorus under monsoon conditions in a complex terrain of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwanghun; Spohn, Marie; Park, Soo Jin; Huwe, Bernd; Ließ, Mareike

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in topsoils are critical for plant nutrition. Relatively little is known about the spatial patterns of N and P in the organic layer of mountainous landscapes. Therefore, the spatial distributions of N and P in both the organic layer and the A horizon were analyzed using a light detection and ranging (LiDAR) digital elevation model and vegetation metrics. The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of vegetation and topography on the spatial patterns of N and P in a small watershed covered by forest in South Korea. Soil samples were collected using the conditioned latin hypercube method. LiDAR vegetation metrics, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and terrain parameters were derived as predictors. Spatial explicit predictions of N/P ratios were obtained using a random forest with uncertainty analysis. We tested different strategies of model validation (repeated 2-fold to 20-fold and leave-one-out cross validation). Repeated 10-fold cross validation was selected for model validation due to the comparatively high accuracy and low variance of prediction. Surface curvature was the best predictor of P contents in the organic layer and in the A horizon, while LiDAR vegetation metrics and NDVI were important predictors of N in the organic layer. N/P ratios increased with surface curvature and were higher on the convex upper slope than on the concave lower slope. This was due to P enrichment of the soil on the lower slope and a more even spatial distribution of N. Our digital soil maps showed that the topsoils on the upper slopes contained relatively little P. These findings are critical for understanding N and P dynamics in mountainous ecosystems. PMID:28837590

  19. Environmental drivers of spatial patterns of topsoil nitrogen and phosphorus under monsoon conditions in a complex terrain of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwanyong; Choi, Kwanghun; Spohn, Marie; Park, Soo Jin; Huwe, Bernd; Ließ, Mareike

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in topsoils are critical for plant nutrition. Relatively little is known about the spatial patterns of N and P in the organic layer of mountainous landscapes. Therefore, the spatial distributions of N and P in both the organic layer and the A horizon were analyzed using a light detection and ranging (LiDAR) digital elevation model and vegetation metrics. The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of vegetation and topography on the spatial patterns of N and P in a small watershed covered by forest in South Korea. Soil samples were collected using the conditioned latin hypercube method. LiDAR vegetation metrics, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and terrain parameters were derived as predictors. Spatial explicit predictions of N/P ratios were obtained using a random forest with uncertainty analysis. We tested different strategies of model validation (repeated 2-fold to 20-fold and leave-one-out cross validation). Repeated 10-fold cross validation was selected for model validation due to the comparatively high accuracy and low variance of prediction. Surface curvature was the best predictor of P contents in the organic layer and in the A horizon, while LiDAR vegetation metrics and NDVI were important predictors of N in the organic layer. N/P ratios increased with surface curvature and were higher on the convex upper slope than on the concave lower slope. This was due to P enrichment of the soil on the lower slope and a more even spatial distribution of N. Our digital soil maps showed that the topsoils on the upper slopes contained relatively little P. These findings are critical for understanding N and P dynamics in mountainous ecosystems.

  20. Using Data Assimilation and State Augmentation to Update a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Parameter in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. A.; Hacker, J.

    2013-12-01

    A major source of model error in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is uncertainty in empirical parameters. In certain surface layer parameterization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (and other NWP models), there is one such parameter, the Zilitinkevich constant Czil, which governs the strength of the thermal coupling between the land surface and the surface layer. This constant has a direct effect of the heat and moisture fluxes through the surface layer, and a secondary effect on the momentum flux. It thus has a large effect on the growth and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. There are no known methods to directly measure the correct value of Czil, so its value must be estimated. It has been common practice to treat Czil as a global constant in WRF, but recent research suggests it should not be a constant in space or in time. To develop an estimate of Czil that varies both in space and in time, we couple a WRF ensemble with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). In this WRF-DART ensemble prediction system we use an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter to assimilate surface and upper-air observations and update the WRF state vector of temperature, wind, and moisture variables. Using a process called state augmentation, we also append Czil to the state vector and allow DART to update Czil as well. We demonstrate the benefit of estimating a variable Czil on low-level temperature and wind forecasts. To do this we compare the performance of a constant-Czil and a variable-Czil ensemble from late September to mid-October 2012, to coincide with high-resolution meteorological observations made during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) in western Utah.

  1. High Resolution Stratigraphic Mapping in Complex Terrain: A Comparison of Traditional Remote Sensing Techniques with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle - Structure from Motion Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbit, P. R.; Hugenholtz, C.; Durkin, P.; Hubbard, S. M.; Kucharczyk, M.; Barchyn, T.

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing and digital mapping have started to revolutionize geologic mapping in recent years as a result of their realized potential to provide high resolution 3D models of outcrops to assist with interpretation, visualization, and obtaining accurate measurements of inaccessible areas. However, in stratigraphic mapping applications in complex terrain, it is difficult to acquire information with sufficient detail at a wide spatial coverage with conventional techniques. We demonstrate the potential of a UAV and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetric approach for improving 3D stratigraphic mapping applications within a complex badland topography. Our case study is performed in Dinosaur Provincial Park (Alberta, Canada), mapping late Cretaceous fluvial meander belt deposits of the Dinosaur Park formation amidst a succession of steeply sloping hills and abundant drainages - creating a challenge for stratigraphic mapping. The UAV-SfM dataset (2 cm spatial resolution) is compared directly with a combined satellite and aerial LiDAR dataset (30 cm spatial resolution) to reveal advantages and limitations of each dataset before presenting a unique workflow that utilizes the dense point cloud from the UAV-SfM dataset for analysis. The UAV-SfM dense point cloud minimizes distortion, preserves 3D structure, and records an RGB attribute - adding potential value in future studies. The proposed UAV-SfM workflow allows for high spatial resolution remote sensing of stratigraphy in complex topographic environments. This extended capability can add value to field observations and has the potential to be integrated with subsurface petroleum models.

  2. Absorption Spectrum of a Ru(II)-Aquo Complex in Vacuo: Resolving Individual Charge-Transfer Transitions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang; Weber, J Mathias

    2015-11-25

    Ruthenium(II) complexes are of great interest as homogeneous catalysts and as photosensitizers; however, their absorption spectra are typically very broad and offer only little insight into their electronic structure. We present the electronic spectrum of the aquo complex [(trpy)(bipy)Ru(II)-OH2](2+) measured by photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions in vacuo (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine and trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine). In the visible and near-UV, [(trpy)(bipy)Ru(II)-OH2](2+) has several electronic bands that are not resolved in absorption spectra of this complex in solution but are partially resolved in vacuo. The experimental results are compared with results from time-dependent density functional theory calculations.

  3. Evaluating Wind Fields from a Diagnostic Model Over Complex Terrain in the Phoenix Region and Implications to Dispersion Calculations for Regional Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Shaw, William J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper compares the wind field from a diagnostic model (CALMET) over complex terrain in the Phoenix region in the USA with observations that are gridded by a state-of-the-art Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) system. The wind difference between the CALMET and FDDA wind fields is larger at night than in the day. The magnitude of the wind difference can be smaller than 5% of the mean wind speed at low levels in areas with dense observational stations, while it can be larger than 80% in areas without observational stations or at high altitudes. The vector-mean wind direction difference over the domain is 15 deg on the surface level and 25 deg between 10 and 1500 m. To evaluate the effects of the wind difference on dispersion calculations, dispersion of a hypothetical passive tracer released from surface point sources is simulated by the second-order closure integrated puff (SCIPUFF) model driven by the CALMET and FDDA wind fields, respectively. Differences in the two simulated tracer concentration fields increase with time due to accumulation of effects of the wind differences both near the surface and at higher altitudes. Even for the release in the area with the densest distribution of surface stations, the relative difference in the peak surface concentration from CALMET-SCIPUFF and from FDDA-SCIPUFF is less than 10% only within 0.5 hr after the release in the afternoon, and increases to 70% at 1.5 hr; this is because of large differences in wind above the surface. For the release in the area with few stations, the difference can be larger than 100% or even larger after 1.5 hr from the release. To improve dispersion simulations driven by the CALMET wind in the region, observations at upper-air stations are needed and the current surface observation network needs to be reorganized or more stations are needed to account for the influence of terrain.

  4. An Overview of MADONA: A Multinational Field Study of High-Resolution Meteorology and Diffusion over Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, R. M.; Byers, J. H.; Aufm Kampe, W.; van Raden, H.; Weber, H.; Biltoft, C.; Collins, C. G.; Higgs, T. J.; Jones, C. D.; Ride, D. J.; Robson, R.; Hin, A. R. T.; Johansson, P.-E.; Nyrén, K.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mikkelsen, T.; Santabarbara, J. M.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Kimber, J. F.; Streicher, J.

    1999-01-01

    The multination, high-resolution field study of Meteorology And Diffusion Over Non-Uniform Areas (MADONA) was conducted by scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands at Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom, during September and October 1992. The host of the field study was the Chemical and Biological Defence Establishment (CBDE, now part of Defence Evaluation and Research Agency) at Porton Down. MADONA was designed and conducted for high-resolution meteorological data collection and diffusion experiments using smoke, sulphurhexaflouride (SF6), and propylene gas during unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions in an effort to obtain terrain-influenced meteorological fields, dispersion, and concentration fluctuation measurements using specialized sensors and tracer generators. Thirty-one days of meteorological data were collected during the period 7 September-7 October and 27 diffusion experiments were conducted from 14 to 23 September 1992. Puffs and plumes of smoke and SF6 were released simultaneously for most of the experiments to gauge the resultant diffusion and concentration behavior. Some 44 meteorological and aerosol sensors and four source generators were used during each day of the field study. This array of sensors included 14 towers of wind cups and vanes, 10 sonic anemometer/thermometers, one boundary layer sonde, two lidar, one ion sensor, the CBDE Weather Station, and several one-of-a-kind sensors. Simulations of airflow and diffusion over the MADONA topography (a 9 km by 7.5 km area) were made with a variety of models. Wind fields and wind-related parameters were simulated with several high-resolution (microalpha scale) wind flow models. A tally of the various data-gathering activities indicates that the execution of MADONA was highly successful. Preliminary use of the datasets shows the high quality and depth of the MADONA database. This well-documented database is

  5. Downscaling and predictability of historical monthly mean surface winds over a region of complex terrain and marine influence: Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, C.; van der Kamp, D.; Monahan, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    valleys and ocean channels. Predictability at stations in regions of relatively flat terrain was less dependent on wind direction. The latter stations also displayed region-wide seasonal shifts in the direction of the most skillfully predicted wind component. In summary, at most stations in Western Canada, monthly mean vector wind components were more reliably predicted than wind speeds. This result complicates the assessment of local changes in mean wind speed, extremes, and wind energy under climate change that is often a desired outcome of the downscaling exercise using modelled fields as predictors. However, useful projections might still be obtained at stations where a single wind direction is dominant.

  6. Validation of high-resolution WRF-ARW model runs against airborne measurements over complex terrain in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Miglietta, Franco; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2015-04-01

    An intensive aerial campaign was flown in the context of the CARBIUS project (Maselli et al., 2010) between July 2004 and December 2005. The flights covered, over more than 240 Km, a target area in central Italy (between the regions of Lazio and Tuscany) characterized by various land uses and topography, ranging from coastal zones to mountainous landscapes (Colline Metallifere, Tuscany). The aerial vector (Sky Arrow 650 ERA) was equipped for high frequency (50 Hz) measurements of the three components of mean wind and turbulence, as well as air temperature, CO2 and H2O concentrations. While the aim of the CARBIUS campaign was focused on GHG fluxes, the dataset is used in the present work as a benchmark to assess the capability of mesoscale models to correctly simulate transport fields. A first assessment has been done by comparing the dataset to a coupled WRF-NMM-CALMET system (Gioli et al., 2014), but the aim of the present work is to expand on those foundations by comparing the data to higher resolution WRF-ARW simulations. WRF-ARW outputs are, in fact, frequently used as inputs to multiple dispersion models and any misrepresentation of the "real" situation is therefore propagated through the modelling chain. Our aim is to assess these potential errors keeping into account different topographic situations and seasons thanks to the existent aerial dataset. Moreover the sensitivity of the WRF-ARW model to different initial and boundary conditions (ECMWF vs. CFSR) is explored, since also the initial forcing may influence the representation of the transport field. Results show that the model is generally capable of reproducing the main features of the mean wind field independently from the choice of the initial forcing. Terrain features still show an impact on the model outputs (especially on wind directions), moreover the performance of the model is also influenced by seasonal effects. Gioli B., Gualtieri G., Busillo C., Calastrini F., Gozzini B., Miglietta F. (2014

  7. Bright, highly water-soluble triazacyclononane europium complexes to detect ligand binding with time-resolved FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Sadovnikova, Victoria; Bourrier, Emmanuel; Mathis, Gérard; Lamarque, Laurent; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Parker, David

    2014-09-26

    Luminescent europium complexes are used in a broad range of applications as a result of their particular emissive properties. The synthesis and application of bright, highly water-soluble, and negatively charged sulfonic- or carboxylic acid derivatives of para-substituted aryl-alkynyl triazacyclononane complexes are described. Introduction of the charged solubilizing moieties suppresses cellular uptake or adsorption to living cells making them applicable for labeling and performing assays on membrane receptors. These europium complexes are applied to monitor fluorescent ligand binding on cell-surface proteins with time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays in plate-based format and using TR-FRET microscopy.

  8. Scoping a field experiment: error diagnostics of TRMM precipitation radar estimates in complex terrain as a basis for IPHEx2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Wilson, A. M.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    , though this behavior is strongly conditioned by the coarse spatial resolution (5 km) of the terrain topography mask used to remove ground clutter effects. Precipitation associated with small-scale systems (< 25 km2) and isolated deep convection tends to be underestimated, which we attribute to non-uniform beam-filling effects due to spatial averaging of reflectivity at the PR resolution. Mixed precipitation events (i.e., cold fronts and snow showers) fall into OVR or FA categories, but these are also the types of events for which observations from standard ground-based raingauge networks are more likely subject to measurement uncertainty, that is raingauge underestimation errors due to under-catch and precipitation phase. Overall, the space-time structure of the errors shows strong links among precipitation, envelope orography, landform (ridge-valley contrasts), and local hydrometeorological regime that is strongly modulated by the diurnal cycle, pointing to three major error causes that are inter-related: (1) representation of concurrent vertically and horizontally varying microphysics; (2) non uniform beam filling (NUBF) effects and ambiguity in the detection of bright band position; and (3) spatial resolution and ground clutter correction.

  9. Characteristics of the atmospheric circulation associated with cold-season heavy rainfall and flooding over a complex terrain region in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Lolis, C. J.; Zoumakis, N. M.; Kassomenos, P.; Melas, D.

    2014-01-01

    Raingauge data from four meteorological stations in Chalkidiki peninsula (Greece) were used to identify the characteristics of the synoptic circulation patterns associated with cold-season heavy rainfall events and corresponding flooding over the area. Precipitation climatology over the complex topography of Chalkidiki is characterized by limited annual rainfall, but in the occurrence of heavy rainfall episodes daily accumulations are exceptionally high with increased precipitation rates, leading often to severe flooding. Fifty-five cases of high daily accumulations for the period of 1997 to 2010, mostly observed during December and October, were classified into eight clusters by applying S-Mode Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis to the ERA-Interim grid point reanalysis data. The results revealed that, in most cases, intense rainfall and flooding is produced by synoptic scale disturbances that generate and sustain cyclonic activity over south Italy, the Ionian, and less frequently over the Aegean Sea. In particular, the atmospheric circulation patterns associated with heavy rainfall are characterized by the presence of a southeasterly-easterly low-level humid flow over Chalkidiki in conjunction with the potentially unstable lower troposphere influenced by mid-level cyclonic vorticity advection and enhanced low-level convergence over the complex terrain.

  10. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  11. A multiscale modelling methodology applicable for regulatory purposes taking into account effects of complex terrain and buildings on pollutant dispersion: a case study for an inner Alpine basin.

    PubMed

    Oettl, D

    2015-11-01

    Dispersion modelling in complex terrain always has been challenging for modellers. Although a large number of publications are dedicated to that field, candidate methods and models for usage in regulatory applications are scarce. This is all the more true when the combined effect of topography and obstacles on pollutant dispersion has to be taken into account. In Austria, largely situated in Alpine regions, such complex situations are quite frequent. This work deals with an approach, which is in principle capable of considering both buildings and topography in simulations by combining state-of-the-art wind field models at the micro- (<1 km) and mesoscale γ (2-20 km) with a Lagrangian particle model. In order to make such complex numerical models applicable for regulatory purposes, meteorological input data for the models need to be readily derived from routine observations. Here, use was made of the traditional way to bin meteorological data based on wind direction, speed, and stability class, formerly mainly used in conjunction with Gaussian-type models. It is demonstrated that this approach leads to reasonable agreements (fractional bias < 0.1) between observed and modelled annual average concentrations in an Alpine basin with frequent low-wind-speed conditions, temperature inversions, and quite complex flow patterns, while keeping the simulation times within the frame of possibility with regard to applications in licencing procedures. However, due to the simplifications in the derivation of meteorological input data as well as several ad hoc assumptions regarding the boundary conditions of the mesoscale wind field model, the methodology is not suited for computing detailed time and space variations of pollutant concentrations.

  12. New tool for CO2 flux partitioning with soil chamber flux implementation as a solution for site in topographically complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šigut, Ladislav; Mammarella, Ivan; Kolari, Pasi; Dařenová, Eva; Novosadová, Kateřina; Pietras, Justina; Pokorný, Radek; Sedlák, Pavel; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Eddy covariance method (EC) is one of the most accurate and direct approaches for measurements of fluxes of matter and energy on the level of an entire ecosystem. CO2 flux data acquired using the global network of EC flux towers help us to better understand the impacts of natural and anthropogenic phenomena on the global carbon balance. Comparisons among different sites are usually performed on annual sums of net ecosystem exchange (annual sums of NEE). Nowadays, EC is also used in complex terrain on the edge of its applicability (e.g. hills, cities) such as the mountain forest site at Bílý Kříž, Beskydy Mountains, Czech Republic. This requires revisiting of generally applied algorithms for computation of annual sums of NEE. The first aim of this study is the assessment of the performance and correctness of a newly developed tool for CO2 flux separation in comparison with standard algorithms. Simple models describing response of NEE to temperature and photosynthetic active radiation will be used for flux partitioning and a new approach to remove seasonality from datasets will be demonstrated. The second aim of this study will be to evaluate whether it is possible to estimate defensible annual sums of NEE for complex terrain site Bílý Kříž with the help of auxiliary biomass inventory and soil chamber measurements. Here the up-scaling of soil respiration to ecosystem respiration will be attempted and the resulting sums of NEE will be compared to independent biomass inventory estimates of net primary productivity. The importance of this research lies in extending the boundaries of EC application, thus contributing to better understanding of carbon balance in mountainous regions ecosystems which are not well represented within networks of EC flux towers. Acknowledgement This work was supported by CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0073, CZ.1.07/2.4.00/31.0056, OU SGS20/PřF/2014 grants and MICMoR graduate programme.

  13. Boundary layer dynamics and its parameterization over the central Himalayas: A step towards improved weather and air quality forecasting over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims towards understanding the boundary layer (BL) dynamics and its parameterization, with observations carried out at ARIES, Manora Peak (29.4⁰ N, 79.5⁰ E, 1960 amsl) in the central Himalayas. The site is located over a complex mountainous terrain and the measurements made with Radar Wind Profiler (RWP), ultrasonic anemometer at two levels and a micro pulse LiDAR are being incorporated in this study. Measurement of local BL has been conducted using 1290 MHz radar wind profiler (RWP) as a part of major field campaign, GVAX. The RWP provides 24 hour diurnal cycle of the BL dynamical state over the site. The general criterion of peak in SNR profile being considered as mixed layer (ML) height was found to be inadequate. Therefore, a new approach is implemented according to which the region of SNR above 6 dB was taken as ML. The maxima in monthly-mean ML height is observed to vary from 557 ± 200 m in November (late autumn) to 912 ± 318 m during March (early spring). As a continuation of this study we have attempted to understand the micrometeorology of the site with fast-response measurements (25 Hz) of temperature and wind at two levels above ground using ultrasonic anemometer. These observations are used to derive diurnal variations of surface layer micro-meteorological parameters during fair-weather conditions. Turbulence and gust characteristics of wind over the site have also been parameterized to provide input for dispersion modeling and understand aerosol distribution over the Himalayas. These observations are consolidated with observations of aerosol vertical distribution made with LIDAR for 2 years, identifying the influences on aerosol loadings from IGP via BL evolution and convective mixing. A strong seasonality in aerosol vertical profile within lower 4 km is observed. Finally, these measurements are used to evaluate high resolution (5 km x 5 km) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Model simulated and measured

  14. Multiscale assessment of spatial precipitation variability over complex mountain terrain using a high-resolution spatiotemporal wavelet reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarleque, Christian; Vuille, Mathias; Hardy, Douglas R.; Posadas, Adolfo; Quiroz, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Studying precipitation variability in the Peruvian Andes is a challenge given the high topographic variability and the scarcity of weather stations. Yet previous research has shown that a near-linear relationship exists between precipitation and vegetation in the semiarid central Andes. We exploit this relationship by developing a new, spatially highly resolved spatiotemporal precipitation reconstruction method, using daily precipitation time series from in situ weather stations, and dekadal (10 calendar days) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) fields. The two data sets are combined through a wavelet decomposition method. A 4° × 4° region around Quelccaya ice cap (QIC), the world's largest tropical ice cap located in the central Peruvian Andes, was selected as study area, due to its importance for climatic, glaciologic, and paleoclimatic research. The reconstructed end product, a 1 km2 gridded precipitation data set at dekadal temporal resolution, was validated against independent rain gauge data and compared with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 version 7 product. This validation showed a better overall performance of our own reconstruction than the TRMM data. Additionally, a comparison of our precipitation product with snowfall measurements at the QIC summit (5670 m) shows a regionally coherent signal at the dekadal scale, suggesting that the precipitation falling at QIC is driven by regional- rather than local-scale convective activity. We anticipate that this methodology and the type of data generated in this study will be useful for hydrological and glaciological studies, as well as for validation of high-resolution downscaling products in mountain regions.

  15. Landscape structure control on soil CO2 efflux variability in complex terrain: Scaling from point observations to watershed scale fluxes

    Treesearch

    Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Brian L. McGlynn

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal variability of soil CO2 efflux across 62 sites of a 393-ha complex watershed of the northern Rocky Mountains. Growing season (83 day) cumulative soil CO2 efflux varied from ~300 to ~2000 g CO2 m-2, depending upon landscape position, with a median of 879.8 g CO2 m-2. Our findings revealed that highest soil CO2 efflux rates were...

  16. Skylab altimeter observations over terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, A.; Thormodsgard, J. M.; Okada, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Data obtained by Skylab radar altimeter (S193) over the continental U.S.A. for pass 1 of SL-3 were analyzed to relate radar return signal parameters such as range, power, and waveform to ground track terrain features. The altimeter, which was originally designed for ocean observations, performed predictably well over terrain with moderate to low relief. The maximum return from more complex areas corresponded usually to the lower flatter regions within the seven kilometer diameter footprint. Altimeter measured heights correlated with map topography with an rms deviation of + or - 30 m for terrain topography with large height dispersion (passes 1 and 28) and + or - 5 m for slowly varying terrain (passes 16, 17, and 18). Analysis of the waveform and statistical characteristics of the individual signals indicated that larger signal power was usually related to dominantly specular reflections from patches 100 m or larger. Results established the capability of a spacecraft altimeter system to observe characteristic radar signatures for different types of terrain within the bandwidth restrictions of the AGC and range tracker loops.

  17. Urban Terrain Zone Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    function . An example of the interaction of some of these can result in an exposed surface of decorative brick veneer on a framed stracture . Or, a...Classification System for HOUT Studies . . . . . . . . .- ..- . . . . . . 14 2. Urban Terrain Zones Function /Morphology Relationship...By Function --All Cities Aggregated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 6. Building Types: Major Terrain Zones . . . . ...... 103 7. Urban Terrain

  18. Locally induced surface air confluence by complex terrain and its effects on air pollution in the valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín R.; Caetano, Ernesto

    Using a meteorological computational model it is shown how, in the Valley of Mexico, a high pressure system together with the complex orography of the region induce the formation of a local confluence line. With the aid of a prognostic air quality model it is shown that the maximum pollutant mixing ratios are placed on and follow the confluence line which crosses over the most populated areas of Mexico City. This phenomenon provides an explanation of why and when pollutants assume its geographical distribution in the valley during high mixing ratio episodes.

  19. Interactions between complicated flow-dispersion patterns and boundary layer evolution in a mountainous complex terrain during elevated SO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N.; Triantafyllou, Athanassios G.; Garas, Stylianos; Krestou, Athina; Leivaditou, Elena

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion of air pollutants from multiple industrial stacks located in complex topography is an interesting subject. An attractive case is that of the wider region of Western Macedonia in NW Greece, where the greater amount of electric power of Greece is being produced by lignite power plant stations (LPPS). Considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants are emitted by those LPPS into the atmosphere due to the quantities of coal burned. The variability of the topographic features and the terrain complexity of the area may lead to the formation of local atmospheric circulations of various types, which affect pollutant's transport and dispersion. In the present work, the dispersion conditions that favor the pollutants accumulation in the area are investigated. For this purpose, 1 year's hourly SO2 concentrations, surface wind measurements and a mesoscale meteorological and air pollution model (The Air Pollution Model, TAPM) were used. The SO2 and wind measurements were collected in situ from monitoring stations located nearby and at a greater distance from the power plants. Yearly and daily variations of SO2 concentrations are analyzed and discussed, and the period with the highest concentrations is selected. During this period, the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the area as well as the pollutants dispersion is examined. Statistical measures between modeled and observed meteorological data were in good agreement and a good correlation coefficient 0.68 and 0.98 was found in the SO2 variations. The analysis of the wind fields indicated better ventilation in the center of the area due to topographic venturi effects, while the dispersion mechanism which resulted in the relatively high ground level concentrations was fumigation. Finally, the evolution of the ABL was affected by the complex interactions between topography and mesoscale flows as it was found by the turbulent kinetic energy cross sections.

  20. Interactions between complicated flow-dispersion patterns and boundary layer evolution in a mountainous complex terrain during elevated SO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N.; Triantafyllou, Athanassios G.; Garas, Stylianos; Krestou, Athina; Leivaditou, Elena

    2017-08-01

    The dispersion of air pollutants from multiple industrial stacks located in complex topography is an interesting subject. An attractive case is that of the wider region of Western Macedonia in NW Greece, where the greater amount of electric power of Greece is being produced by lignite power plant stations (LPPS). Considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants are emitted by those LPPS into the atmosphere due to the quantities of coal burned. The variability of the topographic features and the terrain complexity of the area may lead to the formation of local atmospheric circulations of various types, which affect pollutant's transport and dispersion. In the present work, the dispersion conditions that favor the pollutants accumulation in the area are investigated. For this purpose, 1 year's hourly SO2 concentrations, surface wind measurements and a mesoscale meteorological and air pollution model (The Air Pollution Model, TAPM) were used. The SO2 and wind measurements were collected in situ from monitoring stations located nearby and at a greater distance from the power plants. Yearly and daily variations of SO2 concentrations are analyzed and discussed, and the period with the highest concentrations is selected. During this period, the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the area as well as the pollutants dispersion is examined. Statistical measures between modeled and observed meteorological data were in good agreement and a good correlation coefficient 0.68 and 0.98 was found in the SO2 variations. The analysis of the wind fields indicated better ventilation in the center of the area due to topographic venturi effects, while the dispersion mechanism which resulted in the relatively high ground level concentrations was fumigation. Finally, the evolution of the ABL was affected by the complex interactions between topography and mesoscale flows as it was found by the turbulent kinetic energy cross sections.

  1. Non-SMC Element 2 (NSMCE2) of the SMC5/6 Complex Helps to Resolve Topological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Verver, Dideke E.; Zheng, Yi; Speijer, Dave; Hoebe, Ron; Dekker, Henk L.; Repping, Sjoerd; Stap, Jan; Hamer, Geert

    2016-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes shape and regulate the structure and dynamics of chromatin, thereby controlling many chromosome-based processes such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, gene transcription and DNA repair. The SMC5/6 complex is previously described to promote DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair by sister chromatid recombination, and found to be essential for resolving recombination intermediates during meiotic recombination. Moreover, in budding yeast, SMC5/6 provides structural organization and topological stress relief during replication in mitotically dividing cells. Despite the essential nature of the SMC5/6 complex, the versatile mechanisms by which SMC5/6 functions and its molecular regulation in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. By using a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS), we show that after the CRISPR-Cas9-mediated removal of the SMC5/6 subunit NSMCE2, treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide triggered an increased sensitivity in cells lacking NSMCE2. In contrast, NSMCE2 appeared not essential for a proper DNA damage response or cell survival after DSB induction by ionizing irradiation (IR). Interestingly, by way of immunoprecipitations (IPs) and mass spectrometry, we found that the SMC5/6 complex physically interacts with the DNA topoisomerase II α (TOP2A). We therefore propose that the SMC5/6 complex functions in resolving TOP2A-mediated DSB-repair intermediates generated during replication. PMID:27792189

  2. Role of surface and subsurface lateral water flows on summer precipitation in a complex terrain region: A WRF-Hydro case-study for Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummler, Thomas; Arnault, Joel; Gochis, David; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in hydrometeorological modeling aim towards more sophisticated treatment of terrestrial hydrologic processes. The standard version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model describes terrestrial water transport as a purely vertical process. The hydrologically enhanced version of WRF, namely WRF-Hydro, does account for lateral terrestrial water flows, which allows for a more comprehensive process description of the interdependencies between water- and energy fluxes at the land-atmosphere interface. In this study, WRF and WRF-Hydro are applied to the Bavarian Alpine region in southern Germany, a complex terrain landscape in a relatively humid, mid-latitude climate. Simulation results are validated with gridded and station observation of precipitation, temperature and river discharge. Differences between WRF and WRF-Hydro results are investigated with a joint atmospheric-terrestrial water budget analysis. Changes in the partitioning in (near-) surface runoff and percolation are prominent. However, values for evapotranspiration ET feature only marginal variations, suggesting that soil moisture content is not a limiting factor of ET in this specific region. Simulated precipitation fields during isolated summertime events still show appreciable differences, while differences in large-scale, multi-day rainy periods are less substantial. These differences are mainly related to differences in the moisture in- and outflow terms of the atmospheric water budget induced by the surface and sub-surface lateral redistribution of soil moisture in WRF-Hydro.

  3. 3-D inversion of complex magnetotelluric data from an Archean-Proterozoic terrain in northeastern São Francisco Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Mauricio S.; Egbert, Gary D.; Padilha, Antonio L.; Pádua, Marcelo B.; Vitorello, Ícaro

    2017-09-01

    We present a magnetotelluric (MT) study in the northeastern part of the São Francisco Craton that encompasses an Archean-Proterozoic terrain, the Serrinha Block, breached by a rift basin developed mostly in Early Cretaceous times during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Even though the MT sites are regularly spaced, the profiles have different orientations from one another, making the data distribution over the area highly uneven and therefore non-ideal for 3-D modeling. However, the data set is very complex, with dimensionality analysis indicating prevalence of 3-D geoelectric structure. Results from 3-D inversion are evaluated for robustness and potentiality for yielding tectonic information. At upper crustal depths, the resulting 3-D model is coherent with surface geology, whereas at mid and lower crustal depths more cryptic structures are revealed, likely of Palaeoproterozoic age. The most striking features in the model are several strong (∼1 Ωṡm) crustal conductors beneath the central part of the Serrinha Block, which we attribute to a Palaeoproterozoic oceanic plate subduction and arc-continent collision event involving the Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt and the basement of the Serrinha Block. The west-dipping geometry of these conductors provides a constraint on subduction polarity and gives support to tectonic evolutionary models proposing that the Rio Itapicuru Belt was formed in an island arc environment.

  4. On the variability of the surface environment response to synoptic forcing over complex terrain: a multivariate data analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halios, Christos H.; Helmis, Costas G.; Flocas, Helena A.; Nyeki, Stephan; Assimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N.

    2012-11-01

    Synoptic climatology relates the atmospheric circulation with the surface environment. The aim of this study is to examine the variability of the surface meteorological patterns, which are developing under different synoptic scale categories over a suburban area with complex topography. Multivariate Data Analysis techniques were performed to a data set with surface meteorological elements. Three principal components related to the thermodynamic status of the surface environment and the two components of the wind speed were found. The variability of the surface flows was related with atmospheric circulation categories by applying Correspondence Analysis. Similar surface thermodynamic fields develop under cyclonic categories, which are contrasted with the anti-cyclonic category. A strong, steady wind flow characterized by high shear values develops under the cyclonic Closed Low and the anticyclonic H-L categories, in contrast to the variable weak flow under the anticyclonic Open Anticyclone category.

  5. Semi-automatic methods for landslide features and channel network extraction in a complex mountainous terrain: new opportunities but also challenges from high resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Sofia, Giulia; Pirotti, Francesco; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, remotely sensed technologies such as airborne and terrestrial laser scanner have improved the detail of analysis providing high-resolution and high-quality topographic data over large areas better than other technologies. A new generation of high resolution (~ 1m) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) are now available for different landscapes. These data call for the development of the new generation of methodologies for objective extraction of geomorphic features, such as channel heads, channel networks, bank geometry, landslide scars, service roads, etc. The most important benefit of a high resolution DTM is the detailed recognition of surface features. It is possible to recognize in detail divergent-convex landforms, associated with the dominance of hillslope processes, and convergent-concave landforms, associated with fluvial-dominated erosion. In this work, we test the performance of new methodologies for objective extraction of geomorphic features related to landsliding and channelized processes in order to provide a semi-automatic method for channel network and landslide features recognition in a complex mountainous terrain. The methodologies are based on the detection of thresholds derived by statistical analysis of variability of surface curvature. We considered a study area located in the eastern Italian Alps where a high-quality set of LiDAR data is available and where channel heads, related channel network, and landslides have been mapped in the field by DGPS. In the analysis we derived 1 m DTMs from bare ground LiDAR points, and we used different smoothing factors for the curvature calculation in order to set the more suitable curvature maps for the recognition of selected features. Our analyses suggest that: i) the scale for curvature calculations has to be a function of the scale of the features to be detected, (ii) rougher curvature maps are not optimal as they do not explore a sufficient range at which features occur, while smoother

  6. Mapping snow depth in complex alpine terrain with close range aerial imagery - estimating the spatial uncertainties of repeat autonomous aerial surveys over an active rock glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Jason; Marcer, Marco; Bodin, Xavier; Brenning, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Snow depth mapping in open areas using close range aerial imagery is just one of the many cases where developments in structure-from-motion and multi-view-stereo (SfM-MVS) 3D reconstruction techniques have been applied for geosciences - and with good reason. Our ability to increase the spatial resolution and frequency of observations may allow us to improve our understanding of how snow depth distribution varies through space and time. However, to ensure accurate snow depth observations from close range sensing we must adequately characterize the uncertainty related to our measurement techniques. In this study, we explore the spatial uncertainties of snow elevation models for estimation of snow depth in a complex alpine terrain from close range aerial imagery. We accomplish this by conducting repeat autonomous aerial surveys over a snow-covered active-rock glacier located in the French Alps. The imagery obtained from each flight of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used to create an individual digital elevation model (DEM) of the snow surface. As result, we obtain multiple DEMs of the snow surface for the same site. These DEMs are obtained from processing the imagery with the photogrammetry software Agisoft Photoscan. The elevation models are also georeferenced within Photoscan using the geotagged imagery from an onboard GNSS in combination with ground targets placed around the rock glacier, which have been surveyed with highly accurate RTK-GNSS equipment. The random error associated with multi-temporal DEMs of the snow surface is estimated from the repeat aerial survey data. The multiple flights are designed to follow the same flight path and altitude above the ground to simulate the optimal conditions of repeat survey of the site, and thus try to estimate the maximum precision associated with our snow-elevation measurement technique. The bias of the DEMs is assessed with RTK-GNSS survey observations of the snow surface elevation of the area on and surrounding

  7. Time-Resolved and Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Complex Cognitive Processes and their Role in Disorders like Developmental Dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Mórocz, István Akos; Janoos, Firdaus; van Gelderen, Peter; Manor, David; Karni, Avi; Breznitz, Zvia; von Aster, Michael; Kushnir, Tammar; Shalev, Ruth

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this article is to report on the importance and challenges of a time-resolved and spatio-temporal analysis of fMRI data from complex cognitive processes and associated disorders using a study on developmental dyscalculia (DD). Participants underwent fMRI while judging the incorrectness of multiplication results, and the data were analyzed using a sequence of methods, each of which progressively provided more a detailed picture of the spatio-temporal aspect of this disease. Healthy subjects and subjects with DD performed alike behaviorally though they exhibited parietal disparities using traditional voxel-based group analyses. Further and more detailed differences, however, surfaced with a time-resolved examination of the neural responses during the experiment. While performing inter-group comparisons, a third group of subjects with dyslexia (DL) but with no arithmetic difficulties was included to test the specificity of the analysis and strengthen the statistical base with overall fifty-eight subjects. Surprisingly, the analysis showed a functional dissimilarity during an initial reading phase for the group of dyslexic but otherwise normal subjects, with respect to controls, even though only numerical digits and no alphabetic characters were presented. Thus our results suggest that time-resolved multi-variate analysis of complex experimental paradigms has the ability to yield powerful new clinical insights about abnormal brain function. Similarly, a detailed compilation of aberrations in the functional cascade may have much greater potential to delineate the core processing problems in mental disorders.

  8. Time-Resolved and Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Complex Cognitive Processes and their Role in Disorders like Developmental Dyscalculia

    PubMed Central

    Mórocz, István Akos; Janoos, Firdaus; van Gelderen, Peter; Manor, David; Karni, Avi; Breznitz, Zvia; von Aster, Michael; Kushnir, Tammar; Shalev, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to report on the importance and challenges of a time-resolved and spatio-temporal analysis of fMRI data from complex cognitive processes and associated disorders using a study on developmental dyscalculia (DD). Participants underwent fMRI while judging the incorrectness of multiplication results, and the data were analyzed using a sequence of methods, each of which progressively provided more a detailed picture of the spatio-temporal aspect of this disease. Healthy subjects and subjects with DD performed alike behaviorally though they exhibited parietal disparities using traditional voxel-based group analyses. Further and more detailed differences, however, surfaced with a time-resolved examination of the neural responses during the experiment. While performing inter-group comparisons, a third group of subjects with dyslexia (DL) but with no arithmetic difficulties was included to test the specificity of the analysis and strengthen the statistical base with overall fifty-eight subjects. Surprisingly, the analysis showed a functional dissimilarity during an initial reading phase for the group of dyslexic but otherwise normal subjects, with respect to controls, even though only numerical digits and no alphabetic characters were presented. Thus our results suggest that time-resolved multi-variate analysis of complex experimental paradigms has the ability to yield powerful new clinical insights about abnormal brain function. Similarly, a detailed compilation of aberrations in the functional cascade may have much greater potential to delineate the core processing problems in mental disorders. PMID:22368322

  9. Modeling Feasibility of a Proposed Renewable Energy System with Wind and Solar Resources and Hydro Storage in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Koracin, D.; Hamilton, R.; Hagen, D.; King, K. C.

    2012-04-01

    High temporal and spatial variability in wind and solar power brings difficulties in integrating these resources into an electricity grid. These difficulties are even more emphasized in areas with complex topography due to complicated flow patterns and cloudiness evolution. This study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of a proposed renewable energy system with wind and solar resources and hydro storages in western Nevada, U.S.A. The state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used for the prediction of wind fields and incoming solar radiation at the ground surface. Forecast winds and solar radiation were evaluated with observational data from four wind masts and four meteorological towers in two months, July 2007 and January 2010. Based on a hypothetical wind farm and an assumed neighboring solar power plant both located near the hydro storage facility, as well as considering local power demand, the efficiency of the renewable energy system is projected. One of the main questions was how to optimize a schedule of activating pump storages according to the characteristics of several available hydro pumps, and wind and/or solar power predictions. The results show that segmentation of the pump-storage channel provides improved efficiency of the entire system. This modeled renewable energy system shows promise for possible applications and grid integration.

  10. Smoke dispersion modeling over complex terrain using high resolution meteorological data and satellite observations - The FireHub platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, S.; Amiridis, V.; Zanis, P.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Sofiou, F. I.; Herekakis, T.; Brioude, J.; Stohl, A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-10-01

    A total number of 20,212 fire hot spots were recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument over Greece during the period 2002-2013. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) of these events ranged from 10 up to 6000 MW at 1 km resolution, and many of these fire episodes resulted in long-range transport of smoke over distances up to several hundred kilometers. Three different smoke episodes over Greece are analyzed here using real time hot-spot observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) satellite instrument as well as from MODIS hot-spots. Simulations of smoke dispersion are performed with the FLEXPART-WRF model and particulate matter emissions are calculated directly from the observed FRP. The modeled smoke plumes are compared with smoke stereo-heights from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument and the sensitivities to atmospheric and modeling parameters are examined. Driving the simulations with high resolution meteorology (4 × 4 km) and using geostationary satellite data to identify the hot spots allows the description of local scale features that govern smoke dispersion. The long-range transport of smoke is found to be favored over the complex coastline environment of Greece due to the abrupt changes between land and marine planetary boundary layers (PBL) and the decoupling of smoke layers from the surface.

  11. Downscaling wind and wavefields for 21st century coastal flood hazard projections in a region of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, A. C.; Erikson, L. H.; Barnard, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    While global climate models (GCMs) provide useful projections of near-surface wind vectors into the 21st century, resolution is not sufficient enough for use in regional wave modeling. Statistically downscaled GCM projections from Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues provide daily averaged near-surface winds at an appropriate spatial resolution for wave modeling within the orographically complex region of San Francisco Bay, but greater resolution in time is needed to capture the peak of storm events. Short-duration high wind speeds, on the order of hours, are usually excluded in statistically downscaled climate models and are of key importance in wave and subsequent coastal flood modeling. Here we present a temporal downscaling approach, similar to constructed analogues, for near-surface winds suitable for use in local wave models and evaluate changes in wind and wave conditions for the 21st century. Reconstructed hindcast winds (1975-2004) recreate important extreme wind values within San Francisco Bay. A computationally efficient method for simulating wave heights over long time periods was used to screen for extreme events. Wave hindcasts show resultant maximum wave heights of 2.2 m possible within the Bay. Changes in extreme over-water wind speeds suggest contrasting trends within the different regions of San Francisco Bay, but 21th century projections show little change in the overall magnitude of extreme winds and locally generated waves

  12. Smoke Dispersion Modeling Over Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Meteorological Data and Satellite Observations: The FireHub Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomos, S.; Amiridis, V.; Zanis, P.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Sofiou, F. I.; Herekakis, T.; Brioude, J.; Stohl, A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-01-01

    A total number of 20,212 fire hot spots were recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument over Greece during the period 2002e2013. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) of these events ranged from 10 up to 6000 MW at 1 km resolution, and many of these fire episodes resulted in long-range transport of smoke over distances up to several hundred kilometers. Three different smoke episodes over Greece are analyzed here using real time hot-spot observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) satellite instrument as well as from MODIS hot-spots. Simulations of smoke dispersion are performed with the FLEXPART-WRF model and particulate matter emissions are calculated directly from the observed FRP. The modeled smoke plumes are compared with smoke stereo-heights from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument and the sensitivities to atmospheric and modeling parameters are examined. Driving the simulations with high resolution meteorology (4 4 km) and using geostationary satellite data to identify the hot spots allows the description of local scale features that govern smoke dispersion. The long-range transport of smoke is found to be favored over the complex coastline environment of Greece due to the abrupt changes between land and marine planetary boundary layers (PBL) and the decoupling of smoke layers from the surface.

  13. Smoke Dispersion Modeling Over Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Meteorological Data and Satellite Observations: The FireHub Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomos, S.; Amiridis, V.; Zanis, P.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Sofiou, F. I.; Herekakis, T.; Brioude, J.; Stohl, A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-01-01

    A total number of 20,212 fire hot spots were recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument over Greece during the period 2002e2013. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) of these events ranged from 10 up to 6000 MW at 1 km resolution, and many of these fire episodes resulted in long-range transport of smoke over distances up to several hundred kilometers. Three different smoke episodes over Greece are analyzed here using real time hot-spot observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) satellite instrument as well as from MODIS hot-spots. Simulations of smoke dispersion are performed with the FLEXPART-WRF model and particulate matter emissions are calculated directly from the observed FRP. The modeled smoke plumes are compared with smoke stereo-heights from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument and the sensitivities to atmospheric and modeling parameters are examined. Driving the simulations with high resolution meteorology (4 4 km) and using geostationary satellite data to identify the hot spots allows the description of local scale features that govern smoke dispersion. The long-range transport of smoke is found to be favored over the complex coastline environment of Greece due to the abrupt changes between land and marine planetary boundary layers (PBL) and the decoupling of smoke layers from the surface.

  14. Downscaling wind and wavefields for 21st century coastal flood hazard projections in a region of complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, Andrea; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    While global climate models (GCMs) provide useful projections of near-surface wind vectors into the 21st century, resolution is not sufficient enough for use in regional wave modeling. Statistically downscaled GCM projections from Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues provide daily averaged near-surface winds at an appropriate spatial resolution for wave modeling within the orographically complex region of San Francisco Bay, but greater resolution in time is needed to capture the peak of storm events. Short-duration high wind speeds, on the order of hours, are usually excluded in statistically downscaled climate models and are of key importance in wave and subsequent coastal flood modeling. Here we present a temporal downscaling approach, similar to constructed analogues, for near-surface winds suitable for use in local wave models and evaluate changes in wind and wave conditions for the 21st century. Reconstructed hindcast winds (1975–2004) recreate important extreme wind values within San Francisco Bay. A computationally efficient method for simulating wave heights over long time periods was used to screen for extreme events. Wave hindcasts show resultant maximum wave heights of 2.2 m possible within the Bay. Changes in extreme over-water wind speeds suggest contrasting trends within the different regions of San Francisco Bay, but 21th century projections show little change in the overall magnitude of extreme winds and locally generated waves.

  15. Complete complex conjugate resolved heterodyne swept-source optical coherence tomography using a dispersive optical delay line

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) provides a substantial sensitivity advantage over its time-domain counterpart, but suffers from a reduced imaging depth range due to sensitivity falloff and complex conjugate ambiguity. Heterodyne complex conjugate-resolved SSOCT (HCCR-SSOCT) has been previously demonstrated as a technique to completely resolve the complex conjugate ambiguity, effectively doubling the falloff limited imaging depth, without the reduction in imaging speed associated with other CCR techniques. However, previous implementations of this technique have employed expensive and lossy optical modulators to provide the required differential phase modulation. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a dispersive optical delay line (D-ODL) as the reference arm of an OCT system to realize HCCR-SSOCT. This technique maintains the existing advantages of HCCR-SSOCT in that it completely resolves the complex conjugate artifact and does not reduce imaging speed, while conferring the additional advantages of being low cost, maintaining system sensitivity and resolution, not requiring any additional signal processing, and working at all wavelengths and imaging speeds. The D-ODL also allows for hardware correction of unbalanced dispersion in the reference and sample arm, adding further flexibility to system design. We demonstrate the technique using an SSOCT system operating at 100kHz with a central wavelength of 1040nm. Falloff measurements performed using a standard OCT configuration and the proposed D-ODL demonstrate a doubling of the effective imaging range with no sensitivity or resolution penalty. Feasibility of the technique for in vivo imaging was demonstrated by imaging the ocular anterior segments of healthy human volunteers. PMID:21559133

  16. Terrain types and local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    Grooved terrain is subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology into: (1) groove lanes - elongate parallel groove bands, (2) grooved polygons - polygonal domains of parallel grooves, (3) reticulate terrain - polygonal domains of orthogonal grooves, and (4) complex grooved terrain - polygons with several complexly cross-cutting groove sets. Detailed geologic mapping of select areas, employing previously established conventions for determining relative age relations, reveals a general three-stage sequence of grooved terrain emplacement: first, dissection of the lithosphere by throughgoing grooves, and pervasive deformation of intervening blocks; second, extensive flooding and continued deformation of the intervening blocks; third, repeated superposition of groove lanes concentrated at sites of initial throughgoing grooves. This sequence is corroborated by crater-density measurements. Dominant orientations of groove sets are parallel to relict zones of weakness that probably were reactivated during grooved terrain formation. Groove lane morphology and development consistent with that predicted for passive rifts suggests a major role of global expansion in grooved terrain formation.

  17. Terrain types and local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1986-11-01

    Grooved terrain is subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology into: (1) groove lanes - elongate parallel groove bands, (2) grooved polygons - polygonal domains of parallel grooves, (3) reticulate terrain - polygonal domains of orthogonal grooves, and (4) complex grooved terrain - polygons with several complexly cross-cutting groove sets. Detailed geologic mapping of select areas, employing previously established conventions for determining relative age relations, reveals a general three-stage sequence of grooved terrain emplacement: first, dissection of the lithosphere by throughgoing grooves, and pervasive deformation of intervening blocks; second, extensive flooding and continued deformation of the intervening blocks; third, repeated superposition of groove lanes concentrated at sites of initial throughgoing grooves. This sequence is corroborated by crater-density measurements. Dominant orientations of groove sets are parallel to relict zones of weakness that probably were reactivated during grooved terrain formation. Groove lane morphology and development consistent with that predicted for passive rifts suggests a major role of global expansion in grooved terrain formation.

  18. Evaluation of terrain models for the geocoding and terrain correction, of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wivell, C. E.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Kelly, G. G.; Meyer, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The variability of the resolutions and the presence of artifacts cause inaccurate correction of the terrain-induced geometric distortions in synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images. To quantify the effects of these inaccuracies on SAR terrain correction, corrections of a Seasat SAR image were performed using a 1 degrees US Geological Survey (USGS) terrain model, a 7.5-min USGS terrain model, and a terrain model derived from stereoimagery acquired from SPOT. Geometric verifications of the corrected imagery showed that the resolution of the 1 degrees terrain model is not adequate to resolve many features in the Seasat image. Geometric verifications of images corrected with the two higher resolution terrain models showed localized errors as large as 52 m for mountain peaks. However, comparison of data corrected with those models shows that both produce results that differ by less than the resolution of either of them. Periodic artifacts observed in the terrain models translated to ground range differences of 18 m, which are well below the resolution of the SAR imagery.

  19. Automatic remote sensing detection of the convective boundary layer structure over flat and complex terrain using the novel PathfinderTURB algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltera, Yann; Martucci, Giovanni; Hervo, Maxime; Haefele, Alexander; Emmenegger, Lukas; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, stephan

    2016-04-01

    We have developed, applied and validated a novel algorithm called PathfinderTURB for the automatic and real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. The algorithm has been applied to a year of data measured by the automatic LIDAR CHM15K at two sites in Switzerland: the rural site of Payerne (MeteoSwiss station, 491 m, asl), and the alpine site of Kleine Scheidegg (KSE, 2061 m, asl). PathfinderTURB is a gradient-based layer detection algorithm, which in addition makes use of the atmospheric variability to detect the turbulent transition zone that separates two low-turbulence regions, one characterized by homogeneous mixing (convective layer) and one above characterized by free tropospheric conditions. The PathfinderTURB retrieval of the vertical structure of the Local (5-10 km, horizontal scale) Convective Boundary Layer (LCBL) has been validated at Payerne using two established reference methods. The first reference consists of four independent human-expert manual detections of the LCBL height over the year 2014. The second reference consists of the values of LCBL height calculated using the bulk Richardson number method based on co-located radio sounding data for the same year 2014. Based on the excellent agreement with the two reference methods at Payerne, we decided to apply PathfinderTURB to the complex-terrain conditions at KSE during 2014. The LCBL height retrievals are obtained by tilting the CHM15K at an angle of 19 degrees with respect to the horizontal and aiming directly at the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m, asl) on the Jungfraujoch. This setup of the CHM15K and the processing of the data done by the PathfinderTURB allows to disentangle the long-transport from the local origin of gases and particles measured by the in-situ instrumentation at the Sphinx Observatory. The KSE measurements showed that the relation amongst the LCBL height, the aerosol layers above the LCBL top and the gas + particle concentration is all but

  20. Resolving Individual Components in Protein-RNA Complexes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Experiments.

    PubMed

    Rambo, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of protein-RNA complexes has developed into an efficient and economical approach for determining low-resolution shapes of particles in solution. Here, we demonstrate a mutliphase volumetric modeling approach capable of resolving individual components within a low-resolution shape. Through three case studies, we describe the SAXS data collecting strategies, premodeling analysis, and computational methods required for deconstructing complexes into their respective components. This chapter presents an approach using the programs ScÅtter and MONSA and custom scripts for averaging and aligning of multiple independent modeling runs. The method can image small (7kDa) masses within the context of complex and is capable of visualizing ligand-induced conformational changes. Nevertheless, computational algorithms are not without error, and we describe specific considerations during SAXS data reduction and modeling to mitigate possible false positives.

  1. Eu(III)-Fulvic Acid Complexation: Evidence of Fulvic Acid Concentration Dependent Interactions by Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kouhail, Yasmine Z; Benedetti, Marc F; Reiller, Pascal E

    2016-04-05

    Europium speciation is investigated by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) in the presence of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). From complexation isotherms built at different total Eu(III) concentrations, pH values, ionic strength, and SRFA concentrations, it appears that two luminescence behaviors of Eu(III) are occurring. The first part, at the lowest CSRFA values, is showing the typical luminescence evolution of Eu(III) complexed by humic substances--that is, the increase of the asymmetry ratio between the (5)D0 → (7)F2 and (5)D0 → (7)F1 transitions up to a plateau--, and the occurrence of a biexponential decay--the first decay being faster than free Eu(3+). At higher CSRFA, a second luminescence mode is detected as the asymmetry ratio is increasing again after the previous plateau, and could correspond to the formation of another type of complex, and/or it can reflect a different spatial organization of complexed europium within the SRFA structure. The luminescence decay keeps on evolving but link to hydration number is not straightforward due to quenching mechanisms. The Eu(III) chemical environment evolution with CSRFA is also ionic strength dependent. These observations suggest that in addition to short-range interactions--intraparticulate complexation--, there might be interactions at longer range--interparticulate repulsion--between particles that are complexing Eu(III) at high CSRFA. These interactions are not yet accounted by the different complexation models.

  2. Resolving complex fibre architecture by means of sparse spherical deconvolution in the presence of isotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Michailovich, O.; Rathi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) improves upon more traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in its ability to resolve the orientations of crossing and branching neural fibre tracts. The HARDI signals are measured over a spherical shell in q-space, and are usually used as an input to q-ball imaging (QBI) which allows estimation of the diffusion orientation distribution functions (ODFs) associated with a given region-of interest. Unfortunately, the partial nature of single-shell sampling imposes limits on the estimation accuracy. As a result, the recovered ODFs may not possess sufficient resolution to reveal the orientations of fibre tracts which cross each other at acute angles. A possible solution to the problem of limited resolution of QBI is provided by means of spherical deconvolution, a particular instance of which is sparse deconvolution. However, while capable of yielding high-resolution reconstructions over spacial locations corresponding to white matter, such methods tend to become unstable when applied to anatomical regions with a substantial content of isotropic diffusion. To resolve this problem, a new deconvolution approach is proposed in this paper. Apart from being uniformly stable across the whole brain, the proposed method allows one to quantify the isotropic component of cerebral diffusion, which is known to be a useful diagnostic measure by itself.

  3. Monitoring of singlet oxygen luminescence and mitochondrial autofluorescence after illumination of hypericin/mitochondria complex: a time-resolved study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovajova, D.; Jancura, D.; Miskovsky, P.; Chorvat, D., Jr.; Chorvatova, A.; Ragas, X.; Garcia-Diaz, M.; Nonell, S.; Nadova, Z.

    2013-07-01

    A study of hypericin (Hyp) interaction with mitochondria isolated from U-87 MG glioma cells as well as the time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen (1O2) formation and annihilation after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is presented in this work. Interaction between Hyp and mitochondria was studied by steady-state and time-resolved UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A high concentration of Hyp leads to the aggregation of this compound inside the mitochondria and the relative population of the monomeric (biologically active) form of Hyp decreases concomitantly to approximately 10% at the highest used Hyp bulk concentration. Photosensitized production of 1O2 in mitochondria after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex is characterized by a rise lifetime of ˜8 μs and shows saturation behaviour with respect to Hyp concentration. The lifetime of 1O2 depends on the composition of the medium where the mitochondria are suspended, ranging from about 3.0 μs in pure water to 26 μs in H2O-D2O (1:9) phosphate buffer. Our results confirm that only the monomeric form of Hyp is able to produce its excited triplet state, which consequently leads to 1O2 production. An influence of photoactivated Hyp on the mitochondria respiration chain was evaluated by the monitoring of time-resolved NAD(P)H fluorescence. We have demonstrated the rise of the NAD(P)H content after illumination of the Hyp/mitochondria complex.

  4. Hydrogenic Rydberg States of Molecular van der Waals Complexes: Resolved Rydberg Spectroscopy of DABCO-N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, Martin C.; Watkins, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    The complementary threshold ionization techniques of MATI and ZEKE spectroscopy have been used to reveal well-resolved, long-lived (>10 μs) hydrogenic Rydberg series (50≤n≤98) in a van der Waals complex formed between a polyatomic molecule and a diatomic molecule for the first time. The series are observed within 50 cm-1 of the adiabatic ionization threshold as well as two core-excited thresholds corresponding to excitation of up to two quanta in the van der Waals vibra­tional mode.

  5. MODIS Land Surface Temperature time series reconstruction with Open Source GIS: A new quality of temperature based ecological indicators in complex terrain (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neteler, M.

    2009-12-01

    In complex terrain like the Central European Alps, meteorological stations and ground surveys are usually sparsely and/or irregularly distributed and often favor agricultural areas. The application of traditional geospatial interpolation methods in complex terrain remains challenging and difficult to optimize. An alternative data source is remote sensing: high temporal resolution satellite data are continuously gaining interest since these data are intrinsically spatialized: continuous field of observations is obtained with this tool instead of point data. The increasing data availability suggests using these time series as surrogate to certain measures from meteorological stations, especially for temperature and related derivatives. The Terra and Aqua satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide four Earth coverages per day at various resolutions. We analyzed 8 years (2000 to 2008) of daily land surface temperature (LST) data from MODIS in an area located in the Southern European Alps. A method was developed to reconstruct incomplete maps (cloud coverage, invalid pixels) based on image statistics and on a model that includes additional GIS layers. The original LST map resolution of 1000m could be improved to 200m in this process which renders the resulting LST maps applicable at regional scales. We propose the use of these reconstructed daily LST time series as surrogate to meteorological observations especially in the area of epidemiological modeling where data are typically aggregated to decadal indicators. From these daily LST map series, derivable indicators include: 1) temperatures minima, means and maxima for annual/monthly/decadal periods; 2) unusual hot summers;3) the calculation of growing degree days, and 4) spring temperature increase or autumnal temperature decrease. Since more than 8 years of MODIS LST data are available today, even preliminary gradients can be extracted to assess multi-annual temperature trends

  6. Resolving complex chromosome structures during meiosis: versatile deployment of Smc5/6.

    PubMed

    Verver, Dideke E; Hwang, Grace H; Jordan, Philip W; Hamer, Geert

    2016-03-01

    The Smc5/6 complex, along with cohesin and condensin, is a member of the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family, large ring-like protein complexes that are essential for chromatin structure and function. Thanks to numerous studies of the mitotic cell cycle, Smc5/6 has been implicated to have roles in homologous recombination, restart of stalled replication forks, maintenance of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and heterochromatin, telomerase-independent telomere elongation, and regulation of chromosome topology. The nature of these functions implies that the Smc5/6 complex also contributes to the profound chromatin changes, including meiotic recombination, that characterize meiosis. Only recently, studies in diverse model organisms have focused on the potential meiotic roles of the Smc5/6 complex. Indeed, Smc5/6 appears to be essential for meiotic recombination. However, due to both the complexity of the process of meiosis and the versatility of the Smc5/6 complex, many additional meiotic functions have been described. In this review, we provide a clear overview of the multiple functions found so far for the Smc5/6 complex in meiosis. Additionally, we compare these meiotic functions with the known mitotic functions in an attempt to find a common denominator and thereby create clarity in the field of Smc5/6 research.

  7. Improvement in fingerprint detection using Tb(III)-dipicolinic acid complex doped nanobeads and time resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Frank M; Knupp, Gerd; Officer, Simon

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis and application of lanthanide complex doped nanobeads used as a luminescent fingerprint powder. Due to their special optical properties, namely a long emission lifetime, sharp emission profiles and large Stokes shifts, luminescent lanthanide complexes are useful for discriminating against signals from background emissions. This is a big advantage because latent fingerprints placed on multicoloured fluorescent surfaces are difficult to develop with conventional powders. The complex of 2,6-dipicolinic acid (DPA) and terbium ([Tb(DPA)3](3-)) is used for this purpose. Using the Stöber process, this complex is incorporated into a silica matrix forming nanosized beads (230-630nm). It is shown that the [Tb(DPA)3](3-) is successfully incorporated into the beads and that these beads exhibit the wanted optical properties of the complex. A phenyl functionalisation is applied to increase the lipophilicity of the beads and finally the beads are used to develop latent fingerprints. A device for time resolved imaging was built to improve the contrast between developed fingerprint and different background signals, whilst still detecting the long lasting luminescence of the complex. The developed fingerprint powder is therefore promising to develop fingerprints on multicoloured fluorescent surfaces.

  8. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of NOX over complex terrain region of Ranchi with FLEXPART-WRF by incorporation of improved turbulence intensity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate representation of air pollutant dispersion is essential for environmental management and planning purposes. In this study, semi-empirical relationships of turbulence intensity (σu/u*, σv/u* and σw/u*) as a function of surface layer scaling and local stability are developed following boundary layer similarity concepts at Ranchi, a complex terrain in Jharkhand, Eastern India for various seasons. The impact of the new turbulence parameterization for air pollution dispersion simulation is studied by incorporating the same in the Hanna scheme of FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian Particle dispersion model over study region. The model is used to estimate the ground level concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) due to industrial and vehicular sources in study region. The meteorological parameters needed in air-quality simulation are simulated using the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) mesoscale model at high resolution (3 km). Three turbulence schemes (YSU, MYNN2 and ACM2) in ARW are alternatively tested in dispersion simulation and comparisons are made with available air quality data for eight days in different seasons (winter, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon). Simulations with FLEXPART revealed distinct seasonal variation of dispersion patterns. It has been found that the new turbulence intensity relationships in FLEXPART improved the NOx concentration estimates by reducing the negative bias seen with default Hanna scheme. Further, the ARW simulated meteorological parameters using ACM2 and MYNN2 significantly reduced the bias in modeled pollutant concentrations. The study demonstrates the utility of high quality seasonal turbulence measurements in pollution dispersion model for better diffusion parameterization needed in air quality modeling.

  9. NWP Forecast Errors of Boundary Layer Flow in Complex Terrain Observed During the Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) Field Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczak, James M.

    2017-04-01

    The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a U.S. Department of Energy and NOAA-led program whose goal is to improve the accuracy of NWP forecasts of wind speed in complex terrain for wind energy applications. WFIP2 includes a field campaign held in the vicinity of the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S., which began in October 2015, and will continue through March, 2017. As part of WFIP2 a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation has been deployed, including a network of three 449 MHz radar wind profilers (RWP's) with RASS, eight 915 MHz RWP's with RASS, 18 sodars, 4 profiling microwave radiometers, 5 scanning lidars, 5 profiling lidars, a network of 10 microbarographs, and many surface meteorological stations. Key NWP forecast models utilized for WFIP2 are the 13 km resolution Rapid Refresh (RAP), 3km High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), 0.75km HRRR-Nest, and the 12 km North American Mesoscale (NAM) forecast system. Preliminary results from WFIP2 will be presented, including seasonal variations of model forecast errors of wind speed, direction, temperature and humidity profiles and boundary layer depths; meteorological phenomena producing large forecast errors; and the relative skill of the various NWP forecasting systems. Diurnal time height cross-sections of the model's mean bias and RMSE are evaluated for each of the models, providing a holistic view of model accuracy at simulating boundary layer structure. Model errors are analyzed as a function of season (3 month averages) and location, and show the impact of increasing model resolution on forecast skill. Seasonal averages of model biases and RMSE provide more robust results than do shorter case study episodes, and can be used to verify that model errors found in shorter case study episodes are in fact representative. The results are used to identify specific model weaknesses and the corresponding parameterization schemes that are in greatest need of

  10. Evaluation of a Sub-Grid Topographic Drag Parameterizations for Modeling Surface Wind Speed During Storms Over Complex Terrain in the Northeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hacker, J.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hopson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving regional simulation of 10-meter wind speed by verifying PBL schemes for storms at different scales, including convective storms, blizzards, tropical storms and nor'easters over complex terrain in the northeast U.S. We verify a recently proposed sub-grid topographic drag scheme in stormy conditions and compare it with two PBL schemes (Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University) from WRF-ARW over a region in the Northeast U.S. The scheme was designed to adjust the surface drag over regions with high subgrid-scale topographic variability. The schemes are compared using spatial, temporal, and pattern criteria against surface observations. The spatial and temporal criteria are defined by season, diurnal cycle, and topography; the pattern, is based on clusters derived using clustering analysis. Results show that the drag scheme reduces the positive bias of low wind speeds, but over-corrects the high wind speeds producing a magnitude-increasing negative bias with increasing speed. Both other schemes underestimate the most frequent low-speed mode and overestimate the high-speeds. Error characteristics of all schemes respond to seasonal and diurnal cycle changes. The Topo-wind experiment shows the best agreement with the observation quantiles in summer and fall, the best representation of the diurnal cycle in these seasons, and reduces the bias of all surface stations near the coast. In more stable conditions the Topo-wind scheme shows a larger negative bias. The cluster analysis reveals a correlation between bias and mean speed from the Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University schemes that is not present when the drag scheme is used. When the drag scheme is used the bias correlates with wind direction; the bias increases when the meridional wind component is negative. This pattern corresponds to trajectories with more land interaction with the highest biases found in northwest circulation clusters.

  11. Turbulence regimes and the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiening; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ying; Cao, Xianjie; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Beidou

    2014-05-01

    To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University are analyzed. We propose a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and then we examine the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions is found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, is greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeds the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence on timescales of less than 4 min depends systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability is an important factor for local turbulence. Then turbulence is categorized into three regimes based on the behaviors of nonstationary motions and local turbulence. Regime 1 considers stationary turbulence with a wind speed greater than 3.0 m s-1, and the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) can be used to calculate the turbulence momentum flux. Regime 2 examines intermittent turbulence where the MOST is competent to evaluate the local turbulence momentum flux but not nonstationary motions. Regime 3 involves wind speed that is less than the threshold value, where nonstationary motions are dominant, local turbulence is independent of the mean flow, and where the MOST may well be invalid.

  12. Photophysical evaluation of a new functional terbium complex in FRET-based time-resolved homogenous fluoroassays.

    PubMed

    Cywiński, Piotr J; Nchimi Nono, Katia; Charbonnière, Loïc J; Hammann, Tommy; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-04-07

    A new functional luminescent lanthanide complex (LLC) has been synthesized with terbium as a central lanthanide ion and biotin as a functional moiety. Unlike in typical lanthanide complexes assembled via carboxylic moieties, in the presented complex, four phosphate groups are chelating the central lanthanide ion. This special chemical assembly enhances the complex stability in phosphate buffers conventionally used in biochemistry. The complex synthesis strategy and photophysical properties are described as well as the performance in time-resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assays. In those assays, this biotin-LLC transferred energy either to acceptor organic dyes (Cy5 or AF680) labelled on streptavidin or to quantum dots (QD655 or QD705) surface-functionalised with streptavidins. The permanent spatial donor-acceptor proximity is assured through strong and stable biotin-streptavidin binding. The energy transfer is evidenced from the quenching observed in donor emission and from a decrease in donor luminescence decay, both associated with simultaneous increase in acceptor intensity and in the decay time. The dye-based assays are realised in TRIS and in PBS, whereas QD-based systems are studied in borate buffer. The delayed emission analysis allows for quantifying the recognition process and for auto-fluorescence-free detection, which is particularly relevant for application in bioanalysis. In accordance with Förster theory, Förster-radii (R0) were found to be around 60 Å for organic dyes and around 105 Å for QDs. The FRET efficiency (η) reached 80% and 25% for dye and QD acceptors, respectively. Physical donor-acceptor distances (r) have been determined in the range 45-60 Å for organic dye acceptors, while for acceptor QDs between 120 Å and 145 Å. This newly synthesised biotin-LLC extends the class of highly sensitive analytical tools to be applied in the bioanalytical methods such as time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays (TR-FIA), luminescent

  13. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Christopher L; Jozwiak, Christopher; Zhang, Wentao; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 Å(-1), and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ). The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  14. Structure and dynamics of a DNA: polymerase complex by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, David P.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of a fluorescent DNA primer:template with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I has been studied in solution using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited-state decay behavior and internal reorientation dynamics of a dansyl sulfonamide probe connected by a propyl chain to a modified uridine base in the primer strand were very sensitive to the local probe environment and exhibited characteristic changes upon binding of Kienow fragment to the DNA and elongation of the primer strand. Between 5 and 7 bases of duplex DNA upstream of the 3' primer terminus were protected from the solvent by the Kienow fragment and the strength of DNA:protein contacts varied within this region, being strongest at the 3' primer terminus. About 5% of the substrates were bound in a second spatially distinct site on the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Kienow fragment was consistent with this being the active site for 3'->5' exonuclease activity.

  15. A reduced complexity framework to bridge the gap between AGCMs and cloud-resolving models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Kevin A.; Medeiros, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The role of convective parameterizations at high horizontal resolution and their impacts on clouds, circulation, and precipitation processes represent large uncertainties in atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). As the statistical equilibrium in which radiative cooling is balanced by convective heating, radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE) offers a simplified framework to investigate such uncertainties. The Community Atmosphere Model 5 is configured in a RCE setup that consists of an ocean-covered planet with diurnally varying, spatially uniform insolation with no rotation effects. A series of simulations are performed in which the planetary radius is incrementally reduced. Because of the homogeneity of the setup, the effect is to reduce grid spacing, mimicking increased resolution without increasing the number of grid points. The results suggest that the reduced planet approach is able to reproduce the behavior of convection from full high-resolution simulations. At grid spacing less than 20 km, convective motions are predominantly produced by resolved scales.

  16. Modified diglycol-amides for actinide separation: solvent extraction and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy complexation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilden, A.; Modolo, G.; Lange, S.; Sadowski, F.; Bosbach, D.; Beele, B.B.; Panak, P.J.; Skerencak-Frech, A.; Geist, A.; Iqbal, M.; Verboom, W.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the back-bone of the diglycolamide-structure of the TODGA extractant was modified by adding one or two methyl groups to the central methylene carbon-atoms. The influence of these structural modifications on the extraction behavior of trivalent actinides and lanthanides and other fission products was studied in solvent extraction experiments. The addition of methyl groups to the central methylene carbon atoms leads to reduced distribution ratios, also for Sr(II). This reduced extraction efficiency for Sr(II) is beneficial for process applications, as the co-extraction of Sr(II) can be avoided, resulting in an easier process design. The use of these modified diglycol-amides in solvent extraction processes is discussed. Furthermore, the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) to the ligands was studied using Time-Resolved-Laser-Fluorescence-Spectroscopy (TRLFS). The complexes were characterized by slope analysis and conditional stability constants were determined.

  17. Species Delimitation of the Cycas segmentifida Complex (Cycadaceae) Resolved by Phylogenetic and Distance Analyses of Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiuyan; Liu, Jian; Gong, Xun

    2016-01-01

    The Cycas segmentifida complex consists of eight species whose distributions overlap in a narrow region in Southwest China. These eight taxa are also morphologically similar and are difficult to be distinguished. Consequently, their taxonomic status has been a matter of discussion in recent years. To study this species complex, we sequenced four plastid intergenic spacers (cpDNA), three nuclear genes and genotyped 12 microsatellites for the eight taxa from 19 different localities. DNA sequences were analyzed using Maximum Likelihood (ML) method and Bayesian Inference (BI), and microsatellites were analyzed using the Neighbor-joining (NJ) and structure inference methods. Results of cpDNA, nuclear gene GTP and microsatellites all rejected the hypotheses that this complex consisted of eight taxa or one distinct lineage (species) but two previously described species were adopted: Cycas guizhouensis K. M. Lan et R. F. Zou and Cycas segmentifida D. Y. Wang et C. Y. Deng. Cycas longlinensis H. T. Chang et Y. C. Zhong was included in C. guizhouensis and the other five taxa were included in C. segmentifida. Our species delimitation inferred from molecular data largely corresponds to morphological differentiation. However, the other two nuclear genes were unable to resolve species boundaries for this complex independently. This study offered evidences from different genomes for dealing with the species boundaries and taxonomical treatment of the C. segmentifida complex in an integrated perspective. PMID:26913044

  18. Dynamics of ligand substitution in labile cobalt complexes resolved by ultrafast T-jump

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hairong; Wan, Chaozhi; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2008-01-01

    Ligand exchange of hydrated metal complexes is common in chemical and biological systems. Using the ultrafast T-jump, we examined this process, specifically the transformation of aqua cobalt (II) complexes to their fully halogenated species. The results reveal a stepwise mechanism with time scales varying from hundreds of picoseconds to nanoseconds. The dynamics are significantly faster when the structure is retained but becomes rate-limited when the octahedral-to-tetrahedral structural change bottlenecks the transformation. Evidence is presented, from bimolecular kinetics and energetics (enthalpic and entropic), for a reaction in which the ligand assists the displacement of water molecules, with the retention of the entering ligand in the activated state. The reaction time scale deviates by one to two orders of magnitude from that of ionic diffusion, suggesting the involvement of a collisional barrier between the ion and the much larger complex. PMID:18725628

  19. Conceptualizing the regional hydrology of a complex low relief terrain: Climate - geology interactions on sink-source dynamics of Western Boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devito, K. J.; Mendoza, C. A.; Petrone, R. M.; Landhäusser, S.; Silins, U.; Qualizza, C.; Gignac, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Western Boreal Plain (WBP) eco-region of western Canada is experiencing unprecedented industrial development for forest, oil and gas resources, stressing the need to assess and understand the sink and source areas of regional water flow. This requires the development of models that can be use to predict and mitigate the impacts of land use changes on water quantity and quality. The WBP is characterized by low relief, hummocky terrain with complexes of forestland and wetlands, especially peatlands. A paired aspen forest harvest experiment (HEAD2) was conducted on adjacent pond-peatland-aspen forestland complexes of a moraine landform, ubiquitous throughout the WBP, to determine the influence of aspen vegetated forestlands and harvesting relative to wetlands on local and regional water cycling. Reductions in transpiration and interception following aspen harvest resulted in some increase in soil moisture. However, excess water was largely absorbed into deep moraine substrates and resulted in groundwater recharge with little or no lateral flow to adjacent wetlands and aquatic systems. As a result of high soil and groundwater storage there was no observable difference in runoff from the harvested catchment compared to the adjacent reference (uncut) catchment confirming that in most years runoff originates from the wetland (peatland) rather than forestland hydrologic units. Furthermore, soil moisture increases were short lived due to rapid redevelopment of leaf area as result of high-density regeneration of aspen through root suckering. Recovery of transpiration and interception to near pre-harvest conditions occurred within 3 years. Climate cycles, primarily inter-annual variation in snow pack, can overwhelm the influence of aspen harvest in the WBP, as during the harvest experiment large water table rises were observed in both the uncut and the harvested forestlands. This study illustrates that forestlands on deep moraine hummocky substrates of the WBP act

  20. A Real-Life Case Study of Audit Interactions--Resolving Messy, Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Vivien; Fearnley, Stella; Hines, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Real-life accounting and auditing problems are often complex and messy, requiring the synthesis of technical knowledge in addition to the application of generic skills. To help students acquire the necessary skills to deal with these problems effectively, educators have called for the use of case-based methods. Cases based on real situations (such…

  1. A Real-Life Case Study of Audit Interactions--Resolving Messy, Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Vivien; Fearnley, Stella; Hines, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Real-life accounting and auditing problems are often complex and messy, requiring the synthesis of technical knowledge in addition to the application of generic skills. To help students acquire the necessary skills to deal with these problems effectively, educators have called for the use of case-based methods. Cases based on real situations (such…

  2. Local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of the Jovian satellite, Ganymede, is divided into two main units, dark terrain cut by arcuate and subradial furrows, and light terrain consisting largely of areas with pervasive U-shaped grooves. The grooved terrain may be subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology of groove domains into four terrain types: (1) elongate bands of parallel grooves (groove lanes); (2) polygonal domains of parallel grooves (grooved polygons); (3) polygonal domains of two orthogonal groove sets (reticulate terrain); and (4) polygons having two to several complexly cross-cutting groove sets (complex grooved terrain). Reticulate terrain is frequently dark and not extensively resurfaced, and grades to a more hummocky terrain type. The other three grooved terrain types have almost universally been resurfaced by light material during their emplacement. The sequence of events during grooved terrain emplacement has been investigated. An attempt is made to integrate observed geologic and tectonic patterns to better constrain the relative ages and styles of emplacement of grooved terrain types. A revised model of grooved terrain emplacement is proposed and is tested using detailed geologic mapping and measurement of crater density.

  3. Mitochondrial genomes and avian phylogeny: complex characters and resolvability without explosive radiations.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Gillian C; Kardailsky, Olga; Kimball, Rebecca T; Braun, Edward L; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    We improve the taxon sampling for avian phylogeny by analyzing 7 new mitochondrial genomes (a toucan, woodpecker, osprey, forest falcon, American kestrel, heron, and a pelican). This improves inference of the avian tree, and it supports 3 major conclusions. The first is that some birds (including a parrot, a toucan, and an osprey) exhibit a complete duplication of the control region (CR) meaning that there are at least 4 distinct gene orders within birds. However, it appears that there are regions of continued gene conversion between the duplicate CRs, resulting in duplications that can be stable for long evolutionary periods. Because of this stable duplicated state, gene order can eventually either revert to the original order or change to the new gene order. The existence of this stable duplicate state explains how an apparently unlikely event (finding the same novel gene order) can arise multiple times. Although rare genomic changes have theoretical advantages for tree reconstruction, they can be compromised if these apparently rare events have a stable intermediate state. Secondly, the toucan and woodpecker improve the resolution of the 6-way split within Neoaves that has been called an "explosive radiation." An explosive radiation implies that normal microevolutionary events are insufficient to explain the observed macroevolution. By showing the avian tree is, in principle, resolvable, we demonstrate that the radiation of birds is amenable to standard evolutionary analysis. Thirdly, and as expected from theory, additional taxa breaking up long branches stabilize the position of some problematic taxa (like the falcon). In addition, we report that within the birds of prey and allies, we did not find evidence pairing New World vultures with storks or accipitrids (hawks, eagles, and osprey) with Falconids.

  4. Real-time quadrature projection complex conjugate resolved Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Sarunic, Marinko V; Applegate, Brian E; Izatt, Joseph A

    2006-08-15

    We present a novel algorithm for full-range imaging by suppression of the complex conjugate artifact in phase-shifting Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. This technique utilizes the projection of multiple phase-shifted interferograms onto an orthogonal basis set to reconstruct the complex interferogram. Full-range imaging with >30 dB suppression of the symmetric artifact is demonstrated using a 3 x 3 fiber coupler swept source OCT system, providing a depth range of 6.6mm with -8 dB roll-off in sensitivity at the depth boundaries relative to DC. Real-time display of full-range images of the anterior segment of the human eye acquired in vivo at a line rate of 6.67 kHz are presented.

  5. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, Kenneth Alan

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  6. Terrain correlation suitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wang; McClintock, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Terrain-aided navigation (TAN), also referred to as terrain correlation, is a technique that has proven to be highly successful as a navigational aid for autonomous, unmanned guided missiles. Qualitatively speaking, the effectiveness of terrain correlation is a function of signal- to-noise (S/N) ratio. The signal is equivalent to terrain roughness, while the noise is the combination of reference map errors, radar altimeter errors, and INS altitude errors. However, it is not practical to use only a single parameter, such as S/N, to define the suitability of terrain correlation. This paper discusses the shortcomings of the conventional single-parameter approach to the terrain contour matching algorithm (TERCOM) used in cruise missile guidance systems scene selection. A more comprehensive technique is then presented that analyzes the terrain correlation suitability based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique. A figure-of-merit (FOM) for terrain correlation suitability, computed from sample statistics, is introduced and simulation results are provided to illustrate the feasibility of using a multi-parameter FOM technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed approach could provide a cost effective enhancement to the TAN-based mission planning process.

  7. Differently Aged Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-09

    NASA Cassini spacecraft examines old and new terrain on Saturn fascinating Enceladus, a moon where jets of water ice particles and vapor spew from the south pole. Newly created terrain is at the bottom, in the center and on the left of this view.

  8. Terrain Software Conversion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    iv~ 1. Background. In 1979, CASAA (now TRAC-FLVN) contracted BDM Corporation to produce a terrain data base for the Corps Battle Game (predecessor to...vie% and mod-fv terrain Gata used by several of TRAO-FLVN’s war - si-,ulatiors was comnatible only with Tektronix 4027 hardware. TAB-GT was -,e- tc

  9. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  10. Cryptic Terrain on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    There is an enigmatic region near the south pole of Mars known as the 'cryptic' terrain. It stays cold in the spring, even as its albedo darkens and the sun rises in the sky.

    This region is covered by a layer of translucent seasonal carbon dioxide ice that warms and evaporates from below. As carbon dioxide gas escapes from below the slab of seasonal ice it scours dust from the surface. The gas vents to the surface, where the dust is carried downwind by the prevailing wind.

    The channels carved by the escaping gas are often radially organized and are known informally as 'spiders' (figure 1).

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003179_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 01-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 245.9 km (153.7 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.2 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:19 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 78 degrees, thus the sun was about 12 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 210.8 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  11. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  12. Cryptic Terrain on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    There is an enigmatic region near the south pole of Mars known as the 'cryptic' terrain. It stays cold in the spring, even as its albedo darkens and the sun rises in the sky.

    This region is covered by a layer of translucent seasonal carbon dioxide ice that warms and evaporates from below. As carbon dioxide gas escapes from below the slab of seasonal ice it scours dust from the surface. The gas vents to the surface, where the dust is carried downwind by the prevailing wind.

    The channels carved by the escaping gas are often radially organized and are known informally as 'spiders' (figure 1).

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003179_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 01-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 245.9 km (153.7 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.2 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:19 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 78 degrees, thus the sun was about 12 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 210.8 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  13. In search of the mechanisms behind soil carbon metabolism of a Douglas fir forest in complex terrain using naturally abundant 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Sulzman, E. W.; Barnard, H. R.; Kennedy, A.; Phillips, C.; Mix, A.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil is well known for being highly variable, spatially and temporally, in moisture, texture, nutrients, carbon content and organisms. The magnitude of variation in soil characteristics represented in a study is, in part, determined by the choice in site location. Choosing sites that are topographically flat reduces variability due to environmental gradients, variability that is amplified in sites of complex terrain. We measured soil respiration, an integrative measure of ecosystem biological and physical processes, and its isotopic signature (δ13CR-s) to accomplish two goals: 1. Explore how gradients in temperature and moisture within a steeply sloped watershed affect the flux and isotopic signature of soil CO2 2. Deconvolve the isotopic signature of soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic sources using a multi-source mixing model constrained by samples of soil organic matter and water soluble extracts of leaf foliage. Our site is located in a steep catchment within the central Cascades of Oregon (HJ Andrews LTER) where we made respiration measurements in plots established along side a sensor transect that continuously measures soil moisture and temperature; air relative humidity and temperature; and tree transpiration. There was a distinct difference in soil metabolism between the south and north aspects in the watershed. Temperature-corrected basal respiration of the south facing slope was 1 μmol m-2s-1 greater than the north facing slope. There was also a difference in isotopic signature between the two slopes that could be as great as 2 per mil depending on the period within the growing season. The strength of the correlation between environmental variables and soil carbon flux was non-uniform across the catchment. There was, however, a strong positive correlation between soil flux with recent transpiration rates (0 to 3 days prior) as well as with transpiration rates that occurred up to 9 days previously. This pattern was especially prevalent

  14. Complex terrain in the Critical Zone: How topography drives ecohydrological patterns of soil and plant carbon exchange in a semiarid mountainous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron-Gafford, G.; Minor, R. L.; Heard, M. M.; Sutter, L. F.; Yang, J.; Potts, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The southwestern U.S. is predicted to experience increasing temperatures and longer periods of inter-storm drought. High temperature and water deficit restrict plant productivity and ecosystem functioning, but the influence of future climate is predicted to be highly heterogeneous because of the complex terrain characteristic of much of the Critical Zone (CZ). Within our Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in the Southwestern US, we monitor ecosystem-scale carbon and water fluxes using eddy covariance. This whole-ecosystem metric is a powerful integrating measure of ecosystem function over time, but details on spatial heterogeneity resulting from topographic features of the landscape are not captured, nor are interactions among below- and aboveground processes. We supplement eddy covariance monitoring with distributed measures of carbon flux from soil and vegetation across different aspects to quantify the causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity through time. Given that (i) aspect influences how incoming energy drives evaporative water loss and (ii) seasonality drives temporal patterns of soil moisture recharge, we were able to examine the influence of these processes on CO2 efflux by investigating variation across aspect. We found that aspect was a significant source of spatial heterogeneity in soil CO2 efflux, but the influence varied across seasonal periods. Snow on South-facing aspects melted earlier and yielded higher efflux rates in the spring. However, during summer, North- and South-facing aspects had similar amounts of soil moisture, but soil temperatures were warmer on the North-facing aspect, yielding greater rates of CO2 efflux. Interestingly, aspect did not influence photosynthetic rates. Taken together, we found that physical features of the landscape yielded predictable patterns of levels and phenologies of soil moisture and temperature, but these drivers differentially influenced below- and aboveground sources of carbon exchange. Conducting

  15. Resolving the Complexity of Human Skin Metagenomes Using Single-Molecule Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Chih; Deming, Clayton; Segre, Julia A.; Kong, Heidi H.; Korlach, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep metagenomic shotgun sequencing has emerged as a powerful tool to interrogate composition and function of complex microbial communities. Computational approaches to assemble genome fragments have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for de novo reconstruction of genomes from these communities. However, the resultant “genomes” are typically fragmented and incomplete due to the limited ability of short-read sequence data to assemble complex or low-coverage regions. Here, we use single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing to reconstruct a high-quality, closed genome of a previously uncharacterized Corynebacterium simulans and its companion bacteriophage from a skin metagenomic sample. Considerable improvement in assembly quality occurs in hybrid approaches incorporating short-read data, with even relatively small amounts of long-read data being sufficient to improve metagenome reconstruction. Using short-read data to evaluate strain variation of this C. simulans in its skin community at single-nucleotide resolution, we observed a dominant C. simulans strain with moderate allelic heterozygosity throughout the population. We demonstrate the utility of SMRT sequencing and hybrid approaches in metagenome quantitation, reconstruction, and annotation. PMID:26861018

  16. Molecular design of DABNTf as a highly efficient resolving reagent for racemic Pd complex with Tropos biphenylphosphine (BIPHEP) ligand: circular dichroism (CD) spectra of enantiopure BIPHEP-Pd complex.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koichi; Yusa, Yukinori; Aikawa, Kohsuke; Hatano, Manabu

    2003-01-01

    The racemic Pd complexes with chirally flexible (tropos) biphenylphosphine (BIPHEP) ligands can be resolved but transformed into the enantio- and diastereo-pure complex. The enantiopure metal complex of BIPHEP ligand is thus obtained through enantiomer-selective complexation of a racemic BIPHEP-Pd complex with enantiopure 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-di(triflyl)amide, DABNTf. The differential CD spectra of the enantiopure BIPHEP-Pd complex is also reported. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Först, M.; Caviglia, A. D.; Scherwitzl, R.; Mankowsky, R.; Zubko, P.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Wilkins, S. B.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.; Triscone, J.-M.; Hill, J. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-09-01

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.

  18. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviglia, Andrea

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism.

  19. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    DOE PAGES

    Forst, M.; Wilkins, S. B.; Caviglia, A. D.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures1,2 has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium3. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically4. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion.more » Lastly, light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.« less

  20. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    SciTech Connect

    Forst, M.; Wilkins, S. B.; Caviglia, A. D.; Scherwitz, R.; Mankowsky, R.; Zubko, P.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Chuang, Y. -D.; Lee, W. S.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.; Triscone, J. -M.; Hill, J. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-07-06

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures1,2 has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium3. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically4. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Lastly, light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.

  1. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Caviglia, A D; Scherwitzl, R; Mankowsky, R; Zubko, P; Khanna, V; Bromberger, H; Wilkins, S B; Chuang, Y-D; Lee, W S; Schlotter, W F; Turner, J J; Dakovski, G L; Minitti, M P; Robinson, J; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D; Triscone, J-M; Hill, J P; Dhesi, S S; Cavalleri, A

    2015-09-01

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.

  2. Highly resolved self-excited density waves in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, M; Rubin-Zuzic, M; Zhdanov, S; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2007-08-31

    Experimental results on self-excited density waves in a complex plasma are presented. An argon plasma is produced in a capacitively coupled rf discharge at a low power and gas pressure. A cloud of microparticles is subjected to effective gravity in the range of 1-4 g by thermophoresis. The cloud is stretched horizontally (width/height approximately 45 mm/8 mm). The critical pressure for the onset of the waves increases with the temperature gradient. The waves are propagating in the direction of the ion drift. The wave frequency, phase velocity, and wavelength are measured, and particle migrations affected by the waves are analyzed at a time scale of 1 ms/frame and a subpixel space resolution.

  3. Complexation of short ds RNA/DNA oligonucleotides with Gemini micelles: a time resolved SAXS and computational study.

    PubMed

    Falsini, Sara; Di Cola, Emanuela; In, Martin; Giordani, Maria; Borocci, Stefano; Ristori, Sandra

    2017-01-25

    Gene therapy is based on nucleic acid delivery to pathogenic cells in order to modulate their gene expression. The most used non viral vectors are lipid-based nanoaggregates, which are safer than viral carriers and have been shown to assemble easily with both DNA and RNA. However, the transfection efficiency of non viral carriers still needs to be improved before intensive practise in clinical trials can be implemented. For this purpose, the in depth characterization of the complexes formed by nucleic acids and their transporters is of great relevance. In particular, information on the structure and assembly mechanism can be useful to improve our general knowledge of these artificial transfection agents. In this paper, the complexation mechanism of short interfering RNA and DNA molecules (siRNA and siDNA, respectively) with cationic micelles is investigated by combining small angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Micelles were obtained by Gemini surfactants with different spacer lengths (12-3-12, 12-6-12). The siRNA and siDNA used were double strand molecules characterized by the same length and homologous sequence, in order to perform a close comparison. We showed that complexes appear in solution immediately after mixing and, therefore, the investigation of complex formation requires fast experimental techniques, such as time resolved synchrotron SAXS (Tr-SAXS). The obtained systems had internal arrangement constituted by layers of squeezed micelles alternating the nucleic acids. Both SAXS and MD analyses allowed us to evaluate the mean size of complexes in the range of a few nanometers, with looser and less ordered stacking for the DNA containing aggregates.

  4. Resolving the Richat enigma: Doming and hydrothermal karstification above an alkaline complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matton, Guillaume; Jébrak, Michel; Lee, James K. W.

    2005-08-01

    The Richat structure (Sahara, Mauritania) appears as a large dome at least 40 km in diameter within a Late Proterozoic to Ordovician sequence. Erosion has created circular cuestas represented by three nested rings dipping outward from the structure. The center of the structure consists of a limestone-dolomite shelf that encloses a kilometer-scale siliceous breccia and is intruded by basaltic ring dikes, kimberlitic intrusions, and alkaline volcanic rocks. Several hypotheses have been presented to explain the spectacular Richat structure and breccia, but their origin remains enigmatic. The breccia body is lenticular in shape and irregularly thins at its extremities to only a few meters. The breccia was created during karst dissolution and collapse. Internal sediments fill the centimeter- to meter-scale cavities. Alkaline enrichment and the presence of Cretaceous automorphous neoformed K-feldspar demonstrate the hydrothermal origin of these internal sediments and their contemporaneity with magmatism. A model is proposed in which doming and the production of hydrothermal fluids were instrumental in creating a favorable setting for dissolution. The circular Richat structure and its breccia core thus represent the superficial expression of a Cretaceous alkaline complex with an exceptionally well preserved hydrothermal karst infilling at its summit.

  5. Rainfall extremes, weather and climatic characterization over complex terrain: A data-driven approach based on signal enhancement methods and extreme value modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Luis E.; Willems, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Weather and climatic characterization of rainfall extremes is both of scientific and societal value for hydrometeorogical risk management, yet discrimination of local and large-scale forcing remains challenging in data-scarce and complex terrain environments. Here, we present an analysis framework that separate weather (seasonal) regimes and climate (inter-annual) influences using data-driven process identification. The approach is based on signal-to-noise separation methods and extreme value (EV) modeling of multisite rainfall extremes. The EV models use a semi-automatic parameter learning [1] for model identification across temporal scales. At weather scale, the EV models are combined with a state-based hidden Markov model [2] to represent the spatio-temporal structure of rainfall as persistent weather states. At climatic scale, the EV models are used to decode the drivers leading to the shift of weather patterns. The decoding is performed into a climate-to-weather signal subspace, built via dimension reduction of climate model proxies (e.g. sea surface temperature and atmospheric circulation) We apply the framework to the Western Andean Ridge (WAR) in Ecuador and Peru (0-6°S) using ground data from the second half of the 20th century. We find that the meridional component of winds is what matters for the in-year and inter-annual variability of high rainfall intensities alongside the northern WAR (0-2.5°S). There, low-level southerly winds are found as advection drivers for oceanic moist of the normal-rainy season and weak/moderate the El Niño (EN) type; but, the strong EN type and its unique moisture surplus is locally advected at lowlands in the central WAR. Moreover, the coastal ridges, south of 3°S dampen meridional airflows, leaving local hygrothermal gradients to control the in-year distribution of rainfall extremes and their anomalies. Overall, we show that the framework, which does not make any prior assumption on the explanatory power of the weather

  6. Accurate, multi-kb reads resolve complex populations and detect rare microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Itai; Kertesz, Michael; Hug, Laura A.; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Blauwkamp, Timothy A.; Castelle, Cindy J.; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Thomas, Brian C.; Burstein, David; Tringe, Susannah G.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of microbial communities is essential for understanding global biogeochemical processes and can guide bioremediation and medical treatments. Metagenomics is most commonly used to analyze microbial diversity and metabolic potential, but assemblies of the short reads generated by current sequencing platforms may fail to recover heterogeneous strain populations and rare organisms. Here we used short (150-bp) and long (multi-kb) synthetic reads to evaluate strain heterogeneity and study microorganisms at low abundance in complex microbial communities from terrestrial sediments. The long-read data revealed multiple (probably dozens of) closely related species and strains from previously undescribed Deltaproteobacteria and Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Notably, these are the most abundant organisms in the communities, yet short-read assemblies achieved only partial genome coverage, mostly in the form of short scaffolds (N50 = ∼2200 bp). Genome architecture and metabolic potential for these lineages were reconstructed using a new synteny-based method. Analysis of long-read data also revealed thousands of species whose abundances were <0.1% in all samples. Most of the organisms in this “long tail” of rare organisms belong to phyla that are also represented by abundant organisms. Genes encoding glycosyl hydrolases are significantly more abundant than expected in rare genomes, suggesting that rare species may augment the capability for carbon turnover and confer resilience to changing environmental conditions. Overall, the study showed that a diversity of closely related strains and rare organisms account for a major portion of the communities. These are probably common features of many microbial communities and can be effectively studied using a combination of long and short reads. PMID:25665577

  7. Time-resolved luminescence and singlet oxygen formation after illumination of the hypericin-low-density lipoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Gbur, Peter; Dedic, Roman; Chorvat, Dusan; Miskovsky, Pavol; Hala, Jan; Jancura, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence study of hypericin (Hyp) in complex with low-density lipoproteins (LDL) as well as the evolution of singlet oxygen formation and annihilation after illumination of Hyp/LDL complexes at room temperature are presented in this work. The observed shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of Hyp at high Hyp/LDL molar ratios (>25:1) proves the self-quenching of the excited singlet state of monomeric Hyp at these concentration ratios. The very short lifetime ( approximately 0.5 ns) of Hyp fluorescence at very high Hyp/LDL ratios (>150:1) suggests that at high local Hyp concentration inside LDL molecules fast and ultrafast nonradiative decay processes from excited singlet state of Hyp become more important. Contrary to the lifetime of the singlet excited state, the lifetime (its shorter component) of Hyp phosphorescence is not dependent on Hyp/LDL ratio in the studied concentration range. The amount of singlet oxygen produced as well as the integral intensity of Hyp phosphorescence after illumination of Hyp/LDL complexes resemble the dependence of the concentration of molecules of Hyp in monomeric state on Hyp/LDL until a concentration ratio of 60:1. This fact confirms that only monomeric Hyp is able to produce the excited triplet state of Hyp, which in aerobic conditions leads to singlet oxygen production. The value of singlet oxygen lifetime ( approximately 8 micros) after its formation from the excited triplet state of Hyp in LDL proves that molecules of singlet oxygen remain for a certain period of time inside LDL particles and are not immediately released to the aqueous surrounding. That Hyp exists in the complex with LDL in the monodeprotonated state is also demonstrated.

  8. Pluto Fretted Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-20

    NASA New Horizons scientists have spotted an expanse of terrain they describe as fretted bright plains divided into polygon-shaped blocks by a network of dark, connected valleys in Pluto informally named Venera Terra region.

  9. Geological terrain models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    The initial phase of a program to determine the best interpretation strategy and sensor configuration for a radar remote sensing system for geologic applications is discussed. In this phase, terrain modeling and radar image simulation were used to perform parametric sensitivity studies. A relatively simple computer-generated terrain model is presented, and the data base, backscatter file, and transfer function for digital image simulation are described. Sets of images are presented that simulate the results obtained with an X-band radar from an altitude of 800 km and at three different terrain-illumination angles. The simulations include power maps, slant-range images, ground-range images, and ground-range images with statistical noise incorporated. It is concluded that digital image simulation and computer modeling provide cost-effective methods for evaluating terrain variations and sensor parameter changes, for predicting results, and for defining optimum sensor parameters.

  10. LOLA: Defining Lunar Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument on board NASA's LRO spacecraft builds the highest detail topography currently available of the lunar terrain. In this video David Smith, LOLA's P...

  11. Communication: Ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy of photoionization-induced proton transfer in phenol-ammonia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ching-Chi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Jr-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Cheng, Po-Yuan

    2014-11-07

    Photoionization-induced proton transfer (PT) in phenol-ammonia (PhOH-NH{sub 3}) complex has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. Neutral PhOH-NH{sub 3} complexes prepared in a free jet are photoionized by femtosecond [1+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization via the S{sub 1} state, and the subsequent dynamics occurring in the cations is probed by delayed pulses that result in ion fragmentation. The observed temporal evolutions of the photofragmentation spectra are consistent with an intracomplex PT reaction. The experiments revealed that PT in [PhOH-NH{sub 3}]{sup +} cation proceeds in two distinct steps: an initial impulsive wave-packet motion in ∼70 fs followed by a slower relaxation of about 1 ps that stabilizes the system into the final PT configuration. These results indicate that for a barrierless PT system, even though the initial PT motions are impulsive and ultrafast, the reaction may take a much longer time scale to complete.

  12. GOTHiC, a probabilistic model to resolve complex biases and to identify real interactions in Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Borbala; Martincorena, Inigo; Darbo, Elodie; Sugar, Robert; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2017-01-01

    Hi-C is one of the main methods for investigating spatial co-localisation of DNA in the nucleus. However, the raw sequencing data obtained from Hi-C experiments suffer from large biases and spurious contacts, making it difficult to identify true interactions. Existing methods use complex models to account for biases and do not provide a significance threshold for detecting interactions. Here we introduce a simple binomial probabilistic model that resolves complex biases and distinguishes between true and false interactions. The model corrects biases of known and unknown origin and yields a p-value for each interaction, providing a reliable threshold based on significance. We demonstrate this experimentally by testing the method against a random ligation dataset. Our method outperforms previous methods and provides a statistical framework for further data analysis, such as comparisons of Hi-C interactions between different conditions. GOTHiC is available as a BioConductor package (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GOTHiC.html).

  13. Sampling in rugged terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    Work in rugged terrain poses some unique problems that should be considered before research is initiated. Besides the obvious physical difficulties of crossing uneven terrain, topography can influence the bird species? composition of a forest and the observer's ability to detect birds and estimate distances. Census results can also be affected by