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Sample records for resolve experimental lung

  1. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs resolve experimental lung injury in mice and are present in humans with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R.; West, Erin E.; Willett, Matthew H.; Britos, Martin F.; Pipeling, Matthew R.; Brower, Roy G.; Tuder, Rubin M.; McDyer, John F.; King, Landon S.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, inflammation, cytokine induction, and neutrophil accumulation. Although early events in the pathogenesis of ALI have been defined, the mechanisms underlying resolution are unknown. As a model of ALI, we administered intratracheal (i.t.) LPS to mice and observed peak lung injury 4 days after the challenge, with resolution by day 10. Numbers of alveolar lymphocytes increased as injury resolved. To examine the role of lymphocytes in this response, lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1–/– and C57BL/6 WT mice were exposed to i.t. LPS. The extent of injury was similar between the groups of mice through day 4, but recovery was markedly impaired in the Rag-1–/– mice. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that infusion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs as late as 24 hours after i.t. LPS normalized resolution in Rag-1–/– mice. Similarly, Treg depletion in WT mice delayed recovery. Treg transfer into i.t. LPS–exposed Rag-1–/– mice also corrected the elevated levels of alveolar proinflammatory cytokines and increased the diminished levels of alveolar TGF-β and neutrophil apoptosis. Mechanistically, Treg-mediated resolution of lung injury was abrogated by TGF-β inhibition. Moreover, BAL of patients with ALI revealed dynamic changes in CD3+CD4+CD25hiCD127loFoxp3+ cells. These results indicate that Tregs modify innate immune responses during resolution of lung injury and suggest potential targets for treating ALI, for which there are no specific therapies currently available. PMID:19770521

  2. Neurological outcome after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Biener, Ingeborg; Czaplik, Michael; Nolte, Kay; Dembinski, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2011-12-15

    We examined the influences of acute lung injury and hypoxia on neurological outcome. Functional performance was assessed using a neurocognitive test and a neurologic deficit score (NDS) five days before. On experimental day, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to hypoxia only (HO group, n=5) or to acute lung injury (ALI group, n=5). Hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, systemic cytokines and further physiologic variables were obtained at baseline, at the time of ALI, 2, 4 and 8h thereafter. Subsequently, injured lungs were recruited and animals weaned from the ventilator. Neurocognitive testing was re-examined for five days. Then, brains were harvested for neurohistopathology. After the experiment, neurocognitive performance was significantly worsened and the NDS increased in the ALI group. Histopathology revealed no significant differences. Oxygenation was comparable between groups although significantly higher inspiratory pressures occured after ALI. Cytokines showed a trend towards higher levels after ALI. Neurocognitive compromise after ALI seems due to a more pronounced inflammatory response and complex mechanical ventilation.

  3. Noninvasive Imaging of Experimental Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Gang; Antony, Veena B.; Ding, Qiang; Nath, Hrudaya; Eary, Janet F.; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Small animal models of lung fibrosis are essential for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying human fibrotic lung diseases; additionally, they are useful for preclinical testing of candidate antifibrotic agents. The current end-point measures of experimental lung fibrosis involve labor-intensive histological and biochemical analyses. These measures fail to account for dynamic changes in the disease process in individual animals and are limited by the need for large numbers of animals for longitudinal studies. The emergence of noninvasive imaging technologies provides exciting opportunities to image lung fibrosis in live animals as often as needed and to longitudinally track the efficacy of novel antifibrotic compounds. Data obtained by noninvasive imaging provide complementary information to histological and biochemical measurements. In addition, the use of noninvasive imaging in animal studies reduces animal usage, thus satisfying animal welfare concerns. In this article, we review these new imaging modalities with the potential for evaluation of lung fibrosis in small animal models. Such techniques include micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and multimodal imaging systems including PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It is anticipated that noninvasive imaging will be increasingly used in animal models of fibrosis to gain insights into disease pathogenesis and as preclinical tools to assess drug efficacy. PMID:25679265

  4. Stable isotope resolved metabolomics of lung cancer in a SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Higashi, Richard M; Yan, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have determined the time course of [U-(13)C]-glucose utilization and transformations in SCID mice via bolus injection of the tracer in the tail vein. Incorporation of (13)C into metabolites extracted from mouse blood plasma and several tissues (lung, heart, brain, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle) were profiled by NMR and GC-MS, which helped ascertain optimal sampling times for different target tissues. We found that the time for overall optimal (13)C incorporation into tissue was 15-20 min but with substantial differences in (13)C labeling patterns of various organs that reflected their specific metabolism. Using this stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) approach, we have compared the (13)C metabolite profile of the lungs in the same mouse with or without an orthotopic lung tumor xenograft established from human PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma cells. The (13)C metabolite profile shows considerable differences in [U-(13)C]-glucose transformations between the two lung tissues, demonstrating the feasibility of applying SIRM to investigate metabolic networks of human cancer xenograft in the mouse model.

  5. Lung release of HIPDM: A new index of lung dysfunction for clinical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Ghelarducci, L.; Mazzuca, N.; Giuntini, C.; Taccini, E.; Renzoni, G.; Pellegrini, N.; Gilardi, M.C.; Gerundini, P.

    1985-05-01

    Lung uptake, metabolism and release of amines has been experimentally documented. The authors studied in rabbit and man the lung kinetics of radioiodinated N-N-N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1, 3-propanediamine (HIPDM). In rabbits, after i.v. injection, 95% of HIPDM is kept within the lungs and is then released with a mean time (t-bar) of several hours as assessed both in vivo, by gamma camera external counting (n=5; t-bar=7.0 hrs), and in vitro by measuring activity in lung homogenates at various times after injection (n=56; t-bar=7.6 hrs). In 10 healthy non smoking subjects t-bar was 6.4 +- 1 hrs, whereas it was 12.1 +- 2 hrs in 10 asymptomatic smokers with normal pulmonary function tests. Preliminary clinical studies showed that HIPDM lung release is delayed in non smoking patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (n=4; t-bar=11.5 +- 2 hrs) and to a greater extent in adult respiratory distress syndrome (n=4; t-bar=25.8 +- 5hrs), whereas it was not significantly affected in cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=4; t-bar=8.8 +- 2 hrs). Hence, both smoke exposure and injury to the lung microcirculation may impair HIPDM lung kinetics. HIPDM external counting may therefore provide a new index of lung dysfunction in man. Rabbit can be used as a model to evaluate HIPDM lung kinetics in experimentally induced lung injury.

  6. Energy-resolved computed tomography: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2008-10-01

    First experimental results with energy-resolved computed tomography (CT) are reported. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT has been improved with x-ray energy weighting for the first time. Further, x-ray energy weighting improved the CNR in material decomposition CT when applied to CT projections prior to dual-energy subtraction. The existing CT systems use an energy (charge) integrating x-ray detector that provides a signal proportional to the energy of the x-ray photon. Thus, the x-ray photons with lower energies are scored less than those with higher energies. This underestimates contribution of lower energy photons that would provide higher contrast. The highest CNR can be achieved if the x-ray photons are scored by a factor that would increase as the x-ray energy decreases. This could be performed by detecting each x-ray photon separately and measuring its energy. The energy selective CT data could then be saved, and any weighting factor could be applied digitally to a detected x-ray photon. The CT system includes a photon counting detector with linear arrays of pixels made from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor. A cylindrical phantom with 10.2 cm diameter made from tissue-equivalent material was used for CT imaging. The phantom included contrast elements representing calcifications, iodine, adipose and glandular tissue. The x-ray tube voltage was 120 kVp. The energy selective CT data were acquired, and used to generate energy-weighted and material-selective CT images. The energy-weighted and material decomposition CT images were generated using a single CT scan at a fixed x-ray tube voltage. For material decomposition the x-ray spectrum was digitally spilt into low- and high-energy parts and dual-energy subtraction was applied. The x-ray energy weighting resulted in CNR improvement of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.40 and 1.63, respectively, as compared to conventional charge integrating CT. The x-ray energy weighting was also applied

  7. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2016-10-20

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS.

  8. Bosutinib Therapy Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Priscila J.; Clevelario, Amanda L.; Padilha, Gisele A.; Silva, Johnatas D.; Kitoko, Jamil Z.; Olsen, Priscilla C.; Capelozzi, Vera L.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Cruz, Fernanda F.

    2017-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease for which no effective therapy exists. We hypothesized that bosutinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might ameliorate inflammatory responses, attenuate pulmonary fibrosis, and thus improve lung function in experimental silicosis. For this purpose, we investigated the potential efficacy of bosutinib in the treatment of experimental silicosis induced in C57BL/6 mice by intratracheal administration of silica particles. After 15 days, once disease was established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or bosutinib (1 mg/kg/dose in 0.1 mL 1% DMSO) by oral gavage, twice daily for 14 days. On day 30, lung mechanics and morphometry, total and differential cell count in alveolar septa and granuloma, levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor in lung homogenate, M1 and M2 macrophages, total leukocytes, and T cells in BALF, lymph nodes, and thymus, and collagen fiber content in alveolar septa and granuloma were analyzed. In a separate in vitro experiment, RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to silica particles in the presence or absence of bosutinib. After 24 h, gene expressions of arginase-1, IL-10, IL-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and caspase-3 were evaluated. In vivo, in silicotic animals, bosutinib, compared to DMSO, decreased: (1) fraction area of collapsed alveoli, (2) size and number of granulomas, and mononuclear cell granuloma infiltration; (3) IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and TGF-β levels in lung homogenates, (4) collagen fiber content in lung parenchyma, and (5) viscoelastic pressure and static lung elastance. Bosutinib also reduced M1 cell counts while increasing M2 macrophage population in both lung parenchyma and granulomas. Total leukocyte, regulatory T, CD4+, and CD8+ cell counts in the lung-draining lymph

  9. Experimental Time Resolved Electron Beam Temperature Measurements Using Bremsstrahlung Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Menge, P.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1999-06-25

    Electron beam temperature, {beta}{perpendicular} (= v{perpendicular}/v), is important to control for the development of high dose flash radiographic bremsstrahlung sources. At high voltage (> 5 MV) increasing electron beam temperature has a serious deleterious effect on dose production. The average and time resolved behavior of beam temperature was measured during radiographic experiments on the HERMES III accelerator (10 MV, 50 kA, 70 ns). A linear array of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the time integrated average of beam temperature. On and off-axis photoconducting diamond (PCD) detectors were used to measure the time resolved bremsstrahlung dose rate, which is dependent on beam energy and temperature. The beam temperature can be determined by correlating PCD response with accelerator voltage and current and also by analyzing the ratio of PCD amplitudes on and off axis. This ratio is insensitive to voltage and current and thus, is more reliable than utilizing absolute dose rate. The data is unfolded using comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations to obtain absolute beam temperatures. The data taken on HERMES III show abrupt increases in {beta}{perpendicular} midway through the pulse indicating rapid onset of beam instability.

  10. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  11. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Analysis of Ribonucleotide and RNA Metabolism in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Tan, Jinlian; McKinney, Martin M; Lane, Andrew N

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a simple NMR-based method to determine the turnover of nucleotides and incorporation into RNA by stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) in A549 lung cancer cells. This method requires no chemical degradation of the nucleotides or chromatography. During cell growth, the free ribonucleotide pool is rapidly replaced by de novo synthesized nucleotides. Using [U-(13)C]-glucose and [U-(13)C,(15)N]-glutamine as tracers, we showed that virtually all of the carbons in the nucleotide riboses were derived from glucose, whereas glutamine was preferentially utilized over glucose for pyrimidine ring biosynthesis, via the synthesis of Asp through the Krebs cycle. Incorporation of the glutamine amido nitrogen into the N3 and N9 positions of the purine rings was also demonstrated by proton-detected (15)N NMR. The incorporation of (13)C from glucose into total RNA was measured and shown to be a major sink for the nucleotides during cell proliferation. This method was applied to determine the metabolic action of an anti-cancer selenium agent (methylseleninic acid or MSA) on A549 cells. We found that MSA inhibited nucleotide turnover and incorporation into RNA, implicating an important role of nucleotide metabolism in the toxic action of MSA on cancer cells.

  12. Resolving DOI Based URNs Using Squid: An Experimental System at UKOLN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    Describes UKOLN's (United Kingdom Office for Library and Information Networking--a national center for support in network information management in the library/information communities) experimental system that allows digital object identifiers (DOIs) encoded as uniform resource names (URNs) to be resolved on behalf of Web browsers by Squid, a…

  13. Experimental results on time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography with fast-gated SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    We present experimental results of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) and show an increased imaged depth range for a given acquisition time compared to the non gated mode.

  14. Platelet glycoprotein Ibα supports experimental lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shashank; Zuka, Masahiko; Liu, Jungling; Russell, Susan; Dent, Judith; Guerrero, José A.; Forsyth, Jane; Maruszak, Brigid; Gartner, T. Kent; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Ware, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The platelet paradigm in hemostasis and thrombosis involves an initiation step that depends on platelet membrane receptors binding to ligands on a damaged or inflamed vascular surface. Once bound to the surface, platelets provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin-rich network produced by coagulation factors. The platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX, is critical in this process and initiates the formation of a platelet-rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. A role for platelets beyond the hemostasis/thrombosis paradigm is emerging with significant platelet contributions in both tumorigenesis and inflammation. We have established congenic (N10) mouse colonies (C57BL/6J) with dysfunctional GP Ib-IX receptors in our laboratory that allow us an opportunity to examine the relevance of platelet GP Ib-IX in syngeneic mouse models of experimental metastasis. Our results demonstrate platelet GP Ib-IX contributes to experimental metastasis because a functional absence of GP Ib-IX correlates with a 15-fold reduction in the number of lung metastatic foci using B16F10.1 melanoma cells. The results demonstrate that the extracellular domain of the α-subunit of GP Ib is the structurally relevant component of the GP Ib-IX complex contributing to metastasis. Our results support the hypothesis that platelet GP Ib-IX functions that support normal hemostasis or pathologic thrombosis also contribute to tumor malignancy. PMID:17494758

  15. Experimental and Computational Models for Simulating Sound Propagation Within the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Acikgoz, S.; Ozer, M. B.; Mansy, H. A.; Sandler, R. H.

    2008-01-01

    An acoustic boundary element model is used to simulate sound propagation in the lung parenchyma and surrounding chest wall. It is validated theoretically and numerically and then compared with experimental studies on lung-chest phantom models that simulate the lung pathology of pneumothorax. Studies quantify the effect of the simulated lung pathology on the resulting acoustic field measured at the phantom chest surface. This work is relevant to the development of advanced auscultatory techniques for lung, vascular, and cardiac sounds within the torso that utilize multiple noninvasive sensors to create acoustic images of the sound generation and transmission to identify certain pathologies. PMID:18568101

  16. Lung imaging fluorescence endoscope: development and experimental prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcic, Branko; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Hung, Jaclyn; Jaggi, Bruno; Radjinia, Massud; Pon, Alfred; Profio, A. E.

    1991-06-01

    A lung imaging fluorescence endoscope has been developed which can be used for detection and localization of early lung cancer. We exploited tissue autofluorescence alone or in combination with fluorescent tumor localizing drugs to create pseudo images which can clearly delineate the diseased sites from the surrounding normal tissues. With this technique it is possible to detect early lung cancer as well as pre-cancerous lesions of one to two millimeters in diameter and only a few cell layers thick.

  17. Serum copper concentration as an index of experimental lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Ischiropoulos, H. )

    1989-01-01

    Serum copper (Cu) concentration was evaluated as an index of lung injury in two rat models of pneumotoxicity: hemithoracic irradiation and monocrotaline ingestion. In both models there was a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum Cu concentration. This hypercupremia paralleled the development of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction (decreased lung plasminogen activator activity and increased prostacyclin production) and pulmonary fibrosis (hydroxyproline accumulation). In the radiation model, lung injury and hypercupremia persisted for at least 6 months, and were spared similarly when the total dose was delivered in multiple daily fractions as compared to single doses. In irradiated rats, the elevated serum Cu concentration was accompanied by increases in plasma ceruloplasmin, lung Cu concentration, and lung Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In monocrotaline-treated rats, lung damage and hypercupremia also were accompanied by a reduction in liver Cu concentration, and by a direct correlation between the concentrations of Cu and SGOT in the serum. In both models, some but not all modifiers of lung damage (penicillamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, pentoxifylline) also partially prevented the insult-induced hypercupremia. In contrast, serum iron concentration was largely independent of treatment in all experiments. These data suggest that elevated serum copper concentration is an accurate and minimally invasive index of lung injury in irradiated and monocrotaline-treated rats.

  18. Pro-resolving lipid mediator Resolvin D1 serves as a marker of lung disease in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fussbroich, Daniela; Mueller, Klaus; Serve, Friederike; Smaczny, Christina; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects multiple organs, including the lungs, pancreas, liver and intestine. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) locus lead to defective proteins and reduced Cl- secretion and Na+ hyperabsorption in the affected organs. In addition, patients suffering from CF display chronic inflammation that contributes to the pathogenesis of CF. Recent work suggests that CF patients have a reduced capacity to biosynthesize specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs), which contributes to the development and duration of the unwanted inflammation. Alterations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), like lipoxins (LXs), maresins (MaRs), protectins (PDs) and resolvins (Rvs), may play a major role on clinical impact of airway inflammation in CF. Methods In this study, our aims were to detect and quantitate Resolvin D1 (RvD1) in sputum and plasma from patients with CF and compare levels of RvD1 with biomarkers of inflammation and lung function. We studied 27 CF patients aged 6 to 55 years (median 16 years) in a prospective approach. Results DHA can be found in the plasma of our CF patients in the milligram range and is decreased in comparison to a healthy control group. The DHA-derived pro-resolving mediator Resolvin D1 (RvD1) was also present in the plasma (286.4 ± 50 pg/ mL, mean ± SEM) and sputum (30.0 ± 2.6 pg/ mL, mean ± SEM) samples from our patients with CF and showed a positive correlation with sputum inflammatory markers. The plasma concentrations of RvD1 were ten times higher than sputum concentrations. Interestingly, sputum RvD1/ IL-8 levels showed a positive correlation with FEV1 (rs = 0.3962, p< 0.05). Conclusions SPMs, like RvD1, are well known to down-regulate inflammatory pathways. Our study shows that the bioactive lipid mediator RvD1, derived from DHA, was

  19. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  20. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation.

  1. Time- and compartment-resolved proteome profiling of the extracellular niche in lung injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Herbert B; Fernandez, Isis E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Schaab, Christoph; Scheltema, Richard A; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis and repair. However, its composition and architecture are not well characterized. Here, we monitor remodeling of the extracellular niche in tissue repair in the bleomycin-induced lung injury mouse model. Mass spectrometry quantified 8,366 proteins from total tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) over the course of 8 weeks, surveying tissue composition from the onset of inflammation and fibrosis to its full recovery. Combined analysis of proteome, secretome, and transcriptome highlighted post-transcriptional events during tissue fibrogenesis and defined the composition of airway epithelial lining fluid. To comprehensively characterize the ECM, we developed a quantitative detergent solubility profiling (QDSP) method, which identified Emilin-2 and collagen-XXVIII as novel constituents of the provisional repair matrix. QDSP revealed which secreted proteins interact with the ECM, and showed drastically altered association of morphogens to the insoluble matrix upon injury. Thus, our proteomic systems biology study assigns proteins to tissue compartments and uncovers their dynamic regulation upon lung injury and repair, potentially contributing to the development of anti-fibrotic strategies. PMID:26174933

  2. Application of Monte Carlo technique to time-resolved transillumination: a comparison with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scampoli, Paola; Curto, C. A.; Guida, Giovanni; Roberti, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    The growing number of laser applications in medicine and biology has determined a renewed interest on the study of the light transport in turbid media such as biological tissues. One of the most powerful methods used to describe this kind of process is given by the Monte Carlo techniques. We have developed a FORTRAN90 code, running on an Alpha Vax AXP DEC 2100 to simulate the transport of a photon beam with a Gaussian temporal and spatial profile through a multilayered sample. The code provides the sample transmittance and reflectance (both time and space resolved) that can be compared to the experimental data. Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to simulate time-resolved transillumination through water latex and intralipid water solutions with optical properties similar to those of biological tissues. The comparison of Monte Carlo results with experimental data and with analytical solutions to diffusion equation shows a good agreement, suggesting that Monte Carlo techniques are indeed a powerful tool for predictions on light transport in turbid media.

  3. Effects of exogenous surfactant on the non-heart-beating donor lung graft in experimental lung transplantation - a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Gudrun; Knudsen, Lars; Madershahian, Navid; Mühlfeld, Christian; Frank, Konrad; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The use of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) lungs may help to overcome the shortage of lung grafts in clinical lung transplantation, but warm ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion injury (I/R injury) resulting in primary graft dysfunction represent a considerable threat. Thus, better strategies for optimized preservation of lung grafts are urgently needed. Surfactant dysfunction has been shown to contribute to I/R injury, and surfactant replacement therapy is effective in enhancing lung function and structural integrity in related rat models. In the present study we hypothesize that surfactant replacement therapy reduces oedema formation in a pig model of NHBD lung transplantation. Oedema formation was quantified with (SF) and without (non-SF) surfactant replacement therapy in interstitial and alveolar compartments by means of design-based stereology in NHBD lungs 7 h after cardiac arrest, reperfusion and transplantation. A sham-operated group served as control. In both NHBD groups, nearly all animals died within the first hours after transplantation due to right heart failure. Both SF and non-SF developed an interstitial oedema of similar degree, as shown by an increase in septal wall volume and arithmetic mean thickness as well as an increase in the volume of peribron-chovascular connective tissue. Regarding intra-alveolar oedema, no statistically significant difference could be found between SF and non-SF. In conclusion, surfactant replacement therapy cannot prevent poor outcome after prolonged warm ischaemia of 7 h in this model. While the beneficial effects of surfactant replacement therapy have been observed in several experimental and clinical studies related to heart-beating donor lungs and cold ischaemia, it is unlikely that surfactant replacement therapy will overcome the shortage of organs in the context of prolonged warm ischaemia, for example, 7 h. Moreover, our data demonstrate that right heart function and dysfunctions of the pulmonary vascular bed are

  4. The left lung is preferentially targeted during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, F.S.M.; Rocha, F.A.; Dias, F.C.; Rossi, M.A.; Silva, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a chronic systemic mycosis caused by the inhalation of the thermally dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis as well as the recently described P. lutzii. Because the primary infection occurs in the lungs, we investigated the differential involvement of the right and left lungs in experimental P. brasiliensis infection. Lungs were collected from C57BL/6 mice at 70 days after intravenous infection with 1×106 yeast cells of a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis (Pb18). The left lung, which in mice is smaller and has fewer lobes than the right lung, yielded increased fungal recovery associated with a predominant interleukin-4 response and diminished synthesis of interferon-γ and nitric oxide compared with the right lung. Our data indicate differential involvement of the right and left lungs during experimental PCM. This knowledge emphasizes the need for an accurate, standardized protocol for tissue collection during studies of experimental P. brasiliensis infection, since experiments using the same lungs favor the collection of comparable data among different mice. PMID:24141611

  5. Resolution of experimental lung injury by Monocyte-derived inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Mock, Jason R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Files, Daniel C.; Avalos, Claudia R.; Rodriguez, Jackie V.; Waickman, Adam T.; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Pearse, David B.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Crow, Michael T.; King, Landon S.

    2012-01-01

    While early events in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) have been defined, little is known about mechanisms mediating resolution. To search for determinants of resolution, we exposed wild type (WT) mice to intratracheal lipopolysacaccharide (i.t. LPS) and assessed the response at intervals to day 10, when injury had resolved. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was significantly upregulated in the lung at day 4 after LPS. When iNOS−/− mice were exposed to i.t. LPS, early lung injury was attenuated, however recovery was markedly impaired compared to wild type (WT) mice. iNOS−/− mice had increased mortality and sustained increases in markers of lung injury. Adoptive transfer of WT (iNOS+/+) bone marrow-derived monocytes or direct adenoviral gene delivery of iNOS into injured iNOS−/− mice restored resolution of ALI. Irradiated bone marrow chimeras confirmed the protective effects of myeloid-derived iNOS, but not of epithelial iNOS. Alveolar macrophages exhibited sustained expression of co-signalling molecule CD86 in iNOS−/− mice compared to WT mice. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD86 in iNOS−/− mice improved survival and enhanced resolution of lung inflammation. Our findings show that monocyte-derived iNOS plays a pivotal role in mediating resolution of ALI by modulating lung immune responses, thus facilitating clearance of alveolar inflammation and promoting lung repair. PMID:22844117

  6. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  7. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  8. Mechanism of tumour vascularization in experimental lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Vanessza; Bugyik, Edina; Dezso, Katalin; Ecker, Nora; Nagy, Peter; Timar, Jozsef; Tovari, Jozsef; Laszlo, Viktoria; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Wan, Elaine; Frentzas, Sophia; Vermeulen, Peter B; Reynolds, Andrew R; Dome, Balazs; Paku, Sandor

    2015-02-01

    The appearance of lung metastases is associated with poor outcome and the management of patients with secondary pulmonary tumours remains a clinical challenge. We examined the vascularization process of lung metastasis in six different preclinical models and found that the tumours incorporated the pre-existing alveolar capillaries (ie vessel co-option). During the initial phase of vessel co-option, the incorporated capillaries were still sheathed by pneumocytes, but these incorporated vessels subsequently underwent different fates dependent on the model. In five of the models examined (B16, HT1080, HT25, C26, and MAT B-III), the tumour cells gradually stripped the pneumocytes from the vessels. These dissected pneumocytes underwent fragmentation, but the incorporated microvessels survived. In the sixth model (C38), the tumour cells failed to invade the alveolar walls. Instead, they induced the development of vascularized desmoplastic tissue columns. Finally, we examined the process of arterialization in lung metastases and found that they became arterialized when their diameter grew to exceed 5 mm. In conclusion, our data show that lung metastases can vascularize by co-opting the pulmonary microvasculature. This is likely to have important clinical implications, especially with respect to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  9. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  10. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekenis, S. A.; McCann, H.; Tait, N.

    2015-03-15

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the “black box” view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  11. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  12. Experimental evolution of sprays in a lung model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of an experiment conceived to observe the evolution of sprays inside the lungs. We have built a model that covers the first 6 generations (from the trachea to segmental bronchi of 5th generation). This setup is placed on a wind tunnel, and the flow inside the model is induced by a vacuum pump that emulates the breathing process using a valve. We inject a previously determined distribution of particles (water droplets), whose average diameter can be modified. Then, we measure the droplet distribution in different branches and compare how the droplet distribution is modified at each generation. The parameters that control the behavior are the average diameter of the original distribution, the airflow rate inside the model and the frequency of the breathing cycle.

  13. Experimental pressure-temperature phase diagram of boron: resolving the long-standing enigma

    PubMed Central

    Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Bykova, Elena; Wirth, Richard; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Boron, discovered as an element in 1808 and produced in pure form in 1909, has still remained the last elemental material, having stable natural isotopes, with the ground state crystal phase to be unknown. It has been a subject of long-standing controversy, if α-B or β-B is the thermodynamically stable phase at ambient pressure and temperature. In the present work this enigma has been resolved based on the α-B-to- β-B phase boundary line which we experimentally established in the pressure interval of ∼4 GPa to 8 GPa and linearly extrapolated down to ambient pressure. In a series of high pressure high temperature experiments we synthesised single crystals of the three boron phases (α-B, β-B, and γ-B) and provided evidence of higher thermodynamic stability of α-B. Our work opens a way for reproducible synthesis of α-boron, an optically transparent direct band gap semiconductor with very high hardness, thermal and chemical stability. PMID:22355614

  14. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib reduces lung inflammation and remodelling in experimental allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, AL; Magalhães, RF; Branco, VC; Silva, JD; Cruz, FF; Marques, PS; Ferreira, TPT; Morales, MM; Martins, MA; Olsen, PC

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Asthma is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Despite recent advances in understanding of its pathophysiology, asthma remains a major public health problem, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this context, we sought to ascertain whether treatment with the TK inhibitor dasatinib might repair inflammatory and remodelling processes, thus improving lung function, in a murine model of asthma. Experimental Approach Animals were sensitized and subsequently challenged, with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline. Twenty‐four hours after the last challenge, animals were treated with dasatinib, dexamethasone, or saline, every 12 h for 7 consecutive days. Twenty‐four hours after the last treatment, the animals were killed, and data were collected. Lung structure and remodelling were evaluated by morphometric analysis, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy of lung sections. Inflammation was assessed by cytometric analysis and ELISA, and lung function was evaluated by invasive whole‐body plethysmography. Key Results In OVA mice, dasatinib, and dexamethasone led to significant reductions in airway hyperresponsiveness. Dasatinib was also able to attenuate alveolar collapse, contraction index, and collagen fibre deposition, as well as increasing elastic fibre content, in OVA mice. Concerning the inflammatory process, dasatinib reduced inflammatory cell influx to the airway and lung‐draining mediastinal lymph nodes, without inducing the thymic atrophy promoted by dexamethasone. Conclusions and Implications In this model of allergic asthma, dasatinib effectively blunted the inflammatory and remodelling processes in asthmatic lungs, enhancing airway repair and thus improving lung mechanics. PMID:26989986

  15. Photophysics of 1-aminonaphthalene: a theoretical and time-resolved experimental study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Raúl; Longarte, Asier; Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Redondo, Carolina; Castaño, Fernando; González-Ramírez, Israel; Giussani, Angelo; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela

    2009-12-03

    The photophysics of 1-aminonaphthalene (1-napthylamine, AMN) has been investigated on the basis of a constructive experimental-theoretical interplay derived from time-resolved measurements and high-level quantum-chemical ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF calculations. Transient ionization signals at femtosecond resolution were collected for AMN cold isolated molecules following excitation from the vibrationless ground level to a number of vibrational states (within the pump resolution) in the lowest accessible excited state and further multiphoton ionization probing at 500, 800, and 1300 nm. Theory predicts two pipi* states, (1)L(b) and (1)L(a), as the lowest singlet electronic excitations, with adiabatic transitions from S(0) at 3.50 and 3.69 eV, respectively. Since the associated oscillator strength for the lowest transition is exceedingly small, the (1)L(b) state is not expected to become populated significantly and the (1)L(a) state appears as the main protagonist of the AMN photophysics. Though calculations foresee a surface crossing between (1)L(a) and the lower (1)L(b) states, no dynamical signature of it is observed in the time-dependent measurements. In the relaxation of (1)L(a), the radiant emission competes with the intersystem crossing and internal conversion channels. The rates of these mechanisms have been determined at different excitation energies. The internal conversion is mediated by a (1)L(a)/S(0) conical intersection located 0.7 eV above the (1)L(a) minimum. The relaxation of a higher-lying singlet excited state, observed above 40 000 cm(-1) (4.96 eV) and calculated at 5.18 eV, has been also explored.

  16. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 is produced during self-resolving gram-negative bacterial pneumonia and regulates host immune responses for the resolution of lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour, Raja Elie E.; Sham, Ho Pan; Douda, David N.; Colas, Romain A.; Dalli, Jesmond; Bai, Yan; Ai, Xingbin; Serhan, Charles N.; Levy, Bruce D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Host responses to contain infection and mitigate pathogen-mediated lung inflammation are critical for pneumonia resolution. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1; 7S,8R,17R trihydroxy-4Z,9E,11E,13Z,15E,19Z docosahexaenoic acid) is a lipid mediator that displays organ protective actions in sterile lung inflammation, and regulates pathogen-initiated cellular responses. Here, in a self-resolving murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia, lipid mediator metabololipidomics performed on lungs obtained at baseline, 24 hours and 72 hours after infection uncovered temporal regulation of endogenous AT-RvD1 production. Early treatment with exogenous AT-RvD1 (1 hr post-infection) enhanced clearance of E.coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo, and lung macrophage phagocytosis of fluorescent bacterial particles ex vivo. Characterization of macrophage subsets in the alveolar compartment during pneumonia identified efferocytosis by infiltrating macrophages (CD11bHi CD11cLow) and exudative macrophages (CD11bHi CD11cHi). AT-RvD1 increased efferocytosis by these cells ex vivo, and accelerated neutrophil clearance during pneumonia in vivo. These anti-bacterial and pro-resolving actions of AT-RvD1 were additive to antibiotic therapy. Taken together, these findings suggest that the pro-resolving actions of AT-RvD1 during pneumonia represent a novel host-directed therapeutic strategy to complement the current antibiotic centered approach to combatting infections. PMID:26647716

  17. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Parasa, Venkata Ramanarao; Rahman, Muhammad Jubayer; Ngyuen Hoang, Anh Thu; Svensson, Mattias; Brighenti, Susanna; Lerm, Maria

    2014-02-01

    The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB) display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  18. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  19. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  20. The influence of physical activity in the progression of experimental lung cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Paceli, Renato Batista; Cal, Rodrigo Nunes; dos Santos, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cordeiro, José Antonio; Neiva, Cassiano Merussi; Nagamine, Kazuo Kawano; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2012-07-15

    Lung cancer is one of the most incident neoplasms in the world, representing the main cause of mortality for cancer. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that physical activity may reduce the risk of lung cancer, other works evaluate the effectiveness of the use of the physical activity in the suppression, remission and reduction of the recurrence of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic physical activity in the development and the progression of lung cancer. Lung tumors were induced with a dose of 3mg of urethane/kg, in 67 male Balb - C type mice, divided in three groups: group 1_24 mice treated with urethane and without physical activity; group 2_25 mice with urethane and subjected to aerobic swimming free exercise; group 3_18 mice with urethane, subjected to anaerobic swimming exercise with gradual loading 5-20% of body weight. All the animals were sacrificed after 20 weeks, and lung lesions were analyzed. The median number of lesions (nodules and hyperplasia) was 3.0 for group 1, 2.0 for group 2 and 1.5-3 (p=0.052). When comparing only the presence or absence of lesion, there was a decrease in the number of lesions in group 3 as compared with group 1 (p=0.03) but not in relation to group 2. There were no metastases or other changes in other organs. The anaerobic physical activity, but not aerobic, diminishes the incidence of experimental lung tumors.

  1. Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Time-Resolved Near-Field Hall Thruster Plasma Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-20

    26.4+/-0.3 s 38 KHz Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Discharge Currect (AC) Passive inductive probe Band pass...other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...Resolved Near-Field Hall Thruster 5b. GRANT NUMBER Plasma Properties 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Gonzales, A.E.; Scharfe, M.K

  2. Experimental measurement of spatially resolved electron density in a filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao Qiong; Niu, Zhi Wen; Ren, Chun-Sheng; Hou, Bo

    2015-06-29

    By combining a high-speed frame camera with a monochromator, the spatially resolved optical emission spectrum of hydrogen α line in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water has been experimentally measured. The spatially resolved electron densities in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water with a conductivity of 200 μS/cm were investigated. During the experiment, the average energy per pulse of discharge was 90.6 ± 13.6 mJ. The results show that the electron density in the streamer filament is 10{sup 17–18}/cm{sup 3}, and present a decreasing tendency along the axial direction of the streamer filament with increasing distance from the tip of the anode.

  3. Estradiol worsens the syndrome of ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental lung transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; López, Ana; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Machín, Rubén P; Ponce, Miguel A; Fiuza, María D; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Brito, Yanira; Yordi, Nagib Atallah; Chirino, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common complication after lung transplantation. There is evidence that reactive oxygen species are involved in its pathogenesis. We designed an experimental study to evaluate whether the administration of antioxidants to lung transplantation recipients protects against IRI and early acute rejection (AR). Twenty-five rats received left lung transplants after 6 h of ischemia. Fifty minutes before the reperfusion, groups of five rats received a single dose of desferrioxamine (20 mg/kg), estradiol (25 mg/kg), or melatonin (10 mg/kg). The animals were killed 48 h after surgery and the postoperative outcome, IRI, and AR were evaluated. The frequency of severe injury and of moderate-to-severe edema was higher in animals treated with estradiol than in the control group (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). No significant changes in the degree of IRI or AR were observed in the groups treated with desferrioxamine or melatonin. In our study, treatment with the antioxidants melatonin or desferrioxamine before reperfusion had no effects on IRI damage or on AR frequency or severity. However, treatment with estradiol resulted in a worse postoperative outcome and in severe edema. Therefore, despite the antioxidant capacity of estradiol, it is recommended that an evaluation of these adverse effects of estradiol in human lung transplant recipients be performed.

  4. Effects of experimental asthma on inflammation and lung mechanics in sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Feroah, Thom R; Nandedkar, Sandhya D; Holzhauer, Sandra L; Hutchins, William; Schulte, Marie L; Strunk, Robert C; Debaun, Michael R; Hillery, Cheryl A

    2012-03-01

    Experimental asthma increases eosinophil and collagen deposition in the lungs of sickle cell disease (SCD) mice to a greater extent than in control mice. However, the effects of asthma on inflammation and airway physiology remain unclear. To determine effects of asthma on pulmonary inflammation and airway mechanics in SCD mice, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was used to generate chimeric SCD and hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma was induced by sensitizing mice with ovalbumin (OVA). Airway mechanics were assessed using forced oscillation techniques. Mouse lungs were examined histologically and physiologically. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factors in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined by multiplex. IgE was quantified by ELISA. LDH was quantified using a colorimetric enzymatic assay. At baseline (nonsensitized), chimeric SCD mice developed hemolytic anemia with sickled red blood cells, mild leukocytosis, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor and IL-13 compared with chimeric hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma increased perialveolar eosinophils, plasma IgE, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in chimeric hemoglobin A and SCD mice. IFN-γ levels were reduced in both groups. IL-5 was preferentially increased in chimeric SCD mice but not in hemoglobin A mice. Positive end-expiratory pressures and methacholine studies revealed that chimeric SCD mice had greater resistance in large and small airways compared with hemoglobin A mice at baseline and after OVA sensitization. SCD alone induces a baseline lung pathology that increases large and small airway resistance and primes the lungs to increased inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness after OVA sensitization.

  5. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis.

  6. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, P; Kacprzak, M; Weigl, W; Borowska-Solonynko, A; Krajewski, P; Zolek, N; Ciszek, B; Maniewski, R; Liebert, A

    2012-12-07

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  7. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawosz, P.; Kacprzak, M.; Weigl, W.; Borowska-Solonynko, A.; Krajewski, P.; Zolek, N.; Ciszek, B.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2012-12-01

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  8. Experimental lung injury promotes alterations in energy metabolism and respiratory mechanics in the lungs of rats: prevention by exercise.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Maira J; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B S; Machado, Fernanda Rossato; Loureiro, Samanta O; Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Guma, Fátima; Lago, Pedro Dal; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of lung injury on energy metabolism (succinate dehydrogenase, complex II, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP levels), respiratory mechanics (dynamic and static compliance, elastance and respiratory system resistance) in the lungs of rats, as well as on phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The protective effect of physical exercise on the alterations caused by lung injury, including lung edema was also evaluated. Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise. After this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise and after this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in dose 100 μg/100 g body weight. The sham group received isotonic saline instillation. Twelve hours after the injury was performed the respiratory mechanical and after the rats were decapitated and samples were collected. The rats subjected to lung injury presented a decrease in activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain and ATP levels in lung, as well as the formation of pulmonary edema. A decreased lung dynamic and static compliance, as well as an increase in respiratory system resistance, and a decrease in phospholipids content were observed. Physical exercise was able to totally prevent the decrease in succinate dehydrogenase and complex II activities and the formation of pulmonary edema. It also partially prevented the increase in respiratory system resistance, but did not prevent the decrease in dynamic and static compliance, as well as in phospholipids content. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may be one of the important contributors to lung damage and that physical exercise may be beneficial in this pathology, although it did not prevent all changes present in lung injury.

  9. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  10. Experimental Research and the Managerial Attitude: A Tension to Be Resolved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninghoff, Martin; Sormani, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses some typical consequences of a specific research policy on experimental research in biology. The policy is conducted by a national funding agency--the Swiss National Science Foundation--through a particular programme, the "National Centres of Competence in Research" which is designed to promote both "scientific…

  11. Experimental observation of spatially resolved photo-luminescence intensity distribution in dual mode upconverting nanorod bundles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Singh, V. N.; Singh, Nidhi; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A novel method for demonstration of photoluminescence intensity distribution in upconverting nanorod bundles using confocal microscopy is reported. Herein, a strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent dual mode upconverting/downshift Y1.94O3:Ho3+0.02/Yb3+0.04 nanorod bundles by a facile hydrothermal route has been introduced. These luminescent nanorod bundles exhibit strong green emission at 549 nm upon excitations at 449 nm and 980 nm with quantum efficiencies of ~6.3% and ~1.1%, respectively. The TEM/HRTEM results confirm that these bundles are composed of several individual nanorods with diameter of ~100 nm and length in the range of 1–3 μm. Furthermore, two dimensional spatially resolved photoluminescence intensity distribution study has been carried out using confocal photoluminescence microscope throughout the nanorod bundles. This study provides a new direction for the potential use of such emerging dual mode nanorod bundles as photon sources for next generation flat panel optical display devices, bio-medical applications, luminescent security ink and enhanced energy harvesting in photovoltaic applications. PMID:28211891

  12. Experimental observation of spatially resolved photo-luminescence intensity distribution in dual mode upconverting nanorod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Singh, V. N.; Singh, Nidhi; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for demonstration of photoluminescence intensity distribution in upconverting nanorod bundles using confocal microscopy is reported. Herein, a strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent dual mode upconverting/downshift Y1.94O3:Ho3+0.02/Yb3+0.04 nanorod bundles by a facile hydrothermal route has been introduced. These luminescent nanorod bundles exhibit strong green emission at 549 nm upon excitations at 449 nm and 980 nm with quantum efficiencies of ~6.3% and ~1.1%, respectively. The TEM/HRTEM results confirm that these bundles are composed of several individual nanorods with diameter of ~100 nm and length in the range of 1–3 μm. Furthermore, two dimensional spatially resolved photoluminescence intensity distribution study has been carried out using confocal photoluminescence microscope throughout the nanorod bundles. This study provides a new direction for the potential use of such emerging dual mode nanorod bundles as photon sources for next generation flat panel optical display devices, bio-medical applications, luminescent security ink and enhanced energy harvesting in photovoltaic applications.

  13. Nonhematopoietic NADPH oxidase regulation of lung eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in experimentally induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Earwood, Julie; Bansal, Shelly; Jansen, Michael; Babcock, George; Garvy, Beth; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia is one of the most consistent hallmarks of asthma. Infiltration of eosinophils into the lung in experimental asthma is dependent on the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells. Ligation of VCAM-1 activates endothelial cell NADPH oxidase, which is required for VCAM-1-dependent leukocyte migration in vitro. To examine whether endothelial-derived NADPH oxidase modulates eosinophil recruitment in vivo, mice deficient in NADPH oxidase (CYBB mice) were irradiated and received wild-type hematopoietic cells to generate chimeric CYBB mice. In response to ovalbumin (OVA) challenge, the chimeric CYBB mice had increased numbers of eosinophils bound to the endothelium as well as reduced eosinophilia in the lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage. This occurred independent of changes in VCAM-1 expression, cytokine/chemokine levels (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IFNγ, or eotaxin), or numbers of T cells, neutrophils, or mononuclear cells in the lavage fluids or lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Importantly, the OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice had reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The AHR in OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice was restored by bypassing the endothelium with intratracheal administration of eosinophils. These data suggest that VCAM-1 induction of NADPH oxidase in the endothelium is necessary for the eosinophil recruitment during allergic inflammation. Moreover, these studies provide a basis for targeting VCAM-1-dependent signaling pathways in asthma therapies. PMID:17293377

  14. Pulsatility flow around a single cylinder - an experimental model of flow inside an artificial lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Bull, Joseph L.

    2004-11-01

    Pulsatile flow past a single cylinder is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry. This study aims to elucidate the effects of pulstility on the velocity field, which influences the convection-dominated transport within the fluid. The artificial lung device can be connected in parallel or series with the native lungs and may potentially be used as a bridge to transplant or for pulmonary replacement. The artificial lung consists of hollow microfibers through which gas flows and blood flows around. Blood flow through the device is pulsatile because it is driven entirely by the right heart. Steady flow over bluff bodies has been investigated in many contexts, such as heat exchangers. However, few studies have been investigated the effect of pulsatility. The effects of frequency, amplitude of pulsatility, and average flow rate on the formation of vortices after a cylinder are examined. Vortices near the cylinder are found to develop at lower Reynolds number in pulsatile flow than in steady flow. This work is supported by NIH grant R01 HL69420-01.

  15. Effects of exogenous surfactant on the non-heart-beating donor lung graft in experimental lung transplantation – a stereological study

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Gudrun; Knudsen, Lars; Madershahian, Navid; Mühlfeld, Christian; Frank, Konrad; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The use of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) lungs may help to overcome the shortage of lung grafts in clinical lung transplantation, but warm ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion injury (I/R injury) resulting in primary graft dysfunction represent a considerable threat. Thus, better strategies for optimized preservation of lung grafts are urgently needed. Surfactant dysfunction has been shown to contribute to I/R injury, and surfactant replacement therapy is effective in enhancing lung function and structural integrity in related rat models. In the present study we hypothesize that surfactant replacement therapy reduces oedema formation in a pig model of NHBD lung transplantation. Oedema formation was quantified with (SF) and without (non-SF) surfactant replacement therapy in interstitial and alveolar compartments by means of design-based stereology in NHBD lungs 7 h after cardiac arrest, reperfusion and transplantation. A sham-operated group served as control. In both NHBD groups, nearly all animals died within the first hours after transplantation due to right heart failure. Both SF and non-SF developed an interstitial oedema of similar degree, as shown by an increase in septal wall volume and arithmetic mean thickness as well as an increase in the volume of peribron-chovascular connective tissue. Regarding intra-alveolar oedema, no statistically significant difference could be found between SF and non-SF. In conclusion, surfactant replacement therapy cannot prevent poor outcome after prolonged warm ischaemia of 7 h in this model. While the beneficial effects of surfactant replacement therapy have been observed in several experimental and clinical studies related to heart-beating donor lungs and cold ischaemia, it is unlikely that surfactant replacement therapy will overcome the shortage of organs in the context of prolonged warm ischaemia, for example, 7 h. Moreover, our data demonstrate that right heart function and dysfunctions of the pulmonary vascular bed

  16. [The results of experimental study of six-hour heart-lung preservation by autoperfusion method--its evaluation of optimal conditions and lung function after preservation].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, M; Makino, S; Hattori, R; Imura, M; Higashi, K; Morimoto, T; Yada, I; Namikawa, S; Yuasa, H; Kusagawa, M

    1989-04-01

    Up to date, it has been reported that the maintenance of ideal function of the preserved lungs were much more difficult than that of the hearts in heart-lung preservation. In this communication the authors have reported the results of experimental study for optimal conditions for preserving better function of the lungs by autoperfusion method by means of heart-lung preparation using 43 dogs. In this study the conditions of the preservation were fixed as following: perfusing blood temperature 29 degrees C, blood flow 30 ml/kg/min., FiO2 30%, FiCO2 5%, tidal volume 15 ml/kg, ventilation rate 10/min., and PEEP 5 cmH2O. Glucose-Insulin-Potassium (0.03 gm., 0.05 U., 0.02 mEq/kg/hr. respectively) were administered continuously by an infusion pump. The results showed that extravascular lung water contents after 6 hours of preservation was 0.79 (mean) +/- 0.01 (SD), which was increased only 1% over than the control group: 0.78 +/- 0.01. There was no significant difference of static lung compliance in two groups: the preserved group was 0.47 +/- 0.02 ml/gm.cmH2O compared to 0.51 +/- 0.06 in the control group. These results suggest that the autoperfusion method on our preserving conditions seems to be very promising and very effective to keep much better condition of the lungs in heart-lung preservation.

  17. Resolving apparent conflicts between theoretical and experimental models of phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fernanda; Åqvist, Johan; Williams, Nicholas H; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2015-01-28

    Understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer is central to many biochemical processes. However, despite decades of experimental and computational studies, a consensus concerning the precise mechanistic details of these reactions has yet to be reached. In this work we perform a detailed comparative theoretical study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, methyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl sulfate, all of which have served as key model systems for understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer reactions, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of energetically similar but mechanistically distinct possibilities for phosphate monoester hydrolysis. The calculated kinetic isotope effects for p-nitrophenyl phosphate provide a means to discriminate between substrate- and solvent-assisted pathways of phosphate monoester hydrolysis, and show that the solvent-assisted pathway dominates in solution. This preferred mechanism for p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis is difficult to find computationally due to the limitations of compressing multiple bonding changes onto a 2-dimensional energy surface. This problem is compounded by the need to include implicit solvation to at least microsolvate the system and stabilize the highly charged species. In contrast, methyl phosphate hydrolysis shows a preference for a substrate-assisted mechanism. For p-nitrophenyl sulfate hydrolysis there is only one viable reaction pathway, which is similar to the solvent-assisted pathway for phosphate hydrolysis, and the substrate-assisted pathway is not accessible. Overall, our results provide a unifying mechanistic framework that is consistent with the experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects and reconciles the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental models for these biochemically ubiquitous classes of reaction.

  18. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experimental Spectrum of Methanol Between 560 and 654 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH_3OH) in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures, 248-397 K. Analysis of experimental spectra recorded with absolute intensity calibration over a slow temperature ramp provides a means for the simulation of the spectrum as a function of temperature without a complete quantum mechanical (QM) model. These results include contributions from v_t = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via QM techniques. They also contain contributions from the ^{13}C isotopologue in natural abundance. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format and in a frequency point-by-point format that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines. In contrast to our earlier work on the semi-rigid species ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity difference between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for some of the lines. Analysis of these differences points to the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. We will compare our experimental intensities with the most recent QM model, as well as an earlier QM model that includes the variation of the dipole moment function with the torsional angle. S. M. Fortman, I. R. Medvedev, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, Astrophys. J. 737, 20/1-6 (2011). L.-H. Xu, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 305-313 (2008). M. A. Mekhtiev, P. D. Godfrey, and J. T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 194, 171-178 (1999).

  19. Resolving Apparent Conflicts between Theoretical and Experimental Models of Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer is central to many biochemical processes. However, despite decades of experimental and computational studies, a consensus concerning the precise mechanistic details of these reactions has yet to be reached. In this work we perform a detailed comparative theoretical study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, methyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl sulfate, all of which have served as key model systems for understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer reactions, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of energetically similar but mechanistically distinct possibilities for phosphate monoester hydrolysis. The calculated kinetic isotope effects for p-nitrophenyl phosphate provide a means to discriminate between substrate- and solvent-assisted pathways of phosphate monoester hydrolysis, and show that the solvent-assisted pathway dominates in solution. This preferred mechanism for p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis is difficult to find computationally due to the limitations of compressing multiple bonding changes onto a 2-dimensional energy surface. This problem is compounded by the need to include implicit solvation to at least microsolvate the system and stabilize the highly charged species. In contrast, methyl phosphate hydrolysis shows a preference for a substrate-assisted mechanism. For p-nitrophenyl sulfate hydrolysis there is only one viable reaction pathway, which is similar to the solvent-assisted pathway for phosphate hydrolysis, and the substrate-assisted pathway is not accessible. Overall, our results provide a unifying mechanistic framework that is consistent with the experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects and reconciles the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental models for these biochemically ubiquitous classes of reaction. PMID:25423607

  20. Resolving solvophobic interactions inferred from experimental solvation free energies and evaluated from molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, J. Wesley; Bhutta, Amna; Bierbrier, Sarah C.; da Silva Moura, Natalia; Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2017-01-01

    Ben-Naim estimated the solvent-mediated interaction between methanes based on experimental solvation free energy differences between chemically similar hydrocarbons. Interactions were predicted to be strongest in water, dominated by characteristic entropic gains. We use molecular simulations in combination with an empirical interpolation procedure that bridges interactions from outside methane's excluded volume down to overlap to test Ben-Naim's estimates. While Ben-Naim's approach captures many distinctive trends, the alchemical differences between methane and a methyl unit play a non-trivial role on the predicted association strength and the sign of enthalpic and entropic components of the interaction free energy in water and ethanol.

  1. Experimental measurements of lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.

    2003-04-01

    An acoustic backscatter technique was used to estimate in vivo whole-lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and a white whale (Delphinapterus leucas). Subjects were trained to submerge and position themselves near an underwater sound projector and a receiving hydrophone. Acoustic pressure measurements were made near the subjects' lungs while insonified with pure tones at frequencies from 16 to 100 Hz. Whole-lung resonant frequencies were estimated by comparing pressures measured near the subjects' lungs to those measured from the same location without the subject present. Experimentally measured resonant frequencies and damping ratios were much higher than those predicted using equivalent volume spherical air bubble models. The experimental technique, data analysis method, and discrepancy between the observed and predicted values will be discussed. The potential effects of depth on the resonance frequencies will also be discussed.

  2. Involvement of exosomes in lung inflammation associated with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Laia; Casas, Vanessa; Carrascal, Montserrat; Closa, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A frequent complication of acute pancreatitis is the lung damage associated with the systemic inflammatory response. Although various pro-inflammatory mediators generated at both local and systemic levels have been identified, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still poorly understood. In recent years, exosomes have emerged as a new intercellular communication system able to transfer encapsulated proteins and small RNAs and protect them from degradation. Using an experimental model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in rats, we aimed to evaluate the role of exosomes in the extent of the systemic inflammatory response. Induction of pancreatitis increased the concentration of circulating exosomes, which showed a different proteomic profile to those obtained from control animals. A series of tracking experiments using PKH26-stained exosomes revealed that circulating exosomes effectively reached the alveolar compartment and were internalized by macrophages. In vitro experiments revealed that exosomes obtained under inflammatory conditions activate and polarize these alveolar macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Interestingly, the proteomic analysis of circulating exosomes during acute pancreatitis suggested a multi-organ origin with a relevant role for the liver as a source of these vesicles. Tracking experiments also revealed that the liver retains the majority of exosomes from the peritoneal cavity. We conclude that exosomes are involved in the lung damage associated with experimental acute pancreatitis and could be relevant mediators in the systemic effects of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  4. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 2. Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.F.; Sauer, K.; Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A.

    1995-05-18

    Resolution of the absorption spectrum of the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore in C-phycocyanin (PC) trimers is achieved by comparison of the steady state absorption spectra of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3}. Comparison of the anisotropy decays of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3} also greatly aids in the assignment of the dominant kinetic processes in PC trimers. A comparison is made of calculated Foerster rate constants for energy transfer with those rate constants resolved experimentally in the PC trimers. 35 refs.., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Experimental setup for temporally and spatially resolved ICCD imaging of (sub)nanosecond streamer plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiskamp, T.; Sengers, W.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Streamer discharges are efficient non-thermal plasmas for air purification and can be generated in wire-cylinder electrode structures (the plasma reactor). When (sub)nanosecond high-voltage pulses are used to generate the plasma, components like a plasma reactor behave as transmission lines, where transmission times and reflections become important. We want to visually study the influence of these transmission-line effects on the streamer development in the reactor. Therefore, we need a unique experimental setup, which allows us to image the streamers with nanosecond time resolution over the entire length of the plasma reactor. This paper describes the setup we developed for this purpose. The setup consists of a large frame in which a specially designed plasma reactor can be mounted and imaged from below by an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. This camera is mounted on a platform which can be moved by a stepper motor. A computer automates all the experiments and controls the camera movement, camera settings, and the nanosecond high-voltage pulse source we use for the experiments. With the automated setup, we can make ICCD images of the entire plasma reactor at different instances of time with nanosecond resolution (with a jitter of less than several hundreds of picoseconds). Consequently, parameters such as the streamer length and width can be calculated automatically.

  6. Experimental Approach to Visualize Flow in a Stacked Hollow Fiber Bundle of an Artificial Lung With Particle Image Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kaesler, Andreas; Schlanstein, Peter C; Hesselmann, Felix; Büsen, Martin; Klaas, Michael; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2016-12-07

    Flow distribution is key in artificial lungs, as it directly influences gas exchange performance as well as clot forming and blood damaging potential. The current state of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in artificial lungs can only give insight on a macroscopic level due to model simplification applied to the fiber bundle. Based on our recent work on wound fiber bundles, we applied particle image velocimetry (PIV) to the model of an artificial lung prototype intended for neonatal use to visualize flow distribution in a stacked fiber bundle configuration to (i) evaluate the feasibility of PIV for artificial lungs, (ii) validate CFD in the fiber bundle of artificial lungs, and (iii) give a suggestion how to incorporate microscopic aspects into mainly macroscopic CFD studies. To this end, we built a fully transparent model of an artificial lung prototype. To increase spatial resolution, we scaled up the model by a factor of 5.8 compared with the original size. Similitude theory was applied to ensure comparability of the flow distribution between the device of original size and the scaled-up model. We focused our flow investigation on an area (20 × 70 × 43 mm) in a corner of the model with a Stereo-PIV setup. PIV data was compared to CFD data of the original sized artificial lung. From experimental PIV data, we were able to show local flow acceleration and declaration in the fiber bundle and meandering flow around individual fibers, which is not possible using state-of-the-art macroscopic CFD simulations. Our findings are applicable to clinically used artificial lungs with a similar stacked fiber arrangement (e.g., Novalung iLa and Maquet QUADROX-I). With respect to some limitations, we found PIV to be a feasible experimental flow visualization technique to investigate blood-sided flow in the stacked fiber arrangement of artificial lungs.

  7. SU-E-T-178: Experimental Study of Acceptable Movement Conditions for SBRT Lung Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco de Fez, P; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Jornet, N; Eudaldo, T; Latorre-Musoll, A; Ribas, Morales M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To experimentally study the acceptable movement conditions for SBRT lung treatments we quantified with film dosimetry the change in dose distributions due to periodic movements of 5 different amplitudes and 4 respiratory gating duty cycles on a SBRT treatment plan. Methods: We planned a SBRT treatment plan for the QUASAR™ (Modus Medical) phantom equipped with the respiratory motion device. We placed a 3 mm water-equivalent sphere simulating a tumour inside the lung-equivalent insert. This sphere is divided in two hemispheres that allow placing films in between. We used radiochromic EBT2™ (Ashland) films. We oriented the lung insert in such a way that sagittal dose distributions could be measured. We applied a sinusoidal movement with 3 s period for 5 different amplitudes of 0(static), 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 mm without gating. For the 20 mm amplitude we studied the gating technique with 4 duty cycles of 20, 40, 60 and 80% of the respiratory cycle. Each situation was irradiated in a Clinac 2100 linac (Varian) equipped with the RPM™ system. FilmQA Pro™ (Ashland) software together with an Expression 10000XL scanner (EPSON) were used to analyze and compare the measured dose distributions with those planned by the Eclipse™ TPS v. 8.9 (Varian) by means of gamma analysis with 6 criteria: 5%/3mm, 5%/2mm, 5%/1mm, 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm and 2%/2mm (threshold of 10%). Results: Movements with amplitude of less than 7mm do not significantly modified the dosimetry. Gating duty cycles of less than 40% yielded also acceptable results for a 2 cm amplitude movement. Conclusion: To safely perform daily accurate SBRT treatments, movements have to be restricted to 7 mm amplitude (±3.5 mm). Otherwise, a gating strategy should be considered.

  8. Effects on symptoms and lung function in humans experimentally exposed to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B; Ledin, M C; Hammarström, U; Stjernberg, N; Lundbäck, B; Sandström, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diesel exhaust is a common air pollutant made up of several gases, hydrocarbons, and particles. An experimental study was carried out which was designed to evaluate if a particle trap on the tail pipe of an idling diesel engine would reduce effects on symptoms and lung function caused by the diesel exhaust, compared with exposure to unfiltered exhaust. METHODS: Twelve healthy non-smoking volunteers (aged 20-37) were investigated in an exposure chamber for one hour during light work on a bicycle ergometer at 75 W. Each subject underwent three separate double blind exposures in a randomised sequence: to air and to diesel exhaust with the particle trap at the tail pipe and to unfiltered diesel exhaust. Symptoms were recorded according to the Borg scale before, every 10 minutes during, and 30 minutes after the exposure. Lung function was measured with a computerised whole body plethysmograph. RESULTS: The ceramic wall flow particle trap reduced the number of particles by 46%, whereas other compounds were relatively constant. It was shown that the most prominent symptoms during exposure to diesel exhaust were irritation of the eyes and nose and an unpleasant smell increasing during exposure. Both airway resistance (R(aw)) and specific airway resistance (SR(aw)) increased significantly during the exposures to diesel exhaust. Despite the 46% reduction in particle numbers by the trap effects on symptoms and lung function were not significantly attenuated. CONCLUSION: Exposure to diesel exhaust caused symptoms and bronchoconstriction which were not significantly reduced by a particle trap. PMID:8943829

  9. Effectiveness of nitric oxide during spontaneous breathing in experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Rolf; Hochhausen, Nadine; Terbeck, Sandra; Bickenbach, Johannes; Stadermann, Frederik; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2010-04-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) improves gas exchange in about 60% of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recruitment of atelectatic lung areas may improve responsiveness and preservation of spontaneous breathing (SB) may cause recruitment. Accordingly, preservation of SB may improve effectiveness of iNO. To test this hypothesis, iNO was evaluated in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) during SB. In 24 pigs with ALI, effects of 10 ppm iNO were evaluated during controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) and SB in random order. Preservation of SB was provided by 4 different modes: Unassisted SB was enabled by biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP), moderate inspiratory assist was provided by pressure support (PS) and volume-assured pressure support (VAPS), maximum assist was ensured by assist control (A/C). Statistical analysis did not reveal gas exchange improvements due to SB alone. Significant gas exchange improvements due to iNO were only achieved during unassisted SB with BIPAP (P <.05) but not during CMV or assisted SB. The authors conclude that effectiveness of iNO may be improved by unassisted SB during BIPAP but not by assisted SB. Thus combined iNO and unassisted SB is possibly most effective to improve gas exchange in severe hypoxemic ARDS.

  10. Viral replication and lung lesions in BALB/c mice experimentally inoculated with avian metapneumovirus subgroup C isolated from chickens.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xu; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Du, Fang; Wei, Ting; Liu, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) emerged as an important respiratory pathogen causing acute respiratory tract infection in avian species. Here we used a chicken aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) isolate to inoculate experimentally BALB/c mice and found that the aMPV/C can efficiently replicate and persist in the lungs of mice for at least 21 days with a peak viral load at day 6 postinoculation. Lung pathological changes were characterized by increased inflammatory cells. Immunochemical assay showed the presence of viral antigens in the lungs and significant upregulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including MCP-1, MIP-1α, RANTES, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were detected following inoculation. These results indicate for the first time that chicken aMPV/C may replicate in the lung of mice. Whether aMPV/C has potential as zoonotic pathogen, further investigation will be required.

  11. Viral Replication and Lung Lesions in BALB/c Mice Experimentally Inoculated with Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Isolated from Chickens

    PubMed Central

    She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xu; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Du, Fang; Wei, Ting; Liu, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) emerged as an important respiratory pathogen causing acute respiratory tract infection in avian species. Here we used a chicken aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) isolate to inoculate experimentally BALB/c mice and found that the aMPV/C can efficiently replicate and persist in the lungs of mice for at least 21 days with a peak viral load at day 6 postinoculation. Lung pathological changes were characterized by increased inflammatory cells. Immunochemical assay showed the presence of viral antigens in the lungs and significant upregulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including MCP-1, MIP-1α, RANTES, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were detected following inoculation. These results indicate for the first time that chicken aMPV/C may replicate in the lung of mice. Whether aMPV/C has potential as zoonotic pathogen, further investigation will be required. PMID:24637582

  12. Experimental investigation of particle deposition mechanisms in the lung acinus using microfluidic models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Lab-department of Biomedical Engineering Team; Dubowski Lab-faculty of Civil; Environmental Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    In order to experimentally investigate particle deposition mechanisms in the deep alveolated regions of the lungs, we have developed a novel microfluidic device mimicking breathing acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Deposition patterns of airborne polystyrene microspheres (spanning 0.1 μm to 2 μm in diameter) inside the airway tree network compare well with CFD simulations and reveal the roles of gravity and Brownian motion on particle deposition sites. Furthermore, measured trajectories of incense particles (0.1-1 μm) inside the breathing device show a critical role for Brownian diffusion in determining the fate of inhaled sub-micron particles by enabling particles to cross from the acinar ducts into alveolar cavities, especially during the short time lag between inhalation and exhalation phases.

  13. COMPARISON OF LUNG ATTENUATION AND HETEROGENEITY BETWEEN CATS WITH EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA, NATURALLY OCCURRING ASTHMA AND NORMAL CATS.

    PubMed

    Masseau, Isabelle; Banuelos, Alina; Dodam, John; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a prominent feature of feline allergic asthma but requires biopsy for characterization. Computed tomography (CT) has appeal as a minimally invasive diagnostic test. The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to compare indices of airway remodeling between cats with experimentally induced, spontaneous asthma and healthy unaffected cats using CT. We hypothesized that experimental and spontaneous feline asthma would have similar CT airway remodeling characteristics and that these would be significantly different in healthy cats. Experimentally induced asthmatic research cats (n = 5), spontaneously asthmatic pet cats (n = 6), and healthy research cats (n = 5) were scanned unrestrained using a 64-detector row CT scanner. Inspiratory breath-hold CT scans were also performed in experimentally induced asthmatic and healthy cats. Mean ± extent variation of lung attenuation for each cat was determined using an airway inspector software program and CT images were scored for lung heterogeneity by a board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of cat group status. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA (unrestrained scans) and the Student's t-test (anesthetized scans) with significance defined as P < 0.10. Experimentally asthmatic and spontaneously asthmatic cats had significantly (P = 0.028 and P = 0.073, respectively) increased lung attenuation compared to healthy cats. Heterogeneity scores were higher in experimentally induced asthmatic cat than in healthy cats. Objective quantification of lung heterogeneity and lung volume did not differ among the three groups (P = 0.311, P = 0.181, respectively). Findings supported our hypothesis. Inspiratory breath-hold anesthetized CT scans facilitated discrimination between asthmatic and healthy cats in comparison to unrestrained CT scans.

  14. Understanding Lung Deposition of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Acute Experimental Mouse Lung Injury Model Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yutian; Chen, Jianqing; Rong, Haojing; O'Neil, Shawn P.; Ghosh, Brahma; Nguyen, Vuong; Li, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived α1-antitrypsin (AAT) delivered by intravenous infusion is used as augmentation therapy in patients with emphysema who have a genetic mutation resulting in deficiency of AAT. Inhalation is an alternative route of administration that can potentially increase the efficacy and convenience of treatment. This study was conducted to determine whether delivery to the lungs, initially via the intratracheal (IT) route of administration, would deliver efficacious levels of a recombinant AAT (rAAT) to the site of action in the lungs in mice. 125I-radiolabeled rAAT, fluorophore-conjugated rAAT (rAAT-Alexa488), and NE680 (neutrophil elastase 680, a silent fluorescent substrate of neutrophil elastase which fluoresces in the near-infrared range upon activation by neutrophil elastase) were used to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profile, distribution of rAAT within the lung, and efficacy of rAAT to inhibit neutrophil elastase at the site of action, respectively. The study has demonstrated that rAAT was able to gain access to locations where neutrophil elastase was localized. The histochemical quantification of rAAT activity relative to dose at the site of action provided here will improve confidence in predicting the human dose via the inhalation route. PMID:28050284

  15. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy in the Far-Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The relatively low angular resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scale on which mid-to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths - a powerful tool for scientific discovery. We will build the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an eight-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer to fly on a high-altitude balloon. BETTII's spectral-spatial capability, provided by an instrument using double-Fourier techniques, will address key questions about the nature of disks in young star clusters and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the technological groundwork for future space interferometers and for suborbital programs optimized for studying extrasolar planets.

  16. Effects of Nigella sativa seed extract on ameliorating lung tissue damage in rats after experimental pulmonary aspirations.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Aspiration of gastric contents can cause serious lung injury, although the mechanisms of pulmonary damage are still not clear and means of amelioration of the pulmonary damage have been little investigated. The black cumin seed, Nigella sativa L. (NS) has been shown to have specific health benefits and the aim of the current study was to investigate the possible beneficial effects of NS on experimental lung injury in male Wistar rats after pulmonary aspiration of different materials. The rats were randomly allotted into one of six experimental groups (n=7 per group): (1) saline control, (2) saline+NS treated, (3) Pulmocare (a specialized nutritional supplement given to pulmonary patients), (4) Pulmocare+NS treated, (5) hydrochloric acid, (6) hydrochloric acid+NS treated. The saline, Pulmocare and hydrochloric acid were injected into the lungs in a volume of 2 ml/kg. The rats received daily oral doses of NS volatile oil (400mg/kg body weight) by means of intragastric intubation for 7 days starting immediately after the pulmonary aspiration of the materials. After 7 days, the rats were sacrificed and tissue samples from both lungs were taken for histopathological investigation. To date, no similar study investigating the potential for NS treatment to protect against lung injury after pulmonary aspiration of materials has been reported. Our study showed that NS treatment inhibits the inflammatory pulmonary responses, reducing significantly (p<0.05) peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar septal infiltration, alveolar edema, alveolar exudate, alveolar macrophages, interstitial fibrosis, granuloma and necrosis formation in different pulmonary aspiration models. Our data indicate a significant reduction in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a rise in surfactant protein D in lung tissue of different pulmonary aspiration models after NS therapy. Based on our results, we conclude that NS treatment might be beneficial in lung injury and

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Characterization of the Pediatric Pump-Lung.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongjun J; Gellman, Barry; Zhang, Tao; Taskin, M Ertan; Dasse, Kurt A; Griffith, Bartley P

    2011-12-01

    The pediatric pump-lung (PediPL) is a miniaturized integrated pediatric pump-oxygenator specifically designed for cardiac or cardiopulmonary support for patients weighing 5-20 kg to allow mobility and extended use for 30 days. The PediPL incorporates a magnetically levitated impeller with uniquely configured hollow fiber membranes into a single unit capable of performing both pumping and gas exchange. A combined computational and experimental study was conducted to characterize the functional and hemocompatibility performances of this newly developed device. The three-dimensional flow features of the PediPL and its hemolytic characteristics were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics based modeling. The oxygen exchange was modeled based on a convection-diffusion-reaction process. The hollow fiber membranes were modeled as a porous medium which incorporates the flow resistance in the bundle by an added momentum sink term. The pumping function was evaluated for the required range of operating conditions (0.5-2.5 L/min and 1000-3000 rpm). The blood damage potentials were further analyzed in terms of flow and shear stress fields, and the calculations of hemolysis index. In parallel, the hydraulic pump performance, oxygen transfer and hemolysis level were quantified experimentally. Based on the computational and experimental results, the PediPL device is found to be functional to provide necessary oxygen transfer and blood pumping requirements for the pediatric patients. Smooth blood flow characteristics and low blood damage potential were observed in the entire device. The in-vitro tests further confirmed that the PediPL can provide adequate blood pumping and oxygen transfer over the range of intended operating conditions with acceptable hemolytic performance. The rated flow rate for oxygenation is 2.5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis is 0.065 g/100L at 1.0 L/min and 3000 rpm.

  18. Lung Cancer Stem Cell: New Insights on Experimental Models and Preclinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Caroline; Rivera, Sofia; Loriot, Yohann; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Deutsch, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death. Understanding lung tumors physiopathology should provide opportunity to prevent tumor development or/and improve their therapeutic management. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory refers to a subpopulation of cancer cells, also named tumor-initiating cells, that can drive cancer development. Cells presenting these characteristics have been identified and isolated from lung cancer. Exploring cell markers and signaling pathways specific to lung CSCs may lead to progress in therapy and improve the prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Continuous efforts in developing in vitro and in vivo models may yield reliable tools to better understand CSC abilities and to test new therapeutic targets. Preclinical data on putative CSC targets are emerging by now. These preliminary studies are critical for the next generation of lung cancer therapies. PMID:21209720

  19. Changes in breath sound power spectra during experimental oleic acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute lung injury on the frequency spectra of breath sounds, we made serial acoustic recordings from nondependent, midlung and dependent regions of both lungs in ten 35- to 45-kg anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated pigs during development of acute lung injury induced with intravenous oleic acid in prone or supine position. Oleic acid injections rapidly produced severe derangements in the gas exchange and mechanical properties of the lung, with an average increase in venous admixture from 16 ± 12 to 62 ± 16% (P < 0.01), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 25 ± 4 to 14 ± 4 ml/cmH2O (P < 0.01). A concomitant increase in sound power was seen in all lung regions (P < 0.05), predominantly in frequencies 150-800 Hz. The deterioration in gas exchange and lung mechanics correlated best with concurrent spectral changes in the nondependent lung regions. Acute lung injury increases the power of breath sounds likely secondary to redistribution of ventilation from collapsed to aerated parts of the lung and improved sound transmission in dependent, consolidated areas.

  20. /sup 111/In-platelet and /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition in the lungs in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Goulbourne, I.A.; Watson, H.; Davies, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats has been used to study intrapulmonary /sup 125/I-fibrinogen and /sup 111/In-platelet deposition. Pancreatitis caused a significant increase in wet lung weight compared to normal, and this could be abolished by heparin or aspirin pretreatment. /sup 125/I-fibrinogen was deposited in the lungs of animals to a significantly greater degree than in controls (P less than 0.01). /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition was reduced to control levels by pretreatment with aspirin or heparin (P less than 0.05). The uptake of radiolabeled platelets was greater in pancreatitis than in controls (P less than 0.001). Pancreatitis appears to be responsible for platelet entrapment in the lungs. Platelet uptake was reduced by heparin treatment but unaffected by aspirin therapy.

  1. Effects of short-term propofol and dexmedetomidine on pulmonary morphofunction and biological markers in experimental mild acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Vinícius; Santos, Cintia Lourenço; Samary, Cynthia Santos; Araújo, Mariana Neves; Heil, Luciana Boavista Barros; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Fernandes, Fatima Carneiro; Villela, Nivaldo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol may attenuate inflammatory response and improve lung morphofunction in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups. Control (C) and ALI animals received sterile saline solution and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide by intraperitoneal injection respectively. After 24h, ALI animals were randomly treated with dexmedetomidine, propofol, or thiopental sodium for 1h. Propofol reduced static lung elastance and resistive pressure and was associated with less alveolar collapse compared to thiopental sodium and dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine improved oxygenation, but did not modify lung mechanics or histology. Propofol was associated with lower IL (interleukin)-6 and IL-1β expression, whereas dexmedetomidine led to reduced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression in lung tissue compared to thiopental sodium. In conclusion, in this model of mild ALI, short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol led to different functional effects and activation of biological markers associated with pulmonary inflammation.

  2. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun-Lun; Lan, Chou-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Wu, Geng-Chin; Peng, Chia-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI) is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75%) diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR)-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:28291795

  3. Towards predicting the lung fibrogenic activity of nanomaterials: experimental validation of an in vitro fibroblast proliferation assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT) can induce lung inflammation and fibrosis in rodents. Several studies have identified the capacity of CNT to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts. We developed and validated experimentally here a simple and rapid in vitro assay to evaluate the capacity of a nanomaterial to exert a direct pro-fibrotic effect on fibroblasts. Methods The activity of several multi-wall (MW)CNT samples (NM400, the crushed form of NM400 named NM400c, NM402 and MWCNTg 2400) and asbestos (crocidolite) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The proliferative response to MWCNT was assessed on mouse primary lung fibroblasts, human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1), mouse embryonic fibroblasts (BALB-3T3) and mouse lung fibroblasts (MLg) by using different assays (cell counting, WST-1 assay and propidium iodide PI staining) and dispersion media (fetal bovine serum, FBS and bovine serum albumin, BSA). C57BL/6 mice were pharyngeally aspirated with the same materials and lung fibrosis was assessed after 2 months by histopathology, quantification of total collagen lung content and pro-fibrotic cytokines in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Results MWCNT (NM400 and NM402) directly stimulated fibroblast proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and induced lung fibrosis in vivo. NM400 stimulated the proliferation of all tested fibroblast types, independently of FBS- or BSA- dispersion. Results obtained by WST1 cell activity were confirmed with cell counting and cell cycle (PI staining) assays. Crocidolite also stimulated fibroblast proliferation and induced pulmonary fibrosis, although to a lesser extent than NM400 and NM402. In contrast, shorter CNT (NM400c and MWCNTg 2400) did not induce any fibroblast proliferation or collagen accumulation in vivo, supporting the idea that CNT structure is an important parameter for inducing lung fibrosis. Conclusions In this study, an optimized proliferation assay using BSA as a dispersant, MLg cells as targets

  4. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  5. Comparison of four lung scoring systems for the assessment of the pathological outcomes derived from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae experimental infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, four lung lesion scoring methods (Slaughterhouse Pleurisy Evaluation System [SPES], Consolidation Lung Lesion Score [LLS], Image analyses [IA] and Ratio of lung weight/body weight [LW/BW]) were compared for the assessment of the different pathological outcomes derived from an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) experimental infection model. Moreover, pathological data was coupled with clinical (fever, inappetence and clinical score), production (average daily weigh gain [ADWG]) and diagnostic (PCR, ELISA and bacterial isolation) parameters within the four infection outcomes (peracute, acute, subclinically infected and non-infected). Results From the 61 inoculated animals, 9 were classified as peracute (presence of severe App-like clinical signs and lesions and sudden death or euthanasia shortly after inoculation), 31 as acutely affected (presence of App-like clinical signs and lesions and survival until the end of the experiment), 12 as subclinically infected (very mild or no clinical signs but App infection confirmed) and 9 as non-infected animals (lack of App-like clinical signs and lack of evidence of App infection). A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was found with the exception of SPES score versus LW/BW. SPES showed a statistically significant association with all clinical, production and diagnostic (with the exception of PCR detection of App in the tonsil) variables assessed. LLS and IA showed similar statistically significant associations as SPES, with the exception of seroconversion against App at necropsy. In contrast, LW/BW was statistically associated only with App isolation in lungs, presence of App-like lesions and ELISA OD values at necropsy. Conclusions In conclusion, SPES, LLS and IA are economic, fast and easy-to-perform lung scoring methods that, in combination with different clinical and diagnostic parameters, allow the characterization of different outcomes after App infection. PMID

  6. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  7. Clinical review: the implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2004-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in healthy anesthetized patients and in patients ventilated with low positive end-expiratory pressure. However, it is unclear whether recruitment maneuvers are useful when patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome are ventilated with high positive end-expiratory pressure, and in the presence of lung fibrosis or a stiff chest wall. Moreover, it is unclear whether the use of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers can cause bacterial translocation. This article reviews the intrinsic mechanisms of mechanical stress, the controversy regarding clinical use of recruitment maneuvers, and the interactions between lung infection and application of high intrathoracic pressures.

  8. Induction of interleukin-8 and interleukin-12 in neonatal ovine lung following experimental inoculation of bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Redondo, E; Gázquez, A; Vadillo, S; García, A; Franco, A; Masot, A J

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 and to measure the concentrations of these cytokines in lung tissue from lambs infected experimentally with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Lambs (n = 15) were inoculated at 2 days of age with 20 ml of viral inoculum (1.26 × 10(6) TCID50 per ml) or sterile medium (n = 15). Rectal temperature, pulse and respiratory rates were monitored daily in control and infected lambs. Lambs were killed and subject to necropsy examination at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 15 days post inoculation (dpi). There was a temporal association between pulmonary expression of these cytokines and lung pathology in BRSV-infected lambs. The cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were not elevated, but there was a significant increase in IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins and labelled cells, suggesting that these cytokines may play a role in the biological response to BRSV infection and contribute to the development of lung lesions. There was also a significant increase in the cytokine concentration and number of immunolabelled cells expressing IL-8 and IL-12 in infected lungs, suggesting that these cytokines might be used as therapeutic targets in the management of BRSV, in conjunction with measures to combat the causative pathogen and prophylactic methods aimed at preventing infection.

  9. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

  10. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  11. Changes in the biophysical properties and ultrastructure of lungs, and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Davies, G C; Millar, A M; Taylor, T V

    1983-01-01

    Using an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in the rat, we have studied changes in the biophysical properties of lungs and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in this condition. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant decrease in pulmonary compliance (p less than 0.01) and a significant increase in lung weight (p less than 0.01) compared with a control sham operation group. These changes are associated with a 24% increase in intrapulmonary 125I fibrinogen deposition (p less than 0.01), and an 18% increase in 125I fibrinogen deposition per gram of lung tissue (p less than 0.05) in acute pancreatitis, compared with a control sham operation group. The increased fibrinogen deposition is abolished by treatment with low dose heparin. Using the same animal model changes in pulmonary ultrastructure are shown using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that pulmonary abnormalities are associated with intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis and these findings may be relevant to the well described respiratory complications of the condition in man. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:6618271

  12. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  13. An experimental study of sampling time effects on the resolving power of on-line two-dimensional High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan; Gu, Haiwei; Filgueira, Marcelo; Carr, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental effects of sampling time on the resolving power of on-line LC×LC were investigated. The first dimension gradient time (1tg) and sampling time (ts) were systematically varied (1tg = 5, 12, 24 and 49 min; ts = 6, 12, 21 and 40 s). The resolving power of on-line LC×LC was evaluated in terms of two metrics namely the numbers of observed peaks and the effective 2D peak capacities obtained in separations of extracts of maize seeds. The maximum effective peak capacity and number of observed peaks of LC×LC was always achieved at sampling times between 12 and 21 s, at all first dimension gradient times. In addition, both metrics showed that the “crossover” time at which fully optimized 1DLC and LC×LC have equal resolving power varied somewhat with sampling time but is only about 5 minutes for sampling times of 12 and 21 s. The longest crossover time was obtained when the sampling time was 6 s. Furthermore, increasing the first dimension gradient time gave large improvements in the resolving power of LC×LC relative to 1DLC. Finally, comparisons of the corrected and effective 2D peak capacities as well as the number of peaks observed showed that the impact of the coverage factor is quite significant. PMID:21489543

  14. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 1. Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K.; Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A.

    1995-05-18

    Rate constants for excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric aggregation state, isolated from the cyanobacterium cynechococcus sp. PCC 7002, are calculated, using Foerster theory and compared with the results of time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The assignments of the energy-transfer rate constants in PC monomers are confirmed here by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the PC monomers isolated from both the wild-type and a mutant strain (cpcB/C155S) whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore. It is concluded that the Foerster model of resonant energy transfer in the weak coupling limit successfully describes the dominant energy-transfer processes in this protein in the monomeric state. 31 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Effects of atropine and propranolol on lung inflammation in experimental envenomation: comparison of two buthidae venoms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous works had shown that scorpion venom induced neurotransmitter elevation and an inflammatory response associated with various anatomo-pathological modifications. The most dangerous scorpions species in Algeria responsible for these effects are Androctonus australis hector (Aah) and Androctonus amoreuxi (Aam). Results Comparison of the physiopathological effects induced by the two venoms showed differences in the kinetic of cytokine release and in lung injury. The lung edema was only observed in response to Aah venom and it was correlated with cell infiltration. In order to better understand the involved mechanism in inflammatory response, we used two antagonists, atropine (non-selective muscarinic antagonist) and propranolol (β adrenergic antagonist), which lead to a decrease of cell infiltration but has no effect on edema forming. Conclusion These results suggest another pathway in the development of lung injury following envenomation with Aam or Aah venom. PMID:23849182

  16. Seasonal dependency of the effects of experimental stressors on tumor metastasis in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perissin, L; Zorzet, S; Rapozzi, V; Paoletti, D; Giraldi, T

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the application of stressor paradigms in experimental animals affects tumor incidence and progression. However, a high heterogeneity appears both for the animal-tumor system used and for the characteristics of the stressor employed. A high variability was observed also with the application of rotational stress, a carefully and widely characterized mild psychological stressor, to mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma. The aim of this work has been therefore to examine the possible seasonal dependency of the effects of experimental stressors (rotational stress, forced immobilization and electric foot shock) on spontaneous lung metastasis formation in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma. The possible participation of pineal gland and of melatonin have also been examined including in the experimental protocol the measurement of melatonin urinary excretion. The stressor paradigms used significantly increased metastasis weight in spring, in comparison with non-stressed animals. When examined in winter, rotational stress and foot shock significantly decreased metastasis formation, in comparison with non-stressed mice. The effects of forced immobilization were not season-dependent. The melatonin urinary excretion has been measured in relation to the seasonal effects of rotational stress. Nocturnal melatonin excretion is markedly increased by rotational stress in spring and is remarkably decreased in winter. These variations in endogenous melatonin levels caused by rotational stress appear to directly correlate with the effects of the stressor or metastasis. These results lend support to the view that the mechanisms underlying the tumor enhancing action of stressors involve the psychoneuroendocrine network, and indicate the relevance of chronobiology in experimental cancer research and neuro-immuno-modulation.

  17. Fractal Geometry Enables Classification of Different Lung Morphologies in a Model of Experimental Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obert, Martin; Hagner, Stefanie; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Inan, Selcuk; Renz, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Animal models represent the basis of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and are of central importance in the preclinical development of drug therapies. The characterization of irregular lung shapes is a major issue in radiological imaging of mice in these models. The aim of this study was to find out whether differences in lung morphology can be described by fractal geometry. Healthy and asthmatic mouse groups, before and after an acute asthma attack induced by methacholine, were studied. In vivo flat-panel-based high-resolution Computed Tomography (CT) was used for mice's thorax imaging. The digital image data of the mice's lungs were segmented from the surrounding tissue. After that, the lungs were divided by image gray-level thresholds into two additional subsets. One subset contained basically the air transporting bronchial system. The other subset corresponds mainly to the blood vessel system. We estimated the fractal dimension of all sets of the different mouse groups using the mass radius relation (mrr). We found that the air transporting subset of the bronchial lung tissue enables a complete and significant differentiation between all four mouse groups (mean D of control mice before methacholine treatment: 2.64 ± 0.06; after treatment: 2.76 ± 0.03; asthma mice before methacholine treatment: 2.37 ± 0.16; after treatment: 2.71 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). We conclude that the concept of fractal geometry allows a well-defined, quantitative numerical and objective differentiation of lung shapes — applicable most likely also in human asthma diagnostics.

  18. Total deposition of ultrafine particles in the lungs of healthy men and women: experimental and theoretical results

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled ultrafine particles (UFP) may induce greater adverse respiratory effects than larger particles occurring in the ambient atmosphere. Due to this potential of UFP to act as triggers for diverse lung injuries medical as well as physical research has been increasingly focused on the exact deposition behavior of the particles in lungs of various probands. Main purpose of the present study was the presentation of experimental and theoretical data of total, regional, and local UFP deposition in the lungs of men and women. Methods Both experiments and theoretical simulations were carried out by using particle sizes of 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 µm [number median diameters (NMD)]. Inhalation of UFP took place by application of predefined tidal volumes (500, 750, and 1,000 mL) and respiratory flow rates (150, 250, 375, and 500 mL·s−1). For male subjects a functional residual capacity (FRC) of 3,911±892 mL was measured, whereas female probands had a FRC of 3,314±547 mL. Theoretical predictions were based on (I) a stochastic model of the tracheobronchial tree; (II) particle transport computations according to a random walk algorithm; and (III) empirical formulae for the description of UFP deposition. Results Total deposition fractions (TDF) are marked by a continuous diminution with increasing particle size. Whilst particles measuring 0.04 µm in size deposit in the respiratory tract by 40–70%, particles with a size of 0.10 µm exhibit deposition values ranging from 20% to 45%. Except for the largest particles studied here TDF of female probands are higher than those obtained for male probands. Differences between experimental and theoretical results are most significant for 0.10 µm particles, but never exceed 20%. Predictions of regional (extrathoracic, tracheobronchial, alveolar) UFP deposition show clearly that females tend to develop higher tracheobronchial and alveolar deposition fractions than males. This discrepancy is also confirmed by

  19. Differential Cytokine Gene Expression in Granulomas from Lungs and Lymph Nodes of Cattle Experimentally Infected with Aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark lesion of tuberculosis in humans and animals is the granuloma. The granuloma represents a distinct host cellular immune response composed of epithelioid macrophages, lymphocytes, and multinucleated giant cells, often surrounding a caseous necrotic core. Within the granuloma, host-pathogen interactions determine disease outcome. Factors within the granulomas such as cytokines and chemokines drive cell recruitment, activity, function and ultimately the success or failure of the host’s ability to control infection. Hence, an understanding of the granuloma-level cytokine response is necessary to understand tuberculosis pathogenesis. In-situ cytokine expression patterns were measured using a novel in situ hybridization assay, known as RNAScope® in granulomas of the lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes and caudal mediastinal lymph nodes of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis via aerosol exposure. In spite of microscopic morphological similarities, significant differences were seen between late stage granulomas of the lung compared to those of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes for IL-17A, IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL10 and IL-22 but not for TNF-α. Additionally, significant differences were noted between granulomas from two different thoracic lymph nodes that both receive afferent lymphatics from the lungs (i.e., tracheobronchial and caudal mediastinal lymph nodes) for TNF-α, IL-17A, IFN-γ, TGF-β and IL-10 but not for IL-22. These findings show that granuloma morphology alone is not a reliable indicator of granuloma function as granulomas of similar morphologies can have disparate cytokine expression patterns. Moreover, anatomically distinct lymph nodes (tracheobronchial vs caudal mediastinal) differ in cytokine expression patterns even when both receive afferent lymphatics from a lung containing tuberculoid granulomas. These findings show that selection of tissue and anatomic location are critical factors in assessing host immune response to M

  20. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T. Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ihaya, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  1. Local lung deposition of ultrafine particles in healthy adults: experimental results and theoretical predictions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrafine particles (UFP) of biogenic and anthropogenic origin occur in high numbers in the ambient atmosphere. In addition, aerosols containing ultrafine powders are used for the inhalation therapy of various diseases. All these facts make it necessary to obtain comprehensive knowledge regarding the exact behavior of UFP in the respiratory tract. Methods Theoretical simulations of local UFP deposition are based on previously conducted inhalation experiments, where particles with various sizes (0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 µm) were administered to the respiratory tract by application of the aerosol bolus technique. By the sequential change of the lung penetration depth of the inspired bolus, different volumetric lung regions could be generated and particle deposition in these regions could be evaluated. The model presented in this contribution adopted all parameters used in the experiments. Besides the obligatory comparison between practical and theoretical data, also advanced modeling predictions including the effect of varying functional residual capacity (FRC) and respiratory flow rate were conducted. Results Validation of the UFP deposition model shows that highest deposition fractions occur in those volumetric lung regions corresponding to the small and partly alveolated airways of the tracheobronchial tree. Particle deposition proximal to the trachea is increased in female probands with respect to male subjects. Decrease of both the FRC and the respiratory flow rate results in an enhancement of UFP deposition. Conclusions The study comes to the conclusion that deposition of UFP taken up via bolus inhalation is influenced by a multitude of factors, among which lung morphometry and breathing conditions play a superior role. PMID:27942511

  2. Lung response after subchronic glass fiber intratracheal instillation: an experimental study on rats.

    PubMed

    Domokos-Hancu, Bianca; Man, Milena Adina; Liana, Hancu; Pop, Carmen Monica

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effects on the lung after subchronic glass fiber intratracheal instillation study on rats. We evaluated the toxicological effects on the lung: persistent inflammatory reaction, cell proliferation, and pulmonary fibrosis on histopathological examination. We performed a glass fiber intratracheal instillation study on total 32 Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: three test groups exposed to different doses of glass fiber and one control group. One week after the end of the exposure period, all animals were euthanized. The histopathological examination of the lung performed in this study followed both distribution of the lesions through the multilevel biopsies that were taken and the inflammatory profile using both hematoxilin-eozin and Sirius red staining. The inflammatory lesions described for the first group were minimal/slight (grade I) and the total score was between 0 and 10 points (mean value = 3). For the second group, the inflammatory lesions were moderate/marked (grade II) with discrete collagen proliferation and discrete fibrosis and the total score ranged between 11 and 20 points (mean value = 11,250). For the third group, the described inflammatory lesions were massive with total score ranging between 21 and 30 points with collagen deposition, pulmonary and pleural fibrosis, and lung emphysema (mean value = 21,750) and no lesion in control group (with statistically significant difference P ≤ .001). This study of fiber glass intratracheal instillation of three different doses demonstrates that exposure to fiber glass is responsible for the development of persistent inflammatory response and a large range of hystopathological lesions which correlate to the administered dose.

  3. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Cross, F.T.; Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium ({sup 239}PuO{sub 2}). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Effect of tramadol on lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion: an experimental study*

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Sotoudeh, Amir; Jahanshahi, Gholamreza; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Aslani, Kimia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tramadol has a protective effect against lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. METHODS: Twenty Wistar male rats were allocated to one of two groups: ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and ischemia-reperfusion + tramadol (IR+T). The animals were anesthetized with intramuscular injections of ketamine and xylazine (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively). All of the animals underwent 2-h ischemia by occlusion of the femoral artery and 24-h reperfusion. Prior to the occlusion of the femoral artery, 250 IU heparin were administered via the jugular vein in order to prevent clotting. The rats in the IR+T group were treated with tramadol (20 mg/kg i.v.) immediately before reperfusion. After the reperfusion period, the animals were euthanized with pentobarbital (300 mg/kg i.p.), the lungs were carefully removed, and specimens were properly prepared for histopathological and biochemical studies. RESULTS: Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the IR group than in the IR+T group (p = 0.001 for both). Histological abnormalities, such as intra-alveolar edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, were significantly more common in the IR group than in the IR+T group. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our histological and biochemical findings, we conclude that tramadol prevents lung tissue injury after skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24068264

  5. Respiratory compliance but not gas exchange correlates with changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver: an experimental study in pigs with saline lavage lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Dietrich; Pelosi, Paolo; Dembinski, Rolf; Ullmann, Annette; Mahnken, Andreas H; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Atelectasis is a common finding in acute lung injury, leading to increased shunt and hypoxemia. Current treatment strategies aim to recruit alveoli for gas exchange. Improvement in oxygenation is commonly used to detect recruitment, although the assumption that gas exchange parameters adequately represent the mechanical process of alveolar opening has not been proven so far. The aim of this study was to investigate whether commonly used measures of lung mechanics better detect lung tissue collapse and changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver as compared to measures of gas exchange Methods In eight anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, acute lung injury was induced by saline lavage and a recruitment maneuver was performed by inflating the lungs three times with a pressure of 45 cmH2O for 40 s with a constant positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O. The association of gas exchange and lung mechanics parameters with the amount and the changes in aerated and nonaerated lung volumes induced by this specific recruitment maneuver was investigated by multi slice CT scan analysis of the whole lung. Results Nonaerated lung correlated with shunt fraction (r = 0.68) and respiratory system compliance (r = 0.59). The arterial partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) and the respiratory system compliance correlated with poorly aerated lung volume (r = 0.57 and 0.72, respectively). The recruitment maneuver caused a decrease in nonaerated lung volume, an increase in normally and poorly aerated lung, but no change in the distribution of a tidal breath to differently aerated lung volumes. The fractional changes in PaO2, arterial partial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and venous admixture after the recruitment maneuver did not correlate with the changes in lung volumes. Alveolar recruitment correlated only with changes in the plateau pressure (r = 0.89), respiratory system compliance (r = 0.82) and parameters obtained from the pressure-volume curve

  6. Impact of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Moreau vaccine on lung remodeling in experimental asthma.

    PubMed

    Samary, Cynthia dos Santos; Antunes, Mariana Alves; Silva, Johnatas Dutra; Silva, Adriana Lopes da; Araújo, Carla Cristina de; Bakker-Abreu, Ilka; Diaz, Bruno Lourenço; Fernezlian, Sandra; Parra, Edwin Roger; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Silva, Pedro Leme; Lapa e Silva, José Roberto; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed the effects of different administration routes and application times of the BCG-Moreau strain on airway and lung inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice (n=168) were divided into two groups. The first group received BCG-Moreau strain while the second group received saline using the same protocol. BCG or saline were intradermally or intranasally injected one or two months before the induction of asthma. Mice were further sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin or received saline. Twenty-four hours after the last challenge, BCG prevented the triggering of pro-inflammatory cytokines, probably by increasing Foxp3 and interleukin (IL)-10, modulating eosinophil infiltration and collagen fiber deposition, thus reducing airway hyperresponsiveness. In conclusion, BCG-Moreau prevented lung remodeling in the present model of allergic asthma, regardless of administration route and time of vaccination. These beneficial effects may be related to the increase in regulatory T cells and to IL-10 production in tandem with decreased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13).

  7. Synthetic Triterpenoids Can Protect Against Toxicity Without Reducing the Efficacy of Treatment with Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Experimental Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liby, Karen T.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic oleanane triterpenoids are multifunctional drugs being developed for the prevention and treatment of a variety of chronic diseases driven by inflammation and oxidative stress. Low nanomolar concentrations of triterpenoids inhibit the induction of inflammatory cytokines, and these drugs are potent activators of the Nrf2 cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, low micromolar concentrations of triterpenoids increased the production of ROS and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in malignant MCF10 CA1a breast cancer cells. Because cancer cells respond differently to ROS than normal cells, it should be possible to exploit these differences therapeutically. In an experimental model of lung cancer, the triterpenoids activated the Nrf2 pathway, as seen by induction of the cytoprotective enzyme NQO1, and reduced the toxicity of carboplatin and paclitaxel. The induction of the Nrf2 pathway in the lung did not suppress the efficacy of treatment with carboplatin and paclitaxel, as the average tumor burden in the group treated with the combination of CDDO-Me and carboplatin/paclitaxel decreased by 90% (P < 0.05 vs. the controls and both single treatment groups). Understanding the dose response of triterpenoids and related drugs will help provide the proper context for optimizing their potential clinical utility. PMID:24659938

  8. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  9. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  10. Bilateral vagotomy or atropine pre-treatment reduces experimental diesel-soot induced lung inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.S. . E-mail: D.S.McQueen@ed.ac.uk; Donaldson, K.; McNeilly, J.D.; Barton, N.J.; Duffin, R.

    2007-02-15

    To investigate the role of the vagus nerve in acute inflammatory and cardiorespiratory responses to diesel particulate (DP) in the rat airway, we measured changes in respiration, blood pressure and neutrophils in lungs of urethane anesthetized Wistar rats 6-h post-instillation of DP (500 {mu}g) and studied the effect of mid-cervical vagotomy or atropine (1 mg kg{sup -1}) pre-treatment. In conscious rats, we investigated DP, with and without atropine pre-treatment. DP increased neutrophil level in BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) fluid from intact anesthetized rats to 2.5 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8), compared with saline instillation (0.3 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 6}, n = 7; P < 0.05). Vagotomy reduced DP neutrophilia to 0.8 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8; P < 0.05 vs. intact); atropine reduced DP-induced neutrophilia to 0.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} (n = 4; P < 0.05). In conscious rats, DP neutrophilia of 8.5 {+-} 1.8 x 10{sup 6}, n = 4, was reduced by pre-treatment with atropine to 2.2 {+-} 1.2 x 10{sup 6} cells, n = 3. Hyperventilation occurred 6 h after DP in anesthetized rats with intact vagi, but not in bilaterally vagotomized or atropine pre-treated animals and was abolished by vagotomy (P < 0.05, paired test). There were no significant differences in the other variables (mean blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability) measured before and 360 min after DP. In conclusion, DP activates a pro-inflammatory vago-vagal reflex which is reduced by atropine. Muscarinic ACh receptors in the rat lung are involved in DP-induced neutrophilia, and hence muscarinic antagonists may reduce airway and/or cardiovascular inflammation evoked by inhaled atmospheric DP in susceptible individuals.

  11. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  12. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 560 and 654 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-02-20

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region. Absolute intensity calibration and analysis of 166 experimental spectra recorded over a slow 248-398 K temperature ramp provide a means for the simulation of the complete spectrum of methanol as a function of temperature. These results include contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via quantum mechanical (QM) techniques. They also contain contributions from the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In contrast to our earlier work on semi-rigid species, such as ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity differences between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for many of the lines. Analysis of these differences shows the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format, as well as in a frequency point-by-point catalog that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines.

  13. An experimental setup for high resolution 10.5 eV laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using a time-of-flight electron analyzer.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, M H; Götberg, O; Tjernberg, O

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental setup for laser-based angle-resolved time-of-flight photoemission. Using a picosecond pulsed laser, photons of energy 10.5 eV are generated through higher harmonic generation in xenon. The high repetition rate of the light source, variable between 0.2 and 8 MHz, enables high photoelectron count rates and short acquisition times. By using a time-of-flight analyzer with angle-resolving capabilities, electrons emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to ±15° can be collected. Hence, simultaneous acquisition of photoemission data for a complete area of the Brillouin zone is possible. The current photon energy enables bulk sensitive measurements, high angular resolution, and the resulting covered momentum space is large enough to enclose the entire Brillouin zone in cuprate high-T(c) superconductors. Fermi edge measurements on polycrystalline Au shows an energy resolution better than 5 meV. Data from a test measurement of the Au(111) surface state are presented along with measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-T(c) superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + δ) (Bi2212).

  14. Pulsatile flow and oxygen transport past cylindrical fiber arrays for an artificial lung: computational and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R; Fujioka, Hideki; Cook, Keith E; Grotberg, James B

    2008-06-01

    The influence of time-dependent flows on oxygen transport from hollow fibers was computationally and experimentally investigated. The fluid average pressure drop, a measure of resistance, and the work required by the heart to drive fluid past the hollow fibers were also computationally explored. This study has particular relevance to the development of an artificial lung, which is perfused by blood leaving the right ventricle and in some cases passing through a compliance chamber before entering the device. Computational studies modeled the fiber bundle using cylindrical fiber arrays arranged in in-line and staggered rectangular configurations. The flow leaving the compliance chamber was modeled as dampened pulsatile and consisted of a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed on a steady flow. The right ventricular flow was modeled to depict the period of rapid flow acceleration and then deceleration during systole followed by zero flow during diastole. Experimental studies examined oxygen transfer across a fiber bundle with either steady, dampened pulsatile, or right ventricular flow. It was observed that the dampened pulsatile flow yielded similar oxygen transport efficiency to the steady flow, while the right ventricular flow resulted in smaller oxygen transport efficiency, with the decrease increasing with Re. Both computations and experiments yielded qualitatively similar results. In the computational modeling, the average pressure drop was similar for steady and dampened pulsatile flows and larger for right ventricular flow while the pump work required of the heart was greatest for right ventricular flow followed by dampened pulsatile flow and then steady flow. In conclusion, dampening the artificial lung inlet flow would be expected to maximize oxygen transport, minimize work, and thus improve performance.

  15. THE COMPLETE, TEMPERATURE-RESOLVED EXPERIMENTAL SPECTRUM OF VINYL CYANIDE (H{sub 2}CCHCN) BETWEEN 210 AND 270 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2011-08-10

    The results of an experimental approach to the identification and characterization of the astrophysical weed vinyl cyanide in the 210-270 GHz region are reported. This approach is based on spectrally complete, intensity-calibrated spectra taken at more than 400 different temperatures in the 210-270 GHz region and is used to produce catalogs in the usual astrophysical format: line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy. As in our earlier study of ethyl cyanide, we also include the results of a frequency point-by-point analysis, which is especially well suited for characterizing weak lines and blended lines in crowded spectra. This study shows substantial incompleteness in the quantum-mechanical (QM) models used to calculate astrophysical catalogs, primarily due to their omission of many low-lying vibrational states of vinyl cyanide, but also due to the exclusion of perturbed rotational transitions. Unlike ethyl cyanide, the QM catalogs for vinyl cyanide include analyses of perturbed excited vibrational states, whose modeling is more challenging. Accordingly, we include an empirical study of the frequency accuracy of these QM models. We observe modest frequency differences for some vibrationally excited lines.

  16. Experimental and clinical studies with somatostatin analogue octreotide in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V. M.; Smith, I. E.; Everard, M. J.; Teale, J. D.; Reubi, J. C.; Millar, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    We have detected somatostatin receptors (SSR) by autoradiography in 3/4 established small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines but not in two non-SCLC cell lines. The growth of 1/3 SSR positive SCLC cell lines was significantly inhibited by the long-acting somatostatin analogue octreotide (SMS 201-995, Sandostatin) 10(-9) M. We treated 20 SCLC patients with octreotide 250 micrograms three times daily for 1 week prechemotherapy (six patients) or at relapse after chemotherapy (14). Octreotide was well tolerated, and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels were suppressed to 62 +/- 7% of pre-treatment levels. However there was no evidence of anti-tumour activity measured by tumour bulk or serum levels of neuron-specific enolase. In one patient metastatic skin nodules were shown to be SSR positive before and at the end of 2 weeks octreotide. Despite this the patient had progressive disease, and tumour cells obtained by fine needle aspirate before and after treatment showed no growth inhibition when cultured with octreotide immediately or following establishment as a cell line. In summary we saw little correlation between SSR expression and growth inhibition by octreotide, either in vitro or clinically. Images Figure 4 PMID:1654981

  17. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vendetti, Frank P; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P; O'Connor, Mark J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2015-12-29

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts.

  18. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Cryderman, Kate; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis conducted include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WDD's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near-infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  19. Cardiorespiratory effects of spontaneous breathing in two different models of experimental lung injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Varelmann, Dirk; Muders, Thomas; Zinserling, Jörg; Guenther, Ulf; Magnusson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Göran; Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI) can result from various insults to the pulmonary tissue. Experimental and clinical data suggest that spontaneous breathing (SB) during pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) in ALI results in better lung aeration and improved oxygenation. Our objective was to evaluate whether the addition of SB has different effects in two different models of ALI. Methods Forty-four pigs were randomly assigned to ALI resulting either from hydrochloric acid aspiration (HCl-ALI) or from increased intra-abdominal pressure plus intravenous oleic acid injections (OA-ALI) and were ventilated in PCV mode either with SB (PCV + SB) or without SB (PCV – SB). Cardiorespiratory variables were measured at baseline after induction of ALI and after 4 hours of treatment (PCV + SB or PCV – SB). Finally, density distributions and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were assessed by thoracic spiral computed tomography. Results PCV + SB improved arterial partial pressure of oxygen/inspiratory fraction of oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) by a reduction in intrapulmonary shunt fraction in HCl-ALI from 27% ± 6% to 23% ± 13% and in OA-ALI from 33% ± 19% to 26% ± 18%, whereas during PCV – SB PaO2/FiO2 deteriorated and shunt fraction increased in the HCl group from 28% ± 8% to 37% ± 17% and in the OA group from 32% ± 12% to 47% ± 17% (P < 0.05 for interaction time and treatment, but not ALI type). PCV + SB also resulted in higher EELV (HCl-ALI: 606 ± 171 mL, OA-ALI: 439 ± 90 mL) as compared with PCV – SB (HCl-ALI: 372 ± 130 mL, OA-ALI: 192 ± 51 mL, with P < 0.05 for interaction of time, treatment, and ALI type). Conclusions SB improves oxygenation, reduces shunt fraction, and increases EELV in both models of ALI. PMID:18980696

  20. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray O.

    2012-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph- mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize C!Jmponent and integrated system performance. Ray will be assisting with component testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments. He will be developing procedures to guide these tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, he will gain experience with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis Ray will conduct include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WOO's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. In this Research and Technology environment, Ray will be asked to problem solve real-time as issues arise. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, Ray will be utilizing his chemical engineering background to

  1. Immunomodulatory Effect of Mangiferin in Experimental Animals with Benzo(a)Pyrene-induced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Jayakumar, Thangavel; Nishigaki, Ikuo; Ekambaram, Ganapathy; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Vetriselvi, Jayabal; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of mangiferin was studied in various groups of animals. For this study, adult Swiss albino male mice were treated with benzo(a)pyrene, abbreviated as B(a)P, at 50 mg/kg body weight orally twice a week for 4 weeks; and mangiferin was also given orally (pre- and post-initiation of carcinoma) at 100 mg/kg body weight. Immunocompetence and immune complexes as measured by phagocyte index, avidity index, and soluble immune complex (SIC) levels (p<0.001), as well as NBT reduction, were decreased in the B(a)P-treated animals;whereas increased levels of immunocompetence were noted in the mangiferin-treated animals given B(a)P (p<0.001, p<0.05). The levels of immunoglobulins such as IgG and IgM were decreased considerably (p<0.001) in the B(a)P-treated animals compared with their levels in the control animals; whereas the IgA level was increased (p<0.001). In the mangiferin-treated experimental animals given B(a)P, the levels of IgG and IgM were significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05) increased whereas the IgA level was decreased compared with those for the B(a)P-treated mice. Oxidative changes in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages were also measured. The enhanced lipid peroxidation and decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities found in the lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and macrophages from B(a)P-treated mice were significantly reduced and increased, respectively, by the mangiferin treatment. This study confirms the immunomodulatory effect of mangiferin and shows an immunoprotective role arbitrated through a reduction in the reactive intermediate-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. PMID:23847456

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) reduces mortality and improves lung function in a model of experimental obstructive lung disease in female mice.

    PubMed

    Viby, Niels-Erik; Isidor, Marie S; Buggeskov, Katrine B; Poulsen, Steen S; Hansen, Jacob B; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2013-12-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an important insulin secretagogue and GLP-1 analogs are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 displays antiinflammatory and surfactant-releasing effects. Thus, we hypothesize that treatment with GLP-1 analogs will improve pulmonary function in a mouse model of obstructive lung disease. Female mice were sensitized with injected ovalbumin and treated with GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists. Exacerbation was induced with inhalations of ovalbumin and lipopolysaccharide. Lung function was evaluated with a measurement of enhanced pause in a whole-body plethysmograph. mRNA levels of GLP-1R, surfactants (SFTPs), and a number of inflammatory markers were measured. GLP-1R was highly expressed in lung tissue. Mice treated with GLP-1R agonists had a noticeably better clinical appearance than the control group. Enhanced pause increased dramatically at day 17 in all control mice, but the increase was significantly less in the groups of GLP-1R agonist-treated mice (P < .001). Survival proportions were significantly increased in GLP-1R agonist-treated mice (P < .01). SFTPB and SFTPA were down-regulated and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were increased in mice with obstructive lung disease, but levels were largely unaffected by GLP-1R agonist treatment. These results show that GLP-1R agonists have potential therapeutic potential in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, by decreasing the severity of acute exacerbations. The mechanism of action does not seem to be the modulation of inflammation and SFTP expression.

  3. Effect of surfactant on regional lung function in an experimental model of respiratory distress syndrome in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Sam; Porra, Liisa; Broche, Ludovic; Albu, Gergely; Malaspinas, Iliona; Doras, Camille; Strengell, Satu; Peták, Ferenc; Habre, Walid

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the changes in regional lung function following instillation of surfactant in a model of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) induced by whole lung lavage and mechanical ventilation in eight anaesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated New Zealand White rabbits. Regional specific ventilation (sV̇) was measured by K-edge subtraction synchrotron computed tomography during xenon washin. Lung regions were classified as poorly aerated (PA), normally aerated (NA), or hyperinflated (HI) based on regional density. A functional category was defined within each class based on sV̇ distribution (High, Normal, and Low). Airway resistance (Raw), respiratory tissue damping (G), and elastance (H) were measured by forced oscillation technique at low frequencies before and after whole lung saline lavage-induced (100 ml/kg) RDS, and 5 and 45 min after intratracheal instillation of beractant (75 mg/kg). Surfactant instillation improved Raw, G, and H (P < 0.05 each), and gas exchange and decreased atelectasis (P < 0.001). It also significantly improved lung aeration and ventilation in atelectatic lung regions. However, in regions that had remained normally aerated after lavage, it decreased regional aeration and increased sV̇ (P < 0.001) and sV̇ heterogeneity. Although surfactant treatment improved both central airway and tissue mechanics and improved regional lung function of initially poorly aerated and atelectatic lung, it deteriorated regional lung function when local aeration was normal prior to administration. Local mechanical and functional heterogeneity can potentially contribute to the worsening of RDS and gas exchange. These data underscore the need for reassessing the benefits of routine prophylactic vs. continuous positive airway pressure and early "rescue" surfactant therapy in very immature infants.

  4. Resolving Insurgencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government . Authors of Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) publica- tions enjoy full academic freedom...century, the author identifies four ways in which insurgencies have ended. Clear- cut victories for either the government or the insur- gents occurred...threatened government has resolved the conflict by co-opting the insurgents. After achieving a strategic stalemate and persuading the belligerents that

  5. Lung injury-dependent oxidative status and chymotrypsin-like activity of skeletal muscles in hamsters with experimental emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral skeletal muscle is altered in patients suffering from emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress have been demonstrated to participate on skeletal muscle loss of several states, including disuse atrophy, mechanical ventilation, and chronic diseases. No evidences have demonstrated the occurance in a severity manner. Methods We evaluated body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of emphysemic hamsters. The experimental animals had 2 different severities of lung damage from experimental emphysema induced by 20 mg/mL (E20) and 40 mg/mL (E40) papain. Results The severity of emphysema increased significantly in E20 (60.52 ± 2.8, p < 0.05) and E40 (52.27 ± 4.7; crossed the alveolar intercepts) groups. As compared to the control group, there was a reduction on body (171.6 ± 15.9 g) and muscle weight (251.87 ± 24.87 mg) in the E20 group (157.5 ± 10.3 mg and 230.12 ± 23.52 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively), which was accentuated in the E40 group (137.4 ± 7.2 g and 197.87 ± 10.49 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively). Additionally, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence (CL), carbonylated proteins, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were elevated in the E40 group as compared to the E20 group (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). The severity of emphysema significantly correlated with the progressive increase in CL (r = −0.95), TBARS (r = −0.98), carbonyl proteins (r = −0.99), and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity (r = −0.90). Furthermore, augmentation of proteolytic activity correlated significantly with CL (r = 0.97), TBARS (r = 0.96), and carbonyl proteins (r = 0.91). Conclusions Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that muscle atrophy observed in this model of emphysema is mediated by increased muscle chymotrypsin

  6. Antioxidant and antitumor efficacy of Luteolin, a dietary flavone on benzo(a)pyrene-induced experimental lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2016-08-01

    The present study is designed to assess the antioxidant and antitumor potential of luteolin against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Here, we reported that oral administration of B(a)P (50mg/kg body weight) to mice resulted in raised lipid peroxides (LPO), lung specific tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) with concomitant decrease in the levels of both enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and vitamin C. Luteolin treatment (15mg/kg body weight, p.o) significantly counteracted all these alterations and maintained cellular normalcy. Moreover, assessment of protein expression levels by western blot analysis revealed that luteolin treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Furthermore, histopathology of lung tissue and immunohistochemistry of CYP1A1 were carried out to substantiate the anti- lung cancer effect of luteolin. Overall, these findings confirm the chemopreventive potential of luteolin against B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis.

  7. Furrier's lung

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, J. Cortez

    1970-01-01

    As is known, the inhalation of animal hairs can provoke immunological reactions in the respiratory tract affecting the naso-tracheo-bronchial sector and giving rise to asthma-like syndromes. Another form of disease, found in furriers with long exposure to `hair dust', is described. It is characterized by a granulomatous interstitial pneumonia, of the tuberculoid type, very similar to that described in other diseases related to the inhalation of organic dusts, both vegetable and animal, such as `farmer's lung' and `bird fancier's lung'. This new disease—which we experimentally reproduced—can be diagnosed from the occupational history together with the finding on lung biopsy of hair shafts within granulomatous lesions (birefringence and histo-chemical reactions). As in other diseases of this type, a host factor of probable immunological nature is suggested. Attention is drawn to the need to protect workers in the furrier's trade. Images PMID:5484998

  8. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  9. Humidification of base flow gas during adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: an experimental study using a lung model.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoki; Nagano, Osamu; Hirayama, Takahiro; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) with an R100 artificial ventilator, exhaled gas from patient's lung may warm the temperature probe and thereby disturb the humidification of base flow (BF) gas. We measured the humidity of BF gas during HFOV with frequencies of 6, 8 and 10 Hz, maximum stroke volumes (SV) of 285, 205, and 160 ml at the respective frequencies, and, BFs of 20, 30, 40 l/min using an original lung model. The R100 device was equipped with a heated humidifier, Hummax Ⅱ, consisting of a porous hollow fiber in circuit. A 50-cm length of circuit was added between temperature probe (located at 50 cm proximal from Y-piece) and the hollow fiber. The lung model was made of a plastic container and a circuit equipped with another Hummax Ⅱ. The lung model temperature was controlled at 37℃. The Hummax Ⅱ of the R100 was inactivated in study-1 and was set at 35℃ or 37℃ in study-2. The humidity was measured at the distal end of the added circuit in study-1 and at the proximal end in study-2. In study-1, humidity was detected at 6 Hz (SV 285 ml) and BF 20 l/min, indicating the direct reach of the exhaled gas from the lung model to the temperature probe. In study-2 the absolute humidity of the BF gas decreased by increasing SV and by increasing BF and it was low with setting of 35℃. In this study setting, increasing the SV induced significant reduction of humidification of the BF gas during HFOV with R100.

  10. Lung [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the early stage of experimental acute smoke inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R. Scott; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Wellman, Tyler J.; de Prost, Nicolas; Kradin, Richard L.; Venegas, Jose G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs in a third of patients with smoke inhalation injury. Its clinical manifestations usually do not appear until 48 to 72 h after inhalation. Identifying inflammatory changes that occur in pulmonary parenchyma earlier than that could provide insight into the pathogenesis of smoke-induced ALI. Furthermore, noninvasive measurement of such changes might lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Because glucose is the main source of energy for pulmonary inflammatory cells, we hypothesized that its pulmonary metabolism is increased shortly after smoke inhalation, when classic manifestations of ALI are not yet expected. Methods In five sheep we induced unilateral injury with 48 breaths of cotton smoke while the contralateral lung served as control. We used positron emission tomography with: 1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to measure pulmonary inflammatory cell metabolic activity; and 2) [13N]nitrogen in saline to measure shunt and ventilation-perfusion distributions separately in the smoke-exposed and control lungs. Results The pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate was increased at 4 h after smoke inhalation (mean ± SD: 0.0031 ± 0.0013 vs. 0.0026 ± 0.0010 min−1, P < 0.05) mainly as a result of increased glucose phosphorylation. At this stage there was no worsening in lung aeration or shunt. However, there was a shift of perfusion toward units with lower ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (mean ratio ± SD: 0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 1.12 ± 0.02, P < 0.05) and increased heterogeneity of the ventilation-perfusion distribution (mean ± SD: 0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Conclusion Using noninvasive imaging we demonstrated that increased pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occur early after smoke inhalation. PMID:24051392

  11. Diffusion of hyperpolarized 129Xe in the lung: a simplified model of 129Xe septal uptake and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patz, Samuel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Washko, George R.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2011-01-01

    We used hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR to measure pulmonary alveolar surface area per unit gas volume SA/Vgas, alveolar septal thickness h and capillary transit time τ, three critical determinants of the lung's primary role as a gas exchange organ. An analytical solution for a simplified diffusion model is described, together with a modification of the xenon transfer contrast imaging technique utilizing 90° radio-frequency pulses applied to the dissolved phase, rather than traditional 180° pulses. With this approach, three-dimensional (3D) maps of SA/Vgas were obtained. We measured global SA/Vgas, h and τ in four normal subjects, two subjects with mild interstitial lung disease (ILD) and two subjects with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In normals, SA/Vgas decreased with increasing lung volume from ~320 to 80 cm-1 both h~13 μm and τ~1.5 s were relatively constant. For the two ILD subjects, h was, respectively, 36 and 97% larger than normal, quantifying an increased gas/blood tissue barrier; SA/Vgas and τ were normal. The two COPD subjects had SA/Vgas values ~25% that of normals, quantifying septal surface loss in emphysema; h and τ were normal. These are the first noninvasive, non-radiation-based, quantitative measurements of h and τ in patients with pulmonary disease.

  12. Green tea polyphenol extract attenuates lung injury in experimental model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy in mice.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Mazzon, Emanuela; Muià, Carmelo; Genovese, Tiziana; Menegazzi, Marta; Zaffini, Raffaela; Suzuki, Hisanory; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2005-06-29

    Here we investigate the effects of the green tea extract in an animal model of acute inflammation, carrageenan-induced pleurisy. We report here that green tea extract (given at 25 mg/kg i.p. bolus 1 h prior to carrageenan), exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in an animal model of acute inflammation in vivo. Injection of carrageenan (2%) into the pleural cavity of mice elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by fluid accumulation in the pleural cavity that contained many neutrophils (PMNs), an infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and increased production of nitrite/nitrate, tumour necrosis factor alpha. All parameters of inflammation were attenuated by green tea extract treatment. Furthermore, carrageenan induced an up-regulation of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1, as well as nitrotyrosine and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) formation, as determined by immunohistochemical analysis of lung tissues. Staining for the ICAM-1, nitrotyrosine, and PARS was reduced by green tea extract. Our results clearly demonstrate that treatment with green tea extract exerts a protective effect and offers a novel therapeutic approach for the management of lung injury.

  13. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Lung transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or ... lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other ...

  14. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  15. Optimizing positive end-expiratory pressure by oscillatory mechanics minimizes tidal recruitment and distension: an experimental study in a lavage model of lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction It is well established that during mechanical ventilation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome cyclic recruitment/derecruitment and overdistension are potentially injurious for lung tissues. We evaluated whether the forced oscillation technique (FOT) could be used to guide the ventilator settings in order to minimize cyclic lung recruitment/derecruitment and cyclic mechanical stress in an experimental model of acute lung injury. Methods We studied six pigs in which lung injury was induced by bronchoalveolar lavage. The animals were ventilated with a tidal volume of 6 ml/kg. Forced oscillations at 5 Hz were superimposed on the ventilation waveform. Pressure and flow were measured at the tip and at the inlet of the endotracheal tube respectively. Respiratory system reactance (Xrs) was computed from the pressure and flow signals and expressed in terms of oscillatory elastance (EX5). Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was increased from 0 to 24 cm H2O in steps of 4 cm H2O and subsequently decreased from 24 to 0 in steps of 2 cm H2O. At each PEEP step CT scans and EX5 were assessed at end-expiration and end-inspiration. Results During deflation the relationship between both end-expiratory and end-inspiratory EX5 and PEEP was a U-shaped curve with minimum values at PEEP = 13.4 ± 1.0 cm H2O (mean ± SD) and 13.0 ± 1.0 cm H2O respectively. EX5 was always higher at end-inspiration than at end-expiration, the difference between the average curves being minimal at 12 cm H2O. At this PEEP level, CT did not show any substantial sign of intra-tidal recruitment/derecruitment or expiratory lung collapse. Conclusions Using FOT it was possible to measure EX5 both at end-expiration and at end-inspiration. The optimal PEEP strategy based on end-expiratory EX5 minimized intra-tidal recruitment/derecruitment as assessed by CT, and the concurrent attenuation of intra-tidal variations of EX5 suggests that it may also minimize tidal mechanical stress

  16. Neonatal epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression regulates the response of the lung to experimental asthma.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Krista K; Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Bramble, Lori A; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; LaPres, John J

    2012-03-01

    Allergic airway disease is characterized by a T helper type 2 cell-mediated airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Little is known about the role of hypoxia-mediated signaling in the progression of the disease. To address this knowledge gap, a mouse model was created in which doxycycline exposure induces the functional deletion of hypoxia inducible factor-1α from alveolar type II and Clara cells of the lung. When hypoxia inducible factor-1α deletion was induced during the early postnatal development period of the lung, the mice displayed an enhanced response to the ovalbumin model of allergic airway disease. These hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice exhibit increased cellular infiltrates, eosinophilia in the lavage fluid and parenchyma, and T helper type 2 cytokines, as compared with ovalbumin-treated control mice. Moreover, these hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice display increased airway resistance when compared with their control counterparts. Interestingly, if the loss of hypoxia inducible factor-1α was induced in early adulthood, the exacerbated phenotype was not observed. Taken together, these results suggest that epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α plays an important role in establishing the innate immunity of the lung and epithelial-specific deficiency in the transcription factor, during early postnatal development, increases the severity of inflammation and functional airway resistance, following ovalbumin challenge. Finally, these results might explain some of the chronic respiratory pathology observed in premature infants, especially those that receive supplemental oxygen. This early hyperoxic exposure, from normal ambient and supplemental oxygen, would presumably inhibit normal hypoxia inducible factor-1α signaling, mimicking the functional deletion described.

  17. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  18. Effect of lung flooding and high-intensity focused ultrasound on lung tumours: an experimental study in an ex vivo human cancer model and simulated in vivo tumours in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valuable tool for minimally invasive tumour ablation. However, due to the air content in ventilated lungs, lung tumours have never been treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in ex vivo human and in vivo porcine lung cancer models. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of lung flooding and sonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound for lung tumour ablation in ex vivo human and in vivo animal models. Methods Lung flooding was performed in four human lung lobes which were resected from non-small cell lung cancers. B-mode imaging and temperature measurements were simultaneously obtained during high-intensity focused ultrasonography of centrally located lung cancers. The tumour was removed immediately following insonation and processed for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase and H&E staining. In addition, the left lungs of three pigs were flooded. Purified BSA in glutaraldehyde was injected centrally into the left lower lung lobe to simulate a lung tumour. The ultrasound was focused transthoracically through the flooded lung into the simulated tumour with the guidance of sonography. The temperature of the tumour was simultaneously measured. The vital signs of the animal were monitored during the procedure. Results A well-demarcated lesion of coagulation necrosis was produced in four of four human lung tumours. There did not appear to be any damage to the surrounding lung parenchyma. After high-intensity focused ultrasound insonation, the mean temperature increase was 7.5-fold higher in the ex vivo human tumour than in the flooded lung tissue (52.1 K ± 8.77 K versus 7.1 K ± 2.5 K). The transthoracic high-intensity focused ultrasound of simulated tumours in the in vivo model resulted in a mean peak temperature increase up to 53.7°C (±4.5). All of the animals survived the procedure without

  19. Protective effects of Trifolium alexandrinum L. against lung injury induced by environmental toxin CCl4 in experimental rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rahmat Ali; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Saboorshah, Abdus; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Khan, Samiullah

    2016-01-01

    Background In Pakistan numerous medicinal floras has used in the treatment of various human ailments. Among them Trifolium alexandrinum L. is traditionally used in the curing of disease. Presently we designed to ascertain the protective role of Trifolium alexandrinum methanolic extracts (TAME) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced lung injury and oxidative stress in rats. Methods Exposure to CCl4 induces oxidative stress and causes tissue damage by the induction of CCl4 free radicals. Twenty-four male albino rats were divided equally into four groups. Rats in group I had free access to drinking water and laboratory food. Group II was treated with 1 ml/kg body weight (b.w.) CCl4 (30% in olive oil). Groups III and IV rats were fed (p.o.) 200 mg/kg b.w. TAME and 50 mg/kg b.w. silymarin after 24 h of CCl4 treatment for 2 weeks. Results Administration of CCl4 caused a significant (p<0.01) decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase), and glutathione contents were decreased; however, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were increased (p<0.01). The alterations caused by CCl4 were significantly (p<0.01) reversed toward control levels by supplementation of TAME and silymarin. Conclusion These results suggest that in rats TAME and silymarin could protect the lungs against CCl4-induced oxidative damage. PMID:27834184

  20. Relevance of maintenance triple-drug immunosuppression to bridle the amplification of rat cytomegalovirus infection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lehle, K; von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Diez, C; Michl, M; Geissler, E K; Wottge, H U; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W

    2012-12-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy required to treat rejection after lung transplantation (LTx) contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and disease. In a weak allogeneic left LTx model in the rat (Fisher 344 [F344] to Wistar Kyoto [WKY] rats) we analyzed the influence of acute CMV infection on postoperative day (POD) 3, with application of standard triple-drug immunosuppression (TD-IS) (cyclosporin A, azathioprine, prednisolone) on late outcome after LTx. Native right lungs and syngeneic grafts (WKY to WKY) served as controls. Rats were sacrificed on POD 15, 30, 60, and 100. TD-IS completely prevented acute and chronic rejection in non-infected rats. Allografts of CMV-infected rats treated with TD-IS showed only mild perivascular infiltrations in 6/10 rats (POD 15 and 30), which persisted up to POD 100 in 4/10 rats. In the long-term course, mild isolated interstitial and alveolar changes were found in 40% of these animals. In conclusion, rat CMV infection partially neutralized the immunosuppressive effect of TD-IS. However, an amplification of CMV infection under TD-IS can be controlled and does not result in fatal outcome.

  1. Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectrometry Studies of the Autoionization of the 2s{sup 2}2p {sup 2}P Triply Excited State of Atomic Lithium: Experimental Results and R -Matrix Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Cubaynes, D.; Zhou, H. L.; VoKy, L.; Wuilleumier, F. J.; Kennedy, E. T.; Bizau, J. M.; Manson, S. T.; Morgan, T. J.; Blancard, C.

    2000-02-21

    We have measured the angle-resolved energy dependence of the electrons emitted over the energy range of the triply excited 2s{sup 2}2p P{sup 2} lithium resonance using synchrotron radiation. We have also calculated the behavior of the angular distribution parameter {beta} using the R -matrix approximation. Experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement and show deep minima in the 1s2p P{sup 1,} {sup 3} ionic channels. The energy at which the minima occur does not coincide with the resonance energy, but is shifted towards higher energy. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Experimental Study on How Human Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B1-25 is Oxidized by Ozone in the Presence of Fe(II) and Ascorbic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the results of experiments on the chemical fate of the human lung surfactant protein SP-B1-25 upon exposure to gaseous ozone in realistic aqueous media simulating the conditions prevalent in epithelial lining fluids in polluted ambient air. Our experiments consist of exposing aqueous microjets containing SP-B1-25, the natural antioxidant ascorbic acid, and the Fe2+ carried by most atmospheric fine particulates, under mild acidic conditions, such as those created by the innate lung host defense response. Reactants and the products of such interactions are detected via online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We will show that ascorbic acid largely inhibits the ozonation of SP-B1-25 in the absence of Fe2+, leading to the formation of an ascorbic acid ozonide (Enami et al., PNAS 2008). In the presence of Fe2+, however, the ozonide decomposes into reactive intermediates that result in the partial oxidation of SP-B1-25, presumable affecting its function as surfactant. We infer that these experimental results establish a plausible causal link for the observed synergic adverse health effects of ambient ozone and fine particulates

  3. Enhancement of antitumor effect of paclitaxel in combination with immunomodulatory Withania somnifera on benzo(a)pyrene induced experimental lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Senthilnathan, Palaniyandi; Padmavathi, Radhakrishnan; Banu, Syed Mumtaz; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2006-02-25

    The current experimental work deals with the immunomodulatory studies on the extract of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal root powder against benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer in male Swiss albino mice. In our previous study, we reported the antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effect of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal along with paclitaxel. Immune dysfunction has been found to be associated with cancer and chemotherapy. Benzo(a)pyrene induced cancer animals were treated with 400mg/kg bodyweight of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal extract for 30 days significantly alters the levels of immunocompetent cells, immune complexes and immunoglobulins. Based on the data, the carcinogen as well as the paclitaxel affects the immune system, the toxic side effects on the immune system is more reversible and more controllable by W. somnifera (L.) Dunal. These results concluded the immunomodulatory activity of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal extract, which is a known immunomodulator in indigenous medicine.

  4. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, Martin Paul

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  5. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  6. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz for astrophysically significant temperatures. Four hundred and eighty-six spectra with absolute intensity calibration recorded between 240 and 389 K provided a means for the calculation of the complete experimental spectrum (CES) of methanol as a function of temperature. The CES includes contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model quantum mechanically (QM). It also includes the spectrum of the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In general the QM models provide frequencies that are within 1 MHz of their experimental values, but there are several outliers that differ by tens of MHz. As in our recent work on methanol in the 560-654 GHz region, significant intensity differences between our experimental intensities and cataloged values were found. In this work these differences are explored in the context of several QM analyses. The experimental results presented here are analyzed to provide a frequency point-by-point catalog that is well suited for the simulation of crowded and overlapped spectra. Additionally, a catalog in the usual line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy format is provided.

  7. Protective effects of mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia against experimental growth of lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magkouta, Sophia; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Psallidas, Ioannis; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Roussos, Charis; Loutrari, Heleni

    2009-01-01

    Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a traditionally used dietary flavoring agent with medicinal properties, has been shown to exert in vitro antitumor activities, but no study has addressed in vivo efficacy and mechanisms of action. Presently, we demonstrated that treatment of immunocompetent mice with mastic oil (45 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, 3 times a wk for approximately 3 wk) significantly inhibited tumor growth (56.4% +/- 5.7 maximum reduction in tumor volumes) without toxicity. Analysis of tumors by immunohistochemistry and ELISA indicated that this effect is associated with increased apoptosis, reduced neovascularization, and inhibition of chemokine expression. Likewise mastic oil reduced vascular endothelial growth factor and chemokine release by Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Furthermore, mastic oil administration decreased small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) Ras, RhoA and nuclear factor-kappa-B-dependent reporter gene expression in vivo and in vitro, indicating a mechanistic link between mastic oil activities and blocking of relevant signaling and transcription pathways. A dose-response comparison with perillyl alcohol and alpha-pinene, two of its components, revealed a higher efficacy of mastic oil, pointing to a beneficial collective interaction among its ingredients. Conclusively, our results provide novel in vivo evidence of mastic oil inhibitory effects on tumor growth and set a rational basis for its future application in cancer prevention.

  8. Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platisa, Ljiljana; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Goossens, Bart; Marchessoux, Cédric; Kimpe, Tom; Philips, Wilfried

    2009-02-01

    Medical-imaging systems are designed to aid medical specialists in a specific task. Therefore, the physical parameters of a system need to optimize the task performance of a human observer. This requires measurements of human performance in a given task during the system optimization. Typically, psychophysical studies are conducted for this purpose. Numerical observer models have been successfully used to predict human performance in several detection tasks. Especially, the task of signal detection using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) in simulated images has been widely explored. However, there are few studies done for clinically acquired images that also contain anatomic noise. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a CHO in the task of detecting lung nodules in real radiographic images of the chest. To evaluate variability introduced by the limited available data, we employ a commonly used study of a multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) scenario. It accounts for both case and reader variability. Finally, we use the "oneshot" methods to estimate the MRMC variance of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The obtained AUC compares well to those reported for human observer study on a similar data set. Furthermore, the "one-shot" analysis implies a fairly consistent performance of the CHO with the variance of AUC below 0.002. This indicates promising potential for numerical observers in optimization of medical imaging displays and encourages further investigation on the subject.

  9. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary hypertension Complications of lung transplantation include rejection of the transplanted lung and infection. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  10. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the arteries of the lungs ( pulmonary hypertension ) Sarcoidosis Lung transplant may not be done for people ... Chronic Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Lung disease Sarcoidosis Review Date 4/13/2015 Updated by: Dale ...

  11. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... they can't breathe deeply. Pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation ... tuberculosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Patient Instructions Chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  12. Collisional quenching of OD A 2Σ+ by H2: experimental and theoretical studies of the state-resolved OD X 2Π product distribution and branching fraction.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia H; Dempsey, Logan P; Lester, Marsha I; Fu, Bina; Kamarchik, Eugene; Bowman, Joel M

    2010-10-28

    We report joint experimental and theoretical studies of outcomes resulting from the nonreactive quenching of electronically excited OD A  (2)Σ(+) by H(2). The experiments utilize a pump-probe technique to detect the OD X  (2)Π product state distribution under single collision conditions. The OD X  (2)Π products are observed primarily in their lowest vibrational state (v(") = 0) with substantially less population in v(") = 1. The OD X  (2)Π products are generated with a high degree of rotational excitation, peaking at N(") = 21 with an average rotational energy of 4600 cm(-1), and a strong propensity for populating the Π(A(')) Λ-doublet component indicative of alignment of the half-filled pπ orbital in the plane of OD rotation. Branching fraction measurements show that the nonreactive channel accounts for less than 20% of quenching outcomes. Complementary classical trajectory calculations of the postquenching dynamics are initiated from representative points along seams of conical intersections between the ground and excited-state potentials of OD(A  (2)Σ(+),X  (2)Π) + H(2). Diabatic modeling of the initial momenta in the dynamical calculations captures the key experimental trends: OD X  (2)Π products released primarily in their ground vibrational state with extensive rotational excitation and a branching ratio that strongly favors reactive quenching. The OD A  (2)Σ(+) + H(2) results are also compared with previous studies on the quenching of OH A  (2)Σ(+) + H(2); the two experimental studies show remarkably similar rotational energy distributions for the OH and OD X  (2)Π radical products.

  13. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; Simone, Monica de; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  14. Exposure to hydrogen fluoride: an experimental study in humans of concentrations of fluoride in plasma, symptoms, and lung function.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, K; Ekstrand, J; Boe, J; Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the absorption of inhaled hydrogen fluoride (HF) by measuring plasma fluorides and HF concentrations in the breathing zone during exposure to HF. A possible dose-effect relation was investigated by following airway symptoms and lung function-that is, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)-during and after exposure to HF. METHODS: 20 healthy, male volunteers were exposed for one hour to constant HF concentrations that ranged from 0.2 to 5.2 mg/m3; these concentrations are known to occur among potroom workers in the primary aluminium industry. Plasma fluorides were analysed before, during, and after exposure. Symptoms from the eyes and the upper and lower airways were registered and graded from 1 to 5 with a standardised questionnaire. RESULTS: The total symptom score was significantly increased at the end of exposure for all the subjects as a group (P < 0.01) and for the group exposed to HF below the present Norwegian standard for total fluorides 0.6 mg/m3 (P = 0.05). No change was detected in FEV15 although a significant decrease was found in FVC in the group exposed to fluorides below the hygienic standard (n = 9) and for the entire group (n = 23). Almost all the symptoms had disappeared four hours after the end of exposure. Symptom scores from the upper airways were significantly correlated with the HF concentration (r = 0.62, P = 0.002), the change in plasma fluoride concentration (delta C) (r = 0.51, P = 0.01), and the maximum plasma fluoride concentration (Cmax) (r = 0.42, P = 0.05). A significant correlation was also found between the total symptom score for airways and the HF concentration. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed a strong relation between inhaled HF and concentrations of fluoride in plasma. Upper airway and eye symptoms occurred after one hour of exposure to HF even when below the Norwegian hygienic standard for fluorides. PMID:9072031

  15. THE COMPLETE, TEMPERATURE-RESOLVED EXPERIMENTAL SPECTRUM OF ETHYL CYANIDE (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN) BETWEEN 210 AND 270 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-12-20

    This paper reports the extension of a previously reported experimental method for the identification and characterization of astrophysical weeds in millimeter and submillimeter spectra to the widely used 210-270 GHz atmospheric window. At 300 K, these spectra contain contributions from approximately 40 vibrational states in addition to the cataloged ground state. The quantum mechanical analysis of such a large number of states would be a formidable challenge due to the complex interactions among these dense vibrational states. A new heterodyne receiver-based system is reported, as well as its intensity calibration. Results are presented in the standard astrophysical catalog format as well as our previously described point-by-point format that is effective for the characterization of blends. We also describe and validate an additional spectral synthesis approach, based on the much smaller line list catalog, which is useful in the blended line limit.

  16. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: theoretical background.

    PubMed

    Sukstanskii, A L; Yablonskiy, D A

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of (3)He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the (3)He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients-longitudinal (D(L)) and transverse (D(T)) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D(L) and D(T) and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D(L) and D(T) on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry-evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized (3)He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of (3)He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Delta. If Delta is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  17. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of 3He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the 3He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients—longitudinal (D) and transverse (D) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D and D and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D and D on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry—evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of 3He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Δ. If Δ is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  18. Comparison of the effects of low-dose vs. high-dose aminophylline on lung function in experimental meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Drgova, A; Mokry, J; Pullmann, R; Redfors, B; Petraskova, M; Calkovska, A

    2008-12-01

    Due to missing information on appropriate dosing of aminophylline in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), this study compared effects of high-dose and low-dose aminophylline on lung function of animals with MAS. Meconium-instilled rabbits were treated by low-dose (LD, 1.0 mg/kg), or high-dose (HD, 2.0 mg/kg) aminophylline at 0.5 and 2.5 h after meconium instillation, or were left untreated. Within 5 h of oxygen ventilation, HD-aminophylline improved gas exchange, reduced pulmonary shunts and ventilatory pressures, and decreased edema formation and lung neutrophils. LD-aminophylline enhanced lung function to a lower extent than HD-aminophylline, and failed to reduce lung edema and the number of lung neutrophils. Both treatments decreased lung peroxidation, with a stronger effect of HD-aminophylline on lipid oxidation and of LD-aminophylline on protein oxidation. Tracheal reactivity to histamine decreased after HD-aminophylline, while lung tissue reactivity was more reduced after LD-aminophylline. Although LD-aminophylline showed some anti-inflammatory potential, HD-aminophylline improved most of the parameters more effectively.

  19. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei; Champion, Paul; Heilweil, Edwin J.; Nelson, Keith A.; Ziegler, Larry

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. Lung Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  1. Experimental bacterial pneumonia in rabbits: polymorphonuclear leukocyte margination and sequestration in rabbit lungs and quantitation and kinetics of /sup 51/Cr-labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes in E. coli-induced lung lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Movat, H.Z.

    1982-12-01

    A relationship between the circulating and marginal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) pools was documented using /sup 51/Cr-labeled leukocytes as a marker. /sup 51/Cr-leukocytes marginating in the lungs were found to decrease following a first-order exponential decline, while /sup 51/Cr radioactivity accumulated in the liver and the spleen. Intravenously administered endotoxin caused a rapid selective disappearance of PMNs from the circulation. The percentage of infused /sup 51/Cr cells disappearing was equal to the percentage of disappearance of host cells. The PMNs were found to sequester in the lungs, with peak sequestration of labeled cells occurring 5 min after an endotoxin challenge. Over the next 25 min the /sup 51/Cr radioactivity in the lungs declined. Large numbers of PMNs, probably newly derived from the bone marrow, were observed histologically to be sequestered in the lung vasculature 90 min after an endotoxin dose, while the early sequestration of circulating leukocytes could not be assessed histologically. Pulmonary inflammatory lesions were induced selectively with Escherichia coli in the left lower lobes of rabbits, leaving the right lower lobes as intrinsic controls. PMN-accumulation into the lesions was quantitated using /sup 51/Cr-labeled blood leukocytes. With the aid of /sup 125/I-labeled E. coli, a logarithmic dose-response relationship was found between the number of E. coli and of PMNs. Over a 6-hr period circulating PMNs were found to accumulate in a lesion in the left lower lobe, whereas in the control right lower lobe, leukocyte radioactivity declined. These findings were confirmed with the aid of lavages of the right and left lungs. Two peaks of PMN-accumulation were found by studying leukocyte kinetics: a larger peak between 0 and 6 hr and a smaller peak 18-24 hr after instillation of the microorganisms. Histologic studies confirmed the accumulation of leukocytes, and by 3 weeks showed a complete resolution of the lesions.

  2. Resolving the Pericenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2015-10-01

    The Wisdom-Holman mapping method and its variations have become a mainstay of research in solar system dynamics. But the method is not without its limitations. Rauch & Holman noted that at large eccentricities sufficiently small steps must be taken to resolve the pericenter. In this paper, I explore in more detail what it means to resolve the pericenter.

  3. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-04-23

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients.

  4. Dynamic regulation of cardiolipin by the lipid pump Atp8b1 determines the severity of lung injury in experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nancy B; Durairaj, Lakshmi; Chen, Bill B; McVerry, Bryan J; Ryan, Alan J; Donahoe, Michael; Waltenbaugh, Alisa K; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Henderson, Florita C; Etscheidt, Christopher A; McCoy, Diann M; Agassandian, Marianna; Hayes-Rowan, Emily C; Coon, Tiffany A; Butler, Phillip L; Gakhar, Lokesh; Mathur, Satya N; Sieren, Jessica C; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kagan, Valerian E; McLennan, Geoffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2010-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death from infection in the US, yet fundamentally new conceptual models underlying its pathogenesis have not emerged. We show that humans and mice with bacterial pneumonia have markedly elevated amounts of cardiolipin, a rare, mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, in lung fluid and find that it potently disrupts surfactant function. Intratracheal cardiolipin administration in mice recapitulates the clinical phenotype of pneumonia, including impaired lung mechanics, modulation of cell survival and cytokine networks and lung consolidation. We have identified and characterized the activity of a unique cardiolipin transporter, the P-type ATPase transmembrane lipid pump Atp8b1, a mutant version of which is associated with severe pneumonia in humans and mice. Atp8b1 bound and internalized cardiolipin from extracellular fluid via a basic residue-enriched motif. Administration of a peptide encompassing the cardiolipin binding motif or Atp8b1 gene transfer in mice lessened bacteria-induced lung injury and improved survival. The results unveil a new paradigm whereby Atp8b1 is a cardiolipin importer whose capacity to remove cardiolipin from lung fluid is exceeded during inflammation or when Atp8b1 is defective. This discovery opens the door for new therapeutic strategies directed at modulating the abundance or molecular interactions of cardiolipin in pneumonia.

  5. Conditionally replicating oncolytic adenoviral vector expressing arresten and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand experimentally suppresses lung carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shudong; Qi, Zongli; Li, Huijin; Hu, Jun; Wang, Dongyang; Wang, Xin; Feng, Zhenzhen

    2015-08-01

    Current methods of treatment for lung carcinoma are ineffective for the majority of patients. Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a potential novel treatment for a number of neoplastic diseases, including lung carcinoma. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic mechanisms underlying the anti-angiogenesis gene, arresten, and the apoptosis-inducing gene, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), in order to evaluate their therapeutic potential in lung cancer. The two genes were expressed by CRAd, which was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In vitro analyses demonstrated that CRAd adenoviruses are capable of selectively inhibiting A549 lung cancer cell growth and replication but not in that of healthy cells. In vivo analyses demonstrated that the infection of A549 cell lines using CRAd armed with the two genes (CRAd-arresten-TRAIL) enhanced the tumor inhibition, compared with cells infected with CRAd-arresten, CRAd-TRAIL or CRAd, and with the control group. CRAd-arresten-TRAIL may therefore be useful in the treatment of lung cancer.

  6. Assessment of peripheral lung mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T; Suki, Béla

    2008-11-30

    The mechanical properties of the lung periphery are major determinants of overall lung function, and can change dramatically in disease. In this review we examine the various experimental techniques that have provided data pertaining to the mechanical properties of the lung periphery, together with the mathematical models that have been used to interpret these data. These models seek to make a clear distinction between the central and peripheral compartments of the lung by encapsulating functional differences between the conducing airways, the terminal airways and the parenchyma. Such a distinction becomes problematic in disease, however, because of the inevitable onset of regional variations in mechanical behavior throughout the lung. Accordingly, lung models are used both in the inverse sense as vehicles for extracting physiological insight from experimental data, and in the forward sense as virtual laboratories for the testing of specific hypothesis about mechanisms such as the effects of regional heterogeneities. Pathologies such as asthma, acute lung injury and emphysema can alter the mechanical properties of the lung periphery through the direct alteration of intrinsic tissue mechanics, the development of regional heterogeneities in mechanical function, and the complete derecruitment of airspaces due to airway closure and alveolar collapse. We are now beginning to decipher the relative contributions of these various factors to pathological alterations in peripheral lung mechanics, which may eventually lead to the development and assessment of novel therapies.

  7. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  8. Fire-eater's lung.

    PubMed

    Załęska, Jolanta; Błaszczyk, Arkadiusz; Jakubowska, Lilia; Szopiński, Janusz; Polaczek, Mateusz; Grudny, Jacek; Zych, Jacek; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Fire eater's lung (FEL) is an acute hydrocarbon pneumonitis caused by aspiration or inhalation into airways of liquid hydrocarbons. This disorder is classified into distinct form of chemical toxic pneumonitis. An amateur fire-eater is presented in this work. He accidentally aspirated into airways about 1/3 of glass of grill lighter fluid composed of mixture of liquid hydrocarbons. A few hours after this incident he had severe symptoms like weakness, high temperature, midsternal pleuritic chest pain, myalgia of the back, shortness of breath, and dry cough. Radiologic examination revealed consolidations with well-defined cavitary lesions (pneumatoceles) in lower lobes mainly in the left lower lobe. After one week of this event clinical improvement was observed. The lesions resolved nearly completly during three months. The review of the literature connected with fire-eater's lung is also presented.

  9. The Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Lung Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells in Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mokhber Dezfouli, Mohammad Reza; Chaleshtori, Sirous Sadeghian; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Tavanaeimanesh, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Tahamtani, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    Lung diseases cause great morbidity and mortality. The choice of effective medical treatment is limited and the number of lung diseases are difficult to treat with current treatments. The embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to differentiate into cell types of all three germinal layers, including lung epithelial cells. So they can be a potential source for new cell therapies for hereditary or acquired diseases of the airways and lungs. One method for treatment of lung diseases is cell therapy and the use of ESCs that can replace the damaged epithelial and endothelial cells. Progress using ESCs has developed slowly for lung regeneration because differentiation of lung cells from ESCs is more difficult as compared to differentiation of other cells. The review studies the therapeutic effects of differentiated lung cells from embryonic stem cells in lung diseases. There are few studies of differentiation of ESCs into a lineage of respiratory and then investigation of this cell in experimental model of lung diseases.

  10. Paediatric lung recruitment: a review of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Jauncey-Cooke, Jacqui; East, Chris E; Bogossian, Fiona

    2015-03-01

    Lung recruitment is used as an adjunct to lung protective ventilation strategies. Lung recruitment is a brief, deliberate elevation of transpulmonary pressures beyond what is achieved during tidal ventilation levels. The aim of lung recruitment is to maximise the number of alveoli participating in gas exchange particularly in distal and dependant regions of the lung. This may improve oxygenation and end expiratory levels. Restoration of end expiratory levels and stabilisation of the alveoli may reduce the incidence of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). Various methods of lung recruitment have been studied in adult and experimental populations. This review aims to establish the evidence for lung recruitment in the pediatric population.

  11. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  12. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been a steady drop in lung cancer deaths among men, mainly because fewer men are smoking, and since the turn of the century, lung cancer deaths in women have been slowly declining. Cigarette smoking rates had been dropping steadily in the 1990s ...

  13. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  14. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  15. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  16. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  17. Current status of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lau, C L; Patterson, G A

    2003-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the first successful clinical lung transplant was performed in 1983, and, in the interim, lung transplantation has become the preferred treatment option for a variety of end-stage pulmonary diseases. Remarkable progress has been made in the field through refinement of technique and improved understanding of transplant immunology and microbiology. Unfortunately, donor shortages continue to limit the more widespread application of lung transplantation. In order to address this issue, marginal donors, living lobar and split lung donor techniques, and nonheartbeating donors have been used clinically to increase the number of donor lungs available. Chronic rejection of the lung allograft is currently the major hurdle limiting longterm survival. To date, prevention of known risk factors and treatment strategies have not lessened the devastating toll this process has on lung transplant survival. Better understanding of the cause of chronic rejection is needed in order to develop novel strategies for its treatment. Promotion of immune tolerance is a promising area that could potentially eliminate chronic rejection. The present article discusses recent advances in lung transplantation. It also details the major issues facing the field today. Only through continued clinical and experimental investigation will lung transplantation eventually reach its full potential.

  18. Loss of Twist1 in the Mesenchymal Compartment Promotes Increased Fibrosis in Experimental Lung Injury by Enhanced Expression of CXCL12

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jiangning; Tedrow, John R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Dutta, Justin A.; Miller, David T.; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shibing; Chu, Yanxia; Juan-Guardela, Brenda; Kaminski, Naftali; Ramani, Kritika; Biswas, Partha S.; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease characterized by the accumulation of apoptosis-resistant fibroblasts in the lung. We have previously shown that high expression of the transcription factor Twist1 may explain this prosurvival phenotype in vitro. However, this observation has never been tested in vivo. We found that loss of Twist1 in COL1A2+ cells led to increased fibrosis characterized by very significant accumulation of T cells and bone marrow–derived matrix-producing cells. We found that Twist1-null cells expressed high levels of the T cell chemoattractant CXCL12. In vitro, we found that the loss of Twist1 in IPF lung fibroblasts increased expression of CXCL12 downstream of increased expression of the noncanonical NF-κB transcription factor RelB. Finally, blockade of CXCL12 with AMD3100 attenuated the exaggerated fibrosis observed in Twist1-null mice. Transcriptomic analysis of 134 IPF patients revealed that low expression of Twist1 was characterized by enrichment of T cell pathways. In conclusion, loss of Twist1 in collagen-producing cells led to increased bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, which is mediated by increased expression of CXCL12. Twist1 expression is associated with dysregulation of T cells in IPF patients. Twist1 may shape the IPF phenotype and regulate inflammation in fibrotic lung injury. PMID:28179498

  19. Nanoparticle delivery in infant lungs

    PubMed Central

    Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Holger; Takenaka, Shinji; Butler, James P.; Henry, Frank S.; Tsuda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The lung surface is an ideal pathway to the bloodstream for nanoparticle-based drug delivery. Thus far, research has focused on the lungs of adults, and little is known about nanoparticle behavior in the immature lungs of infants. Here, using nonlinear dynamical systems analysis and in vivo experimentation in developing animals, we show that nanoparticle deposition in postnatally developing lungs peaks at the end of bulk alveolation. This finding suggests a unique paradigm, consistent with the emerging theory that as alveoli form through secondary septation, alveolar flow becomes chaotic and chaotic mixing kicks in, significantly enhancing particle deposition. This finding has significant implications for the application of nanoparticle-based inhalation therapeutics in young children with immature lungs from birth to ˜2 y of age. PMID:22411799

  20. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... will recover in the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) before moving to a hospital room for one to three weeks. Your doctor may recommend pulmonary rehabilitation after your lung transplant surgery to help you ...

  1. Lung Injury After One-Lung Ventilation: A Review of the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms Affecting the Ventilated and the Collapsed Lung.

    PubMed

    Lohser, Jens; Slinger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Lung injury is the leading cause of death after thoracic surgery. Initially recognized after pneumonectomy, it has since been described after any period of 1-lung ventilation (OLV), even in the absence of lung resection. Overhydration and high tidal volumes were thought to be responsible at various points; however, it is now recognized that the pathophysiology is more complex and multifactorial. All causative mechanisms known to trigger ventilator-induced lung injury have been described in the OLV setting. The ventilated lung is exposed to high strain secondary to large, nonphysiologic tidal volumes and loss of the normal functional residual capacity. In addition, the ventilated lung experiences oxidative stress, as well as capillary shear stress because of hyperperfusion. Surgical manipulation and/or resection of the collapsed lung may induce lung injury. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung at the conclusion of OLV invariably induces duration-dependent, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inflammatory cytokines are released in response to localized injury and may promote local and contralateral lung injury. Protective ventilation and volatile anesthesia lessen the degree of injury; however, increases in biochemical and histologic markers of lung injury appear unavoidable. The endothelial glycocalyx may represent a common pathway for lung injury creation during OLV, because it is damaged by most of the recognized lung injurious mechanisms. Experimental therapies to stabilize the endothelial glycocalyx may afford the ability to reduce lung injury in the future. In the interim, protective ventilation with tidal volumes of 4 to 5 mL/kg predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 to 10 cm H2O, and routine lung recruitment should be used during OLV in an attempt to minimize harmful lung stress and strain. Additional strategies to reduce lung injury include routine volatile anesthesia and efforts to minimize OLV duration and hyperoxia.

  2. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  3. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  4. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  5. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  6. Lung Nodules: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Lung Nodules Lung Nodules Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask ... Kern, MD (June 01, 2016) What is a lung nodule? A lung nodule is also called a ...

  7. Detection of a Molecular Biomarker for Zygomycetes by Quantitative PCR Assays of Plasma, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissue in a Rabbit Model of Experimental Pulmonary Zygomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan M.; Francesconi, Andrea; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Beveridge, Mara G.; Knudsen, Tena; Milanovich, Jeffery; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Murray, Patrick R.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, targeting the 28S rRNA gene, for the diagnosis of zygomycosis caused by the most common, clinically significant Zygomycetes. The amplicons of the first qPCR assay (qPCR-1) from Rhizopus, Mucor, and Rhizomucor species were distinguished through melt curve analysis. The second qPCR assay (qPCR-2) detected Cunninghamella species using a different primer/probe set. For both assays, the analytic sensitivity for the detection of hyphal elements from germinating sporangiospores in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue homogenates from rabbits was 1 to 10 sporangiospores/ml. Four unique and clinically applicable models of invasive pulmonary zygomycosis served as surrogates of human infections, facilitating the validation of these assays for potential diagnostic utility. For qPCR-1, 5 of 98 infarcted lung specimens were positive by qPCR and negative by quantitative culture (qCx). None were qCx positive only. Among 23 BAL fluid samples, all were positive by qPCR, while 22 were positive by qCx. qPCR-1 detected Rhizopus and Mucor DNA in 20 (39%) of 51 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. Similar properties were observed for qPCR-2, which showed greater sensitivity than qCx for BAL fluid (100% versus 67%; P = 0.04; n = 15). The assay detected Cunninghamella DNA in 18 (58%) of 31 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. These qPCR assays are sensitive and specific for the detection of Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Cunninghamella species and can be used for the study and detection of infections caused by these life-threatening pathogens. PMID:18845827

  8. Stereology of the lung.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Ochs, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Many scientific projects require a quantitative assessment of organ, tissue and cell (ultra)structure. Such quantitative (morphometric) data are essential to make statistically valid comparisons between experimental groups. The structures of interest are measured at different microscopic levels. However, measurements in microscopy pose two problems: 1) Only a small fraction of the whole biological system can be analyzed (sampling problem). 2) The analysis is performed on nearly two-dimensional (physical, optical or virtual) sections through the object although the aim is to obtain biologically meaningful three-dimensional data (3D vs 2D problem). These problems are solved by the application of unbiased sampling and measurement tools known as stereology. This chapter gives a brief introduction to the theory and practical application of stereology, using the lung as an example. Stereological tools needed to quantify volume, number and surface area are introduced and examples are given how to estimate total lung volume, volume of lung parenchyma, alveolar surface area and number of alveolar epithelial type II cells per lung.

  9. Resource Prospector: The RESOLVE Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J.; Smith, J.; J., Captain; Paz, A.; Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R.; Zacny, K.

    2015-10-01

    NASA has been developing a lunar volatiles exploration payload named RESOLVE. Now the primary science payload on-board the Resource Prospector (RP) mission, RESOLVE, consists of several instruments that evaluate lunar volatiles.

  10. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  11. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A resolver rate sensor is disclosed in which dual brushless resolvers are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft. Diverse inputs are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. In one embodiment of the invention the outputs of the first resolver are directly inputted into two separate multipliers and the outputs of the second resolver are inputted into the two separate multipliers, after being demodulated in a pair of demodulator circuits. The multiplied signals are then added in an adder circuit to provide a directional sensitive output. In another embodiment the outputs from the first resolver is modulated in separate modulator circuits and the output from the modulator circuits are used to excite the second resolver. The outputs from the second resolver are demodulated in separate demodulator circuit and added in an adder circuit to provide a direction sensitive rate output.

  12. [Humidifier lung].

    PubMed

    Gerber, P; de Haller, R; Pyrozynski, W J; Sturzenegger, E R; Brändli, O

    1981-02-07

    Breathing air from a humidifier or an air conditioning unit contaminated by various microorganisms can cause an acute lung disease involving fever, cough and dyspnea, termed "humidifier fever". This type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis was first described in 1959 by PESTALOZZI in the Swiss literature and subsequently by BANASZAK et al. in the Anglo-American. Here a chronic form of this disease which led to pulmonary fibrosis is described: A 37-year-old woman who works in a cheese shop presented with dyspnea which had been progressive over two years, weight loss, a diffuse reticular pattern radiographically and a severe restrictive defect in lung function tests. Open lung biopsy revealed chronic interstitial and alveolar inflammation with non-caseating granulomas and fibrotic changes. Circulating immune complexes and precipitins against the contaminated humidifier water and cheese mites were found, but no antibodies suggesting legionnaires' disease. Two out of five otherwise healthy employees of this cheese shop, where a new humidifying system had been installed 7 years earlier, also had precipitins against the contaminated water from the humidifier and the cheese mites. Despite ending of exposure and longterm steroid and immunosuppressive therapy, the signs and symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis persisted. Contrary to the acute disease, this chronic form is termed "humidifier lung". The importance is stressed of investigating the possibility of exposure to contaminated humidifiers or air conditioning units in all cases of newly detected pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Robotic surgery may also be used. Lung surgery using a ... clot from the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to treat many of these ...

  14. Brief resolved unexplained event

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  15. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  16. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  17. Stacking-Dependent Electronic Structure of Trilayer Graphene Resolved by Nanospot Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bao, Changhua; Yao, Wei; Wang, Eryin; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria C; Zhou, Shuyun

    2017-03-08

    The crystallographic stacking order in multilayer graphene plays an important role in determining its electronic structure. In trilayer graphene, rhombohedral stacking (ABC) is particularly intriguing, exhibiting a flat band with an electric-field tunable band gap. Such electronic structure is distinct from simple hexagonal stacking (AAA) or typical Bernal stacking (ABA) and is promising for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics applications. So far clean experimental electronic spectra on the first two stackings are missing because the samples are usually too small in size (μm or nm scale) to be resolved by conventional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here, by using ARPES with a nanospot beam size (NanoARPES), we provide direct experimental evidence for the coexistence of three different stackings of trilayer graphene and reveal their distinctive electronic structures directly. By fitting the experimental data, we provide important experimental band parameters for describing the electronic structure of trilayer graphene with different stackings.

  18. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  19. Pharmacokinetic correlation between experimental and clinical effects on human non-small cell lung cancers of cis-diammineglycolatoplatinum (254-S) and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum.

    PubMed

    Koenuma, M; Kasai, H; Uchida, N; Wada, T; Hattori, M; Oguma, T; Totani, T; Inaba, M

    1995-01-01

    We attempted to correlate the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities of cis-diammineglycolatoplatinum (254-S), a novel platinum complex, and cis-diamminedichloro-platinum (CDDP) against the established culture cell lines and xenografts of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with their clinical effects, based on the previous finding that the cytotoxicity of CDDP depends on the area under the curve (AUC). The concentration of 254-S and CDDP inhibiting the in vitro growth of 4 cultured NSCLC lines by 50% (IC50) was 0.82-7.8 and 0.53-4.2 micrograms/ml, respectively, showing a similar level. Of the 4 cell lines, only the most sensitive line, RERF-LC-AI, showed an IC50 close to a specific concentration (0.50 for 254-S and 0.32 micrograms/ml for CDDP) that reproduces in vitro the clinical AUCfree (24.8 and 5.34 micrograms-hr/ml) of the respective drugs. We treated 6 lines of human NSCLC xenografts implanted in nude mice with 254-S and CDDP at a particular dose (13.2 and 3.7 mg/kg) that is equivalent to the clinical doses with respect to the plasma AUCfree. 254-S and CDDP exhibited significant antitumor effects on 2 and 1 of the 6 lines, respectively. These in vitro and in vivo findings were considered to be relatively well correlated with the reported clinical response rates of 15-19% for 254-S and 14-15% for CDDP.

  20. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  1. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  2. Automated Lung Segmentation from HRCT Scans with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Ammi Reddy; Kande, Giri Babu; Ede, Venkata Krishna Rao; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Performing accurate and fully automated lung segmentation of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images affected by dense abnormalities is a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel algorithm for automated segmentation of lungs based on modified convex hull algorithm and mathematical morphology techniques. Sixty randomly selected lung HRCT scans with different abnormalities are used to test the proposed algorithm, and experimental results show that the proposed approach can accurately segment the lungs even in the presence of disease patterns, with some limitations in the apices and bases of lungs. The algorithm demonstrates a high segmentation accuracy (dice similarity coefficient = 98.62 and shape differentiation metrics dmean = 1.39 mm, and drms = 2.76 mm). Therefore, the developed automated lung segmentation algorithm is a good candidate for the first stage of a computer-aided diagnosis system for diffuse lung diseases.

  3. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  4. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  5. Angle-resolved optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien Emmanuel

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a powerful tool for probing the microstructure of biological tissue non-invasively at high-speed. OCT measures depth-resolved reflectance of infrared light, generating cross-sectional images non-invasively with micron-scale resolution. As with other imaging modalities that employ coherent detection, OCT images are confounded by speckle noise. Speckle imposes a grainy texture on images that reduces the signal-to-noise ratio to near unity values. As a result, it conceals subtle differences in scattering properties known to be crucial for differentiating normal from diseased tissue states. In this thesis, we developed a novel OCT modality called "Angle-Resolved OCT" in which depth scans (A-lines) are obtained simultaneously from a broad range of backscattering angles. We demonstrated that high levels of speckle reduction can be achieved by averaging the magnitudes of A-lines corresponding to the same transverse locations. With both experimental and analytic approaches, we demonstrated that this averaging method does not lead to a substantial loss in spatial resolution. We developed two different imaging systems for performing Angle-Resolved OCT. With the first system, angular data was acquired simultaneously; with the second, it was acquired sequentially. The first system had superior speckle-reduction capabilities but image quality degraded significantly with small sample movements. The second system allowed for in vivo imaging, as demonstrated with Resolved OCT systems, the speckle-reduced images showed hitherto unprecedented delineation of tissue microstructure.

  6. Comparison of the protoscolocidal effectiveness of hypertonic saline, povidone-iodine and albendazole solutions in an experimental lung hydatid cyst model.

    PubMed

    Durgun Yetim, T; Basoglu, A; Taslak Sengul, A; Yetim, I; Serdar Bekdemir, O; Hokelek, M

    2011-01-01

    Secondary hydatidosis is an important problem encountered during the surgical treatment of hydatid cysts. This study describes an experimental model of secondary hydatidosis by cyst inoculation, used to explore whether simultaneous inoculation of protoscolocidal agents could prevent secondary hydatidosis. Fertile cyst fluid was injected into the pleural space of rabbits alone (group 1, n = 8), and in combination with 2% albendazole solution (group 2, n = 8), 20% hypertonic saline (group 3, n = 8) or 10% povidone-iodine (group 4, n = 8). Computed tomography imaging of the thorax, indirect haemagglutination (IHA) titres and eosinophil counts were used to determine cyst development. After 16 months, three control rabbits had pneumothorax, seven had cysts and four had parenchymal nodules. Histopathological investigation of nodules revealed 87.5% cyst formation. Pleural thickening was observed in rabbits from all groups. Cyst formation rates, IHA titres and eosinophilia counts were higher in group 1 than in groups 2-4. This study demonstrated the experimental formation of secondary hydatidosis and found that topical protoscolocidal agents were beneficial in preventing cyst recurrence.

  7. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Emphysema Interstitial fibrosis Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary hypertension Sarcoidosis Lung hemorrhage Asthma Risks There are no significant ... Read More Asbestosis Interstitial lung disease Lung disease Sarcoidosis Review Date 11/19/2015 Updated by: Denis ...

  8. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  9. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - ...

  10. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  11. What is the best method to fit time-resolved data? A comparison of the residual minimization and the maximum likelihood techniques as applied to experimental time-correlated, single-photon counting data

    DOE PAGES

    Santra, Kalyan; Zhan, Jinchun; Song, Xueyu; ...

    2016-02-10

    The need for measuring fluorescence lifetimes of species in subdiffraction-limited volumes in, for example, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, entails the dual challenge of probing a small number of fluorophores and fitting the concomitant sparse data set to the appropriate excited-state decay function. This need has stimulated a further investigation into the relative merits of two fitting techniques commonly referred to as “residual minimization” (RM) and “maximum likelihood” (ML). Fluorescence decays of the well-characterized standard, rose bengal in methanol at room temperature (530 ± 10 ps), were acquired in a set of five experiments in which the total number ofmore » “photon counts” was approximately 20, 200, 1000, 3000, and 6000 and there were about 2–200 counts at the maxima of the respective decays. Each set of experiments was repeated 50 times to generate the appropriate statistics. Each of the 250 data sets was analyzed by ML and two different RM methods (differing in the weighting of residuals) using in-house routines and compared with a frequently used commercial RM routine. Convolution with a real instrument response function was always included in the fitting. While RM using Pearson’s weighting of residuals can recover the correct mean result with a total number of counts of 1000 or more, ML distinguishes itself by yielding, in all cases, the same mean lifetime within 2% of the accepted value. For 200 total counts and greater, ML always provides a standard deviation of <10% of the mean lifetime, and even at 20 total counts there is only 20% error in the mean lifetime. Here, the robustness of ML advocates its use for sparse data sets such as those acquired in some subdiffraction-limited microscopies, such as STED, and, more importantly, provides greater motivation for exploiting the time-resolved capacities of this technique to acquire and analyze fluorescence lifetime data.« less

  12. What is the best method to fit time-resolved data? A comparison of the residual minimization and the maximum likelihood techniques as applied to experimental time-correlated, single-photon counting data

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Kalyan; Zhan, Jinchun; Song, Xueyu; Smith, Emily A.; Vaswani, Namrata; Petrich, Jacob W.

    2016-02-10

    The need for measuring fluorescence lifetimes of species in subdiffraction-limited volumes in, for example, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, entails the dual challenge of probing a small number of fluorophores and fitting the concomitant sparse data set to the appropriate excited-state decay function. This need has stimulated a further investigation into the relative merits of two fitting techniques commonly referred to as “residual minimization” (RM) and “maximum likelihood” (ML). Fluorescence decays of the well-characterized standard, rose bengal in methanol at room temperature (530 ± 10 ps), were acquired in a set of five experiments in which the total number of “photon counts” was approximately 20, 200, 1000, 3000, and 6000 and there were about 2–200 counts at the maxima of the respective decays. Each set of experiments was repeated 50 times to generate the appropriate statistics. Each of the 250 data sets was analyzed by ML and two different RM methods (differing in the weighting of residuals) using in-house routines and compared with a frequently used commercial RM routine. Convolution with a real instrument response function was always included in the fitting. While RM using Pearson’s weighting of residuals can recover the correct mean result with a total number of counts of 1000 or more, ML distinguishes itself by yielding, in all cases, the same mean lifetime within 2% of the accepted value. For 200 total counts and greater, ML always provides a standard deviation of <10% of the mean lifetime, and even at 20 total counts there is only 20% error in the mean lifetime. Here, the robustness of ML advocates its use for sparse data sets such as those acquired in some subdiffraction-limited microscopies, such as STED, and, more importantly, provides greater motivation for exploiting the time-resolved capacities of this technique to acquire and analyze fluorescence lifetime data.

  13. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  14. Importance of mast cell Prss31/transmembrane tryptase/tryptase-γ in lung function and experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and colitis.

    PubMed

    Hansbro, Philip M; Hamilton, Matthew J; Fricker, Michael; Gellatly, Shaan L; Jarnicki, Andrew G; Zheng, Dominick; Frei, Sandra M; Wong, G William; Hamadi, Sahar; Zhou, Saijun; Foster, Paul S; Krilis, Steven A; Stevens, Richard L

    2014-06-27

    Protease serine member S31 (Prss31)/transmembrane tryptase/tryptase-γ is a mast cell (MC)-restricted protease of unknown function that is retained on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane when MCs are activated. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the Prss31 gene in different mouse strains and then used a Cre/loxP homologous recombination approach to create a novel Prss31(-/-) C57BL/6 mouse line. The resulting animals exhibited no obvious developmental abnormality, contained normal numbers of granulated MCs in their tissues, and did not compensate for their loss of the membrane tryptase by increasing their expression of other granule proteases. When Prss31-null MCs were activated with a calcium ionophore or by their high affinity IgE receptors, they degranulated in a pattern similar to that of WT MCs. Prss31-null mice had increased baseline airway reactivity to methacholine but markedly reduced experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and colitis, thereby indicating both beneficial and adverse functional roles for the tryptase. In a cigarette smoke-induced model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, WT mice had more pulmonary macrophages, higher histopathology scores, and more fibrosis in their small airways than similarly treated Prss31-null mice. In a dextran sodium sulfate-induced acute colitis model, WT mice lost more weight, had higher histopathology scores, and contained more Cxcl-2 and IL-6 mRNA in their colons than similarly treated Prss31-null mice. The accumulated data raise the possibility that inhibitors of this membrane tryptase may provide additional therapeutic benefit in the treatment of humans with these MC-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  15. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  16. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  17. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  18. Targeted delivery of magnetic aerosol droplets to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dames, Petra; Gleich, Bernhard; Flemmer, Andreas; Hajek, Kerstin; Seidl, Nicole; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bittmann, Iris; Bergemann, Christian; Weyh, Thomas; Trahms, Lutz; Rosenecker, Joseph; Rudolph, Carsten

    2007-08-01

    The inhalation of medical aerosols is widely used for the treatment of lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection and, more recently, lung cancer. Targeted aerosol delivery to the affected lung tissue may improve therapeutic efficiency and minimize unwanted side effects. Despite enormous progress in optimizing aerosol delivery to the lung, targeted aerosol delivery to specific lung regions other than the airways or the lung periphery has not been adequately achieved to date. Here, we show theoretically by computer-aided simulation, and for the first time experimentally in mice, that targeted aerosol delivery to the lung can be achieved with aerosol droplets comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles--so-called nanomagnetosols--in combination with a target-directed magnetic gradient field. We suggest that nanomagnetosols may be useful for treating localized lung disease, by targeting foci of bacterial infection or tumour nodules.

  19. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  20. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation.

  1. Experimental evaluations of the accuracy of 3D and 4D planning in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Mark K. H.; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Ng, Sherry C. Y.; Tong, Anthony S. M.; Tam, Eric K. W.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the complexity of 4D target tracking radiotherapy, the accuracy of this treatment strategy should be experimentally validated against established standard 3D technique. This work compared the accuracy of 3D and 4D dose calculations in respiration tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Using the 4D planning module of the CyberKnife treatment planning system, treatment plans for a moving target and a static off-target cord structure were created on different four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) datasets of a thorax phantom moving in different ranges. The 4D planning system used B-splines deformable image registrations (DIR) to accumulate dose distributions calculated on different breathing geometries, each corresponding to a static 3D-CT image of the 4D-CT dataset, onto a reference image to compose a 4D dose distribution. For each motion, 4D optimization was performed to generate a 4D treatment plan of the moving target. For comparison with standard 3D planning, each 4D plan was copied to the reference end-exhale images and a standard 3D dose calculation was followed. Treatment plans of the off-target structure were first obtained by standard 3D optimization on the end-exhale images. Subsequently, they were applied to recalculate the 4D dose distributions using DIRs. All dose distributions that were initially obtained using the ray-tracing algorithm with equivalent path-length heterogeneity correction (3D{sub EPL} and 4D{sub EPL}) were recalculated by a Monte Carlo algorithm (3D{sub MC} and 4D{sub MC}) to further investigate the effects of dose calculation algorithms. The calculated 3D{sub EPL}, 3D{sub MC}, 4D{sub EPL}, and 4D{sub MC} dose distributions were compared to measurements by Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes of the moving target object, and the coronal plane for the static off-target object based on the {gamma} metric at 5%/3mm criteria ({gamma}{sub 5%/3mm}). Treatment plans were considered

  2. Lung cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Baldwin, D R

    2015-12-01

    Deaths from lung cancer are greater than for any other type of malignancy. Many people present with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis and survival is limited. Low radiation dose CT (LDCT) screening appears to offer part of the solution to this. The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed a 20% reduction in cancer related mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all cause mortality in patients who had LDCT compared to chest X-ray. Lung Cancer screening is now being implemented in the US using the NLST screening criteria but many questions remain about the details of the methodology of screening and its cost effectiveness. Many of these questions are being answered by ongoing European trials that are reporting their findings. In this review we objectively analyse current research evidence and explore the issues that need to be resolved before implementation, including technical considerations, selection criteria and effective nodule management protocols. We discuss the potential barriers that will be faced when beginning a national screening programme and possible solutions to them.

  3. Peri-emphysematous lung infection.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D A; D'Esopo, N D

    1981-01-01

    The difficulty in classifying pulmonary infection within areas of bullous emphysema may have contributed to the lack of appreciation of this entity. This process is important to recognize because: (1) the clinical picture is usually benign:; (2) it may be confused with tuberculosis, fungal disease, and carcinoma of the lung; and (3) radiographic resolution may be slow. For these reasons, pneumonitis which occurs within emphysematous lung may have been previously considered as slowly resolving pneumonias. The development of air-fluid levels within bullae has been called "infected emphysematous bullae." We believe that this phrase is misleading since there are no bacteriologic data to support the presence of infection within the bullae containing fluid. In fact, direct sampling of intrabullous fluid has been rarely reported and, if obtained, has been generally negative for bacteria. Furthermore, the clinical course in our patients is alos not consistent with infection within a space. Once fiberoptic bronchoscopy has excluded an obstructing endobronchial lesion, the physician may patiently follow the anticipated gradual resolution. We suggest that the phrase, "periemphysematous lung infection" best describes these related clinical-radiological conditions.

  4. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  5. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  6. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  7. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  8. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  9. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs. This is most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... it may mean any of the following problems: Sarcoidosis (disease in which inflammation occurs in the lungs ...

  10. Open lung biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of different conditions, such as: Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Wegener granulomatosis Risks There is a possibility of ... biopsy Malignant mesothelioma Pulmonary tuberculosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Solitary fibrous tumor Viral pneumonia ...

  11. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System A ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  13. Lung cancer screening update

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Loewen, Gregory; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality globally and the American cancer society estimates approximately 226,160 new cases and 160,340 deaths from lung cancer in the USA in the year 2012. The majority of lung cancers are diagnosed in the later stages which impacts the overall survival. The 5-year survival rate for pathological st age IA lung cancer is 73% but drops to only 13% for stage IV. Thus, early detection through screening and prevention are the keys to reduce the global burden of lung cancer. This article discusses the current state of lung cancer screening, including the results of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial, the consideration of implementing computed tomography screening, and a brief overview of the role of bronchoscopy in early detection and potential biomarkers that may aid in the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:23599684

  14. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 442 Cervical Uterine Ovarian Breast Lung RESEARCH FUNDING LEVELS FISCAL YEAR 2012 (DOLLARS PER DEATH) MORE RESEARCH URGENT LY NEEDED • The biology of lung cancer is different in women • Mutations ...

  15. Children's Use of Gesture to Resolve Lexical Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Evan; Holler, Judith

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study investigating 3-5-year-old children's use of gesture to resolve lexical ambiguity. Children were told three short stories that contained two homonym senses; for example, "bat" (flying mammal) and "bat" (sports equipment). They were then asked to re-tell these stories to a second experimenter. The data were coded for the means…

  16. Virginia Resolves, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, S. Rex, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These two issues of "Virginia Resolves" provide articles of interest to the social studies reader and provides ideas for social studies instruction and curriculum. The fall issue features seven articles: (1) "Death and the Young Child" (Rosanne J. Marek); (2) "Simulations: Bibliography for the Middle and Elementary…

  17. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  18. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer

  19. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about 20,000 ...

  20. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease? Childhood interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) lung disease, or chILD, ... with similar symptoms—it's not a precise diagnosis. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) also occurs in adults. However, ...

  1. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and Respiratory System A ... didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about 20,000 ...

  2. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  3. Experimental validation of 2-D generalized geometric super resolved approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Amikam; Zalevsky, Zeev; Cohen, Nadav; Hadas, Zadok; Marom, Emanuel; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we generalize the method of using a 2-D moving binary random mask to overcome the geometrical resolution limitation of an imaging sensor. The spatial blurring is caused by the size of the imaging sensor pixels which yield insufficient spatial sampling. The mask is placed in an intermediate image plane and can be shifted in any direction while keeping the sensor as well as all other optical components fixed. Out of the set of images that are captured and registered, a high resolution image can be composed. In addition, this proposed approach reduces the amount of required computations and it has an improved robustness to spatial noise.

  4. The lung in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, which induces gradients in ventilation, blood flow, and gas exchange. Studies of lungs in microgravity provide a means of elucidating the effects of gravity. They suggest a mechanism by which gravity serves to match ventilation to perfusion, making for a more efficient lung than anticipated. Despite predictions, lungs do not become edematous, and there is no disruption to, gas exchange in microgravity. Sleep disturbances in microgravity are not a result of respiratory-related events; obstructive sleep apnea is caused principally by the gravitational effects on the upper airways. In microgravity, lungs may be at greater risk to the effects of inhaled aerosols.

  5. Inconsistencies in findings from the early lung cancer action project studies of lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bach, Peter B

    2011-07-06

    Long-standing guidelines against screening high-risk individuals for lung cancer may change following the publication of the randomized National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which shows a benefit of computed tomography compared with chest x-ray screening. Guideline panels will likely also seek additional information from nonrandomized studies of computed tomography screening, such as the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP). However, for the ELCAP findings to be incorporated into new guidelines, some inconsistencies in the published data should first be resolved. Specifically, some of the reports from ELCAP appear to contradict others in terms of important endpoints, and several findings from ELCAP appear to be statistically improbable or outliers when compared with analyses and studies by other research groups. Clarification of both internal and external inconsistencies is a prerequisite for evaluation of the body of work published by ELCAP investigators.

  6. Advances in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kei

    2010-04-01

    Artificial lungs have already been developed as complete artificial organs, and results of many investigations based on innovative concepts have been reported continuously. In open-heart surgery, artificial lungs are used for extracorporeal circulation to maintain gas exchange, and the commercial products currently available perform adequately, including providing for antithrombogenicity. However, patients after cardiopulmonary arrest or severe respiratory/circulatory failure have required long-term assist with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The number of artificial lungs used for ECMO in those cases has shown significant growth in recent years. Therefore, it is expected that durability and antithrombogenicity will ensure the prolonged use of an artificial lung for several weeks or months. Furthermore, interests in research are shifting to use of oxygenators as a bridge to lung transplantation and an implantable artificial lung. This paper discusses recent advances in artificial lungs, focusing on the current state and on trends in research and development.

  7. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  8. Perioperative Lung Protection Provided by High-Dose Ambroxol in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Huayong; Zhang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    The purpose is to observe the clinical effect of large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride in lung protection during the perioperative period of lung cancer operation. Fifty-six lung cancer patients who have undergone open-thoracic pulmonary lobectomy were divided randomly into two groups, and were given normal and large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride, respectively, during their perioperative period. Statistics based on post-operation clinical observations were analyzed in terms of ease of expectoration and expectoration properties, duration of antibiotics dependence, occurrence of lung complications, and adverse reactions related to ambroxol hydrochloride. On the third and the seventh day, the experimental group showed signs of improvement in terms of ease of expectoration and expectoration properties, compared with the controlled group. In terms of occurrence of post-operation lung complications and duration of antibiotics dependence, the experimental group also performed better. Using large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride would result in better clinical effects than using normal doses in preventing post-operation complications, and its clinical value in lung protection during lung cancer perioperative period calls for further research and promotion.

  9. ATM protein is deficient in over 40% of lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Villaruz, Liza C; Jones, Helen; Dacic, Sanja; Abberbock, Shira; Kurland, Brenda F; Stabile, Laura P; Siegfried, Jill M; Conrads, Thomas P; Smith, Neil R; O'Connor, Mark J; Pierce, Andrew J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2016-09-06

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the USA and worldwide, and of the estimated 1.2 million new cases of lung cancer diagnosed every year, over 30% are lung adenocarcinomas. The backbone of 1st-line systemic therapy in the metastatic setting, in the absence of an actionable oncogenic driver, is platinum-based chemotherapy. ATM and ATR are DNA damage signaling kinases activated at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stalled and collapsed replication forks, respectively. ATM protein is lost in a number of cancer cell lines and ATR kinase inhibitors synergize with cisplatin to resolve xenograft models of ATM-deficient lung cancer. We therefore sought to determine the frequency of ATM loss in a tissue microarray (TMA) of lung adenocarcinoma. Here we report the validation of a commercial antibody (ab32420) for the identification of ATM by immunohistochemistry and estimate that 61 of 147 (41%, 95% CI 34%-50%) cases of lung adenocarcinoma are negative for ATM protein expression. As a positive control for ATM staining, nuclear ATM protein was identified in stroma and immune infiltrate in all evaluable cases. ATM loss in lung adenocarcinoma was not associated with overall survival. However, our preclinical findings in ATM-deficient cell lines suggest that ATM could be a predictive biomarker for synergy of an ATR kinase inhibitor with standard-of-care cisplatin. This could improve clinical outcome in 100,000's of patients with ATM-deficient lung adenocarcinoma every year.

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of 5-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Brand, Christian; Oeltermann, Olivia; Pratt, David; Weinkauf, Rainer; Meerts, W Leo; van der Zande, Wim; Kleinermanns, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2010-07-14

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the vibrationless origin and of eight vibronic bands of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) have been measured and analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. The experimental results are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. All vibronic bands can be explained by absorption of a single conformer, which unambiguously has been shown to be the anti-conformer from its rotational constants and excitation energy. For both anti- and syn-conformers, a (1)L(a)/(1)L(b) gap larger than 4000 cm(-1) is calculated, making the vibronic coupling between both states very small, thereby explaining why the spectrum of 5MOI is very different from that of the parent molecule, indole.

  12. Resolving Phase Ambiguities In OQPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved design for modulator and demodulator in offset-quaternary-phase-key-shifting (OQPSK) communication system enables receiver to resolve ambiguity in estimated phase of received signal. Features include unique-code-word modulation and detection and digital implementation of Costas loop in carrier-recovery subsystem. Enchances performance of carrier-recovery subsystem, reduces complexity of receiver by removing redundant circuits from previous design, and eliminates dependence of timing in receiver upon parallel-to-serial-conversion clock.

  13. Resolved conifolds in supergravity solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2008-01-15

    We construct generalized 11D supergravity solutions of fully localized intersecting D2/D4 brane systems. These solutions are obtained by embedding six-dimensional resolved Eguchi-Hanson conifolds lifted to M-theory. We reduce these solutions to ten dimensions, obtaining new D-brane systems in type IIA supergravity. We discuss the limits in which the dynamics of the D2 brane decouples from the bulk for these solutions.

  14. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Hielscher, A.H.; Liu, H.; Chance, B.; Tittel, F.K.; Jacques, S.L.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze {ital in} {ital vivo} measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  15. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  16. Lung cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Rodriguez, Raúl; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. PMID:28210127

  17. Micro-imaging of the Mouse Lung via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    Quantitative measurement of lung microstructure is of great significance in assessment of pulmonary disease, particularly in the earliest stages. Conventional stereological assessment of ex-vivo fixed tissue specimens under the microscope has a long and successful tradition and is regarded as a gold standard, but the invasive nature limits its applications and the practicality of use in longitudinal studies. The technique for diffusion MRI-based 3He lung morphometry was previously developed and validated for human lungs, and was recently extended to ex-vivo mouse lungs. The technique yields accurate, quantitative information about the microstructure and geometry of acinar airways. In this dissertation, the 3He lung morphometry technique is for the first time successfully implemented for in-vivo studies of mice. It can generate spatially-resolved maps of parameters that reveal the microstructure of mouse lung. Results in healthy mice indicate excellent agreement between in-vivo morphometry via 3He MRI and microscopic morphometry after sacrifice. The implementation and validation of 3He morphometry in healthy mice open up new avenues for application of the technique as a precise, noninvasive, in-vivo biomarker of changes in lung microstructure, within various mouse models of lung disease. We have applied 3He morphometry to the Sendai mouse model of lung disease. Specifically, the Sendai-virus model of chronic obstructive lung disease has demonstrated an innate immune response in mouse airways that exhibits similarities to the chronic airway inflammation in human COPD and asthma, but the effect on distal lung parenchyma had not been investigated. We imaged the time course and regional distribution of mouse lung microstructural changes in vivo after Sendai virus (SeV) infection with 1H and 3He diffusion MRI. 1H MR images detected the SeV-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo and 3He lung morphometry showed modest increase in alveolar duct radius distal to airway

  18. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  19. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  20. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  1. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does not improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.

  2. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE PAGES

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  3. Antioxidant vitamins and prevention of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.B. )

    1992-09-30

    Although the evidence for oxidative stress for air pollution in the human lung is fragmentary, the hypothesis that oxidative stress is an important, if not the sole, mechanism of toxicity of oxidizing air pollutants and tobacco smoke is compelling and growing. First, biochemical mechanisms have been worked out for oxidation of lung lipids by the gas phase of cigarette smoke, NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3]. The oxidation of lung lipids can be prevented by both vitamins C and E. Vitamin C is more effective in preventing oxidation by NO[sub 2], and vitamin E is more effective against O[sub 3]. Second, multiple species of experimental animals develop lung disease similar to human bronchitis and emphysema from exposure to NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3], respectively. The development of these diseases occurs over a near lifetime exposure when the levels of NO[sub 2] or O[sub 3] are at near ambient air pollution values. Third, isolated human cells are protected against oxidative damage from NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3] by both vitamins C and E. Fourth, the vitamin C level in the lung either declines on exposure to NO[sub 2] for short-term exposures or increases on chronic cigarette smoke exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on serum vitamin C is apparently complex and may be related to the daily intake of vitamin C as well as smoking. Serum vitamin C levels may be poor indicators of lung demands when daily vitamin C intakes are above 100 mg/day. Fifth, vitamin C supplementation protects against the effects of ambient levels of air pollution in adults as measured by histamine challenge. An augmented response to histamine challenge may represent increased lung permeability brought about by air pollution. In experimental animal and human experiments, the amount of vitamin C or E that afforded protection was in excess of the current recommended dietary allowance.

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  5. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  6. Lung protective strategies in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, B; Slinger, P

    2010-12-01

    Patients are at risk for several types of lung injury in the perioperative period including atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, acute lung injury, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Anaesthetic management can cause, exacerbate, or ameliorate these injuries. This review examines the effects of perioperative mechanical ventilation and its role in ventilator-induced lung injury. Lung protective ventilatory strategies to specific clinical situations such as cardiopulmonary bypass and one-lung ventilation along with newer novel lung protective strategies are discussed.

  7. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  8. Resolving the Shock Wave Profile in Viscous Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Borg, John

    2011-06-01

    Capturing and modeling shock wave profiles has a long history in computational analysis. Often artificial irreversibilities and/or smearing schemes are implemented in order to stabilize and resolve the shock. This work presents a direct numeric simulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations where the shock profile is completely resolved without the use of artificial viscosity or shock smearing techniques. Several viscosity models are employed to study the role of viscosity on this second order accurate finite difference scheme. The results are compared to an analytic solutions and experimental results. The results indicated that the shock front thickness and entropy production are in good agreement with simple analytic solutions and experimental results. The extension of this technique to solid and granular materials will be discussed.

  9. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  10. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Explore How the Lungs Work What Are... The Respiratory System What Happens When You Breathe What Controls Your Breathing Lung Diseases & Conditions Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Asthma Bronchitis COPD How the Heart Works Respiratory Failure Send a link to NHLBI to someone ...

  11. Artificial lung: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Go, T; Macchiarini, P

    2008-10-01

    While the number of the patients suffering from end-stage pulmonary disease has been increasing, the most common treatment for this entity remains mechanical ventilation that entails the risks of lung damage by itself. Although the lung protective strategy for the prevention of further damage to the lung tissue has been elucidated and performed, mechanical ventilation alone as the management tactic coping with the patients of acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic respiratory failure and lung transplantations has been a frustrated scenario. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or extracorporeal lung assist have been applied to these patients with occasional success, but it always accompanies difficulties such as multiple blood transfusion, labor intensity, technically complexity and tendency to infection. In contrast to advances in the development of cardiac or renal support systems for adults, the development of extra-, para- and intracorporeal mechanical systems for acute or chronic lung respiratory failure has logged far behind. It has been mostly due to the lack of the capable technologies. Entering 21st century with advent of new technology especially invention of the low resistance oxygenator, the developments of artificial lungs have entered the new stage. In this report current status of the artificial lungs will be reviewed.

  12. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  13. Measurement of extravascular lung water using the single indicator method in patients: research and potential clinical value.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lisa M; Liu, Kathleen D; Matthay, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    Extravascular lung water includes all of the fluid within the lung but outside of the vasculature. Lung water increases as a result of increased hydrostatic vascular pressure or from an increase in lung endothelial and epithelial permeability or both. Experimentally, extravascular lung water has been measured gravimetrically. Clinically, the chest radiograph is used to determine whether extravascular lung water is present but is an insensitive instrument for determining the quantity of lung water. Bedside measurement of extravascular lung water in patients is now possible using a single indicator thermodilution method. This review critically evaluates the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the potential value of measuring extravascular lung water in patients using the single indicator method.

  14. Measurement of extravascular lung water using the single indicator method in patients: research and potential clinical value

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Extravascular lung water includes all of the fluid within the lung but outside of the vasculature. Lung water increases as a result of increased hydrostatic vascular pressure or from an increase in lung endothelial and epithelial permeability or both. Experimentally, extravascular lung water has been measured gravimetrically. Clinically, the chest radiograph is used to determine whether extravascular lung water is present but is an insensitive instrument for determining the quantity of lung water. Bedside measurement of extravascular lung water in patients is now possible using a single indicator thermodilution method. This review critically evaluates the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the potential value of measuring extravascular lung water in patients using the single indicator method. PMID:19617309

  15. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  16. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer.

  17. Lung transplant infection.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Sergio R; Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Levine, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapeutic procedure for the treatment of end-stage pulmonary parenchymal and vascular disease. Despite improved survival rates over the decades, lung transplant recipients have lower survival rates than other solid organ transplant recipients. The morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation is largely due to infection- and rejection-related complications. This article will review the common infections that develop in the lung transplant recipient, including the general risk factors for infection in this population, and the most frequent bacterial, viral, fungal and other less frequent opportunistic infections. The epidemiology, diagnosis, prophylaxis, treatment and outcomes for the different microbial pathogens will be reviewed. The effects of infection on lung transplant rejection will also be discussed.

  18. Microsecond-resolved SDR-based cavity ring down ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, D; Spiliotis, A K; Stamataki, K; Katsoprinakis, G E; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Loppinet, B; Rakitzis, T P; Surligas, M; Papadakis, S

    2015-06-20

    We present an experimental apparatus that allows microsecond-resolved ellipsometric and absorption measurements. The apparatus is based on an optical cavity containing a Dove prism, in which light undergoes total internal reflection (TIR), while the data acquisition is based on software defined radio technology and custom-built drivers. We demonstrate the ability to sense rapid variations in the refractive index above the TIR interface for arbitrarily long times with a temporal resolution of at least 2 μs.

  19. Resolving thermoelectric "paradox" in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Connor D; Matrozova, Ekaterina A; Petrashov, Victor T

    2016-02-01

    For almost a century, thermoelectricity in superconductors has been one of the most intriguing topics in physics. During its early stages in the 1920s, the mere existence of thermoelectric effects in superconductors was questioned. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the effects may occur in inhomogeneous superconductors. Theoretical breakthrough followed in the 1970s, when the generation of a measurable thermoelectric magnetic flux in superconducting loops was predicted; however, a major crisis developed when experiments showed puzzling discrepancies with the theory. Moreover, different experiments were inconsistent with each other. This led to a stalemate in bringing theory and experiment into agreement. With this work, we resolve this stalemate, thus solving this long-standing "paradox," and open prospects for exploration of novel thermoelectric phenomena predicted recently.

  20. Comparative Pathobiology of Environmentally Induced Lung Cancers in Humans and Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in humans worldwide. Environmental factors play an important role in the epidemiology of these cancers. Rodents are the most common experimental model to study human lung cancers and are frequently used in bioassays to identify environmental exposure hazards associated with lung cancer. Lung tumors in rodents are common, particularly in certain strains of mice. Rodent lung tumors are predominantly bronchioloalveolar carcinomas and usually follow a progressive continuum of hyperplasia to adenoma to carcinoma. Human lung cancers are phenotypically more diverse and broadly constitute 2 types: small cell lung cancers or non-small cell lung cancers. Rodent lung tumors resulting from exposure to environmental agents are comparable to certain adenocarcinomas that are a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers. Human pulmonary carcinomas differ from rodent lung tumors by exhibiting greater morphologic heterogeneity (encompassing squamous cell, neuroendocrine, mucinous, sarcomatoid, and multiple cell combinations), higher metastatic rate, higher stromal response, aggressive clinical behavior, and lack of a clear continuum of proliferative lesions. In spite of these differences, rodent lung tumors recapitulate several fundamental aspects of human lung tumor biology at the morphologic and molecular level especially in lung cancers resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:25351923

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  2. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  3. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  4. Experimental studies on the effect of (Lambda-Cyhalothrin) insecticide on lungs and the ameliorating effect of plant extracts (Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) and garlic (Allium sativum L.) on asthma development in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lambda-cyhalothrin (LTC) is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide for agricultural and public health applications. This study was to determine the pathological alterations of LTC in lungs, which has not previously been studied, and the ameliorating effects of plant extracts (ginseng and garlic) on the development of asthma in albino rats. Methods Four groups (gps) of albino rats, (n = 20, average body weight = 200 gm with an age of 4 months), were formed. Gp 1 was kept as control. Gp 2 was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LTC at a dose of 1/6 LD50 that is 9.34 mg/kg body weight (w.t.) daily for 21 days (d). Gp 3 & 4 were injected (i.p.) with ginseng at the dose of 200 mg/kg b.wt and garlic (Allium sativum L.) at the dose of 100 mg/kg b.wt., respectively, one hour before being given LTC at a dose of 1/6 LD50 (9.34 mg/kg b.wt.) daily. Each groups were divided into two sacrificed, at 15 and 21 d p.i. Blood and lung samples were collected for hematological and histopathological examinations. Results Hematological findings showed that the animals in gps 2 and 3, which were treated for 21 days, showed a significant difference in RBC counts (P > .001), Hb (P > .007), PCV% (P > .004), (P > .008) in comparison with the control group. Signs of cough and nasal discharge were seen in gp 2, which became mild in gp 4. Grossly, the lungs showed congestion and consolidation in gp 2. Histopathologically, macroabscesses and interstitial alveolitis were seen in gp 2, which led to obstruction in the lumen of the bronchioles at 21 d p.i. Meanwhile, thickening in the interalveolar septa with mononuclear cells was seen in gps. 3 and 4 at 21d p.i. Conclusions The study shows 3 gps of rats injected with LHC alone or combined with garlic and ginseng extract, each group were divided into two sacrificed (15 and 21 d p.i.). Lambda cyhalothrin causes bronchial obstruction in the lungs of the rats (15 and 21 d p.i), which decreased into mild to

  5. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients.

  6. Left ventricular failure produces profound lung remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice: heart failure causes severe lung disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingjie; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Xu, Xin; Wang, Huan; Hu, Xinli; Lu, Zhongbing; Kwak, Dongmin; Xu, Yawei; Gunther, Roland; Huo, Yuqing; Weir, E Kenneth

    2012-06-01

    Chronic left ventricular failure causes pulmonary congestion with increased lung weight and type 2 pulmonary hypertension. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for type 2 pulmonary hypertension and the development of novel treatments for this condition requires a robust experimental animal model and a good understanding of the nature of the resultant pulmonary remodeling. Here we demonstrate that chronic transverse aortic constriction causes massive pulmonary fibrosis and remodeling, as well as type 2 pulmonary hypertension, in mice. Thus, aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure are associated with a ≤5.3-fold increase in lung wet weight and dry weight, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Interestingly, the aortic constriction-induced increase in lung weight was not associated with pulmonary edema but resulted from profound pulmonary remodeling with a dramatic increase in the percentage of fully muscularized lung vessels, marked vascular and lung fibrosis, myofibroblast proliferation, and leukocyte infiltration. The aortic constriction-induced left ventricular dysfunction was also associated with right ventricular hypertrophy, increased right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and right atrial hypertrophy. The massive lung fibrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and pulmonary hypertension in mice after transverse aortic constriction clearly indicate that congestive heart failure also causes severe lung disease. The lung fibrosis and leukocyte infiltration may be important mechanisms in the poor clinical outcome in patients with end-stage heart failure. Thus, the effective treatment of left ventricular failure may require additional efforts to reduce lung fibrosis and the inflammatory response.

  7. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  8. [Pediatric lung resection. A case series and evaluation of postoperative lung function].

    PubMed

    Caussade, S; Zúñiga, S; García, C; González, S; Campos, E; Soto, G; Zúñiga, F; Sánchez, I

    2001-12-01

    The most common causes of pulmonary lobectomy in children are congenital lung malformations (CLM) and bronchiectasias. Our aim was to present the causes and clinical course and lung function of lobectomized patients. Between 1990 and July 1999 27 lobectomies were performed on patients whose ages ranged from newborn to 14 years. Lobectomies were performed to correct CLM in 124 cases and for acquired pulmonary disease (APD) in 13. Among CLM cases, half (n = 7) had cystic adenomatoid malformation. Among the APD patients, 10 had bronchiectasias, with etiological confirmation in 6 cases (3 secondary to serious adenovirus infection). Mean hospital stay was 4.6 days among those who experienced no postoperative complications. Symptoms resolved after surgery for most symptomatic patients. Lung function tests could be carried out with 8 patients over 6 years old whose operations had taken place 7 to 78 months earlier (x = 35 months) and whose age at the time of surgery was a mean 7 years 6 months (range 60 to 144 months). Spirometry showed normal forced vital capacity for 7 of 8 patients (87 to 143% of theoretical value). Arterial oxygen saturation measured during and after a 6-minute walking test was normal for 7 of 8 patients. Chest films showed reduced lung volume on the affected side in 5 of 8 patients. In summary, lobectomy is a procedure with few complications. It requires a short hospital stay and has good postoperative prognosis. Function and x-ray studies show adequate lung growth and development, with normal lung function in those who could be so examined because they were old enough to cooperate.

  9. Bioengineering Lungs for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2016-05-01

    Whole lung extracellular matrix scaffolds can be created by perfusion of cadaveric organs with decellularizing detergents, providing a platform for organ regeneration. Lung epithelial engineering must address both the proximal airway cells that function to metabolize toxins and aid mucociliary clearance and the distal pneumocytes that facilitate gas exchange. Engineered pulmonary vasculature must support in vivo blood perfusion with low resistance and intact barrier function and be antithrombotic. Repopulating the native lung matrix with sufficient cell numbers in appropriate anatomic locations is required to enable organ function.

  10. Microgravity and the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from studies of the effect of microgravity on the lungs of rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission, and from relevant laboratory experiments. The effects of microgravity fall into five categories: topographical structure and function, the lung volumes and mechanics, the intrathoracic blood pressures and volumes, the pulmonary deposition of aerosol, and denitrogenaton during EVA. The ultrastructure of the left lungs of rats flown for 14 days on the Cosmos 2044 spacecraft and that of some tail-suspended rats disclosed presence of red blood cells in the alveolar spaces, indicating that pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary edema occurred in these rats. Possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed.

  11. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... need to have a tube inserted in the space between the collapsed lung and the chest wall to remove the air and allow the lung to re-expand. If ... to a few days (usually) to drain the air allowing the small hole in the lung to ... may collect in the space between the lung and its covering membrane. If ...

  13. Computational model of OCT in lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David C.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Lung research may have significant impact on human health. As two examples, recovery from collapse of the alveoli and the severe post surgery declines in forced vital capacity in patients under the effects of anesthesia are both poorly understood. Optical imaging is important to lung research for its inherently high resolution. Microscopy and color imaging are fundamentals of medicine, but interior lung tissue is usually viewed either endoscopically or ex vivo, stained slices. Techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have become increasingly popular in medical imaging because of their sectioning and depth penetration. Since OCT has the ability to achieve higher depth penetration than confocal it is more widely used in lung imaging, despite the difficulty of interpreting the images due to the poor numerical aperture (NA). To understand light propagation through the highly reflective and refractive surfaces of the lung, we developed a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. FDTD solves a discrete approximation to Maxwell's equations. Initial simulations have shown that structure up to 30 - 40μm below the surface is clearly visible. Deeper structures are hard to interpret, because of light scattering, compounded by speckle associated with coherent detection. Further simulations and experimental imaging may lead to improved collection and processing of images at deeper levels.

  14. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  15. Radiation effects in the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Coggle, J E; Lambert, B E; Moores, S R

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the principles of radiobiology that can explain the time of onset, duration, and severity of the complex reactions of the lung to ionizing radiation. These reactions have been assayed biochemically, cell kinetically, physiologically, and pathologically. Clinical and experimental data are used to describe the acute and late reactions of the lung to both external and internal radiation including pneumonitis, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Acute radiation pneumonitis, which can be fatal, develops in both humans and animals within 6 months of exposure to doses greater than or equal to 8 Gy of low LET radiation. It is divisible into a latent period lasting up to 4 weeks; an exudative phase (3-8 weeks) and with an acute pneumonitic phase between 2 and 6 months. The latter is an inflammatory reaction with intra-alveolar and septal edema accompanied by epithelial and endothelial desquamation. The critical role of type II pneumonocytes is discussed. One favored hypothesis suggests that the primary response of the lung is an increase in microvascular permeability. The plasma proteins overwhelm the lymphatic and other drainage mechanisms and this elicits the secondary response of type II cell hyperplasia. This, in its turn, produces an excess of surfactant that ultimately causes the fall in compliance, abnormal gas exchange values, and even respiratory failure. The inflammatory early reaction may progress to chronic fibrosis. There is much evidence to suggest that pneumonitis is an epithelial reaction and some evidence to suggest that this early damage may not be predictive of late fibrosis. However, despite detailed work on collagen metabolism, the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis remains unknown. The data on radiation-induced pulmonary cancer, both in man and experimental animals from both external and internal irradiation following the inhalation of both soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on

  16. Resolving controversy of unusually high refractive index of a tubulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosudský, O.; Dráber, P.; Cifra, M.

    2017-02-01

    The refractive index of a tubulin is an important parameter underlying fundamental electromagnetic and biophysical properties of microtubules – protein fibers essential for several cell functions including cell division. Yet, the only experimental data available in the current literature show values of the tubulin refractive index (n=2.36\\text{--}2.90) which are much higher than what the established theories predict based on the weighted contribution of the polarizability of individual amino acids constituting the protein. To resolve this controversy, we report here modeling and rigorous experimental analysis of the refractive index of a purified tubulin dimer. Our experimental data revealed that the refractive index of the tubulin is n=1.64 at wavelength 589 nm and 25 °C, that is much closer to the values predicted by the established theories than what the earlier experimental data provide.

  17. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Nikhiles

    2016-10-01

    Angle Resolved Photo Emission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a very effective tool to study the electronic states of solids, from simple metals to complex systems like cuprate superconductors. For photon energy in the range of 10 - 100 eV, it is a surface sensitive process as the free path of the photo emitted electrons is of the order of a few lattice parameters. However to interpret the experimental data one needs to have a theoretical foundation for the photoemission process. From the theory of photoemission it may be seen that one can get information about the state from which the electron has been excited. As the translational periodicity is broken normal to the surface, a new type of electron state in the forbidden energy gap can exist localized in the surface region. ARPES can reveal the existence and the property of such surface states. We shall also discuss briefly how the electromagnetic field of the photons are influenced by the presence of the surface and how one can try to take that into account in photoemission theory.

  18. Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis results in mild lung inflammation and altered respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alison S F; Saccone, Gino T P; Bersten, Andrew D; Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and contributes to the majority of AP-associated deaths. Although some aspects of AP-induced lung inflammation have been demonstrated, investigation of resultant changes in lung function is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize lung injury in caerulein-induced AP. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7-8/group) received 7 injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) at 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 hours before measurement of lung impedance mechanics. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), plasma, pancreatic, and lung tissue were collected to determine pancreatic and lung measures of acute inflammation. AP developed between 12 and 24 hours, as indicated by increased plasma amylase activity and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, edema, and abnormal acinar cells, before beginning to resolve by 48 hours. In the lung, MPO activity peaked at 12 and 96 hours, with BAL cytokine concentrations peaking at 12 hours, followed by lung edema at 24 hours, and BAL cell count at 48 hours. Importantly, no significant changes in BAL protein concentration or arterial blood gas-pH levels were evident over the same period, and only modest changes were observed in respiratory mechanics. Caerulein-induced AP results in minor lung injury, which is not sufficient to allow protein permeability and substantially alter respiratory mechanics.

  19. Short people got no reason: gender, height, and disparities in the management of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Hyzy, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Though the benefits of lung protective ventilation (LPV) in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) have been known for more than a decade, widespread clinical adoption has been slow. Han and colleagues demonstrate that women with ALI/ARDS are less likely than men to receive LPV, though this disparity resolves when the analysis is adjusted for patient height. This analysis identifies patient height as a significant factor in predicting provider adherence with LPV guidelines, and illuminates why some disparities in intensive care exist and how they may be resolved via improved utilization of evidence-driven protocols.

  20. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... following substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. ... being exposed to cancer-causing substances, such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, and chromium, may help lower their ...

  1. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... another type of non-small cell lung cancer Larynx: The voice box; located above the windpipe Limited ... allows for the passage of air from the larynx to the bronchial tubes Transfusion: The infusion of ...

  2. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  4. What Are the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Explore How the Lungs Work What Are... The Respiratory System What Happens When You Breathe What Controls Your ... breathing possible. (For more information, go to "The Respiratory System" section of this article.) Rate This Content: NEXT >> ...

  5. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... advanced ILD may have: Abnormal enlargement of the base of the fingernails ( clubbing ) Blue color of the ... scan of the chest Echocardiogram Open lung biopsy Measurement of the blood oxygen level at rest or ...

  6. Lung needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, mediastinum, and pleura. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, Venbrux AC, Morgan RA, eds. Image- ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  7. Lung epinephrine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.; Elayan, H.; Ziegler, M.G. )

    1990-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo epinephrine (E) synthesis by rat lung. Nine days after removal of the adrenal medullas, circulating E was reduced to 7% of levels found in sham-operated rats but 30% of lung E remained. Treatment of demedullated rats with 6 hydroxydopamine plus reserpine did not further reduce lung E. In the presence of S-(3H)adenosylmethionine lung homogenates readily N-methylated norepinephrine (NE) to form (3H)E. The rate of E synthesis by lung homogenates was progressively more rapid with increasing NE up to a concentration of 3 mM, above which it declined. The rate of E formation was optimal at an incubation pH of 8 and at temperatures of approximately 55 degrees C. We compared the E-forming enzyme(s) of lung homogenates with those of adrenal and cardiac ventricle. The adrenal contains mainly phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), which is readily inhibited by SKF 29661 and methylates dopamine (DA) very poorly. Cardiac ventricles contain mainly nonspecific N-methyltransferase (NMT), which is poorly inhibited by SKF 29661 and readily methylates both DA and NE. Lung homogenates were inhibited by SKF 29661 about half as well as adrenal but more than ventricle. We used the rate of E formation from NE as an index of PNMT-like activity and deoxyepinephrine synthesis from DA as an index of NMT-like activity. PNMT and NMT activity in rat lung homogenates were not correlated with each other, displayed different responses to change in temperature, and were affected differently by glucocorticoids.

  8. Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki; Takeuchi, Koichiro; Chonan, Tatsuya; Xiao, Yong-long; Harley, Russell A.; Roggli, Victor L.; Hebisawa, Akira; Tallaksen, Robert J.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Day, Gregory A.; Saito, Rena; Stanton, Marcia L.; Suarthana, Eva; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports of pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and, more recently, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in indium workers suggested that workplace exposure to indium compounds caused several different lung diseases. Methods: To better understand the pathogenesis and natural history of indium lung disease, a detailed, systematic, multidisciplinary analysis of clinical, histopathologic, radiologic, and epidemiologic data for all reported cases and workplaces was undertaken. Results: Ten men (median age, 35 years) who produced, used, or reclaimed indium compounds were diagnosed with interstitial lung disease 4-13 years after first exposure (n = 7) or PAP 1-2 years after first exposure (n = 3). Common pulmonary histopathologic features in these patients included intraalveolar exudate typical of alveolar proteinosis (n = 9), cholesterol clefts and granulomas (n = 10), and fibrosis (n = 9). Two patients with interstitial lung disease had pneumothoraces. Lung disease progressed following cessation of exposure in most patients and was fatal in two. Radiographic data revealed that two patients with PAP subsequently developed fibrosis and one also developed emphysematous changes. Epidemiologic investigations demonstrated the potential for exposure to respirable particles and an excess of lung abnormalities among coworkers. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to indium compounds was associated with PAP, cholesterol ester crystals and granulomas, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and pneumothoraces. The available evidence suggests exposure to indium compounds causes a novel lung disease that may begin with PAP and progress to include fibrosis and emphysema, and, in some cases, premature death. Prospective studies are needed to better define the natural history and prognosis of this emerging lung disease and identify effective prevention strategies. PMID:22207675

  9. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in the world and continually leads in mortality among cancers. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer has risen only 4% (from 12% to 16%) over the past 4 decades, and late diagnosis is a major obstacle in improving lung cancer prognosis. Survival of patients undergoing lung resection is greater than 80%, suggesting that early detection and diagnosis of cancers before they become inoperable and lethal will greatly improve mortality. Lung cancer biomarkers can be used for screening, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, stratification, therapy response monitoring, and so on. This review focuses on noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. For that purpose, our discussion in this review will focus on biological fluid-based biomarkers. The body fluids include blood (serum or plasma), sputum, saliva, BAL, pleural effusion, and VOC. Since it is rich in different cellular and molecular elements and is one of the most convenient and routine clinical procedures, serum or plasma is the main source for the development and validation of many noninvasive biomarkers. In terms of molecular aspects, the most widely validated ones are proteins, some of which are used in the clinical sector, though in limited accessory purposes. We will also discuss the lung cancer (protein) biomarkers in clinical trials and currently in the validation phase with hundreds of samples. After proteins, we will discuss microRNAs, methylated DNA, and circulating tumor cells, which are being vigorously developed and validated as potential lung cancer biomarkers. The main aim of this review is to provide researchers and clinicians with an understanding of the potential noninvasive lung cancer biomarkers in biological fluids that have recently been discovered.

  10. The Lung Alveolar Lipofibroblast: An Evolutionary Strategy Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen, the main mode of support for premature infants with immature lungs, can cause toxicity by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt homeostasis; yet, these same molecules were entrained to promote vertebrate lung phylogeny. By providing a deeper understanding of this paradox, we propose physiologically rational strategies to prevent chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity. Recent Advances: To prevent neonatal hyperoxic lung damage biologically, we have exploited the alveolar defense mechanism(s) that evolutionarily evolved to combat increased atmospheric oxygen during the vertebrate water to land transition. Critical Issues: Over the course of vertebrate lung evolution, ROS promoted the formation of lipofibroblasts, specialized adepithelial cells, which protect the alveoli against oxidant injury; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master switch for lipofibroblast differentiation, prevents such oxidant lung injury, both by directly promoting mesodermal differentiation and its antioxidant defenses, and indirectly by stimulating the developmental epithelial–mesenchymal paracrine interactions that have physiologically determined lung surfactant production in accord with the lung's phylogenetic adaptation to atmospheric oxygen, preventing Respiratory Distress Syndrome at birth. Future Directions: The molecular strategy (PPARγ agonists) to prevent CLD of prematurity, proposed by us, although seems to be robust, effective, and safe under experimental conditions, it awaits detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for its safe and effective clinical translation to human infants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1893–1904. “I have procured air [oxygen]…between five and six times as good as the best common air that I have ever met with.” —Joseph Priestley, 1775 PMID:24386954

  11. Lung Parenchymal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This article focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  12. Lung parenchymal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2011-07-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This chapter focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed.

  13. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  14. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography using the reciprocity approach

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved bioluminescence optical tomography is an approach to recover images of, for example, Luciferase activity within a volume using multiwavelength emission data from internal bioluminescence sources. The underlying problem of uniqueness associated with nonspectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography is demonstrated and it is shown that using a non-negative constraint inverse algorithm, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from the measured data. Reconstructed images of bioluminescence are presented using both simulated complex and heterogeneous small animal models as well as real multiwavelength data from a tissue-simulating phantom. The location of the internal bioluminescence source using experimental data is obtained with 0.5 mm accuracy and it is shown that small (2.5 mm diameter) sources of up to 12.5 mm deep, within a complex mouse model, can be resolved accurately using a single view data collection strategy. Finally, using the reciprocity approach for image reconstruction, a dramatic improvement in computational time is shown without loss to image accuracy with both experimental and simulated data, potentially reducing computing time from 402 to 3.75 h. PMID:19070220

  15. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  16. A MALDI-MSI approach to the characterization of radiation-induced lung injury and medical countermeasure development

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Claire L.; Jones, Jace W.; Barrow, Kory; Kieta, Kaitlyn; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kearney, Sean; Smith, Cassandra P.; Gibbs, Allison; Farese, Ann M.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury is highly complex and characterized by multiple pathologies, which occur over time, and sporadically throughout the lung. This complexity makes biomarker investigations and medical countermeasure screenings challenging. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has the ability to spatially resolve differences in molecular profiles within the lung following radiation exposure and can aid in biomarker identification and pharmaceutical efficacy investigations. MALDI-MSI was applied to the investigation of a whole-thorax lung irradiation model in non-human primates (NHP) for lipidomic analysis and medical countermeasure distribution. PMID:26425906

  17. Probing quasiparticle states in strongly interacting atomic gases by momentum-resolved Raman photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam; Carusotto, Iacopo; Georges, Antoine

    2009-08-01

    We investigate a momentum-resolved Raman spectroscopy technique which is able to probe the one-body spectral function and the quasiparticle states of a gas of strongly interacting ultracold atoms. This technique is inspired by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, a powerful experimental probe of electronic states in solid-state systems. Quantitative examples of experimentally accessible spectra are given for the most significant regimes along the BEC-BCS crossover. When the theory is specialized to rf spectroscopy, agreement is found with recent experimental data. The main advantages of this Raman spectroscopy over existing techniques are pointed out.

  18. Preclinical models for interrogating drug action in human cancers using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM)

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In this review we compare the advantages and disadvantages of different model biological systems for determining the metabolic functions of cells in complex environments, how they may change in different disease states, and respond to therapeutic interventions. Background All preclinical drug-testing models have advantages and drawbacks. We compare and contrast established cell, organoid and animal models with ex vivo organ or tissue culture and in vivo human experiments in the context of metabolic readout of drug efficacy. As metabolism reports directly on the biochemical state of cells and tissues, it can be very sensitive to drugs and/or other environmental changes. This is especially so when metabolic activities are probed by stable isotope tracing methods, which can also provide detailed mechanistic information on drug action. We have developed and been applying Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to examine metabolic reprogramming of human lung cancer cells in monoculture, in mouse xenograft/explant models, and in lung cancer patients in situ (Lane et al. 2011; T. W. Fan et al. 2011; T. W-M. Fan et al. 2012; T. W. Fan et al. 2012; Xie et al. 2014b; Ren et al. 2014a; Sellers et al. 2015b). We are able to determine the influence of the tumor microenvironment using these models. We have now extended the range of models to fresh human tissue slices, similar to those originally described by O. Warburg (Warburg 1923), which retain the native tissue architecture and heterogeneity with a paired benign versus cancer design under defined cell culture conditions. This platform offers an unprecedented human tissue model for preclinical studies on metabolic reprogramming of human cancer cells in their tissue context, and response to drug treatment (Xie et al. 2014a). As the microenvironment of the target human tissue is retained and individual patient's response to drugs is obtained, this platform promises to transcend current limitations of drug selection

  19. Helping You Buy: Link Resolver Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Ross

    2006-01-01

    To any library with an electronic collection of any significance, the OpenURL link resolver has (or should) become an indispensable service for helping its users retrieve full text from citations. Although they are a relatively new technology (in library terms, at any rate), link resolvers arguably have become as important as the OPAC; they locate…

  20. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Screening for lung cancer: Does MRI have a role?

    PubMed

    Biederer, Juergen; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Schiebler, Mark L; van Beek, Edwin J R; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    While the inauguration of national low dose computed tomographic (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs has started in the USA, other countries remain undecided, awaiting the results of ongoing trials. The continuous technical development achieved by stronger gradients, parallel imaging and shorter echo time has made lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) an interesting alternative to CT. For the detection of solid lesions with lung MRI, experimental and clinical studies have shown a threshold size of 3-4mm for nodules, with detection rates of 60-90% for lesions of 5-8mm and close to 100% for lesions of 8mm or larger. From experimental work, the sensitivity for infiltrative, non-solid lesions would be expected to be similarly high as that for solid lesions, but the published data for the MRI detection of lepidic growth type adenocarcinoma is sparse. Moreover, biological features such as a longer T2 time of lung cancer tissue, tissue compliance and a more rapid uptake of contrast material compared to granulomatous diseases, in principle should allow for the multi-parametric characterization of lung pathology. Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing. There are now standardized protocols which are easy to implement on current scanner hardware configurations. The image quality has become more robust and currently ongoing studies will help to further contribute experience with multi-center, multi-vendor and multi-platform implementation of this technology. All of the required prerequisites have now been achieved to allow for a dedicated prospective large scale MRI based lung cancer screening trial to investigate the outcomes from using MRI rather than CT for lung cancer screening. This is driven by the hypothesis that MRI would reach a similarly high sensitivity for the detection of early lung cancer with fewer false positive exams (better specificity) than LDCT. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the potential role of lung MRI for the early

  2. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  3. Rotationally resolved near-infrared spectrum of HCBr

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Bor-Chen; Sears, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of bromomethylene (HCBr) in the vicinity of 12800 cm{sup -1} was obtained at Doppler-limited resolution using a transient frequency-modulation absorption technique. In contrast to the better studied halo-methylenes (HCF and HCCl), the number of experimental investigations on HCBr is very limited. Xu et al. reported the spectrum at visible wavelengths, but no rotational structure was resolved. Gilles et al. have used photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the singlet-triplet separation to be 2.6{+-}2.2 kcal/mol. Based upon previous studies, the authors tentatively assign the observed band to be the A{sup 1}A{double_prime}(0,2,0){r_arrow}x{sup 1}A{prime}(0,0,0) transition. The analysis of the observed spectrum will be discussed.

  4. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  5. Lung morphometry: the link between structure and function.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R

    2017-03-01

    The study of the structural basis of gas exchange function in the lung depends on the availability of quantitative information that concerns the structures establishing contact between the air in the alveoli and the blood in the alveolar capillaries, which can be entered into physiological equations for predicting oxygen uptake. This information is provided by morphometric studies involving stereological methods and allows estimates of the pulmonary diffusing capacity of the human lung that agree, in experimental studies, with the maximal oxygen consumption. The basis for this "machine lung" structure lies in the complex design of the cells building an extensive air-blood barrier with minimal cell mass.

  6. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Toumpanakis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus) in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction). The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. PMID:27713628

  7. Live Imaging of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  8. Comparison of sliced lungs with whole lung sets for a torso phantom measured with Ge detectors using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP).

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gary H; Guerriere, Steven

    2003-02-01

    Lung counters are generally used to measure low energy photons (<100 keV). They are usually calibrated with lung sets that are manufactured from a lung tissue substitute material that contains homogeneously distributed activity; however, it is difficult to verify either the activity in the phantom or the homogeneity of the activity distribution without destructive testing. Lung sets can have activities that are as much as 25% different from the expected value. An alternative method to using whole lungs to calibrate a lung counter is to use a sliced lung with planar inserts. Experimental work has already indicated that this alternative method of calibration can be a satisfactory substitute. This work has extended the experimental study by the use of Monte Carlo simulation to validate that sliced and whole lungs are equivalent. It also has determined the optimum slice thicknesses that separate the planar sources in the sliced lung. Slice thicknesses have been investigated in the range of 0.5 cm to 9.0 cm and at photon energies from 17 keV to 1,000 keV. Results have shown that there is little difference between sliced and whole lungs at low energies providing that the slice thickness is 2.0 cm or less. As the photon energy rises the slice thickness can increase substantially with no degradation on equivalence.

  9. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  10. Frequency-resolved optical gating for characterization of VUV pulses using ultrafast plasma mirror switching.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Ryuji; Kumada, Takayuki; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Akagi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-04

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method for characterizing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) pulses based on time-resolved reflection spectroscopy of fused silica pumped by an intense laser pulse. Plasma mirror reflection is used as an ultrafast optical switch, which enables us to measure frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) traces. The VUV temporal waveform can be retrieved from the measured FROG trace using principal component generalized projections algorithm with modification. The temporal profile of the plasma mirror reflectivity is also extracted simultaneously.

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  12. Interstitial Lung Disease in Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Sara R.; Castelino, Flavia V.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology and with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multi-organ involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of the disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of ILD hinges upon careful clinical evaluation as well as pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). A number of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic mediators are involved in the pathogenesis of SSc-ILD, with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) playing a key role in the development of fibrosis. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of disease initiation and progression, effective therapeutic options are still limited. A number of experimental therapies are currently in early phase clinical trials and show promise. PMID:25836640

  13. Adaptive lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Linton, D M

    2001-09-01

    Adaptive lung ventilation (ALV) is a method of closed-loop mechanical ventilation analogous to modern closed-loop technology in aviation such as the autopilot and automatic landing system. The algorithm of the controller of ALV is designed to automatically provide pressure-controlled synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (P-SIMV) and weaning as individually required in any clinical situation. The synchronized pressure limited breaths constantly adapt to the patient requirements to encourage optimal alveolar ventilation with minimal adverse physiological disturbance and timely weaning. The ease of application, efficiency, and safety of the first ALV controllers have been demonstrated in lung models, in patients with normal lungs undergoing general anesthesia, in patients requiring unusual positioning, in transition to and from one-lung anesthesia, and in long-term ventilation of patients with various lung pathologies and in weaning patients who have restrictive or obstructive pulmonary disease. Prospective comparative studies of ALV versus other currently used manually selected modes of mechanical ventilation, such as the one reported in this article, should confirm the safety and identify the benefits of this form of advanced closed-loop mechanical ventilation technology.

  14. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  15. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  16. [Indium lung disease].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-01

    "Indium lung" is a new occupational lung disease. The global demand for indium, the major material used in manufacturing flat-screen display panels, has skyrocketed since the 1990s (Japan comprises 85% of the worldwide demand). The first case was reported in Japan in 2003, followed by seven cases (interstitial pneumonia and emphysema) in Japan. Two pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) cases in the USA followed in 2011. Indium lung has been described as interstitial pneumonia, pneumothorax, emphysema, and PAP. In 2013, The Japan Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare issued an "Ordinance on the Prevention of Hazards Due to Specified Chemical Substances" requiring employers to provide regular health checks for employees and measurements of work environment concentrations of respirable indium dust.

  17. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  18. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  19. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  20. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  1. Molecular developmental mechanism in polypterid fish provides insight into the origin of vertebrate lungs

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Norifumi; Kobayashi, Ritsuko; Yano, Tohru; Noda, Masatsugu; Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro; Okabe, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    The lung is an important organ for air breathing in tetrapods and originated well before the terrestrialization of vertebrates. Therefore, to better understand lung evolution, we investigated lung development in the extant basal actinopterygian fish Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus). First, we histologically confirmed that lung development in this species is very similar to that of tetrapods. We also found that the mesenchymal expression patterns of three genes that are known to play important roles in early lung development in tetrapods (Fgf10, Tbx4, and Tbx5) were quite similar to those of tetrapods. Moreover, we found a Tbx4 core lung mesenchyme-specific enhancer (C-LME) in the genomes of bichir and coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and experimentally confirmed that these were functional in tetrapods. These findings provide the first molecular evidence that the developmental program for lung was already established in the common ancestor of actinopterygians and sarcopterygians. PMID:27466206

  2. National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

  3. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Oxygen Therapy Sarcoidosis Stress Testing Rate This Content: Updated: December 9, ...

  4. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  5. Lung-MAP Clinical Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Lung-MAP study, which will examine treatment outcomes for patients with squamous cell lung cancer assigned to different targeted drugs based on the results of genomic tumor profiling.

  6. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  7. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  8. Poverty and lung health.

    PubMed

    Rusen, I D; Squire, S Bertel; Billo, Nils E

    2010-04-01

    The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) held its 40th World Conference on Lung Health in Cancun, Mexico, between 3 and 7 December 2009. It was attended by over 2000 delegates from 104 countries around the world. The conference featured four stimulating plenary sessions and an extensive selection of scientific symposia. A total of 1125 abstracts were also presented from five broad categories: clinical trials and TB basic science, clinical research for treatment and care, epidemiology, education, advocacy and social issues, and policy and program implementation. In addition, the conference was preceded by a series of well-attended postgraduate courses and workshops.

  9. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Pamela; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2017-02-01

    The molecular characterization of lung cancer has changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. Through the recognition of novel biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations, it is possible to identify subsets of patients who benefit from targeted molecular therapies. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. This article focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy and potential new targets for drug development.

  10. Lung cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ze-hong; White, James; Zhang, Lin-bo

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most dreaded of all cancers because of the higher mortality rates associated with it worldwide. The various subtypes of lung cancer respond differently to a particular treatment regime, which makes the therapeutic interventions all the more complicated. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. They are considered as the factors responsible for the cases of tumor relapse. The CSCs may have significant role in the development of lung tumorigenesis based on the identification of the CSCs which respond during injury. The properties of multi-potency and self-renewal are shared in common by the lung CSCs with the normal pluripotent stem cells which can be isolated using the similar markers. This review deals with the origin and characteristics of the lung cancer stem cells. The role of different markers used to isolate lung CSCs like CD44, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), CD133 and ABCG2 (ATP binding cassette sub family G member 2) have been discussed in detail. Analysis of the developmental signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog in the regulation and maintenance of the lung CSCs have been done. Finally, before targeting the lung CSC biomarkers for potential therapeutics, challenges faced in lung cancer stem cell research need to be taken into account. With the accepted notion that the CSCs are to blame for cancer relapse and drug resistance, targeting them can be an important aspect of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  11. Theory and experiments on time-resolved reflectance from adult heads for functional tomographic imaging of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.; Suzuki, M.

    2014-02-01

    Finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis has been formulated for predicting time-resolved reflectance from an adult head model with brain grooves containing a non-scattering layer. Mean delay (MD) dependences on source detector separation (d) and time-resolved reflectance calculated using the FDTD analysis were compared with in vivo experiments of human heads. It is shown that the theoretical and experimental MD dependences on d and the time-resolved reflectance are well predicted by FDTD analysis. These results have shown that tomographic imaging of brain activities is promising, which improves depth sensitivities by enhancing the contribution of late photons in time-resolved systems.

  12. The effect of artificial neural network model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yiming; Wu, Yongjun; Nie, Guangjin; Ni, Ran

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis potential of artificial neural network (ANN) model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer, to differentiate lung cancer from lung benign disease, normal control, and gastrointestinal cancers. Serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), gastrin, neurone specific enolase (NSE), sialic acid (SA), Cu/Zn, Ca were measured through different experimental procedures in 117 lung cancer patients, 93 lung benign disease patients, 111 normal control, 47 gastric cancer patients, 50 patients with colon cancer and 50 esophagus cancer patients, 19 parameters of basic information were surveyed among lung cancer, lung benign disease and normal control, then developed and evaluated ANN models to distinguish lung cancer. Using the ANN model with the six serum tumor markers and 19 parameters to distinguish lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy people, the sensitivity was 98.3%, the specificity was 99.5% and the accuracy was 96.9%. Another three ANN models with the six serum tumor markers were employed to differentiate lung cancer from three gastrointestinal cancers, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of distinguishing lung cancer from gastric cancer by the ANN model of lung cancer-gastric cancer were 100%, 83.3% and 93.5%, respectively; The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of discriminating lung cancer by lung cancer-colon cancer ANN model were 90.0%, 90.0%, and 90.0%; And which were 86.7%, 84.6%, and 86.0%, respectively, by lung cancer-esophagus cancer ANN model. ANN model built with the six serum tumor markers could distinguish lung cancer, not only from lung benign disease and normal people, but also from three common gastrointestinal cancers. And our evidence indicates the ANN model maybe is an excellent and intelligent system to discriminate lung cancer.

  13. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  14. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  15. Lung Mechanics in Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    lung mechanics in vivo during spontaneous breathing (dynamic) and mechanical ventilation (static), and the static compliance of the excised lung after...to depth. Physiological Zoology, 1982. 55(1): p. 105-111. 6. Fahlman, A., et al., Estimating the effect of lung collapse and pulmonary shunt on gas...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lung Mechanics in Marine Mammals Andreas Fahlman

  16. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    recombinase activity into pulmonary tissues, and we discuss here the different techniques underlying these applications. Concomitant with Cre/Flp recombinase-based models are the tetracycline (Tet)-inducible bitransgenic systems in which presence or absence of doxycycline can turn the expression of a specific oncogene on or off. The use of several Tet-inducible lung cancer models for NSCLC is presented here in which the reversal of oncogene expression led to complete tumor regression and provided us with important insight of how oncogene dependence influence lung cancer survival and growth. As alternative to Tet-inducible models, we discuss the application of reversible expressed, transgenic mutant estrogen receptor (ER) fusion proteins, which are regulated via systemic tamoxifen administration. Most of the various lung cancer models can be combined through the generation of transgenic compound mice so that the use of these somatic mouse models can be even more enhanced for the study of specific molecular pathways that facilitate growth and maintenance of lung cancer. Finally, this description of the practical application and methodology of mouse models for lung cancer should be helpful in assisting researchers to make the best choices and optimal use of (existing) somatic models that suits the specific experimental needs in their study of lung cancer.

  17. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  18. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  19. Super-resolving interference without intensity-correlation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, De-Zhong; Xu, Bao-Long; Zhang, Su-Heng; Wang, Kaige

    2015-05-01

    The high-order intensity correlation function of N -photon interference with thermal light observed in a recent experiment [S. Oppel, T. Büttner, P. Kok, and J. von Zanthier, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 233603 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.233603] is analyzed. The terms in the expansion of the N th -order correlation function are put into three groups. One group contributes a homogeneous background. Both of the other two contribute (N -1 ) -fold super-resolving fringes. In principle they correspond to coherent and incoherent superpositions of classical optical fields, respectively. Therefore similar super-resolving fringes can be obtained without intensity-correlation measurements. We report the experimental results of the coherent and incoherent super-resolving diffraction fringes, which are observed directly in the intensity distribution. The N -1 sources in both the coherent and incoherent cases are set in certain definite positions. In the coherent case, moreover, the phase difference between two adjacent source fields is π . The fringe visibility is unity in the incoherent case, while it decreases as N increases in the incoherent case.

  20. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  1. [Lung auscultation--an overview].

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Urs; Huber, Lars Christian

    2015-07-01

    The auscultation of the lungs is - among anamnesis - the most important part in the assessment of patients presenting with pulmonary symptoms. The lung auscultation is reproducible, cost efficient and very helpful to distinguish between differential diagnoses, in particular in emergency situations. Detection and description of lung sounds requires experience and should be performed by strict adherence to the internationally accepted terminology.

  2. Environmental radiation and the lung

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Philip E.; Walsh, Phillip J.

    1974-01-01

    Environmental sources of radioactive materials and their relation to lung doses and lung burdens are described. The approaches used and the problems encountered in estimating lung doses are illustrated. Exposure to radon daughter products is contrasted to exposure to plutonium as particular examples of the hazards associated with radioactive materials of different chemical and physical characteristics. PMID:4620334

  3. Amelioration of superoxide dismutase on ventilator-induced lung injury by suppressing leukocyte in the lungs and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Ling; Du, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jiun-; Wang, David

    2013-08-31

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a free radical scavenger and a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects have recently been noted. We studied the effects of this antioxidant on lung damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using 8- to 12-wk-old Sprange-Dawley rats (n = 40). Animals were randomized and evenly divided into two experimental groups, low tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation (V(T) = 9 ml/kg) and high V(T) ventilation (V(T) = 28 ml/kg). Each group was evenly divided into two subgroups: ten animals were treated with superoxide dismutase (SOD; 10,000 U/kg i.v., 2 h prior to the ventilation) and the rests were treated with vehicle. Lung injury was evaluated by histological examination, and cells counts of red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) in the alveoli and the septal wall thickness in lung tissues and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The lung permeability was assessed by the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), lung weight to body weight ratio (LW/BW) and protein concentration in broncholavage fluid (BALF). Levels of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the lungs were evaluated by tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and methylguanidine (MG) in BALF, respectively. SOD pretreatment significantly decreased WBC counts in systemic circulation and in alveoli, and effectively attenuated high V(T) ventilation induced lung injury by reducing hyaline membrane development, septal wall thickness, lung W/D and LW/BW and serum LDH in relation to those of the control. In addition, lung tissues MDA and MG in BALF were also notably reduced.

  4. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  5. Influence of hemodialysis on clinical outcomes after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sara A.; Gillen, Jacob R.; Hranjec, Tjasa; Kozower, Benjamin D.; Jones, David R.; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure after lung transplantation is associated with significant morbidity. However, the significance of acute kidney injury (AKI) after lung transplantation remains unclear and poorly studied. We hypothesized that hemodialysis (HD)-dependent AKI after lung transplantation is associated with significant mortality. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective review of all patients undergoing lung transplantation from July 1991 to July 2009 at our institution. Recipients with AKI (creatinine > 3 mg/dL) were identified. We compared recipients without AKI versus recipients with and without HD-dependent AKI. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared by log rank test. Results Of 352 lung transplant recipients reviewed at our institution, 17 developed non–HD-dependent AKI (5%) and 16 developed HD-dependent AKI (4.6%). Cardiopulmonary bypass was significantly higher in patients with HD-dependent AKI. None of the recipients who required HD had recovery of renal function. The 30-day mortality was significantly greater in recipients requiring HD (63% versus 0%; P < 0.0001). One-year mortality after transplantation was significantly increased in recipients with HD-dependent AKI compared with those with non–HD-dependent AKI (87.5% versus 17.6%; P < 0.001). Conclusions Hemodialysis is associated with mortality after lung transplantation. Fortunately, AKI that does not progress to HD commonly resolves and has a better overall survival. Avoidance, if possible, of cardiopulmonary bypass may attenuate the incidence of AKI. Aggressive measures to identify and treat early postoperative renal dysfunction and prevent progression to HD may improve outcomes after lung transplantation. PMID:23481566

  6. The roles of diol epoxide and o-quinone pathways in mouse lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a)pyrene: relevance to human lung carcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is sufficient epidemiological evidence supported by experimental data that some PAH-containing complex environmental mixtures pose risks to human health by increasing lung cancer incidence. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that human respirator...

  7. Lung transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100120.htm Lung transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 5 Go to slide 2 ...

  8. Agenesis of the lung.

    PubMed

    Sbokos, C G; McMillan, I K

    1977-07-01

    Agenesis of the lung is rare. The cases of ten patients with this malformation are recorded and illustrated. Most had congenital malformation of other organs, especially the heart, as well. All had hypoplasia of the pulmonary artery or its branches. A pantaloon-like appearance of the trachea and the main bronchi on the bronchograms is described. Exercise tolerance was impaired in all patients.

  9. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  10. An amyloid lung

    PubMed Central

    Zundel, W. E.; Prior, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 55-year-old housewife died from an illness characterized by progressive respiratory incapacity. Changes were confined to the lungs and consisted of a diffuse infiltration by amyloid. No adequate cause was found for this amyloid, and we suggest that this is a case of primary alveolar septal amyloidosis. Images PMID:5559913

  11. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  12. A new boundary correction method for lung parenchyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junfang; Jiang, Huiqin; Ma, Ling; Liu, Yumin; Toshiya, Nakaguchi

    2017-02-01

    In order to repair the boundary depressions caused by juxtapleural nodules and improve the lung segmentation accuracy, we propose a new boundary correction method for lung parenchyma. Firstly, the top-hat filter is used to enhance the image contrast; Secondly, we employ the Ostu algorithm for image binarization; Thirdly, the connected component labeling algorithm is utilized to remove the main trachea; Fourthly, the initial mask image is obtained by morphological region filling algorithm; Fifthly, the boundary tracing algorithm is applied to extract the initial lung contour; Afterwards, we design a sudden change degree algorithm to modify the initial lung contour; Finally, the complete lung parenchyma image is obtained. The novelty is that sudden change degree algorithm can detect the inflection points more accurately than other methods, which contributes to repairing lung contour efficiently. The experimental results show that the proposed method can incorporate the juxtapleural nodules into the lung parenchyma effectively, and the precision is increased by 6.46% and 2.72% respectively compared with the other two methods, providing favorable conditions for the accurate detection of pulmonary nodules and having important clinical value.

  13. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zenesini, A; Lignier, H; Tayebirad, G; Radogostowicz, J; Ciampini, D; Mannella, R; Wimberger, S; Morsch, O; Arimondo, E

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  14. Time-Resolved Measurement of Landau-Zener Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Radogostowicz, J.; Ciampini, D.; Mannella, R.; Arimondo, E.; Lignier, H.; Morsch, O.; Tayebirad, G.; Wimberger, S.

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  15. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment.

  16. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    PubMed

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  17. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  18. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field.

  19. Automatic lung nodule matching on sequential CT images.

    PubMed

    Hong, Helen; Lee, Jeongjin; Yim, Yeny

    2008-05-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation and registration method that provides more efficient and robust matching of lung nodules in sequential chest computed tomography (CT) images. Our method consists of four steps. First, the lungs are extracted from chest CT images by the automatic segmentation method. Second, gross translational mismatch is corrected by optimal cube registration. This initial alignment does not require extracting any anatomical landmarks. Third, the initial alignment is step-by-step refined by hierarchical surface registration. To evaluate the distance measures between lung boundary points, a three-dimensional distance map is generated by narrow-band distance propagation, which drives fast and robust convergence to the optimal value. Finally, correspondences of manually detected nodules are established from the pairs with the smallest Euclidean distances. Experimental results show that our segmentation method accurately extracts lung boundaries and the registration method effectively finds the nodule correspondences.

  20. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś , A.; Braziewicz, J.; Banaś , D.; Majewska, U.; Góź Dź , S.; Urbaniak, A.

    1999-04-01

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  1. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field. PMID:28119741

  2. Fingerprints of Majorana fermions in spin-resolved subgap spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirla, Razvan; Moca, Cǎtǎlin Paşcu

    2016-07-01

    When a strongly correlated quantum dot is tunnel coupled to a superconductor, it leads to the formation of Shiba bound states inside the superconducting gap. They have been measured experimentally in a superconductor-quantum dot-normal lead setup. Side coupling the quantum dot to a topological superconducting wire that supports Majorana bound states at its ends, drastically affects the structure of the Shiba states and induces supplementary in-gap states. The anomalous coupling between the Majorana bound states and the quantum dot gives rise to a characteristic imbalance in the spin-resolved spectral functions for the dot operators. These are clear fingerprints for the existence of Majorana fermions and they can be detected experimentally in transport measurements. In terms of methods employed, we have used analytical approaches combined with the numerical renormalization group approach.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of particle deposition in large-scale, multigenerational lung models.

    PubMed

    Walters, D Keith; Luke, William H

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a useful tool for the prediction of airflow and particle transport within the human lung airway. Several published studies have demonstrated the use of Eulerian finite-volume CFD simulations coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking methods to determine local and regional particle deposition rates in small subsections of the bronchopulmonary tree. However, the simulation of particle transport and deposition in large-scale models encompassing more than a few generations is less common, due in part to the sheer size and complexity of the human lung airway. Highly resolved, fully coupled flowfield solution and particle tracking in the entire lung, for example, is currently an intractable problem and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This paper adopts a previously reported methodology for simulating large-scale regions of the lung airway (Walters, D. K., and Luke, W. H., 2010, "A Method for Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations of Large-Scale Regions of the Human Lung Airway," ASME J. Fluids Eng., 132(5), p. 051101), which was shown to produce results similar to fully resolved geometries using approximate, reduced geometry models. The methodology is extended here to particle transport and deposition simulations. Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are performed in combination with Eulerian simulations of the airflow in an idealized representation of the human lung airway tree. Results using the reduced models are compared with those using the fully resolved models for an eight-generation region of the conducting zone. The agreement between fully resolved and reduced geometry simulations indicates that the new method can provide an accurate alternative for large-scale CFD simulations while potentially reducing the computational cost of these simulations by several orders of magnitude.

  4. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  5. Hypoxia in Models of Lung Cancer: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Edward E.; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K.; Erler, Janine T.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean; Sayles, Leanne; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; –Thu Le, Quynh; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer in order to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. Experimental Design Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or subcutaneously were studied using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET), and post-mortem by immunohistochemical observation of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The response of these models to the hypoxia-activated cytotoxin PR-104 was also quantified by formation of γH2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. Results Minimal FAZA and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, while subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping of both hypoxia probes. These observations correlated with the response of these tumors to PR-104, and with the reduced incidence of hypoxia in human lung cancers relative to other solid tumor types. Conclusions These findings suggest that in situ models of lung cancer in mice may be more reflective of the human disease, and encourage judicious selection of preclinical tumor models for the study of hypoxia imaging and anti-hypoxic cell therapies. PMID:20858837

  6. Resolving the forbidden band of SF6.

    PubMed

    Boudon, V; Manceron, L; Kwabia Tchana, F; Loëte, M; Lago, L; Roy, P

    2014-01-28

    Sulfur hexafluoride is an important molecule for modeling thermophysical and polarizability properties. It is also a potent greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose concentration in the atmosphere, although very low is increasing rapidly; its global warming power is mostly conferred by its strong infrared absorption in the ν3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm(-1). This heavy species, however, features many hot bands at room temperature (at which only 31% of the molecules lie in the ground vibrational state), especially those originating from the lowest, v6 = 1 vibrational state. Unfortunately, the ν6 band itself (near 347 cm(-1)), in the first approximation, is both infrared- and Raman-inactive, and no reliable spectroscopic information could be obtained up to now and this has precluded a correct modeling of the hot bands. It has been suggested theoretically and experimentally that this band might be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction with infrared-active fundamentals and appears in high pressure measurements as a very faint, unresolved band. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 163 ± 2 K temperature, coupled to synchrotron radiation and a high resolution interferometer, the spectrum of the ν6 far-infrared region has been recorded. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of hot bands. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution, is indeed ν6. The fully resolved spectrum has been analyzed, thanks to the XTDS software package. The band appears to be activated by faint Coriolis interactions with the strong ν3 and ν4 fundamental bands, resulting in the appearance of a small first-order dipole moment term, inducing unusual selection rules. The band center (ν6 = 347.736707(35) cm(-1)) and rovibrational parameters are now accurately determined for the v6 = 1 level. The ν6 perturbation-induced dipole moment is estimated to be 33 ± 3

  7. Time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haller, Emmanuel B.

    1996-01-01

    In response to an invitation by the editor-in-chief, I would like to present the current status of time-domain imaging. With exciting new photon diffusion techniques being developed in the frequency domain and promising optical coherence tomography, time-resolved transillumination is in constant evolution and the subject of passionate discussions during the numerous conferences dedicated to this subject. The purpose of time-resolved optical tomography is to provide noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of the interior of living bodies by the use of nonionizing radiation. Moreover, the use of visible to near-infrared wavelength yields metabolic information. Breast cancer screening is the primary potential application for time-resolved imaging. Neurology and tissue characterization are also possible fields of applications. Time- resolved transillumination and optical tomography should not only improve diagnoses, but the welfare of the patient. As no overview of this technique has yet been presented to my knowledge, this paper briefly describes the various methods enabling time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as the clinical challenges they face are discussed. Although an analytic and computable model of light transport through tissues is essential for a meaningful interpretation of the transillumination process, this paper will not dwell on the mathematics of photon propagation.

  8. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    regenerate 3D alveolar lung structure (Figures 4C–4H). To examine this, sorted day 15 Nkx2-1GFP+ ESC-derived cells, delivered by intra-tracheal...indicative of lung and thyroid lineages and can recellularize a 3D lung tissue scaffold. Thus, we have derived a pure population of progenitors able to...Media and Recellularize 3D Lung Tissue Scaffolds A known feature of primary fetal lung epithelial cells late in devel- opment is their capacity to respond

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of caspase-8 limits lung tumour outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Terlizzi, Michela; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Perillo, Giuseppe; Galderisi, Antonio; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Despite advances in therapy, conventional therapy is still the main treatment and has a high risk of chemotherapy resistance. Caspase-8 is involved in cell death and is a recognized marker for poor patient prognosis. Experimental Approach To elucidate the role of caspase-8 in lung carcinoma, we used human samples of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a mouse model of carcinogen-induced lung cancer. Key Results Healthy and cancerous NSCLC samples had similar levels of the active form of caspase-8. Similarly, lung tumour-bearing mice had high levels of the active form of caspase-8. Pharmacological inhibition of caspase-8 by z-IETD-FMK robustly reduced tumour outgrowth and this was closely associated with a reduction in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-18, IL-1α, IL-33, but not IL-1β. Furthermore, inhibition of caspase-8 reduced the recruitment of innate suppressive cells, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but not of regulatory T cells to lungs of tumour-bearing mice. However, despite the well-known role of caspase-8 in cell death, the apoptotic cascade (caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bcl-2 dependent) was not active in lungs of z-IETD-treated tumour-bearing mice, but instead higher levels of the short segment of c-FLIP (c-FLIPs) were detected. Similarly, human healthy lung samples had higher levels of c-FLIPs than cancerous samples. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that caspase-8 is an important orchestrator of cancer-associated inflammation and the presence of short segment of c-FLIP determines whether caspase-8 induces tumour proliferation or tumour arrest/regression in the lung. PMID:25917370

  10. Lessons from a canine model of compensatory lung growth.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W

    2004-01-01

    For over a century, canines have been used to study adaptation to surgical lung resection or pneumonectomy (PNX) that results in a quantifiable and reproducible loss of lung units. As reviewed by Schilling (1965), the first successful experimental pneumonectomies were performed in dogs and rabbits in 1881. By the early 1920s, it was appreciated that dogs can function normally with one remaining lung that increases in volume to fill the thoracic cavity (Andrus, 1923; Heuer and Andrus, 1922; Heuer and Dunn, 1920); these pioneering observations paved the way for surgeons to perform major lung resection in patients. Reports in the 1950s (Schilling et al., 1956) detail surprisingly well-preserved work performance in dogs following staged resection of up to 70% of lung mass. Since then, the bulk of the literature on post-PNX adaptation has shifted to rodents, especially for defining molecular mediators of compensatory lung growth. Because rodents are smaller and easier to handle, more animals can be studied over a shorter duration, resulting in time and cost savings. On the other hand, key aspects of lung anatomy, development, and time course of response in the rodent do not mimic those in the human subject, and few rodent studies have related structural adaptation to functional consequences. In larger mammals, anatomical lung development more closely resembles that in humans, and physiological function can be readily measured. Because dogs are natural athletes, functional limits of compensation can be characterized relatively easily by stressing oxygen transport at peak exercise. Thus, the canine model remains useful for relating structure to function, defining sources and limits of adaptation as well as evaluating therapeutic manipulation. This chapter summarizes key concepts of compensatory lung growth that have been consolidated from canine studies: (i) structure-function relationships during adaptation, (ii) dysanaptic (unequal) nature of compensation, and (iii

  11. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  12. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  13. Effects of lung volume on clearance of solutes from the air spaces of lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, B.T.; James, H.L.; McLarty, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Several investigators have shown that the clearance rate of aerosolized 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA, mol wt = 492, radius = 0.6 nm) from the air spaces of the lungs of humans and experimental animals increases with lung volume. To further investigate this phenomenon we performed a compartmental analysis of the 2-h clearance of DTPA from the lungs of anesthetized sheep using a new method to more accurately correct for the effects of DTPA recirculation. This analysis showed that the DTPA clearance in eight sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.42 +/- 0.15%/min. Ventilating eight sheep with an end-expired pressure of 10 cmH/sub 2/O throughout the study increased the end-expired volume 0.4 +/- 0.1 liter BTPS and created a clearance curve that was best described by a two-compartment model. In these sheep 56 +/- 16% of the DTPA cleared from the lungs at a rate of 7.9 +/- 2.9%/min. The remainder cleared at a rate similar to that measured in the sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure (0.35 +/- 0.18%/min). Additional control and lung inflation experiments were performed using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin (mol wt = 66,000, radius = 3.6 nm). In six control sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure the albumin clearance was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.06 +/- 0.02%/min. The clearance rate in six sheep with increased lung volume was slightly larger (0.09 +/- 0.02, P less than 0.05) but was well described by a one-compartment model.

  14. Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) Accelerates Collagen Degradation and Clearance from Lungs in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Hui-Hua; Ra, Hyun-Jeong; Majumdar, Sonali; Gulick, Dexter L; Jerome, Jacob A; Madsen, Daniel H; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Speicher, David W; Bachovchin, William W; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Puré, Ellen

    2016-04-08

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by progressive, unrelenting lung scarring, with death from respiratory failure within 2-4 years unless lung transplantation is performed. New effective therapies are clearly needed. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface-associated serine protease up-regulated in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in wound healing and cancer. We postulate that FAP is not only a marker of disease but influences the development of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. In two different models of pulmonary fibrosis, intratracheal bleomycin instillation and thoracic irradiation, we find increased mortality and increased lung fibrosis in FAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Lung extracellular matrix analysis reveals accumulation of intermediate-sized collagen fragments in FAP-deficient mouse lungs, consistent within vitrostudies showing that FAP mediates ordered proteolytic processing of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-derived collagen cleavage products. FAP-mediated collagen processing leads to increased collagen internalization without altering expression of the endocytic collagen receptor, Endo180. Pharmacologic FAP inhibition decreases collagen internalization as expected. Conversely, restoration of FAP expression in the lungs of FAP-deficient mice decreases lung hydroxyproline content after intratracheal bleomycin to levels comparable with that of wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that FAP participates directly, in concert with MMPs, in collagen catabolism and clearance and is an important factor in resolving scar after injury and restoring lung homeostasis. Our study identifies FAP as a novel endogenous regulator of fibrosis and is the first to show FAP's protective effects in the lung.

  15. [Epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Becker, N

    2010-08-01

    Lung cancer is by far the most common form of cancer worldwide and in Germany is now "only" still the commonest cause of death from cancer. The most important single risk factor is smoking but in selected population groups, for example in the professional area, other factors can also play a role which cannot be ignored and open up a corresponding potential for prevention. Effective early detection procedures are at present unknown. The most promising, however, is multislice computed tomography (MSCT) which for this reason is presently being tested for effectiveness in several large research projects. The results are not expected for some years. Until then the early detection of lung cancer with MSCT cannot be considered suitable for routine use but can only be justified within the framework of research studies.

  16. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; Herbst, Roy S; Morgensztern, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of patients with good performance status and advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer has been based on the use of first-line platinum-based doublet and second-line docetaxel. Immunotherapy represents a new therapeutic approach with the potential for prolonged benefit. Although the vaccines studied have not shown benefit in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors against the PD-1/PD-L1 axis showed increased overall survival compared with docetaxel in randomized clinical trials, which led to the approval of nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Because only a minority of patients benefit from this class of drugs, there has been an intense search for biomarkers.

  17. Nutrition aspects of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cranganu, Andreea; Camporeale, Jayne

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Notable carcinogens involved in the development of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke, and radon. Lung cancer is divided into 2 major types: non-small-cell lung cancer, the most prevalent, and small-cell lung cancer. Treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the same. Medical nutrition therapy is often required for nutrition-related side effects of cancer treatment, which include but are not limited to anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and esophagitis. The best protection against lung cancer is avoidance of airborne carcinogens and increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that smokers taking large amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements had increased lung cancer incidence and mortality. However, ingestion of beta-carotene from foods, along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, has a protective role against lung disease. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by lung cancer patients is prevalent; therefore, clinicians should investigate whether complementary and alternative therapies are used by patients and advise them on the use of these therapies to avoid any potential side effects and interactions with conventional therapies. The article concludes with a case study of a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer and illustrates the use of medical nutrition therapy in relation to cancer treatment side effects.

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Medicinal Plants and Their Constituents on Lung Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Hyun; Kwon, Yong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Acute bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are essentially lung inflammatory disorders. Various plant extracts and their constituents showed therapeutic effects on several animal models of lung inflammation. These include coumarins, flavonoids, phenolics, iridoids, monoterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenoids. Some of them exerted inhibitory action mainly by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and nuclear transcription factor-κB activation. Especially, many flavonoid derivatives distinctly showed effectiveness on lung inflammation. In this review, the experimental data for plant extracts and their constituents showing therapeutic effectiveness on animal models of lung inflammation are summarized. PMID:27956716

  19. Angiosarcoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Grafino, Mónica; Alves, Paula; de Almeida, Margarida Mendes; Garrido, Patrícia; Hasmucrai, Direndra; Teixeira, Encarnação; Sotto-Mayor, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular tumor. Pulmonary involvement is usually attributable to metastasis from other primary sites, primary pulmonary angiosarcoma therefore being quite uncommon. We report a case of angiosarcoma with pulmonary involvement, probably primary to the lung, which had gone untreated for more than two years. We describe this rare neoplasm and its growth, as well as the extensive local invasion and hematogenous metastasis at presentation. We also discuss its poor prognosis. PMID:26982044

  20. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  1. Regional tidal lung strain in mechanically ventilated normal lungs.

    PubMed

    Paula, Luis Felipe; Wellman, Tyler J; Winkler, Tilo; Spieth, Peter M; Güldner, Andreas; Venegas, Jose G; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Carvalho, Alysson R; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2016-12-01

    Parenchymal strain is a key determinant of lung injury produced by mechanical ventilation. However, imaging estimates of volumetric tidal strain (ε = regional tidal volume/reference volume) present substantial conceptual differences in reference volume computation and consideration of tidally recruited lung. We compared current and new methods to estimate tidal volumetric strains with computed tomography, and quantified the effect of tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on strain estimates. Eight supine pigs were ventilated with VT = 6 and 12 ml/kg and PEEP = 0, 6, and 12 cmH2O. End-expiratory and end-inspiratory scans were analyzed in eight regions of interest along the ventral-dorsal axis. Regional reference volumes were computed at end-expiration (with/without correction of regional VT for intratidal recruitment) and at resting lung volume (PEEP = 0) corrected for intratidal and PEEP-derived recruitment. All strain estimates demonstrated vertical heterogeneity with the largest tidal strains in middependent regions (P < 0.01). Maximal strains for distinct estimates occurred at different lung regions and were differently affected by VT-PEEP conditions. Values consistent with lung injury and inflammation were reached regionally, even when global measurements were below critical levels. Strains increased with VT and were larger in middependent than in nondependent lung regions. PEEP reduced tidal-strain estimates referenced to end-expiratory lung volumes, although it did not affect strains referenced to resting lung volume. These estimates of tidal strains in normal lungs point to middependent lung regions as those at risk for ventilator-induced lung injury. The different conditions and topography at which maximal strain estimates occur allow for testing the importance of each estimate for lung injury.

  2. Synchronous Multiple Lung Adenocarcinomas: Estrogen Concentration in Peripheral Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shinchi, Yusuke; Sanada, Mune; Motooka, Yamato; Fujino, Kosuke; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate of synchronous multiple lung adenocarcinomas (SMLA), which display multiple ground glass opacity nodules in the peripheral lung, is increasing due to advances in high resolution computed tomography. The backgrounds of multicentric development of adenocarcinoma are unknown. In this study, we quantitated estrogen concentration in the peripheral lungs of postmenopausal female patients with SMLA. Methods The tissue concentration of estrogens (estrone [E1] and estdadiol [E2]) in the noncancerous peripheral lung were measured with liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in postmenopausal female patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The expression levels of CYP19A1 in the normal lung were also quantitated with real-time PCR. Thirty patients with SMLA and 79 cases of control patients with single lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Results The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the noncancerous tissue were significantly higher in SMLA cases than control cases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). The minor allele (A) of single nucleotide polymorphism rs3764221 were significantly associated with higher concentration of E1 and E2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) and higher CYP19A1 mRNA expression (P = 0.03). Conclusion The tissue estrogen concentration of peripheral lung was significantly higher in SMLA than control cases. The high concentration of estrogen may be one of the causes of multicentric development of peripheral lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27526096

  3. Morphometric examination of native lungs in human lung allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, B M; Burton, C M; Milman, N; Iversen, M; Andersen, C B

    2006-11-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the degree of lung damage in patients with alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) at the time of lung transplantation. Using unbiased stereological methods, lung-, bronchial- and vessel-volume, capillary length, and alveolar surface area and densities were estimated in recipient lungs from 21 consecutive patients with pre-transplant diagnoses including COPD (n=7), alpha1AT deficiency (n=6) and CF (n=8). Six unused adult donor lungs served as controls. Information relating to patient demography and pre-transplant lung function was obtained by retrospective chart review. Disease groups differed significantly with respect to demographics and pre-transplant lung function. Total lung volume was similar in all groups. Bronchial volume was significantly larger in CF patients compared to the control group (p<0.0001) and to the other two diagnostic groups: alpha1AT deficiency (p=0.0001) and COPD (p<0.0001). Alveolar surface density and capillary length density were significantly lower in patients with alpha1AT deficiency and COPD compared to controls (p<0.0001, respectively) and to patients with CF (p<0.0002, respectively). There were no correlations between clinical lung function and morphometric measurements. We conclude that unbiased microscopic stereological morphometry is an evolving science with the potential to elucidate pulmonary disease pathogenesis.

  4. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  5. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; ...

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  6. [Asbestos-related lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lotti, M

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of tumour death and a large percentage of it is associated with tobacco smoking. Epidemiology has shown that asbestos cumulative exposures increase the risk of lung cancer to a variable extent, depending on the manufacturing process and the specific job. The risk appears relatively small (< or = 2) and is detectable after massive exposures only. Clinical diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer is based upon medical history (exposures > 25 ff.ml years double the risk), possible lung fibrosis and counts of asbestos bodies and fibers in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissues. Pleural plaques do not correlate with the cumulative exposures that are associated with lung cancer. The multiplicative interaction between smoke and asbestos is only detectable when the risk associated with asbestos exposure is increased, i.e. after high exposures.

  7. Lysyl oxidase promotes bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis through modulating inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Liu, Qingbo; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jianfeng; Yu, Ronghuan; Ge, Gaoxiang

    2014-12-01

    Enzymes involved in collagen biosynthesis, including lysyl oxidase (LOX), have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. LOX expression is significantly upregulated in bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung fibrosis, and knockdown of LOX expression or inhibition of LOX activity alleviates the lung fibrosis. Unexpectedly, treatment of the mice with LOX inhibitor at the inflammatory stage, but not the fibrogenic stage, efficiently reduces collagen deposition and normalizes lung architecture. Inhibition of LOX impairs inflammatory cell infiltration, TGF-β signaling, and myofibroblast accumulation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LOX sensitizes the fibrosis-resistant Balb/c mice to BLM-induced inflammation and lung fibrosis. These results suggest that LOX is indispensable for the progression of BLM-induced experimental lung fibrosis by aggravating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis process after lung injury.

  8. Approaches for Resolving Dynamic IP Addressing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foo, Schubert; Hui, Siu Cheung; Yip, See Wai; He, Yulan

    1997-01-01

    A problem with dynamic Internet protocol (IP) addressing arises when the Internet connection is through an Internet provider since the IP address is allocated only at connection time. This article examines a number of online and offline methods for resolving the problem. Suggests dynamic domain name system (DNS) and directory service look-up are…

  9. MMS establishes team to resolve royalty disputes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-22

    This paper reports that the U.S. Minerals Management Service has set up a permanent negotiating team to resolve royalty disputes with producers. MMS plans to use the team approach to negotiate multiple settlements in single, marathon negotiations covering issues such as production monitoring, production valuation, royalty reporting, and royalty payments.

  10. Resolvability and the Tetrahedral Configuration of Carbon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses evidence for the tetrahedral configuration of the carbon atom, indicating that three symmetrical configurations are theoretically possible for coordination number four. Includes table indicating that resolvability of compounds of type CR'R"R"'R"" is a necessary but not sufficient condition for proving tetrahedral…

  11. Evaluation study of building-resolved urban dispersion models

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry; Brown, Mike J.; Coirier, WIlliam J.; Ericson, Shawn C.; Hansen, Olav R.; Huber, Alan H.; Kim, Sura; Leach, Martin J.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Senocak, Inanc

    2007-09-10

    For effective emergency response and recovery planning, it is critically important that building-resolved urban dispersion models be evaluated using field data. Several full-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and semi-empirical building-resolved (SEB) models are being advanced and applied to simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas. To obtain an estimate of the current state-of-readiness of these classes of models, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funded a study to compare five CFD models and one SEB model with tracer data from the extensive Midtown Manhattan field study (MID05) conducted during August 2005 as part of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP; Allwine and Flaherty 2007). Six days of tracer and meteorological experiments were conducted over an approximately 2-km-by-2-km area in Midtown Manhattan just south of Central Park in New York City. A subset of these data was used for model evaluations. The study was conducted such that an evaluation team, independent of the six modeling teams, provided all the input data (e.g., building data, meteorological data and tracer release rates) and run conditions for each of four experimental periods simulated. Tracer concentration data for two of the four experimental periods were provided to the modeling teams for their own evaluation of their respective models to ensure proper setup and operation. Tracer data were not provided for the second two experimental periods to provide for an independent evaluation of the models. The tracer concentrations resulting from the model simulations were provided to the evaluation team in a standard format for consistency in inter-comparing model results. An overview of the model evaluation approach will be given followed by a discussion on the qualitative comparison of the respective models with the field data. Future model developments efforts needed to address modeling gaps identified from this study will also be discussed.

  12. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  13. Lung nodule classification using deep feature fusion in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changmiao; Elazab, Ahmed; Wu, Jianhuang; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-11-12

    Lung nodules are small, round, or oval-shaped masses of tissue in the lung region. Early diagnosis and treatment of lung nodules can significantly improve the quality of patients' lives. Because of their small size and the interlaced nature of chest anatomy, detection of lung nodules using different medical imaging techniques becomes challenging. Recently, several methods for computer aided diagnosis (CAD) were proposed to improve the detection of lung nodules with good performances. However, the current methods are unable to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity. In this paper, we propose using deep feature fusion from the non-medical training and hand-crafted features to reduce the false positive results. Based on our experimentation of the public dataset, our results show that, the deep fusion feature can achieve promising results in terms of sensitivity and specificity (69.3% and 96.2%) at 1.19 false positive per image, which is better than the single hand-crafted features (62% and 95.4%) at 1.45 false positive per image. As it stands, fusion features that were used to classify our candidate nodules have resulted in a more promising outcome as compared to the single features from deep learning features and the hand-crafted features. This will improve the current CAD method based on the use of deep feature fusion to more effectively diagnose the presence of lung nodules.

  14. Lung protection by inhalation of exogenous solubilized extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinglei; Ravikumar, Priya; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hsia, Connie C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) contains complex tissue-specific components that work in concert to promote tissue repair and constructive remodeling and has been used experimentally and clinically to accelerate epithelial wound repair, leading us to hypothesize that lung-derived ECM could mitigate acute lung injury. To explore the therapeutic potential of ECM for noninvasive delivery to the lung, we decellularized and solubilized porcine lung ECM, then characterized the composition, concentration, particle size and stability of the preparation. The ECM preparation at 3.2 mg/mL with average particle size <3 μm was tested in vitro on human A549 lung epithelial cells exposed to 95% O2 for 24 hours, and in vivo by tracheal instillation or nebulization into the lungs of rats exposed intermittently or continuously to 90% O2 for a cumulative 72 hours. Our results showed that the preparation was enriched in collagen, reduced in glycosaminoglycans, and contained various bioactive molecules. Particle size was concentration-dependent. Compared to the respective controls treated with cell culture medium in vitro or saline in vivo, ECM inhalation normalized cell survival and alveolar morphology, and reduced hyperoxia-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage. This proof-of-concept study established the methodology, feasibility and therapeutic potential of exogenous solubilized ECM for pulmonary cytoprotection, possibly as an adjunct or potentiator of conventional therapy. PMID:28151947

  15. Lung sound classification using cepstral-based statistical features.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Nandini; Sahidullah, Md; Saha, Goutam

    2016-08-01

    Lung sounds convey useful information related to pulmonary pathology. In this paper, short-term spectral characteristics of lung sounds are studied to characterize the lung sounds for the identification of associated diseases. Motivated by the success of cepstral features in speech signal classification, we evaluate five different cepstral features to recognize three types of lung sounds: normal, wheeze and crackle. Subsequently for fast and efficient classification, we propose a new feature set computed from the statistical properties of cepstral coefficients. Experiments are conducted on a dataset of 30 subjects using the artificial neural network (ANN) as a classifier. Results show that the statistical features extracted from mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) of lung sounds outperform commonly used wavelet-based features as well as standard cepstral coefficients including MFCCs. Further, we experimentally optimize different control parameters of the proposed feature extraction algorithm. Finally, we evaluate the features for noisy lung sound recognition. We have found that our newly investigated features are more robust than existing features and show better recognition accuracy even in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs).

  16. Palliative care in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Koczywas, Marianna; Grannis, Fred; Harrington, Annie

    2011-04-01

    Advancements in the surgical and medical treatment of lung cancer have resulted in more favorable short-term survival outcomes. After initial treatment, lung cancer requires continued surveillance and follow-up for long-term side effects and possible recurrence. The integration of quality palliative care into routine clinical care of patients with lung cancer after surgical intervention is essential in preserving function and optimizing quality of life through survivorship. An interdisciplinary palliative care model can effectively link patients to the appropriate supportive care services in a timely fashion. This article describes the role of palliative care for patients with lung cancer.

  17. Brain injury requires lung protection

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Aguilar, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “The high-mobility group protein B1-Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (HMGB1-RAGE) axis mediates traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation” published recently in Science Translational Medicine links lung failure after transplantation with alterations in the axis HMGB1-RAGE after TBI, opening a new field for exploring indicators for the early detection of patients at risk of developing acute lung injury (ALI). The lung is one of the organs most vulnerable to the inflammatory cascade triggered by TBI. HMGB1 is an alarm in that can be released from activated immune cells in response to tissue injury. Increased systemic HMGB1 concentration correlates with poor lung function before and after lung transplant, confirming its role in acute ALI after TBI. HMGB1 exerts its influence by interacting with several receptors, including the RAGE receptor. RAGE also plays an important role in the onset of innate immune inflammatory responses, and systemic levels of RAGE are strongly associated with ALI and clinical outcomes in ventilator-induced lung injury. RAGE ligation to HMGB1 triggers the amplification of the inflammatory cascade involving nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Identifying early biomarkers that mediate pulmonary dysfunction will improve outcomes not only in lung transplantation, but also in other scenarios. These novel findings show that upregulation of the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays an important role in brain-lung crosstalk. PMID:26046092

  18. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Rice, Shawn J; Belani, Chandra P

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease with high morbidity and mortality despite targeted therapy. Symptom burden related to cancer impairs quality of life and functional status in patients with lung cancer and in survivors. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been recognized as an effective, noninvasive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory disease. It is well established that pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with chronic obstruction pulmonary disease through improved exercise capacity and symptoms. Evidence is increasing that the benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation can be applied to patients with lung cancer. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation has made its way as a cornerstone of integrated care for patients with lung cancer.

  19. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  20. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  1. Lucas-Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas-Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169-82). The so-called Lucas-Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1-16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27-71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  2. Broadscale resolving power performance of a high precision uniform field ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Dodds, James N; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2015-10-21

    An extensive study of two current ion mobility resolving power theories ("conditional" and "semi-empirical") was undertaken using a recently developed drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer. The current study investigates the quantitative agreement between experiment and theory at reduced pressure (4 Torr) for a wide range of initial ion gate widths (100 to 500 μs), and ion mobility values (K0 from 0.50 to 3.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) representing measurements obtained in helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide drift gas. Results suggest that the conditional resolving power theory deviates from experimental results for low mobility ions (e.g., high mass analytes) and for initial ion gate widths beyond 200 μs. A semi-empirical resolving power theory provided close-correlation of predicted resolving powers to experimental results across the full range of mobilities and gate widths investigated. Interpreting the results from the semi-empirical theory, the performance of the current instrumentation was found to be highly linear for a wide range of analytes, with optimal resolving powers being accessible for a narrow range of drift fields between 14 and 17 V cm(-1). While developed using singly-charged ion mobility data, preliminary results suggest that the semi-empirical theory has broader applicability to higher-charge state systems.

  3. Protective lung ventilation in operating room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Constantin, J M; Jaber, S

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications adversely affect clinical outcomes and healthcare utilization, so that prevention has become a measure of the quality of perioperative care. Mechanical ventilation is an essential support therapy to maintain adequate gas exchange during general anesthesia for surgery. Mechanical ventilation using high tidal volume (VT) (between 10 and 15 mL/kg) has been historically encouraged to prevent hypoxemia and atelectasis formation in anesthetized patients undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery. However, there is accumulating evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that mechanical ventilation, especially the use of high VT and plateau pressure, may potentially aggravate or even initiate lung injury. Ventilator-associated lung injury can result from cyclic alveolar overdistension of non-dependent lung tissue, and repetitive opening and closing of dependent lung tissue resulting in ultrastructural damage at the junction of closed and open alveoli. Lung-protective ventilation, which refers to the use of lower VT and limited plateau pressure to minimize overdistension, and positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration, was shown to improve outcome in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been recently suggested that this approach might also be beneficial in a broader population, especially in critically ill patients without ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. There is, however, little evidence regarding a potential beneficial effect of lung protective ventilation during surgery, especially in patients with healthy lungs. Although surgical patients are frequently exposed to much shorter periods of mechanical ventilation, this is an important gap in knowledge given the number of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the operating room. This review developed the benefits of lung protective ventilation during surgery

  4. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  6. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases? Asbestos-related lung diseases are ... as the peritoneum (PER-ih-to-NE-um). Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases Figure A shows the location ...

  7. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  8. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY OF HUMAN LUNG PARENCHYMA: TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT, THEORETICAL MODELING AND IN VIVO VALIDATION

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L; McGee, Kiaran P

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop a novel MR-based method for visualizing the elastic properties of human lung parenchyma in vivo and to evaluate the ability of this method to resolve differences in parenchymal stiffness at different respiration states in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods A spin-echo MR Elastography (MRE) pulse sequence was developed to provide both high shear wave motion sensitivity and short TE for improved visualization of lung parenchyma. The improved motion sensitivity of this approach was modeled and tested with phantom experiments. In vivo testing was then performed on ten healthy volunteers at the respiratory states of residual volume (RV) and total lung capacity (TLC). Results Shear wave propagation was visualized within the lungs of all volunteers and was processed to provide parenchymal shear stiffness maps of all ten subjects. Density corrected stiffness values at TLC (1.83 ± 0.22 kPa) were higher than those at the RV (1.14 ± 0.14 kPa) with the difference being statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusion 1H-based MR Elastography can noninvasively measure the shear stiffness of human lung parenchyma in vivo and can quantitate the change in shear stiffness due to respiration. The values obtained were consistent with previously reported in vitro assessments of cadaver lungs. Further work is required to increase the flexibility of the current acquisition and to investigate the clinical potential of lung MRE. PMID:21591003

  9. Biochemical and connective tissue changes in cyclophosphamide-induced lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, N; Punithavathi, D; Chandrakasan, G

    1998-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to characterize the biochemical and connective tissue components and to correlate the significance of morphological and biochemical perturbations in cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/100 g body weight of CP, and their pneumotoxic derangements were characterized during an early destructive phase followed by a proliferative and synthetic phase. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was higher in CP-treated rats at days 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11, but there was a significant decrease in lung ACE activity during the same time period. Elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase activity were observed in the lung lavage fluid of CP-administered rats days 2, 3, 5, and 7. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was higher in CP rats. Of significance was the presence of collagenase and collagenolytic cathepsin in the lavage fluid of CP rats, when compared with the barely detectable levels in controls. A similar increase in these enzyme activities was also noticed in the lung tissue of CP rats during the same experimental period. Lavage fluid hydroxyproline content was higher in CP rats when compared with controls. Similarly, lung protein and DNA levels were elevated significantly after treatment with CP. The pulmonary histamine and serotonin contents were significantly higher in CP rats. The incorporation of [3H]thymidine into lung total DNA, [3H]proline into lung hydroxyproline, and [35S]sulphate into lung glycosaminoglycan, measured as indicators of lung DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis, respectively, was also higher in CP groups. Increased levels of hydroxyproline, elastin, hexosamine, total hexose, fucose, sialic acid, and uronic acid in the lungs of rats 14, 28, and 42 days after CP insult were characterized as biomarkers of CP-induced interstitial changes. These findings indicate that CP-induced lung fibrosis results in

  10. Resolving Cognitive Conflict in a Realistic Situation with Modeling Characteristics: Coping with a Changing Reference in Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahbari, Juhaina Awawdeh; Peled, Irit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of using a realistic situation with modeling characteristics in creating and resolving a cognitive conflict to promote understanding of a changing reference in fraction calculations. The study was conducted among 96 seventh graders divided into 2 experimental groups and 1 control group. The experimental groups…

  11. Complex structure of spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, F.; Ferré, A.; Hort, O.; Dubrouil, A.; Quintard, L.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Burgy, F.; Mével, E.; Mairesse, Y.; Constant, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the spatiospectral coupling appearing in the spatially resolved high-order-harmonic spectra generated in gases. When ionization is weak, harmonic generation in the far field often exhibits rings surrounding a central spot centered on each odd harmonics in the spatiospectral domain. The nature of these structures is debated. They could stem from interferences between the emission of short and long trajectories, or could be the signature of the temporal and spatial dependence of the longitudinal phase matching of long trajectories (Maker fringes). We conducted spectrally and spatially resolved measurements of the harmonic spectra as a function of pressure, intensity, and ellipticity. In addition, we performed calculations where only a single emission plane is included (i.e., omitting deliberately the longitudinal phase matching), reproducing the features experimentally observed. This study has been completed by the spatiospectral coupling when strong ionization occurs leading to complex patterns which have been compared to calculations using the same model and also show good agreement. We conclude that many spatiospectral structures of the harmonic spectrum can be interpreted in terms of spatial and temporal transverse coherence of the emitting medium without resorting to longitudinal phase matching or quantum phase interference between short and long trajectories.

  12. Automatic calibration of resolver signals via state observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Resolver sensors are utilized as absolute position transducers in many industrial applications. To get position information from resolvers, envelope detection and angle demodulation are required. Ideally, the signals after envelope detection are two sinusoidal orthogonal envelope signals. However, these sinusoidal envelope signals are often disturbed by unexpected actions such as DC offsets, amplitude deviation, and non-orthogonal phase shift. To overcome the influences of these factors and improve demodulation accuracy, an offline automatic calibration method for the two sinusoidal envelope signals is proposed. A state observer is introduced to estimate the amplitude and DC offsets of the envelope signals. To estimate the phase shift, a sinusoidal signal whose DC offset is a function of the phase shift of the envelope signals is constructed based on properties of triangle functions. Its offset could also be estimated by an observer. The simulation results revealed that the proposed method can converge to a single root accurately without complicated parameter selection. The validity and performance of the calibration method are verified in an experimental prototype.

  13. Portable optical oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chu, Ssu-Wei

    2014-11-10

    A new, simple signal processing, low-cost technique for the fabrication of a portable oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence is described. The sensing film uses the oxygen sensing dye platinum meso-tetra (pentfluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) embedded in a polymer matrix. The ratio τ0100 measures sensitivity of the sensing film, where τ0 and τ100 represent the detected fluorescence lifetimes from the sensing film exposed to 100% nitrogen and 100% oxygen, respectively. The experimental results reveal that the PtTFPP-doped oxygen sensor has a sensitivity of 2.2 in the 0%-100% range. A preparation procedure for coating the photodiodes with the oxygen sensor film that produces repetitive and reliable sensing devices is proposed. The developed time-resolved optical oxygen sensor is portable, low-cost, has simple signal processing, and lacks optical filter elements. It is a cost-effective alternative to traditional electrochemical-based oxygen sensors and provides a platform for other optical based sensors.

  14. Vibrationally resolved cross sections for the photoionization of CS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratmann, R. E.; Lucchese, Robert R.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed vibrationally resolved calculations of the excitation of the symmetric stretch in the photoionization of CS2 leading to the X 2Πg, A 2Πu, B 2Σ+u, and C 2Σ+g states of CS+2. Previous theoretical work has determined that the kπg shape resonance in the (5σu)-1 channel consists mainly of a linear combination of low lying virtual d orbitals on sulfur and is thus essentially atomic in nature. This conclusion was primarily based on the shape of the resonant wave function and the insensitivity of the energy of the resonance to bond stretching. Here, we have determined that the energies of the kπ shape resonances located well above threshold and the σ bound states just below threshold are insensitive to bond length. We have also found nearly constant vibrational branching ratios in all channels and polarization components. This is in qualitative agreement with experimental vibrationally resolved cross sections [S. Kakar, H. C. Choi, and E. D. Poliakoff, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 4690 (1992)] which show nearly constant vibrational branching ratios. Our present results indicate that caution must be exercised when using bond length sensitivity as an exclusive means to determine the existence of shape resonances.

  15. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  16. CT image construction of a totally deflated lung using deformable model extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Pierce, Greg; Lee, Ting-Yim; and others

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to construct CT image of a totally deflated lung from a free-breathing 4D-CT image sequence acquired preoperatively. Such a constructed CT image is very useful in performing tumor ablative procedures such as lung brachytherapy. Tumor ablative procedures are frequently performed while the lung is totally deflated. Deflating the lung during such procedures renders preoperative images ineffective for targeting the tumor. Furthermore, the problem cannot be solved using intraoperative ultrasound (U.S.) images because U.S. images are very sensitive to small residual amount of air remaining in the deflated lung. One possible solution to address these issues is to register high quality preoperative CT images of the deflated lung with their corresponding low quality intraoperative U.S. images. However, given that such preoperative images correspond to an inflated lung, such CT images need to be processed to construct CT images pertaining to the lung's deflated state. Methods: To obtain the CT images of deflated lung, we present a novel image construction technique using extrapolated deformable registration to predict the deformation the lung undergoes during full deflation. The proposed construction technique involves estimating the lung's air volume in each preoperative image automatically in order to track the respiration phase of each 4D-CT image throughout a respiratory cycle; i.e., the technique does not need any external marker to form a respiratory signal in the process of curve fitting and extrapolation. The extrapolated deformation field is then applied on a preoperative reference image in order to construct the totally deflated lung's CT image. The technique was evaluated experimentally using ex vivo porcine lung. Results: The ex vivo lung experiments led to very encouraging results. In comparison with the CT image of the deflated lung we acquired for the purpose of validation, the constructed CT image was very similar. The

  17. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... air is necessary for keeping humans (and many animals) alive. And the two parts that are large and in charge when it comes to breathing? If you guessed your lungs, you're right! Your lungs make up one of the largest ...

  18. Asbestos-related lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Westerfield, B.T. )

    1992-06-01

    Asbestos is a versatile fibrous mineral that can cause lung disease and death. Asbestosis, benign pleural disease, lung cancer, and mesothelioma can all result from inhaling asbestos. The history of disease and exposure risks are discussed. The difficult assessment of risk and the long latency period for development of disease demand evaluation and regular surveillance of asbestos-exposed workers.22 references.

  19. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Your Lungs & Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Lungs & Respiratory System Print A A A What's in this article? ... in your body, and they work with your respiratory system to allow you to take in fresh air, ...

  20. Fully resolved simulations of particle sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Wang, Yayun; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Progress in computational capabilities - and specifically in the realm of massively parallel architectures - render possible the simulation of fully resolved fluid-particle systems. This development will drastically improve physical understanding and modelling of these systems when the particle size is not negligible and their concentration appreciable. Using a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-sized spheres, we carry out fully resolved simulations of more than one thousand sedimenting spheres. We discuss the results of these simulations focusing on statistical aspects such as particle velocity fluctuations, particle pair distribution function, microstructure, and others. Supported by NSF Grant CBET 1335965.

  1. Time resolved astronomy with the SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; McPhate, J.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Potter, S. B.; O'Donoghue, D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Schellart, P.; Spark, M.; Welsh, B. Y.; Zietsman, E.

    2010-07-01

    While time resolved astronomical observations are not new, the extension of such studies to sub-second time resolution is and has resulted in the opening of a new observational frontier, High Time Resolution Astronomy (HTRA). HTRA studies are well suited to objects like compact binary stars (CVs and X-ray binaries) and pulsars, while asteroseismology of pulsating stars, occultations, transits and the study of transients, will all benefit from such HTRA studies. HTRA has been a SALT science driver from the outset and the first-light instruments, namely the UV-VIS imager, SALTICAM, and the multi-purpose Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS), both have high time resolution modes. These are described, together with some observational examples. We also discuss the commissioning observations with the photon counting Berkeley Visible Image Tube camera (BVIT) on SALT. Finally we describe the software tools, developed in Python, to reduce SALT time resolved observations.

  2. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  3. Mitochondria in lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell’s most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:26928034

  4. Mitochondria in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Suzanne M; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell's most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  5. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  6. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light. PMID:27762396

  7. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light.

  8. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  9. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  10. Spatially resolved single photon detection with a quantum sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, A. M.; Wilson, R. D.; Everitt, M.; Savel'ev, S.; Gulevich, D. R.; Allen, J.; Dubrovich, V. K.; Il'ichev, E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method of resolving a spatially coherent signal, which contains on average just a single photon, against the background of local noise at the same frequency. The method is based on detecting the signal simultaneously in several points more than a wavelength apart through the entangling interaction of the incoming photon with the quantum metamaterial sensor array. The interaction produces the spatially correlated quantum state of the sensor array, characterised by a collective observable (e.g., total magnetic moment), which is read out using a quantum nondemolition measurement. We show that the effects of local noise (e.g., fluctuations affecting the elements of the array) are suppressed relative to the signal from the spatially coherent field of the incoming photon as , where N is the number of array elements. The realisation of this approach in the microwave range would be especially useful and is within the reach of current experimental techniques. PMID:24322568

  11. Chemistry resolved kinetic flow modeling of TATB based explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitello, Peter; Fried, Laurence E.; William, Howard; Levesque, George; Souers, P. Clark

    2012-03-01

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB-based explosives are believed to have multiple time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. We use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. We term our model chemistry resolved kinetic flow, since CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. We present here two variants of our new rate model and comparison with hot, ambient, and cold experimental data for PBX 9502.

  12. Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

    2011-07-21

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

  13. Resolving Ambiguity in Nonmonotonic Inheritance Hierarchies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    this case, specificity cannot resolve the ambiguity w.r.t. platypus at mammal, and r 2 supports both of the assertions marked (***): that platypuses ...eoss jo~yer Figure 2: Is a platypus a mammal? Figure 3: A blue whale is an aquatic creature. eater does not defeat either the assertion that Joe is a...derived conclusion that platypuses are mammals is directly opposed by the (equally legitimate) conclusion that platypuses are not mammals. In this case

  14. Towards convection-resolving climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schar, C.; Ban, N.; Fuhrer, O.; Keller, M.; Lapillonne, X.; Leutwyler, D.; Lüthi, D.; Schlemmer, L.; Schmidli, J.; Schulthess, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Moist convection is a fundamental process in our climate system, but is usually parameterized in climate models. The underlying approximations introduce significant uncertainties and biases, and there is thus a general thrust towards the explicit representation of convection. For climate applications, convection-resolving simulations are still very expensive, but are increasingly becoming feasible. Here we present recent results pertaining to the development and exploitation of convection-resolving regional climate models. We discuss the potential and challenges of the approach, highlight validation using decade-long simulations, explore convection-resolving climate change scenarios, and provide an outlook on the use of next-generation supercomputing architectures. Detailed results will be presented using the COSMO model over two computational domains at a horizontal resolution of 2.2 km. The first covers an extended Alpine region from Northern Italy to Northern Germany. For this domain decade-long simulations have been conducted, driven by both reanalysis as well as CMIP5 model data. Results show that explicit convection leads to significant improvements in the representation of summer precipitation, and to substantial differences in climate projections in terms of precipitation statistics. The second domain covers European (with 1536x1536x60 grid points) and the respective simulations exploit heterogeneous many-core hardware architectures. Results demonstrate realistic mesoscale processes embedded in synoptic-scale features, such as line convection along cold frontal systems, or the triggering of moist convection by propagating cold-air pools. Currently a 10-year simulation using this set up is near completion. To efficiently use GPU-based high-performance computers, the model code underwent significant development, including a rewrite of the dynamical core in C++. It is argued that today's largest supercomputers would in principle be able to support - already

  15. Fast frequency-resolved terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Kawada, Yoichi; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Akiyama, Koichiro; Takahashi, Hironori

    2011-03-01

    We propose a fast, frequency-resolved, real-time, terahertz imaging method. With our method, images at two specific terahertz frequencies can be acquired in 1 min. Three kinds of drugs (L-histidine, maltose, and CBZ3), which have absorption peaks in the terahertz region, were distinguished in 3 min by using our method. This technique can be used in industrial applications, such as nondestructive testing.

  16. Angle-Resolved Auger Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Access to Vibronic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, A.; Patanen, M.; Hans, A.; Petrov, I. D.; Bozek, J. D.; Ehresmann, A.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the angle-averaged excitation and decay spectra of molecules, vibronic coupling may induce the usually weak dipole-forbidden transitions by the excitation intensity borrowing mechanism. The present complementary theoretical and experimental study of the resonant Auger decay of core-to-Rydberg excited CH4 and Ne demonstrates that vibronic coupling plays a decisive role in the formation of the angle-resolved spectra by additionally involving the decay rate borrowing mechanism. Thereby, we propose that the angle-resolved Auger spectroscopy can in general provide very insightful information on the strength of the vibronic coupling.

  17. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  19. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  20. Time-Resolved Measurements in Optoelectronic Microbioanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory; Kossakovski, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    A report presents discussion of time-resolved measurements in optoelectronic microbioanalysis. Proposed microbioanalytical laboratory-on-a-chip devices for detection of microbes and toxic chemicals would include optoelectronic sensors and associated electronic circuits that would look for fluorescence or phosphorescence signatures of multiple hazardous biomolecules in order to detect which ones were present in a given situation. The emphasis in the instant report is on gating an active-pixel sensor in the time domain, instead of filtering light in the wavelength domain, to prevent the sensor from responding to a laser pulse used to excite fluorescence or phosphorescence while enabling the sensor to respond to the decaying fluorescence or phosphorescence signal that follows the laser pulse. The active-pixel sensor would be turned on after the laser pulse and would be used to either integrate the fluorescence or phosphorescence signal over several lifetimes and many excitation pulses or else take time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence or phosphorescence. The report also discusses issues of multiplexing and of using time-resolved measurements of fluorophores with known different fluorescence lifetimes to distinguish among them.

  1. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old man developed progressive vertigo, saccadic eye movements, and tremors. Computed tomography showed multiple lung nodules. Surgery was performed and the pathological diagnosis was large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in the left upper lobe with ipsilobar metastases, and adenocarcinoma in the left lower lobe. The neurological symptoms resolved dramatically after complete resection of the tumors. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with non-small-cell lung carcinoma is extremely rare. Surgery should not be delayed if a complete resection is expected.

  2. Lung cancer diagnosis with quantitative DIC microscopy and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Longfei; Cai, Shuangshuang; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, Min

    2017-01-01

    We report the study of lung squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis using the TI-DIC microscopy and the scattering-phase theorem. The spatially resolved optical properties of tissue are computed from the 2D phase map via the scattering-phase theorem. The scattering coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient, and the anisotropy factor are all found to increase with the grade of lung cancer. The retrieved optical parameters are shown to distinguish cancer cases from the normal cases with high accuracy. This label-free microscopic approach applicable to fresh tissues may be promising for in situ rapid cancer diagnosis.

  3. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    out the potential landscape of the system (often a molecule or an atom) under study [4, 5]. However, the dynamical processes might also be induced by the tunnelling process itself [6, 7]. In the field of molecular science, excited single molecule experiments have been especially performed [8]. As a nice example, we refer to the work of Sykes' group [9] on thioether molecular rotors. In addition, several groups explore the possibility of combining time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy with optical techniques [10, 11]. Although the majority of studies that have been performed so far focus on rather simple systems under nearly ideal and well-defined conditions, we anticipate that time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy can also be applied in other research areas, such as biology and soft condensed matter, where the experimental conditions are often less ideal. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the possibilities of this simple, but powerful technique. References [1] Besenbacher F, Laegsgaard E and Stengaard I 2005 Mater. Today 8 26 [2] van Houselt A and Zandvliet H J W 2010 Rev. Mod. Phys. 82 1593 [3] Tringides M C and Hupalo M 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264002 [4] Ronci F, Colonna S, Cricenti A and Le Lay G 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264003 [5] van Houselt A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264004 [6] Sprodowski C, Mehlhorn M and Morgenstern K 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264005 [7] Saedi A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264007 [8] Sloan P A 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264001 [9] Jewell A D, Tierney H L, Baber A E, Iski E V, Laha M M and Sykes E C H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264006 [10] Riedel D 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264009 [11] Terada Y, Yoshida S, Takeuchi O and Shigekawa H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264008

  4. Spectral dependence of resolving power of optical method of detection of ultrasonically enhanced agglutination of human blood erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovski, V. A.; Dvoretski, K. N.; Dolmashkin, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    The spectral dependence of the resolving power of an acoustooptic method of monitoring agglutination of human blood erythrocytes is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, in principle, the resolving power of this method can be increased by several dozen times. The results of the work can be used to create instruments for determining the human blood type in the AB0 system and in the Rhesus system.

  5. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  6. RESOLVE: Bridge between early lunar ISRU and science objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Sanders, G.; Larson, W.; Johnson, K.

    2007-08-01

    interstellar volatiles from cold molecular clouds. These sources leave distinctive signatures, many detectable by RESOLVE. Comet impacts are likely to produce coherent layers of ice (probably reduced to pebbles and boulders by subsequent small impacts, and buried); these would be detected by imaging and Raman spectroscopy, the high water (H2O) signal measured by the GC, and possibly by changes in the drilling rate or torque. More continuous delivery mechanism theories would not produce layers or boulders of ice, but might bond regolith grains together. Continuous sources might be distinguished by H/H2O ratios and the abundances of other volatiles. Hydrogen isotopic composition would provide additional important information because these sources have distinctive D/H ratios, so one enhancement to RESOLVE would be an incorporation of a mass spectrometer with the existing GC. Reactions in the Polar Regolith: Billions of years of micrometeorite bombardment, irradiation by cosmic rays and interstellar Lyman-alpha ultraviolet, and the presence of carbon-, hydrogen-, oxygen-, and nitrogen-bearing volatiles might have led to the production of organic compounds, a process that has been demonstrated experimentally. Heating by micrometeorite impacts might drive reactions involving water to produce phyllosilicates (clay minerals). If abundant enough, these reaction products could be observable by Raman spectroscopy and GC analysis. Thus, the polar cold traps are natural laboratories for the study of processes operating in interstellar space, and the RESOLVE suite of instruments can shed light on those processes.

  7. Hyaluronan Contributes to Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome and Stimulates Lung Allograft Rejection through Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingan; Sugimoto, Seichiro; Kennedy, Vanessa E.; Zhang, Helen L.; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N.; Kelly, Fran L.; Huang, Howard; Kreisel, Daniel; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although innate immunity is increasingly recognized to contribute to lung allograft rejection, the significance of endogenous innate ligands, such as hyaluronan (HA) fragments, in clinical or experimental lung transplantation is uncertain. Objectives: To determine if HA is associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in lung transplant recipients, and evaluate the effect of low- or high-molecular-weight HA on experimental lung allograft rejection, including dependence on innate signaling pathways or effector cells. Methods: HA concentrations were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and plasma samples from lung recipients with or without established BOS. BOS and normal lung tissues were assessed for HA localization and expression of HA synthases. Murine orthotopic lung recipients with established tolerance were treated with low- or high-molecular-weight HA under varied experimental conditions, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/4 and myeloid differentiation protein 88 deficiency and neutrophil depletion. Measurements and Main Results: HA localized within areas of intraluminal small airways fibrosis in BOS lung tissue. Moreover, transcripts for HA synthase enzymes were significantly elevated in BOS versus normal lung tissues and both lavage fluid and plasma HA concentrations were increased in recipients with BOS. Treatment with low-molecular-weight HA abrogated tolerance in murine orthotopic lung recipients in a TLR2/4- and myeloid differentiation protein 88–dependent fashion and drove expansion of alloantigen-specific T lymphocytes. Additionally, TLR-dependent signals stimulated neutrophilia that promoted rejection. In contrast, high-molecular-weight HA attenuated basal allograft inflammation. Conclusions: These data suggest that accumulation of HA could contribute to BOS by directly activating innate immune signaling pathways that promote allograft rejection and neutrophilia. PMID:24471427

  8. Advances in lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Miguel José; Rahal, Antonio; Vieira, Fabio Augusto Cardillo; Silva, Paulo Savoia Dias da; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the chest has advanced in recent decades. This imaging modality is currently used to diagnose several pathological conditions and provides qualitative and quantitative information. Acoustic barriers represented by the aerated lungs and the bony framework of the chest generate well-described sonographic artifacts that can be used as diagnostic aids. The normal pleural line and A, B, C, E and Z lines (also known as false B lines) are artifacts with specific characteristics. Lung consolidation and pneumothorax sonographic patterns are also well established. Some scanning protocols have been used in patient management. The Blue, FALLS and C.A.U.S.E. protocols are examples of algorithms using artifact combinations to achieve accurate diagnoses. Combined chest ultrasonography and radiography are often sufficient to diagnose and manage lung and chest wall conditions. Chest ultrasonography is a highly valuable diagnostic tool for radiologists, emergency and intensive care physicians. RESUMO O exame ultrassonográfico do tórax avançou nas últimas décadas, sendo utilizado para o diagnóstico de inúmeras condições patológicas, e fornecendo informações qualitativas e quantitativas. Os pulmões aerados e o arcabouço ósseo do tórax representam barreira sonora para o estudo ultrassonográfico, gerando artefatos que, bem conhecidos, são utilizados como ferramentas diagnósticas. Eco pleural normal, linhas A, linhas B, linhas C, linhas E e Z (conhecidas como falsas linhas B) são artefatos com características peculiares. Os padrões de consolidação e de pneumotórax também são bem estabelecidos. Alguns protocolos têm sido utilizados no manuseio dos pacientes: Blue Protocol, Protocolo FALLS e Protocolo C.A.U.S.E são exemplos de três propostas que, por meio da associação entre os artefatos, permitem sugerir diagnósticos precisos. A ultrassonografia de tórax, aliada à radiografia de tórax, muitas vezes é suficiente para o diagn

  9. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies. PMID:27019769

  11. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies.

  12. Residential radon-222 exposure and lung cancer: exposure assessment methodology.

    PubMed

    Field, R W; Steck, D J; Lynch, C F; Brus, C P; Neuberger, J S; Kross, B C

    1996-01-01

    Although occupational epidemiological studies and animal experimentation provide strong evidence that radon-222 (222Rn) progeny exposure causes lung cancer, residential epidemiological studies have not confirmed this association. Past residential epidemiological studies have yielded contradictory findings. Exposure misclassification has seriously compromised the ability of these studies to detect whether an association exists between 222Rn exposure and lung cancer. Misclassification of 222Rn exposure has arisen primarily from: 1) detector measurement error; 2) failure to consider temporal and spatial 222Rn variations within a home; 3) missing data from previously occupied homes that currently are inaccessible; 4) failure to link 222Rn concentrations with subject mobility; and 5) measuring 222Rn gas concentration as a surrogate for 222Rn progeny exposure. This paper examines these methodological dosimetry problems and addresses how we are accounting for them in an ongoing, population-based, case-control study of 222Rn and lung cancer in Iowa.

  13. Apparatus and Techniques for Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction using Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lin, C.; Rod, E.; Bai, L.; Shen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Complementary advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have recently made possible many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. Herein we present key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  14. Cannabis and the lung.

    PubMed

    Reid, P T; Macleod, J; Robertson, J R

    2010-12-01

    The use of cannabis is embedded within many societies, mostly used by the young and widely perceived to be safe. Increasing concern regarding the potential for cannabis to cause mental health effects has dominated cannabis research and the potential adverse respiratory effects have received relatively little attention. Studies on cannabis are challenging and subject to confounding by concomitant use of tobacco and other social factors, and while many of the studies referred to in this review are beset by the difficulties inherent in undertaking epidemiological research of the effects of cannabis, there is an emerging concern among many chest physicians who would suggest that habitual smoking of cannabis may contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumothorax and respiratory infections, including tuberculosis. Special attention should be given to the risk of lung cancer, particularly as biological plausibility may precede epidemiology.

  15. Vanishing lung syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Im, Yunhee; Farooqi, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Giant bullae often mimic pneumothorax on radiographic appearance. We present the case of a 55-year-old man admitted to a referring hospital with dyspnea, cough, and increasing sputum production; he refused thoracotomy for tension pneumothorax and presented to our hospital for a second opinion. A computed tomography (CT) scan at our hospital revealed a giant bulla, which was managed conservatively as an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thoracic surgery was consulted but advised against bullectomy. Giant bullae can easily be misdiagnosed as a pneumothorax, but the management of the two conditions is vastly different. Distinguishing between the two may require CT scan. Symptomatic giant bullae are managed surgically. We highlight the etiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of bullous lung disease, especially in comparison to pneumothorax. PMID:27695175

  16. Lunge performance and its determinants.

    PubMed

    Cronin, John; McNair, Peter J; Marshall, Robert N

    2003-01-01

    For activities such as squash, badminton and fencing, the ability to quickly complete a lunge and return to the start or move off in another direction is critical for success. Determining which strength qualities are important predictors of lunge performance was the focus of this study. Thirty-one male athletes performed: (1) a unilateral maximal squat (one-repetition maximum, 1-RM) and unilateral jump squat (50% 1-RM) on an instrumented supine squat machine, and (2) a forward lunge while attached to a linear transducer. We performed stepwise multiple regression analysis with lunge performance as the dependent variable and various strength, flexibility and anthropometric measures as the independent variables. From the many strength and power measures calculated, time to peak force was the best single predictor of lunge performance, which accounted for 55% of the explained variance. The best three-variable model for predicting lunge performance accounted for 76-85% of the explained variance. The models differed, however, according to whether lunge performance was expressed relative to body mass (time to peak force, mean power and relative strength = 76%) or taken as an absolute value (time to peak force, leg length and flexibility = 85%). We conclude that one to two trials were reliable for strength diagnosis and that one strength measure cannot accurately explain functional performance because other factors, such as body mass, flexibility and leg length, have diverse effects on the statistical models.

  17. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  18. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  19. Occupational and environmental lung disease.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Danielle M; Meyer, Cristopher A; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Occupational and environmental lung disease remains a major cause of respiratory impairment worldwide. Despite regulations, increasing rates of coal worker's pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis are being reported in the United States. Dust exposures are occurring in new industries, for instance, silica in hydraulic fracking. Nonoccupational environmental lung disease contributes to major respiratory disease, asthma, and COPD. Knowledge of the imaging patterns of occupational and environmental lung disease is critical in diagnosing patients with occult exposures and managing patients with suspected or known exposures.

  20. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  1. Pain management in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  2. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    PubMed

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  3. Resolving manipulator redundancy under inequality constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.T.; Chen, T.H.; Sun, Y.Y. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    Due to hardware limitations, physical constraints such as joint rate bounds, joint angle limits, and joint torque constraints always exist. In this paper, these constraints are considered into the general formulation of the redundant inverse kinematic problem. To take these physical constraints into account, the computationally efficient Compact Quadratic Programming (QP) method is formed to resolve the constrained kinematic redundancy problem. In addition, the Compact-Inverse QP method is also formulated to remedy the unescapable singularity problem with inequality constraints. Two examples are given to demonstrate the generality and superiority of these two methods: to eliminate the drift phenomenon caused by self motion and to remedy saturation-type nonlinearity problem.

  4. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  5. Resolving AGN with PanSTARRS transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Andy

    2012-10-01

    With PanSTARRS we have discovered a new class of slow, blue nuclear transients which we believe to be rare examples of background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies, amplified by a factor of 10--100. The background AGN should be somewhat resolved by the foreground lens, providing a unique new diagnostic of AGN size and structure - the UV, optical, IR, BLR, and X-ray regions should have differing evolutions during the event. This proposal is a first step towards understanding the structure of the X-ray source : testing the microlensing hypothesis, characterising the SED, and establishing the first two epochs in an expected gradual decline.

  6. Resolving the question of color naming universals

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Paul; Regier, Terry

    2003-01-01

    The existence of cross-linguistic universals in color naming is currently contested. Early empirical studies, based principally on languages of industrialized societies, suggested that all languages may draw on a universally shared repertoire of color categories. Recent work, in contrast, based on languages from nonindustrialized societies, has suggested that color categories may not be universal. No comprehensive objective tests have yet been conducted to resolve this issue. We conduct such tests on color naming data from languages of both industrialized and nonindustrialized societies and show that strong universal tendencies in color naming exist across both sorts of language. PMID:12855768

  7. Ozone therapy ameliorates paraquat-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaldirim, Umit; Uysal, Bulent; Yuksel, Ramazan; Macit, Enis; Eyi, Yusuf E; Toygar, Mehmet; Tuncer, Salim K; Ardic, Sukru; Arziman, Ibrahim; Aydin, Ibrahim; Oztas, Yesim; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Topal, Turgut

    2014-12-01

    Paraquat (PQ) overdose can cause acute lung injury and death. Ozone therapy (OT) was previously demonstrated to alleviate inflammation and necrosis in various pathologies. We therefore hypothesized that OT has ameliorative and preventive effects on PQ-induced lung damage due to anti-inflammatory and antioxidants properties. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 24) were separated into three groups: sham, PQ, and PQ+OT groups. 15 mg/kg PQ was administered intraperitoneally in PQ and PQ+OT groups to induce experimental lung injury. One hour after PQ treatment, PQ+OT group was administered a single dose of ozone-oxygen mixture (1 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal route for four consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed on fifth day after PQ administration. Blood samples and lung tissues were collected to evaluate the inflammatory processes, antioxidant defense and pulmonary damage. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neopterin levels, tissue oxidative stress parameters, total TGF-β1 levels, and histological injury scores in PQ+OT group were significantly lower than PQ group (P<0.05, PQ vs. PQ+OT). Total antioxidant capacity in PQ+OT group was significantly higher than PQ group (P < 0.05, PQ+OT vs. PQ). These findings suggest that outcome in PQ-induced lung injury may be improved by using OT as an adjuvant therapy.

  8. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  9. Novel therapeutic targets on the horizon for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Jain, Amit; Takano, Angela; Newell, Evan W; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Lim, Wan-Teck; Tan, Eng-Huat; Zhai, Weiwei; Hillmer, Axel M; Tam, Wai-Leong; Tan, Daniel S W

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and is classically divided into two major histological subtypes: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although NSCLC and SCLC are considered distinct entities with different genomic landscapes, emerging evidence highlights a convergence in therapeutically relevant targets for both histologies. In adenocarcinomas with defined alterations such as EGFR mutations and ALK translocations, targeted therapies are now first-line standard of care. By contrast, many experimental and targeted agents remain largely unsuccessful for SCLC. Intense preclinical research and clinical trials are underway to exploit unique traits of lung cancer, such as oncogene dependency, DNA damage response, angiogenesis, and cellular plasticity arising from presence of cancer stem cell lineages. In addition, the promising clinical activity observed in NSCLC in response to immune checkpoint blockade has spurred great interest in the field of immunooncology, with the scope to develop a diverse repertoire of synergistic and personalised immunotherapeutics. In this Review, we discuss novel therapeutic agents for lung cancer that are in early-stage development, and how prospective clinical trials and drug development may be shaped by a deeper understanding of this heterogeneous disease.

  10. Green tea and prevention of esophageal and lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-06-01

    Green tea contains high concentrations of tea polyphenols that have shown inhibitory effects against the development, progress, and growth of carcinogen-induced tumors in animal models at different organ sites, including the esophagus and lung. Green tea polyphenols also have shown to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Besides antioxidative property, green tea polyphenols have pro-oxidative activities under certain conditions and modulate phase II metabolic enzymes that can enhance the detoxification pathway of environmental toxicants and carcinogens. Although epidemiological studies have provided inconclusive results on the effect of green tea consumption against the development of esophageal and lung cancers in humans overall, the inverse association between green tea intake and risk of esophageal cancer risk is more consistently observed in studies with adequate control for potential confounders. Epidemiological studies also have demonstrated an inverse, albeit moderate, association between green tea consumption and lung cancer, especially in non-smokers. This article reviews data on the cancer-preventive activities of green tea extract and green tea polyphenols and possible mechanisms against the esophageal and lung carcinogenesis in experimental animals, and summarizes the current knowledge from epidemiological studies on the relationship between green tea consumption and esophageal and lung cancer risk in humans.

  11. Human lung morphology models for particle deposition studies.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Fleming, J S; Conway, J H

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is of paramount importance in calculating deposition patterns of inhaled particulate matter (PM) to be used in the definition of ambient air quality standards. Due to the inherently complex nature of the branching structure of the airway network, practical assumptions must be made for modeling purposes. The most commonly used mathematical models reported in the literature that describe PM deposition use Weibel's model A morphology. This assumes the airways of the lung to be a symmetric, dichotomously branching system. However, computer simulations of this model, when compared to scintigraphy images, have shown it to lack physiological realism (Martonen et al., 1994a). Therefore, a more physiologically realistic model of the lung is needed to improve the current PM dosimetry models. Herein, a morphological model is presented that is based on laboratory data from planar gamma camera and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Key elements of this model include: The parenchymal wall of the lung is defined in mathematical terms, the whole lung is divided into distinct left and right components, a set of branching angles is derived from experimental measurements, and the branching network is confined within the discrete left and right components (i.e., there is no overlapping of airways). In future work, this new, more physiologically realistic morphological model can be used to calculate PM deposition patterns for risk assessment protocols.

  12. 3D imaging of lung tissue by confocal microscopy and micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, Andres; Breithecker, Andreas; Rau, Wigbert D.

    2001-07-01

    Two complementary techniques for the imaging of tissue subunits are discussed. A computer guided light microscopic imaging technique is described first, which confocally resolves thick serial sections axially. The lateral area of interest is increased by scanning a mosaic of images in each plane. Subsequently, all images are fused digitally to form a highly resolved volume exhibiting the fine structure of complete respiratory units of lung. A different technique described is based on microtomography. This method allows to image volumes up to 3x3x3 cm at a resolution of up to 7 microns. Due to the lack of strong density differences, a contrast enhancement procedure is introduced which makes this technique applicable for the imaging of lung tissue. Imaging, visualization and analysis described here are parts of an ongoing project to model structure and to simulate function of tissue subunits and complete organs.

  13. REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE: The RESOLVE Survey in Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen; Norman, Dara; Norris, Mark; Hoversten, Erik; Stark, David; Moffett, Amanda; Baker, Ashley D.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Crawford, Steve; Damjanov, Ivana; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Gonzalez, Roberto; Hall, Kirsten; Khochfar, Sadegh; Leroy, Adam; Lu, Yu; Maraston, Claudia; McGaugh, Stacy; Naluminsa, Liz; Salzer, John J.; Sellwood, Jerry A.; Vaisanen, Petri; Watson, Linda

    2013-08-01

    We request 14 nights of gray/dark time with the Goodman Spectrograph on SOAR and 88 hours of gray/dark time with the GMOS IFU on Gemini over two semesters to complete Phase 1 of the RESOLVE survey, providing a volume-limited gas, stellar, and dynamical mass census in the exceptionally complete Stripe 82 legacy equatorial strip. RESOLVE spans diverse large-scale cosmic structures and probes mass scales down to ~10^9 Msun in the gas-rich dwarf galaxy regime. With the proposed census, RESOLVE will (1) provide the first direct, complete, and environment-dependent measurement of the velocity function, potentially uncovering crucial clues to puzzling discrepancies in the dwarf galaxy inventory, and (2) put a unique constraint on the location of the ``missing baryons,'' via a comprehensive census of multiple mass components in relation to star formation and dynamical mass in a cosmological volume.

  14. [Current status and future of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Date, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Lung transplantation has been a widely accepted treatment modality for patients with end-stage chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). COPD is the most frequent indication for lung transplantation according to the report from International Society for Lung and Heart Transplantation. However, it is a minor population in Japan. A total of 204 lung transplants have been performed in Japan to date. Among them, 10 patients were suffering from severe COPD. Nine of them received cadaveric lung transplantation and one received living-donor lobar lung transplantation. All are currently alive during follow-up period of 3-87 months.

  15. Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-11-01

    We present a time-resolved study of the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue phantoms. When a laser pulse interacts with a material, optical energy is absorbed by a combination of linear (heat generation and thermoelastic expansion) and nonlinear absorption (expanding plasma), according to both the laser light irradiance and material properties. The objective is to elucidate the contribution of linear and nonlinear optical absorption to bubble formation. Depending on the local temperatures and pressures reached, both interactions may lead to the formation of bubbles. We discuss three experimental approaches: piezoelectric sensors, time-resolved shadowgraphy, and time-resolved interferometry, to follow the formation of bubbles and measure the pressure originated by 6 ns laser pulses interacting with tissue phantoms. We studied the bubble formation and pressure transients for varying linear optical absorption and for radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation. We report a rapid decay (of 2 orders of magnitude) of the laser-induced mechanical pressure measured (by time-resolved shadowgraphy) very close to the irradiation spot and beyond 1 mm from the irradiation site (by the piezoelectric sensor). Through time-resolved interferometry measurements, we determined that bubble formation can occur at marginal temperature increments as low as 3°C.

  16. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting.

  17. [Current state and development of artificial lungs].

    PubMed

    Mei, Zaoxian; Sun, Xin; Wu, Qi

    2010-12-01

    The artificial lung is a technical device for providing life support; it will be put in use when the natural lungs are failing and are not able to maintain sufficient oxygenation of the body's organ systems. From the viewpoint of long-term development, the artificial lung should be permanently implanted in the body, so that it will substitute for the human pulmonary function partially or completely. In this paper, four artificial lung technologies were expounded with reference to the development and research process of artificial lung. They were extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, intravascular artificial lung, implantable artificial lung, and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist. In this paper were described the structure of the four kinds of artificial lung, the working principle, and their advantages, disadvantages and indications. The prospect of artificial lung was evaluated in the light of the data from the existing animal experiments and from the clinical experience of the centers.

  18. A simple, closed-form, mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Potkay, Joseph A

    2013-06-01

    Microfabrication techniques are attractive for constructing artificial lungs due to the ability to create features similar in size to those in the natural lung. However, a simple and intuitive mathematical model capable of accurately predicting the gas exchange performance of microchannel artificial lungs does not currently exist. Such a model is critical to understanding and optimizing these devices. Here, we describe a simple, closed-form mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs and qualify it through application to experimental data from several research groups. We utilize lumped parameters and several assumptions to obtain a closed-form set of equations that describe gas exchange. This work is intended to augment computational models by providing a more intuitive, albeit potentially less accurate, understanding of the operation and trade-offs inherent in microchannel artificial lung devices.

  19. Effects of early surfactant treatment persisting for one week after lung transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M E; Hofstede, G J; Petersen, A H; Haagsman, H P; Oetomo, S B; Prop, J

    1997-08-01

    We investigated whether pulmonary surfactant in rat lung transplants recovered during the first week post-transplantation, along with symptoms of the reimplantation response, and whether this recovery was affected by early surfactant treatment. The severity of pulmonary injury was varied by transplanting left lungs with 6-h and 20-h ischemia (n = 12 and 19, respectively). Half of the transplants were treated by instillation of surfactant before reperfusion. Lungs from sham operated, and normal rats (n = 4 and 5, respectively) served as controls. The pulmonary injury severely impaired lung transplant function; 10 of the worst affected animals died. After 1 wk, symptoms of reimplantation response and properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed. If untreated, the reimplantation response had almost resolved in the 6-h but not in the 20-h ischemia group; pulmonary surfactant, however, continued to be deficient in both ischemia groups (low amounts of surfactant phospholipids and surfactant protein A [SP-A]). Surfactant treatment improved the recovery from injury in the 20-h ischemia group resulting in normal lung function and amounts of surfactant phospholipids. Amounts of SP-A were not improved by surfactant treatment. In conclusion, early surfactant treatment enhances recovery from transplantation injury and is persistently beneficial for pulmonary surfactant in lung transplants.

  20. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129