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Sample records for resolving nonstationary spectral

  1. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time–frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  2. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  3. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  4. Spectrally resolving single-shot polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Knitter, Sebastian; Hellwig, Tim; Kues, Michael; Fallnich, Carsten

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate a spectrally resolving single-shot polarimeter. The system consists of a commercial imaging spectrograph, modified by a birefringent wedge and a segmented polarizer. The physical operating principle and limitations of the apparatus as well as preliminary polarimetric measurements on the emission of random lasers are reported. PMID:21847155

  5. A novel nonstationary deconvolution method based on spectral modeling and variable-step sampling hyperbolic smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Wang, Shoudong; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Guochang; Zheng, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Deconvolution is an important part of seismic processing tool for improving the resolution. One of the key assumptions made in most deconvolutional methods is that the seismic data is stationary. However, due to the anelastic absorption, the seismic data is usually nonstationary. In this paper, a novel nonstationary deconvolution approach is proposed based on spectral modeling and variable-step sampling (VSS) hyperbolic smoothing. To facilitate our method, firstly, we apply the Gabor transform to perform a time-frequency decomposition of the nonstationary seismic trace. Secondly, we estimate the source wavelet amplitude spectrum by spectral modeling. Thirdly, smoothing the Gabor magnitude spectrum of seismic data along hyperbolic paths with VSS can obtain the magnitude of the attenuation function, and can also eliminate the effect of source wavelet. Fourthly, by assuming that the source wavelet and attenuation function are minimum phase, their phases can be determined by Hilbert transform. Finally, the estimated two factors are removed by dividing them into the Gabor spectrum of the trace to estimate the Gabor spectrum of the reflectivity. An inverse Gabor transform gives the time-domain reflectivity estimate. Tests on synthetic and field data show that the presented method is an effective tool that not only has the advantages of stationary deconvolution, but also can compensate for the energy absorption, without knowing or estimating the quality factor Q.

  6. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  7. Spectral and time evolution in diffraction from a slit of polychromatic and nonstationary plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereda, Leonid; Ferrari, Aldo; Bertolotti, Mario

    1996-07-01

    A study of the changes in the spectrum and of the time intensity of the diffraction pattern of nonstationary light sources, started earlier [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 12, 1519 (1995)] is completed. The evolution of the spectrum for the off-axis points of the diffraction pattern from a source with a Gaussian spectrum is discussed, and the reason for the red and blue shifts of the spectral maximum is found analytically. The maximum values of the shifts are estimated. It is shown that the normalized spatial distribution of energy of the diffraction pattern from a time Gaussian-shaped pulsed source coincides exactly with the normalized spatial distribution of intensity from a stationary source with Gaussian spectral density and the same bandwidth. The influence of the spectral changes on the time intensity of the diffraction pattern for the Gaussian-shaped pulsed source is also discussed. The values of the diffraction angle are calculated when a slit splits the Gaussian-shaped pulse into two separate pulses. Moreover, it is shown that from these values of the diffraction angle two separate pulses can recombine.

  8. Depth Estimation from the Scaling Power Spectral Density of Nonstationary Gravity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A. R.; Dimri, V. P.

    A technique to estimate the depth to anomalous sources from the scaling power spectra of long nonstationary gravity profiles is presented. The nonstationary profile is divided into piecewise stationary segments based on the criterion of optimum gate length in which the time-varying and time-invariant autocorrelation functions are similar. The division of a nonstationary into piecewise stationary allows identification of the portion of the crust with different geological histories, and using the stationary portion of the gravity profiles, more consistent depths to the anomalous sources have been obtained. The technique is tested with the synthetic gravity profile and applied along the Jaipur-Raipur geotransect in western and central India. The geotransect has been divided into four stationary parts: Vindhyan low, Bundelkhand low, Narmada rift and Chhattisgarh basin; each section corresponding to a different geological formation. Forward modeling of gravity data using results of each stationary section is carried out to propose the subsurface structure along the Jaipur-Raipur transect.

  9. Angular spectral plane-wave expansion of nonstationary random fields in stochastic mode-stirred reverberation processes.

    PubMed

    Arnaut, Luk R

    2010-04-01

    We derive an integral expression for the plane-wave expansion of the time-varying (nonstationary) random field inside a mode-stirred reverberation chamber. It is shown that this expansion is a so-called oscillatory process, whose kernel can be expressed explicitly in closed form. The effect of nonstationarity is a modulation of the spectral density of the field on a time scale that is a function of the cavity relaxation time. It is also shown how the contribution by a nonzero initial value of the field can be incorporated into the expansion. The results are extended to a special class of second-order processes, relevant to the reception of a mode-stirred reverberation field by a device under test with a first-order (relaxation-type) frequency response.

  10. Angular spectral plane-wave expansion of nonstationary random fields in stochastic mode-stirred reverberation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaut, Luk R.

    2010-04-01

    We derive an integral expression for the plane-wave expansion of the time-varying (nonstationary) random field inside a mode-stirred reverberation chamber. It is shown that this expansion is a so-called oscillatory process, whose kernel can be expressed explicitly in closed form. The effect of nonstationarity is a modulation of the spectral density of the field on a time scale that is a function of the cavity relaxation time. It is also shown how the contribution by a nonzero initial value of the field can be incorporated into the expansion. The results are extended to a special class of second-order processes, relevant to the reception of a mode-stirred reverberation field by a device under test with a first-order (relaxation-type) frequency response.

  11. Modeling and image reconstruction in spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2007-02-01

    Recent interest in modeling and reconstruction algorithms for Bioluminescence Tomography (BLT) has increased and led to the general consensus that non-spectrally resolved intensity-based BLT results in a non-unique problem. However, the light emitted from, for example firefly Luciferase, is widely distributed over the band of wavelengths from 500 nm to 650 nm and above, with the dominant fraction emitted from tissue being above 550 nm. This paper demonstrates the development of an algorithm used for multi-wavelength 3D spectrally resolved BLT image reconstruction in a mouse model. It is shown that using a single view data, bioluminescence sources of up to 15 mm deep can be successfully recovered given correct information about the underlying tissue absorption and scatter.

  12. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  13. Spectrally resolved visualization of fluorescent dyes permeating into skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Ulf; Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Burg, Jan Michael; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    We present a spectrally resolved confocal imaging approach to qualitatively asses the overall uptake and the penetration depth of fluorescent dyes into biological tissue. We use a confocal microscope with a spectral resolution of 5 nm to measure porcine skin tissue after performing a Franz-Diffusion experiment with a submicron emulsion enriched with the fluorescent dye Nile Red. The evaluation uses linear unmixing of the dye and the tissue autofluorescence spectra. The results are combined with a manual segmentation of the skin's epidermis and dermis layers to assess the penetration behavior additionally to the overall uptake. The diffusion experiments, performed for 3h and 24h, show a 3-fold increased dye uptake in the epidermis and dermis for the 24h samples. As the method is based on spectral information it does not face the problem of superimposed dye and tissue spectra and therefore is more precise compared to intensity based evaluation methods.

  14. Phase Resolved X-ray Spectral Analysis of Soft IPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekon, Yakup

    2016-07-01

    As a subclass of Cataclysmic Variables, Intermediate Polars (IPs) are magnetic systems which mainly show hard X-ray emission. However, there have been an increasing number of systems that also show a soft emission component arising from reprocessed X-rays from the white dwarf limbs. Due to their relatively short periods, they pose as good canditates to perform phase resolved analysis. In this work, X-ray phase resolved spectral analysis of selected IPs with soft X-ray emission components (such as PQ Gem, V2069 Cyg etc.) over the orbital and/or spin periods will be presented. The analyses will help a better understanding of the complex absorption mechanisms and the nature of the soft X-ray emissions in soft IPs.

  15. Time- and spectrally resolved terahertz photoconductivity of quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmach, C.; Vasile, G.; Hirsch, A.; Bonk, R.; Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Hein, G.; Becker, C. R.; Nachtwei, G.

    2007-07-01

    We present terahertz photoconductivity measurements on GaAs/AlGaAs and HgTe/HgCdTe heterostructures. The photoresponse is investigated time and spectrally resolved under quantum Hall conditions. The samples are excited by a pulsed p-Ge laser, which emits photons of frequencies around 2THz (corresponding to photon energies around 10meV ). Corbino-shaped GaAs/AlGaAs samples show relaxation times τ down to 10ns . The dependence of τ on the applied source-drain voltage is explained by a two-level picture after normalizing the data. All spectrally resolved measurements show contributions of the cyclotron resonance and the bolometric effect. These results are compared to numerical calculations based on a self-consistent Born approximation method. The measurements on HgTe/HgCdTe samples show comparable results. However, the effective mass in these samples is only mc=0.026m0 (approximately 1/3 of the mass in GaAs/AlGaAs ). Thus the cyclotron resonance is shifted to smaller magnetic fields around 2T . This fact makes HgTe/HgCdTe systems especially interesting for terahertz detector applications.

  16. Development of a spectrally resolved multifocal multiphoton microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixin; Shao, Yonghong; Qu, Junle; Li, Heng; Guo, Baoping; Liu, Wenqing; Niu, Hanben

    2008-12-01

    Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy (MMM) can acquire three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence microscopic images of samples by multiphoton excitation with the advantages of high speed, reduced photobleaching, enhanced penetration depth and high signal-to-noise ratio. As fluorescence spectrum can provide information about the components of the sample, it is becoming increasingly popular in biomedicine to combine fluorescence spectrum measurement with multidimensional fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we present the development of a spectrally resolved multifocal multiphoton microscope (SR-MMM). A microlens array is employed in the MMM system to produce 2D excitation foci on the sample for simultaneous two-photon excitation and a pair of galvo mirrors is used to scan the excitation foci across the sample. A liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) is mounted in front of a high-speed cooled CCD camera and is used to change the detection wavelength of the MMM system. Depth-resolved and spectrum-resolved two-photon excitation fluorescence images of a few samples are obtained with the SR-MMM system.

  17. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  18. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known. PMID:27464179

  19. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Smith, Darryl L.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solution using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.

  20. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Los Alamos National Lab.; Smith, Darryl L.; Los Alamos National Lab.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solutionmore » using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.« less

  1. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  2. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path.

  3. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  4. Spectrally resolved fast transient brain states in electrophysiological data

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Diego; Quinn, Andrew J.; Baker, Adam P.; Dupret, David; Tejero-Cantero, Alvaro; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of producing coordinated fast changing neural dynamics across multiple brain regions in order to adapt to rapidly changing environments. However, it is non-trivial to identify multiregion dynamics at fast sub-second time-scales in electrophysiological data. We propose a method that, with no knowledge of any task timings, can simultaneously identify and describe fast transient multiregion dynamics in terms of their temporal, spectral and spatial properties. The approach models brain activity using a discrete set of sequential states, with each state distinguished by its own multiregion spectral properties. This can identify potentially very short-lived visits to a brain state, at the same time as inferring the state's properties, by pooling over many repeated visits to that state. We show how this can be used to compute state-specific measures such as power spectra and coherence. We demonstrate that this can be used to identify short-lived transient brain states with distinct power and functional connectivity (e.g., coherence) properties in an MEG data set collected during a volitional motor task. PMID:26631815

  5. Spectrally resolved fast transient brain states in electrophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, Diego; Quinn, Andrew J; Baker, Adam P; Dupret, David; Tejero-Cantero, Alvaro; Woolrich, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    The brain is capable of producing coordinated fast changing neural dynamics across multiple brain regions in order to adapt to rapidly changing environments. However, it is non-trivial to identify multiregion dynamics at fast sub-second time-scales in electrophysiological data. We propose a method that, with no knowledge of any task timings, can simultaneously identify and describe fast transient multiregion dynamics in terms of their temporal, spectral and spatial properties. The approach models brain activity using a discrete set of sequential states, with each state distinguished by its own multiregion spectral properties. This can identify potentially very short-lived visits to a brain state, at the same time as inferring the state's properties, by pooling over many repeated visits to that state. We show how this can be used to compute state-specific measures such as power spectra and coherence. We demonstrate that this can be used to identify short-lived transient brain states with distinct power and functional connectivity (e.g., coherence) properties in an MEG data set collected during a volitional motor task. PMID:26631815

  6. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  7. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target.

  8. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target. PMID:23787661

  9. Mode resolved bend-loss analysis in few-mode fibers using spatially and spectrally resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Lorenzo; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2015-10-15

    The increasing use of few-mode fibers for high-speed optical communication systems in space division multiplexing has created a need for mode resolved characterization of few-mode fibers. In this Letter, we present a new method to characterize the bend loss of the individual modes in a few-mode fiber. This procedure uses a simple setup for spatially and spectrally resolved imaging and allows the measurement of the bend loss of each and every guided mode at once. It does not require the use of mode converters in contrast to other methods. Results for graded-index two- and four-mode fibers are presented, together with comparisons against direct bend-loss measurements for the four-mode and standard single-mode fibers.

  10. Studies of multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for spectral fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    McGown, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    During the past two project periods (7/1/88--12/31/90), we have made significant advances towards our goal of characterizing samples in terms of their dynamic spectral characteristics through the use of phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Specific achievements are discussed, each of which describes a particular area of focus in our studies.

  11. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  12. Comparing spectral resolvability in chinchillas and human listeners using phase discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, William P.; Sparks, Kathryn; Wu, Yuanxing Esther; Pham, Ellen

    2001-05-01

    A tone complex made of harmonic components that are added in cosine-starting phase can be discriminated from complexes comprised of identical harmonics that are added with random-starting phases. Phase discrimination occurs when unresolved harmonics interact within a single auditory channel. When harmonics are resolved, there is less interaction among components resulting in poorer phase discrimination performance. Thus, phase discrimination indirectly reflects spectral resolvability. Performance in a phase discrimination task was measured in chinchillas and human listeners to compare spectral resolvability between the two groups. Subjects discriminated a cosine-phase tone complex from random-phase tone complexes in a go/no-go behavioral paradigm. Tone complexes were comprised of a 250-Hz fundamental frequency and N consecutive higher harmonics, where N was 5, 10, 20, and 40. Performance was evaluated in terms of d'. The results show that the measured d' increased as N increased, and values of d' for each N condition were similar between chinchillas and human listeners. Values of the criterion for each N condition were also similar between chinchillas and humans. The results do not support the hypothesis that spectral resolvability is poorer in chinchillas, but suggest that resolvability is similar between the two groups. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  13. Time-resolved and spectral-resolved optical imaging to study brain hemodynamics in songbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottin, Stéphane; Montcel, Bruno; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Ramstein, Stéphane; Vignal, Clémentine; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2011-07-01

    Contrary to the intense debate about brain oxygen dynamics and its uncoupling in mammals, very little is known in birds. In zebra finches, picosecond optical tomography (POT) with a white laser and a streak camera can measure in vivo oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes following physiological stimulation (familiar calls and songs). POT demonstrated sufficient sub-micromolar sensitivity to resolve the fast changes in hippocampus and auditory forebrain areas with 250 μm resolution. The time-course is composed of (i) an early 2s-long event with a significant decrease in Hb and HbO2, respectively -0.7 μMoles/L and -0.9 μMoles/L (ii) a subsequent increase in blood oxygen availability with a plateau of HbO2 (+0.3μMoles/L) and (iii) pronounced vasodilatation events immediately following the end of the stimulus. One of the findings of our work is the direct link between the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals previously published in birds and our results. Furthermore, the early vasoconstriction event and post-stimulus ringing seem to be more pronounced in birds than in mammals. These results in bird, a tachymetabolic vertebrate with a long lifespan, can potentially yield new insights for example in brain aging.

  14. Simultaneous analytical characterisation of two ultrashort laser pulses using spectrally resolved interferometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Artigas, David; Cormack, Iain G; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2006-05-15

    In this paper we discuss in detail the underlying theory of a novel method that allows the characterizing of ultrashort laser pulses to be achieved in an analytical way. MEFISTO, (measuring the electric field by interferometric spectral trace observation) is based on a Fourier analysis of the information contained in a spectrally resolved interferometric correlation and can be applied to both situations: the characterization of an unknown pulse (MEFISTO) or to the simultaneous characterization of two different unknowns pulses (Blind-MEFISTO). The theoretical development and experimental practical implications are discussed in both situations.

  15. Simultaneous analytical characterisation of two ultrashort laser pulses using spectrally resolved interferometric correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Artigas, David; Cormack, Iain G.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we discuss in detail the underlying theory of a novel method that allows the characterizing of ultrashort laser pulses to be achieved in an analytical way. MEFISTO, (measuring the electric field by interferometric spectral trace observation) is based on a Fourier analysis of the information contained in a spectrally resolved interferometric correlation and can be applied to both situations: the characterization of an unknown pulse (MEFISTO) or to the simultaneous characterization of two different unknowns pulses (Blind-MEFISTO). The theoretical development and experimental practical implications are discussed in both situations.

  16. DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF RADIATION/THERMAL FRONTS WITH FULL RESOLVED SPECTRAL OPACITY VARIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    L. AUER; R. LOWRIE

    2000-12-01

    The radiation transport and linearized thermal energy equations have been analyzed to find the temporal dependence of the component modes in a radiation/thermal front. The fully resolved spectral variation of the opacity as a function of energy, as well as the exact time and angular dependence, is treated in this work. As we are able to study arbitrarily complicated opacity spectra, we stress the importance of the new results as a check on the effect of using opacity averages.

  17. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  18. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  19. Spectrally-resolved measurement of concentrated light distributions for Fresnel lens concentrators.

    PubMed

    Besson, P; White, P McVey; Dominguez, C; Voarino, P; Garcia-Linares, P; Lemiti, M; Schriemer, H; Hinzer, K; Baudrit, M

    2016-01-25

    A test method that measures spectrally resolved irradiance distribution for a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) optical system is presented. In conjunction with electrical I-V curves, it is a means to visualize and characterize the effects of chromatic aberration and nonuniform flux profiles under controllable testing conditions. The indoor characterization test bench, METHOD (Measurement of Electrical, Thermal and Optical Devices), decouples the temperatures of the primary optical element (POE) and the cell allowing their respective effects on optical and electrical performance to be analysed. In varying the temperature of the POE, the effects on electrical efficiency, focal distance, spectral sensitivity, acceptance angle and multi-junction current matching profiles can be quantified. This work presents the calibration procedures to accurately image the spectral irradiance distribution of a CPV system and a study of system behavior over lens temperature. PMID:26832591

  20. Nonstationary envelope process and first excursion probability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    The definition of stationary random envelope proposed by Cramer and Leadbetter, is extended to the envelope of nonstationary random process possessing evolutionary power spectral densities. The density function, the joint density function, the moment function, and the crossing rate of a level of the nonstationary envelope process are derived. Based on the envelope statistics, approximate solutions to the first excursion probability of nonstationary random processes are obtained. In particular, applications of the first excursion probability to the earthquake engineering problems are demonstrated in detail.

  1. Yukawas, G-flux, and spectral covers from resolved Calabi-Yau's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsano, Joseph; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2011-11-01

    We use the resolution procedure of Esole and Yau [1] to study Yukawa couplings, G-flux, and the emergence of spectral covers from elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau's with a surface of A 4 singularities. We provide a global description of the Esole-Yau resolution and use it to explicitly compute Chern classes of the resolved 4-fold, proving the conjecture of [2] for the Euler character in the process. We comment on the physical implications of the surprising singular fibers in codimension 2 and 3 in [1] and emphasize a group theoretic interpretation based on the A 4 weight lattice. We then construct explicit G-fluxes by brute force in one of the 6 birationally equivalent Esole-Yau resolutions, quantize them explicitly using our result for the second Chern class, and compute the spectrum and flux-induced 3-brane charges, finding agreement with results and conjectures of local models in all cases. Finally, we provide a precise description of the spectral divisor formalism in this setting and sharpen the procedure described in [3] in order to explicitly demonstrate how the Higgs bundle spectral cover of the local model emerges from the resolved Calabi-Yau geometry. Along the way, we demonstrate explicitly how the quantization rules for fluxes in the local and global models are related.

  2. Velocity and Temperature Measurement in Supersonic Free Jets Using Spectrally Resolved Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The flow fields of unheated, supersonic free jets from convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles operating at M = 0.99, 1.4, and 1.6 were measured using spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering technique. The axial component of velocity and temperature data as well as density data obtained from a previous experiment are presented in a systematic way with the goal of producing a database useful for validating computational fluid dynamics codes. The Rayleigh scattering process from air molecules provides a fundamental means of measuring flow properties in a non-intrusive, particle free manner. In the spectrally resolved application, laser light scattered by the air molecules is collected and analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The difference between the incident laser frequency and the peak of the Rayleigh spectrum provides a measure of gas velocity. The temperature is measured from the spectral broadening caused by the random thermal motion and density is measured from the total light intensity. The present point measurement technique uses a CW laser, a scanning FPI and photon counting electronics. The 1 mm long probe volume is moved from point to point to survey the flow fields. Additional arrangements were made to remove particles from the main as well as the entrained flow and to isolate FPI from the high sound and vibration levels produced by the supersonic jets. In general, velocity is measured within +/- 10 m/s accuracy and temperature within +/- 10 K accuracy.

  3. Monochromatic imaging camera for spectrally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hareland, W.A.

    1994-12-31

    Spectrally and spatially resolved emissions have been measured from argon plasmas in an experimental radio-frequency plasma reactor. The monochromatic imaging camera records 2-dimensional images at a single wavelength of light, and the 2-dimensional images are treated by Abel inversion to produce 3-dimensional maps of single excited species in radio-frequency plasmas. Monochromatic images of argon were measured at a spectral bandwidth of 2.4 nm over the wavelength range from 394 to 912 nm. The spatial distribution of excited argon varies with excitation state. Lower-energy argon (< 13 eV) is found throughout the plasma, whereas, higher-energy argon is observed in and directly above the sheath in capacitively coupled discharges. Monochromatic imaging provides new optical diagnostics for measuring and monitoring plasmas.

  4. An imaging spectro-polarimeter for measuring hemispherical spectrally resolved down-welling sky polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Roche, Michael; Hyatt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A full sky imaging spectro-polarimeter has been developed that measures spectrally resolved (~2.5 nm resolution) radiance and polarization (𝑠0, 𝑠1, 𝑠2 Stokes Elements) of natural sky down-welling over approximately 2π sr between 400nm and 1000nm. The sensor is based on a scanning push broom hyperspectral imager configured with a continuously rotating polarizer (sequential measurement in time polarimeter). Sensor control and processing software (based on Polaris Sensor Technologies Grave' camera control software) has a straight-forward and intuitive user interface that provides real-time updated sky down-welling spectral radiance/polarization maps and statistical analysis tools.

  5. Divertor electron temperature and impurity diffusion measurements with a spectrally resolved imaging radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, D. J.; Kumar, D.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Jaworski, M. A.

    2012-10-15

    A divertor imaging radiometer (DIR) diagnostic is being studied to measure spatially and spectrally resolved radiated power P{sub rad}({lambda}) in the tokamak divertor. A dual transmission grating design, with extreme ultraviolet ({approx}20-200 A) and vacuum ultraviolet ({approx}200-2000 A) gratings placed side-by-side, can produce coarse spectral resolution over a broad wavelength range covering emission from impurities over a wide temperature range. The DIR can thus be used to evaluate the separate P{sub rad} contributions from different ion species and charge states. Additionally, synthetic spectra from divertor simulations can be fit to P{sub rad}({lambda}) measurements, providing a powerful code validation tool that can also be used to estimate electron divertor temperature and impurity transport.

  6. Spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single dye molecules in polymers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, S. V.; Naumov, A. V.; Vainer, Yu. G.; Kador, Lothar

    2012-11-01

    We present a method for the spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single quantum emitters. It is based on the well-known technique of repeated recording of single-molecule (SM) fluorescence excitation spectra. The potential of our approach is presented for the example of single tetra-tert-butylterrylene molecules in an amorphous polymer matrix (polyisobutylene), which exhibit fluorescence blinking at cryogenic temperatures. Measuring the spectral dependence of the blinking statistics improves the possibility to clarify the microscopic nature of the dark state(s) of the emitters. We demonstrate how the blinking statistics can be definitely attributed to conformational changes in the local environment of a SM and how the parameters of the corresponding elementary excitations can be measured. The analysis of the blinking statistics as a function of the optical excitation frequency allows us to discriminate between photo-induced and spontaneous transitions into a dark state.

  7. Spectrally resolved fluorescence cross sections of BG and BT with a 266-nm pump wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Joshua; Thomas, Michael E.; Joseph, Richard I.

    2007-04-01

    The spectrally resolved absolute fluorescence cross sections of Bacillus globigii (BG) and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were measured with a 266nm Nd:YAG laser source. The aerosol samples were prepared in dilute aqueous suspensions for measurement and the absolute cross section was found by use of the Raman scattering line from water. Integrated cross sections for BT and BG were found to be 1.1864 × 10 -12 cm2(spore sr) and 3.251 × 10 -13 cm2/ (spore sr) respectively.

  8. Spectrally resolved four-wave mixing experiments on bulk GaAs with 14-fs pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.U.; Steinbach, D.; Wegener, M.; Marschner, T.; Stolz, W.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the coherent dynamics at the band edge of GaAs at low temperatures for carrier densities ranging from 4.3{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} to 4.4{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} by means of spectrally resolved transient four-wave mixing with 14-fs pulses. At large nonequilibrium carrier densities we observe oscillations with an energy-dependent oscillation period related to interference among continuum states. The experimental findings are compared with a simple model. This comparison delivers a weak energy dependence of dephasing in the initial buildup phase of screening. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  9. Dichroic spectrally-resolved interferometry to overcome the measuring range limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Ki-Nam

    2015-09-01

    In this investigation, a simple method to eliminate the dead zone without the minimum measurable distance and extend the measurable range of spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI) twice based on the bandwidth separation by a dichroic beam splitter (DBS) is proposed. The main advantage of this dichroic SRI is that it can be simply implemented with a dichroic beam splitter and another reference mirror from the typical SRI. Feasibility experiments were performed to verify the principle of the dichroic SRI and the result confirmed the effectiveness of this method as the extended measuring range. Some practical error sources are considered and the alternative solutions are also discussed.

  10. Spectrally resolved cavity ring down measurement of high reflectivity mirrors using a supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Schmidl, Gabriele; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Schippel, Stefan; Heyer, Hartmut

    2009-12-10

    We investigate a cavity ring down setup that offers the possibility to measure the spectrally resolved reflectivities of high reflectivity mirrors. The setup consists of a resonator (ring down cavity) and an intensified CCD camera system combined with a spectrograph for spectral resolution. A commercial supercontinuum laser (350-1750 nm) is applied as a compact excitation source. It is based on a photonic crystal fiber that is pumped by a q-switched microchip laser (1.6 ns pulse duration, 25 kHz repetition rate). This combination allows simultaneously recording the transmittance of the cavity over a wide wavelength range determined by the excitation source and the spectral sensitivity of the detector. The photon lifetimes inside the cavity (ring down times) are measured with high spectral resolution by means of an intensified camera system. Subsequently shifting the "gate" of the image intensifier from short to long delay times after the excitation pulse allows calculation of the reflectivity spectrum of the mirrors. Comparison of these results with measurements using a conventional setup (laser diode 675 nm and photomultiplier tube) clearly shows the high potential of the method due to the multichannel excitation and the detection scheme. PMID:20011015

  11. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity.

    PubMed

    Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ϵ , is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ϵ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  12. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  13. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  14. Noninvasive tumor detection using spectrally-resolved in-vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenich, Gennady; Kimel, Sol; Malik, Zvi; Orenstein, Arie

    2000-11-01

    A novel spectral image-analysis system was used for tumor fluorescence and reflectance imaging in an animal model and in patients. Transcutaneous fluorescence imaging was carried out on Balb/c mice bearing subcutaneous C26 colon carcinoma after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a metabolic precursor of protoporphyrin-IX (PP), and of a novel photosensitizer tetrahydroporphyrin (THP). Tumors were clearly observable by fluorescence detection using green light excitation. Tumor versus normal tissue uptake of the photosensitizing agents was determined by monitoring fluorescence intensity. Maximal PP accumulation in tumor was observed 3 h after i.p. injection of ALA, whereas THP showed selective accumulation in tumor 24 h after administration. Reflectance spectroscopy was employed to study pigmented human skin lesions (nevus, pigmented BCC and pigmented melanoma). In the near-infrared region (800-880 nm) pigmented BCC and melanoma exhibited a differently shaped reflectance spectrum compared to normal skin and nevus. Spatially and spectrally resolved imaging, in combination with mathematical algorithms (such as normalization, spectral similarity mapping and division) allowed unambiguous detection of malignancies. Optical biopsy results from a total of 51 patients showed 45 benign nevi, 3 pigmented BCC and 3 malignant melanomas, as confirmed by histology.

  15. Platform for spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from imploding capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, D.; Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Yi, A.; Boehm, K.; Bachmann, B.; Divol, L.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Masters, N.; Saunders, A. M.; Weber, C.; Falcone, R. W.; Neumayer, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. Scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees are highly sensitive to K-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3 giving the possibility to investigate effects of pressure ionization and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before or shortly after stagnation of the implosion.

  16. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  17. Spectrally-resolved Soft X-ray Observations and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry; McTiernan, James; Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-04-01

    Solar X-ray observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during solar flares and quiescent periods. How the corona is heated to its ~1-3 MK nominal temperature remains one of the fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics; heating of plasma to tens of MK during solar flares -- particularly to the hottest observed temperatures of up to ~50 MK -- is also still poorly understood. Soft X-ray emission (~0.1-10 keV; or ~0.1-10 nm) is particularly sensitive to hot coronal plasma and serves as a probe of the thermal processes driving coronal plasma heating. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding these energetic processes, but there have historically been very few such observations. We present new solar soft X-ray spectra from the Amptek X123-SDD, measuring quiescent solar X-ray emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution from two SDO/EVE calibration sounding rocket underflights in 2012 and 2013. Combined with observations from RHESSI, GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, and SDO/AIA, the temperature distribution derived from these data suggest significant hot (5-10 MK) emission from active regions, and the 2013 spectra suggest a low-FIP enhancement of only ~1.6 relative to the photosphere, 40% of the usually-observed value from quiescent coronal plasma. We explore the implications of these findings on coronal heating. We discuss future missions for spectrally-resolved soft X-ray observations using the X123-SDD, including the upcoming MinXSS 3U CubeSat using the X123-SDD and scheduled for deployment in mid-2015, and the CubIXSS 6U CubeSat mission concept.

  18. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  19. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  20. Spectrally-resolved forbidden emission lines: new EXES constraints on accelerating flows from cool evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham

    2015-10-01

    Mass loss from cool evolved stars is important for both stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, but it still remains poorly understood. Early-M supergiants are important for mass loss studies because they have little dust and molecules in their winds and yet still are able to drive high mass-loss rates like their dusty cousins of later spectral-types. We propose to use SOFIA-EXES to spectrally-resolve with R=50,000 two 25 micron forbidden emission lines from the ground terms of [Fe II] and [S I] in order to trace the wind acceleration and turbulence in the outflows of cool evolved M stars. For early-M supergiants these species will be the dominant ionization stages and trace the outflow mass, and the emission diagnostics can be used to test theoretical models in the crucial wind acceleration region. We also seek to refine the intrinsic wavelength of the [S I] 25.249 micron line so that it can be used as a new astrophysical velocity diagnostic.

  1. Spectrally resolved measurement of small optical losses by cavity enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuner, T.; Paa, W.; Schmidl, G.; Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-05-01

    In general losses of optical of less than 1 % cannot be measured precisely with the best-established techniques (e.q. two-beam spectroscopy). However, it is possible to measure losses in the 0.0001 - 0.5 % range with high accuracy using cavity enhanced spectroscopy (CES) methods. Such low losses can be measured with CES, due to an increased interaction path way with the object. The Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) technique takes advantage of the CES method and transforms the optical loss information into the time domain. Two types of CRD setups for spectrally resolved loss measurement of laser mirrors will be presented. The first setup uses a tunable laser system for serial detection of the reflectivity spectra. The second method determines the spectral losses using a super continuum source. Here, simultaneous excitation and a spectrometer based camera system for separate detection of several wavelengths is used. Results will be shown and compared with direct absorption measurements of the same sample.

  2. Time-resolved spectral measurements on a multielectrode DFB laser using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. [Distributed feedback laser

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; O'Dowd, R.F. . Dept. of Electronic Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer based time-resolved spectral measurement system capable of transform limited performance is described here. The system results from a model developed for the Fabry-Perot interferometer from which the mirror reflectivity emerges as the critical parameter in determining both the temporal and spectral response. Using this system, the response of a multi-electrode DFB laser under a number of different modulation formats is investigated.

  3. In vivo stoichiometry monitoring of G protein coupled receptor oligomers using spectrally resolved two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, M. R.; Singh, D. R.; Raicu, V.

    2010-02-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) between a donor molecule in an electronically excited state and an acceptor molecule in close proximity has been frequently utilized for studies of protein-protein interactions in living cells. Typically, the cell under study is scanned a number of times in order to accumulate enough spectral information to accurately determine the RET efficiency for each region of interest within the cell. However, the composition of these regions may change during the course of the acquisition period, limiting the spatial determination of the RET efficiency to an average over entire cells. By means of a novel spectrally resolved two-photon microscope, we were able to obtain a full set of spectrally resolved images after only one complete excitation scan of the sample of interest. From this pixel-level spectral data, a map of RET efficiencies throughout the cell is calculated. By applying a simple theory of RET in oligomeric complexes to the experimentally obtained distribution of RET efficiencies throughout the cell, a single spectrally resolved scan reveals stoichiometric and structural information about the oligomer complex under study. This presentation will describe our experimental setup and data analysis procedure, as well as an application of the method to the determination of RET efficiencies throughout yeast cells (S. cerevisiae) expressing a G-protein-coupled receptor, Sterile 2 α factor protein (Ste2p), in the presence and absence of α-factor - a yeast mating pheromone.

  4. Spectrally resolved detection of sodium in the atmosphere of HD 189733b with the HARPS spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyttenbach, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Udry, S.; Pepe, F.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Atmospheric properties of exoplanets can be constrained with transit spectroscopy. At low spectral resolution, this technique is limited by the presence of clouds. The signature of atomic sodium (Na i), known to be present above the clouds, is a powerful probe of the upper atmosphere, where it can be best detected and characterized at high spectral resolution. Aims: Our goal is to obtain a high-resolution transit spectrum of HD 189733b in the region around the resonance doublet of Na i at 589 nm, to characterize the absorption signature that was previously detected from space at low resolution. Methods: We analyzed archival transit data of HD 189733b obtained with the HARPS spectrograph (ℛ = 115 000) at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. We performed differential spectroscopy to retrieve the transit spectrum and light curve of the planet, implementing corrections for telluric contamination and planetary orbital motion. We compared our results to synthetic transit spectra calculated from isothermal models of the planetary atmosphere. Results: We spectrally resolve the Na i D doublet and measure line contrasts of 0.64 ± 0.07% (D2) and 0.40 ± 0.07% (D1) and FWHMs of 0.52 ± 0.08 Å. This corresponds to a detection at the 10σ level of excess of absorption of 0.32 ± 0.03% in a passband of 2 × 0.75 Å centered on each line. We derive temperatures of 2600 ± 600 K and 3270 ± 330 K at altitudes of 9800 ± 2800 and 12 700 ± 2600 km in the Na i D1 and D2 line cores, respectively. We measure a temperature gradient of ~0.2 K km-1 in the region where the sodium absorption dominates the haze absorption from a comparison with theoretical models. We also detect a blueshift of 0.16 ± 0.04 Å (4σ) in the line positions. This blueshift may be the result of winds blowing at 8 ± 2 km s-1 in the upper layers of the atmosphere. Conclusions: We demonstrate the relevance of studying exoplanet atmospheres with high-resolution spectrographs mounted on 4-m-class telescopes. Our

  5. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  6. Spatially-resolved Spectral Analysis of the Hot Gaseous Emission in the M31 Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, Mihoko; Irwin, J.; Wong, K.; Million, E.

    2013-04-01

    We report results from a deep, ~400 ks archival Chandra ACIS study of the galactic bulge in M31. We aim to greater understand the properties of the hot gas in galactic bulges, which play an important role in galaxy evolution via outflows. Detailed, spatially resolved, spectral analysis of the central 3 arcmin reveal that the hot gas is well characterized by a two-temperature, collisionally ionized, optically-thin plasma model with temperatures k 0.2 and 0.5 keV. The radial temperature profile of the k 0.2 keV component is approximately flat, while the temperature profile of the k 0.5 component contains a potential small central peak. The surface brightness of the k 0.2 keV gas follows a beta model distribution that is comparable to the stellar distribution of the bulge. The surface brightness of the hotter k 0.5 keV component follows a significantly different trend. We discuss the interpretation of our results.

  7. Source Reconstruction for Spectrally-resolved Bioluminescence Tomography with Sparse A priori Information

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujie; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Douraghy, Ali; Stout, David; Tian, Jie; Chan, Tony F.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2009-01-01

    Through restoration of the light source information in small animals in vivo, optical molecular imaging, such as fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT), can depict biological and physiological changes observed using molecular probes. A priori information plays an indispensable role in tomographic reconstruction. As a type of a priori information, the sparsity characteristic of the light source has not been sufficiently considered to date. In this paper, we introduce a compressed sensing method to develop a new tomographic algorithm for spectrally-resolved bioluminescence tomography. This method uses the nature of the source sparsity to improve the reconstruction quality with a regularization implementation. Based on verification of the inverse crime, the proposed algorithm is validated with Monte Carlo-based synthetic data and the popular Tikhonov regularization method. Testing with different noise levels and single/multiple source settings at different depths demonstrates the improved performance of this algorithm. Experimental reconstruction with a mouse-shaped phantom further shows the potential of the proposed algorithm. PMID:19434138

  8. Application of a Phase-resolving, Directional Nonlinear Spectral Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. R.; Sheremet, A.; Tian, M.; Hanson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We describe several applications of a phase-resolving, directional nonlinear spectral wave model. The model describes a 2D surface gravity wave field approaching a mildly sloping beach with parallel depth contours at an arbitrary angle accounting for nonlinear, quadratic triad interactions. The model is hyperbolic, with the initial wave spectrum specified in deep water. Complex amplitudes are generated based on the random phase approximation. The numerical implementation includes unidirectional propagation as a special case. In directional mode, it solves the system of equations in the frequency-alongshore wave number space. Recent enhancements of the model include the incorporation of dissipation caused by breaking and propagation over a viscous mud layer and the calculation of wave induced setup. Applications presented include: a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation, a study of the evolution of a single directional triad, and several preliminary comparisons to wave spectra collected at the USACE-FRF in Duck, NC which show encouraging results although further validation with a wider range of beach slopes and wave conditions is needed.

  9. Time-resolved spectral characterization of a pulsed external-cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Raybaut, Myriam; Godard, Antoine; Petit, Johan; Lefebvre, Michel

    2012-10-01

    Spectrally tunable narrow-linewidth mid-infrared sources are used in a variety of spectrometric optical systems for detection, identification, and/or quantification of chemical species. However, in the pulsed regime they often display a varying spectrum in time, either from shot-to-shot or during the pulse itself, with consequences on the measurement accuracy, resolution, and repeatability. This is, for instance, the case of pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCL), mainly because of strong transient thermal effects in the optical waveguide. Unfortunately, little information has been published on this subject because mid-infrared time-resolved spectrometers are extremely scarce. In this paper, we explain how this can be circumvented by using time-gated frequency upconversion in a nonlinear crystal. We apply this principle to characterize a pulsed external cavity QCL (EC-QCL) at 7.8 μm, using AgGaS2 as the nonlinear crystal and a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser as the pump source. The upconverted near infrared spectrum is conveniently analyzed with a high resolution lambdameter and an optical spectrum analyzer. We evidence frequency chirp at an average rate of -50 MHz/ns and mode hops spanning 15 GHz for the EC-QCL. These results are compared to published data.

  10. Implosion stability and symmetry analysis of OMEGA direct-drive implosions using spectrally-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Heather M.

    Abstract Line absorption spectroscopy of Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell of inertial confinement fusion targets is a powerful diagnostic to characterize the state of the un-ablated and compressed shell that confines the hot and dense core fuel. In this dissertation we investigate two applications of this diagnostic to warm shell implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA national laser user facility that provide new insights about implosion symmetry, stability and mixing. This was accomplished through two groups of experiments and different types of data processing and analysis. In a first group of experiments, streaked high-spectral resolution but spatially integrated measurements were recorded with a crystal spectrometer to determine the time-history of electron temperature and density, ionization state and areal density for tracer layers initially located at several depths from the shell's inner surface. This analysis included, for the first time, the effect of self-emission of Ti K-shell line transitions. We found that the self-emission is important for tracer layers located close to the core, and has to be taken into account in order to obtain accurate values of temperature and density; but this effect is less important for tracer layers initially placed farther from the core, for which the self-emission may be neglected and analysis of transmission is sufficient to model and interpret the absorption spectrum. This finding is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions will remain at lower temperatures because they are less affected by thermal transport. In a second group of experiments, arrays of spectrally-resolved images were recorded with a novel multi-monochromatic x-ray imager: the MMI instrument. The MMI affords simultaneous time-gated (snapshots), spatial- (based on pinholes) and spectral- (multi-layer Bragg

  11. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  12. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  13. Spectrally resolved efficiencies of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction in the western Canadian Arctic: particles versus solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Xie, H.; Bélanger, S.; Leymarie, E.; Babin, M.

    2013-06-01

    Spectrally resolved efficiency (i.e. apparent quantum yield, AQY) of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction is a useful indicator of substrate photoreactivity and a crucial parameter for modeling CO photoproduction rates in the water column. Recent evidence has suggested that CO photoproduction from particles in marine waters is significant compared to the well-known CO production from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photodegradation. Although CDOM-based CO AQY spectra have been extensively determined, little is known of this information on the particulate phase. Using water samples collected from the Mackenzie estuary, shelf, and Canada Basin in the southeastern Beaufort Sea, the present study for the first time quantified the AQY spectra of particle-based CO photoproduction and compared them with the concomitantly determined CDOM-based CO AQY spectra. CO AQYs of both particles and CDOM decreased with wavelength but the spectral shape of the particulate AQY was flatter in the visible regime. This feature resulted in a disproportionally higher visible light-driven CO production by particles, thereby increasing the ratio of particle- to CDOM-based CO photoproduction with depth in the euphotic zone. In terms of depth-integrated production in the euphotic zone, CO formation from CDOM was dominated by the ultraviolet (UV, 290-400 nm) radiation whereas UV and visible light played roughly equal roles in CO production from particles. Spatially, CO AQY of bulk particulate matter (i.e. the sum of organics and inorganics) augmented from the estuary and shelf to the basin while CO AQY of CDOM trended inversely. Water from the deep chlorophyll maximum layer revealed higher CO AQYs than did surface water for both particles and CDOM. CO AQY of bulk particulate matter exceeded that of CDOM on the shelf and in the basin, but the sequence reversed in the estuary. Without consideration of the potential role of metal oxides (e.g. iron oxides) in particle photochemistry

  14. Spectrally resolved efficiencies of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction in the Western Canadian Arctic: particles versus solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Xie, H.; Bélanger, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-11-01

    Spectrally resolved efficiency (i.e. apparent quantum yield, AQY) of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction is a useful indicator of substrate photoreactivity and a crucial parameter for modeling CO photoproduction rates in the water column. Recent evidence has suggested that CO photoproduction from particles in marine waters is significant compared to the well-known CO production from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photodegradation. Although CDOM-based CO AQY spectra have been extensively determined, little is known of this information on the particulate phase. Using water samples collected from the Mackenzie estuary, shelf, and Canada Basin in the Southeastern Beaufort Sea, the present study for the first time quantified the AQY spectra of particle-based CO photoproduction and compared them with the concomitantly determined CDOM-based CO AQY spectra. CO AQYs of both particles and CDOM decreased with wavelength but the spectral shape of the particulate AQY was flatter in the visible regime. This feature resulted in a disproportionally higher visible light-driven CO production by particles, thereby increasing the ratio of particle- to CDOM-based CO photoproduction with depth in the euphotic zone. In terms of depth-integrated production in the euphotic zone, CO formation from CDOM was dominated by the ultraviolet (UV, 290-400 nm) radiation whereas UV and visible light played roughly equal roles in CO production from particles. Spatially, CO AQY of bulk particulate matter (i.e. the sum of organics and inorganics) augmented from the estuary to shelf to basin while CO AQY of CDOM trended inversely. Water from the deep chlorophyll maximum layer revealed higher CO AQYs than did surface water for both particles and CDOM. CO AQY of bulk particulate matter exceeded that of CDOM on the shelf and in the basin but the sequence reversed in the estuary. Mineral absorption-corrected CO AQY of particulate organic matter (POM) was, however, greater than its CDOM

  15. Dependence of cloud properties derived from spectrally resolved visible satellite observations on surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Grzegorski, M.; Platt, U.

    2008-05-01

    Cloud climate feedback constitutes the most important uncertainty in climate modelling, and currently even its sign is still unknown. In the recently published report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), 6 out of 20 climate models showed a positive and 14 a negative cloud radiative feedback in a doubled CO2 scenario. The radiative budget of clouds has also been investigated by experimental methods, especially by studying the relation of satellite observed broad band shortwave and longwave radiation to sea surface temperature. Here we present a new method for the investigation of the dependence of cloud properties on temperature changes, derived from spectrally resolved satellite observations in the visible spectral range. Our study differs from previous investigations in three important ways: first, we directly extract cloud properties (effective cloud fraction and effective cloud top height) and relate them to surface temperature. Second, we retrieve the cloud altitude from the atmospheric O2 absorption instead from thermal IR radiation. Third, our correlation analysis is performed using 7.5 years of global monthly anomalies (with respect to the average of the same month for all years). For most parts of the globe (except the tropics) we find a negative correlation of effective cloud fraction versus surface-near temperature. In contrast, for the effective cloud top height a positive correlation is found for almost the whole globe. Both findings might serve as an indicator for an overall positive cloud radiative feedback. Another peculiarity of our study is that the cloud-temperature relationships are determined for fixed locations (instead to spatial variations over selected areas) and are based on the "natural" variability over several years (instead the anomaly for a strong El-Nino event). From a detailed comparison to cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), in general good agreement is found

  16. MRI-coupled spectrally-resolved fluorescence tomography for in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Tuttle, Stephen B.; Jiang, Shudong; Springett, Roger; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2008-02-01

    A unique fluorescence imaging system incorporates multi-channel spectrometer-based optical detection directly into clinical MRI for simultaneous MR and spectrally-resolved fluorescence tomography acquisition in small animal and human breast-sized volumes. A custom designed MRI rodent coil adapted to accommodate optical fibers in a circular geometry for contact mode acquisition provides small animal imaging capabilities, and human breast-sized volumes are imaged using a clinical breast coil modified with an optical fiber patient array. Spectroscopy fibers couple light emitted from the tissue surface to sixteen highly sensitive CCD-based spectrometers operating in parallel. Tissue structural information obtained from standard and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images is used to spatially constrain the diffuse fluorescence tomography reconstruction algorithm, improving fluorescence imaging capabilities qualitatively and quantitatively. Simultaneous acquisition precludes the use of complex co-registration processes. Calibration procedures for the optical acquisition system are reviewed and the imaging limits of the system are investigated in homogeneous and heterogeneous gelatin phantoms containing Indocyanine Green (ICG). Prior knowledge of fluorescence emission spectra is used to de-couple fluorescence emission from residual excitation laser cross-talk. Preliminary in vivo data suggests improved fluorescence imaging in mouse brain tumors using MR-derived spatial priors. U-251 human gliomas were implanted intracranially into nude mice and combined contrast enhanced MRI/fluorescence tomography acquisition was completed at 24 hour intervals over the course of 72 hours after administration of an EGFR targeted NIR fluorophore. Reconstructed images demonstrate an inability to recover reasonable images of fluorescence activity without the use of MRI spatial priors.

  17. High-resolution spectrally-resolved fiber optic sensor interrogation system based on a standard DWDM laser module.

    PubMed

    Njegovec, Matej; Donlagic, Denis

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a spectrally-resolved integration system suitable for the reading of Bragg grating, all-fiber Fabry-Perot, and similar spectrally-resolved fiber-optic sensors. This system is based on a standard telecommunication dense wavelength division multiplexing transmission module that contains a distributed feedback laser diode and a wavelength locker. Besides the transmission module, only a few additional opto-electronic components were needed to build an experimental interrogation system that demonstrated over a 2 nm wide wavelength interrogation range, and a 1 pm wavelength resolution. When the system was combined with a typical Bragg grating sensor, a strain resolution of 1 με and temperature resolution of 0.1 °C were demonstrated experimentally. The proposed interrogation system relies entirely on Telecordia standard compliant photonic components and can thus be straightforwardly qualified for use within the range of demanding applications.

  18. New Instruments for Spectrally-Resolved Solar Soft X-ray Observations from CubeSats, and Larger Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Shih, A.; Warren, H. P.; DeForest, C. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics and evolution of these energetic processes; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport. A better understanding of the thermal plasma informs our interpretation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations of nonthermal particles, improving our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-SDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. An X123-CdTe cadmium-telluride detector is also included for ~5-100 keV HXR spectroscopy with ~0.5-1 keV FWHM resolution. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a pinhole aperture and X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide full-Sun imaging from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. We discuss scaled versions of these instruments, with greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and significantly improved spectral and spatial resolutions for the imager, for deployment on larger platforms such as Small Explorer missions.

  19. A Comparison of PSD Enveloping Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to derive a power spectral density (PSD) envelope for nonstationary acceleration time histories, including launch vehicle data, so that components can be designed and tested accordingly. This paper presents the results of the three methods for an actual flight accelerometer record. Guidelines are given for the application of each method to nonstationary data. The method can be extended to other scenarios, including transportation vibration.

  20. Nonstationary analogue black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    We study the existence of analogue nonstationary spherically symmetric black holes. The prime example is the acoustic model see Unruh (1981 Phys. Rev. Lett. 46 1351). We consider also a more general class of metrics that could be useful in other physical models of analogue black and white holes. We give examples of the appearance of black holes and of disappearance of white holes. We also discuss the relation between the apparent and the event horizons for the case of analogue black holes. In the end we study the inverse problem of determination of black or white holes by boundary measurements for the spherically symmetric nonstationary metrics.

  1. Nonstationary interference and scattering from random media

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.

    1991-12-01

    For the small angle scattering of coherent plane waves from inhomogeneous random media, the three dimensional mean square distribution of random fluctuations may be recovered from the interferometric detection of the nonstationary modulational structure of the scattered field. Modulational properties of coherent waves scattered from random media are related to nonlocal correlations in the double sideband structure of the Fourier transform of the scattering potential. Such correlations may be expressed in terms of a suitability generalized spectral coherence function for analytic fields.

  2. Spectrally resolved eclipse maps of the accretion disk in UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, Rene G. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Horne, Keith; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.

    1993-01-01

    An effort is made to observationally constrain accretion disks on the basis of light curves from the eclipsing cataclysmic variable UX Ursae Majoris, reconstructing the spectral energy distribution across the face of an accretion disk. The spectral resolution obtained suffices to reveal not only the radial dependence of absorption and emission line features within the disk, but also the spectral details of the bright spot that is formed where the accretion stream from the secondary star collides with the disk. The importance of such constraints for theoretical models is noted.

  3. Spectrally resolved time-correlated single photon counting: a novel approach for characterization of endogenous fluorescence in isolated cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chorvat, D; Chorvatova, A

    2006-12-01

    A new setup for time-resolved fluorescence micro-spectroscopy of cells, based on multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting, was designed and tested. Here we demonstrate that the spectrometer allows fast and reproducible measurements of endogenous flavin fluorescence measured directly in living cardiac cells after excitation with visible picosecond laser diodes. Two complementary approaches for the analysis of spectrally- and time-resolved autofluorescence data are presented, comprising the fluorescence decay fitting by exponential series and the time-resolved emission spectroscopy analysis. In isolated cardiac myocytes, we observed three distinct lifetime pools with characteristic lifetime values spanning from picosecond to nanosecond range and the time-dependent red shift of the autofluorescence emission spectra. We compared obtained results to in vitro recordings of free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FAD in lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH). The developed setup combines the strength of both spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and provides a solid base for the study of complex systems with intrinsic fluorescence, such as identification of the individual flavinoprotein components in living cardiac cells. This approach therefore constitutes an important instrumental advancement towards redox fluorimetry of living cardiomyocytes, with the perspective of its applications in the investigation of oxidative metabolic state under pathophysiological conditions, such as ischemia and/or metabolic disorders. PMID:17033778

  4. Steady state anisotropy two-photon microscopy resolves multiple, spectrally similar fluorophores, enabling in vivo multilabel imaging.

    PubMed

    Dubach, J Matthew; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The use of spectrally distinguishable fluorescent dyes enables imaging of multiple targets. However, in two-photon microscopy, the number of fluorescent labels with distinct emission spectra that can be effectively excited and resolved is constrained by the confined tuning range of the excitation laser and the broad and overlapping nature of fluorophore two-photon absorption spectra. This limitation effectively reduces the number of available imaging channels. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon steady state anisotropy imaging (2PSSA) offers the capability to resolve otherwise unresolvable fluorescent tracers both in live cells and in mouse tumor models. This approach expands the number of biological targets that can be imaged simultaneously, increasing the total amount of information that can be obtained through imaging.

  5. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE≤0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  6. Chromatic-aberration diagnostic based on a spectrally resolved lateral-shearing interferometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bahk, Seung -Whan; Dorrer, Christopher; Roides, Rick G.; Bromage, Jake

    2016-03-18

    Here, a simple diagnostic characterizing one-dimensional chromatic aberrations in a broadband beam is introduced. A Ronchi grating placed in front of a spectrometer entrance slit provides spectrally coupled spatial phase information. The radial-group delay of a refractive system and the pulse-front delay of a wedged glass plate have been characterized accurately in a demonstration experiment.

  7. Time-resolved ARPES with sub-15 fs temporal and near Fourier-limited spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, G.; Hendel, A.; Stange, A.; Hanff, K.; Oloff, L.-P.; Yang, L. X.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with sub-15 fs temporal resolution is presented. A hollow-fiber compressor is used for the generation of 6.5 fs white light pump pulses, and a high-harmonic-generation source delivers 11 fs probe pulses at a photon energy of 22.1 eV. A value of 13 fs full width at half-maximum of the pump-probe cross correlation signal is determined by analyzing a photoemission intensity transient probing a near-infrared interband transition in 1T-TiSe2. Notably, the energy resolution of the setup conforms to typical values reported in conventional time-resolved photoemission studies using high harmonics, and an ultimate resolution of 170 meV is feasible.

  8. Spectral Characterization of A Resolved M dwarf-M dwarf Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, Tomoki; Burgasser, Adam J.; Aganze, Christian; Mercado, Gretel; Suarez, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We report characterization of the resolved binary M dwarf SDSS J155526.53+095409.5AB through spectroscopic and imaging analysis. Classification of resolved near-infrared spectra with IRTF/SpeX and tools in the SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit (SPLAT) indicate component types of M3.5 and M8, separated by about 4''. We match the data to atmosphere models using an Monte Carlo Markov Chain routine to determine preliminary physical properties for each component (temperature, surface gravity and metallicity), and obtain estimates for the distance (106±11 pc) and projected separation (419±45 AU).Funding acknowledgement: This project is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G.

  9. Time-resolved spatial phase measurements with 2-dimensional spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Colby; Planchon, Thomas; Amir, Wafa; Squier, Jeff A.; Durfee, Charles G.

    2007-03-01

    We are using 2-dimensional spectral interferometry for sensitive measurements of spatial phase distortions. The reference pulse and the time-delayed probe pulse are coincident on an imaging spectrometer, yielding spectral and spatial phase information. This technique offers the potential of higher sensitivity than traditional spatial interferometry since there are many fringes of data for each spatial point. We illustrate this technique with measurements of the thermal lensing profile in a cryogenically cooled Ti:sapphire amplifier crystal that is pumped by tens of watts of power from four frequency-doubled Nd:YLF lasers running at 1 kHz. By adjusting the relative delay of the probe and reference pulses, we characterize the thermal transients during and after the pump pulses. We compare the measured transient thermal profiles with those calculated with a finite-element model.

  10. Corneal birefringence measured by spectrally resolved Mueller matrix ellipsometry and implications for non-invasive glucose monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Peter; Kaltenbach, Johannes-Maria; Wicker, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A good understanding of the corneal birefringence properties is essential for polarimetric glucose monitoring in the aqueous humor of the eye. Therefore, we have measured complete 16-element Mueller matrices of single-pass transitions through nine porcine corneas in-vitro, spectrally resolved in the range 300…1000 nm. These ellipsometric measurements have been performed at several angles of incidence at the apex and partially at the periphery of the corneas. The Mueller matrices have been decomposed into linear birefringence, circular birefringence (i.e. optical rotation), depolarization, and diattenuation. We found considerable circular birefringence, strongly increasing with decreasing wavelength, for most corneas. Furthermore, the decomposition revealed significant dependence of the linear retardance (in nm) on the wavelength below 500 nm. These findings suggest that uniaxial and biaxial crystals are insufficient models for a general description of the corneal birefringence, especially in the blue and in the UV spectral range. The implications on spectral-polarimetric approaches for glucose monitoring in the eye (for diabetics) are discussed. PMID:27446644

  11. Corneal birefringence measured by spectrally resolved Mueller matrix ellipsometry and implications for non-invasive glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Peter; Kaltenbach, Johannes-Maria; Wicker, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A good understanding of the corneal birefringence properties is essential for polarimetric glucose monitoring in the aqueous humor of the eye. Therefore, we have measured complete 16-element Mueller matrices of single-pass transitions through nine porcine corneas in-vitro, spectrally resolved in the range 300…1000 nm. These ellipsometric measurements have been performed at several angles of incidence at the apex and partially at the periphery of the corneas. The Mueller matrices have been decomposed into linear birefringence, circular birefringence (i.e. optical rotation), depolarization, and diattenuation. We found considerable circular birefringence, strongly increasing with decreasing wavelength, for most corneas. Furthermore, the decomposition revealed significant dependence of the linear retardance (in nm) on the wavelength below 500 nm. These findings suggest that uniaxial and biaxial crystals are insufficient models for a general description of the corneal birefringence, especially in the blue and in the UV spectral range. The implications on spectral-polarimetric approaches for glucose monitoring in the eye (for diabetics) are discussed. PMID:27446644

  12. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  13. Spectrally-Resolved Response Properties of the Three Most Advanced FRET Based Fluorescent Protein Voltage Probes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Dimitar; Iwamoto, Yuka; Akemann, Walther; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Genetically-encoded optical probes for membrane potential hold the promise of monitoring electrical signaling of electrically active cells such as specific neuronal populations in intact brain tissue. The most advanced class of these probes was generated by molecular fusion of the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of Ci-VSP with a fluorescent protein (FP) pair. We quantitatively compared the three most advanced versions of these probes (two previously reported and one new variant), each involving a spectrally distinct tandem of FPs. Despite these different FP tandems and dissimilarities within the amino acid sequence linking the VSD to the FPs, the amplitude and kinetics of voltage dependent fluorescence changes were surprisingly similar. However, each of these fluorescent probes has specific merits when considering different potential applications. PMID:19234605

  14. PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  15. Advanced microscopy :time-resolved multi-spectral imaging of single biomolecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Carl C.; Chandler, David W.; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Luong, A. Khai

    2005-12-01

    Over the past few years we have developed the ability to acquire images through a confocal microscope that contain, for each pixel, the simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and spectra of multiple fluorophores within that pixel. We have demonstrated that our system has the sensitivity to make these measurements on single molecules. The spectra and lifetimes of fluorophores bound to complex molecules contain a wealth of information on the conformational dynamics and local chemical environments of the molecules. However, the detailed record of spectral and temporal information our system provides from fluorophores in single molecules has not been previously available. Therefore, we have studied several fluorophores and simple fluorophore-molecule systems that are representative of the use of fluorophores in biological systems. Experiments include studies of a simple fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, green fluorescent probe variants and quantum dots. This work is intended to provide a basis for understanding how fluorophores report on the chemistry of more complex biological molecules.

  16. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  17. Spectrally resolved hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light emitting diodes: Magneto-electroluminescence studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S. A.; Kelley, M. R.; Martinez, N. J. D.; Nie, W.; Mohite, A.; Nayyar, I. H.; Tretiak, S.; Smith, D. L.; Liu, F.; Ruden, P. P.

    2014-10-13

    We use spectrally resolved magneto-electroluminescence (EL) measurements to study the energy dependence of hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light-emitting diodes. Using layered devices that generate bright exciplex emission, we show that the increase in EL emission intensity I due to small applied magnetic fields of order 100 mT is markedly larger at the high-energy blue end of the EL spectrum (ΔI/I ∼ 11%) than at the low-energy red end (∼4%). Concurrently, the widths of the magneto-EL curves increase monotonically from blue to red, revealing an increasing hyperfine coupling between polarons and nuclei and directly providing insight into the energy-dependent spatial extent and localization of polarons.

  18. Investigation of Solar Flares Using Spectrally, Spatially, and Temporally Resolved Observations in Gamma Rays, Hard X Rays, and Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, Carol Jo; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy components of solar flares radiate at a wide range of wavelengths. We are using spatially, spectrally, and temporally resolved hard X-ray, gamma-ray, and microwave observations of solar flares to investigate flare models and to understand the flare acceleration process. The hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations are obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft that was launched on February 5, 2002. The microwave observations are obtained with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), which has been dedicated to daily observations of solar flares in microwaves with a five-element interferometer since June 1992. These studies are expected to yield exciting new insights into the fundamental physics of the flare acceleration processes.

  19. Spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, and the freshwater crocodile, Crocodylus johnstoni.

    PubMed

    Nagloo, Nicolas; Collin, Shaun P; Hemmi, Jan M; Hart, Nathan S

    2016-05-01

    Crocodilians are apex amphibious predators that occupy a range of tropical habitats. In this study, we examined whether their semi-aquatic lifestyle and ambush hunting mode are reflected in specific adaptations in the peripheral visual system. Design-based stereology and microspectrophotometry were used to assess spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of saltwater (Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni). Both species possess a foveal streak that spans the naso-temporal axis and mediates high spatial acuity across the central visual field. The saltwater crocodile and freshwater crocodile have a peak spatial resolving power of 8.8 and 8.0 cycles deg(-1), respectively. Measurement of the outer segment dimensions and spectral absorbance revealed five distinct photoreceptor types consisting of three single cones, one twin cone and a rod. The three single cones (saltwater/freshwater crocodile) are violet (424/426 nm λmax), green (502/510 nm λmax) and red (546/554 nm λmax) sensitive, indicating the potential for trichromatic colour vision. The visual pigments of both members of the twin cones have the same λmax as the red-sensitive single cone and the rod has a λmax at 503/510 nm (saltwater/freshwater). The λmax values of all types of visual pigment occur at longer wavelengths in the freshwater crocodile compared with the saltwater crocodile. Given that there is a greater abundance of long wavelength light in freshwater compared with a saltwater environment, the photoreceptors would be more effective at detecting light in their respective habitats. This suggests that the visual systems of both species are adapted to the photic conditions of their respective ecological niche. PMID:27208035

  20. Spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, and the freshwater crocodile, Crocodylus johnstoni.

    PubMed

    Nagloo, Nicolas; Collin, Shaun P; Hemmi, Jan M; Hart, Nathan S

    2016-05-01

    Crocodilians are apex amphibious predators that occupy a range of tropical habitats. In this study, we examined whether their semi-aquatic lifestyle and ambush hunting mode are reflected in specific adaptations in the peripheral visual system. Design-based stereology and microspectrophotometry were used to assess spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of saltwater (Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni). Both species possess a foveal streak that spans the naso-temporal axis and mediates high spatial acuity across the central visual field. The saltwater crocodile and freshwater crocodile have a peak spatial resolving power of 8.8 and 8.0 cycles deg(-1), respectively. Measurement of the outer segment dimensions and spectral absorbance revealed five distinct photoreceptor types consisting of three single cones, one twin cone and a rod. The three single cones (saltwater/freshwater crocodile) are violet (424/426 nm λmax), green (502/510 nm λmax) and red (546/554 nm λmax) sensitive, indicating the potential for trichromatic colour vision. The visual pigments of both members of the twin cones have the same λmax as the red-sensitive single cone and the rod has a λmax at 503/510 nm (saltwater/freshwater). The λmax values of all types of visual pigment occur at longer wavelengths in the freshwater crocodile compared with the saltwater crocodile. Given that there is a greater abundance of long wavelength light in freshwater compared with a saltwater environment, the photoreceptors would be more effective at detecting light in their respective habitats. This suggests that the visual systems of both species are adapted to the photic conditions of their respective ecological niche.

  1. Spectrally and time-resolved study of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in cardiac myocytes from human biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Chorvat, D., Jr.; Poirier, N.; Miró, J.; Dahdah, N.; Chorvatova, A.

    2007-09-01

    Rejection of transplanted hearts remains an important reason for death of transplanted children. Finding diagnostic tools for its detection can therefore improve the prognosis in this population of patients. Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) by cardiac catheterization is currently accepted as the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of rejection. Here, we investigate new approach to monitor mitochondrial metabolic state of cardiac cells using spectrally-resolved autofluorescence lifetime detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), or NAD(P)H, the principal electron donor in mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism responsible for vital ATP supply of cardiomyocytes. NAD(P)H autofluorescence is long used for non-invasive fluorescent probing the metabolic state of the heart. In this contribution we report dynamic characteristics of NAD(P)H fluorescence decays in living human cardiomyocytes from EMB, following excitation by UV-pulsed laser diode and detection by spectrally-resolved time-correlated single photon counting. At least a 3-exponential decay model, with 0.5-0.7 ns, 1.9-2.4 ns and 9.0-15.0 ns lifetimes, is necessary to describe cardiomyocyte autofluorescence in human cells. When gathered data were compared to those recorded under same conditions in rats, autofluorescence in human hearts was found significantly lower in comparison to rat ones. Rotenone, the inhibitor of the Complex I of the respiratory chain, increased the fluorescence in human cardiac cells, making them more comparable to experimental rat model. These results suggest that human cardiac cells are more metabolically active than the rat ones in the same conditions. Presented work proposes a new tool for evaluation of oxidative metabolism changes in transplanted hearts.

  2. Novel instrumentation for spectrally resolved soft x-ray plasma tomography: Development and pilot results on TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmaenok, L. A.; Golovkin, S. V.; Govorun, V. N.; Ekimov, A. V.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Pickalov, V. V.; Belik, V. P.; Schüller, F. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Prokhorov, K. A.; Andreev, S. S.; Sorokin, A. A.; Podlaskin, B. G.; Khasanov, L. V.

    2001-02-01

    A novel instrumentation for wavelength- and time-resolved plasma emission tomography in the range 0.1-4 keV has been demonstrated on the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR). The technique is intended for reconstruction of distributions of local emission coefficients (LEC) for selected spectral lines of impurity ions. Further determination (with additional data on electron density and temperature) of spatial distributions of impurity ions at particular ionization stages will become feasible. Spectrally selective plasma images at several viewpoints around plasma are obtained with miniature pinhole cameras supplemented with multilayer mirrors as dispersion elements. The x-ray image is converted to a visible image and transported by a fiber bundle to a gain enhanced recording camera with an electron bombarded charge coupled device tube. A part of the system has been installed on temporary TEXTOR ports. First demonstration results have been obtained on plasma imaging and on subsequent LEC reconstruction using a modified iterative sinogram restoration tomography algorithm. The complete diagnostics will be operational after the TEXTOR shutdown in 2001.

  3. SPATIALLY AND SPECTRALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF A ZEBRA PATTERN IN A SOLAR DECIMETRIC RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; Gary, D. E.; Jing Ju

    2011-07-20

    We present the first interferometric observation of a zebra-pattern radio burst with simultaneous high spectral ({approx}1 MHz) and high time (20 ms) resolution. The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope Subsystem Testbed (FST) and the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) were used in parallel to observe the X1.5 flare on 2006 December 14. By using OVSA to calibrate the FST, the source position of the zebra pattern can be located on the solar disk. With the help of multi-wavelength observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, the zebra source is explored in relation to the magnetic field configuration. New constraints are placed on the source size and position as a function of frequency and time. We conclude that the zebra burst is consistent with a double-plasma resonance model in which the radio emission occurs in resonance layers where the upper-hybrid frequency is harmonically related to the electron cyclotron frequency in a coronal magnetic loop.

  4. "Cat"-ology: Spectrally resolved neurophotonics in the mammalian brain and phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    Physicists provide significant contributions to the field of Biology and Medical Sciences by applying basic physics principles to the field. Specifically, in this work, we probed the light-matter interactions in the NIR region to understand physiological processes in the mammalian brain. We sought to improve on existing principles and propose a new technique by which we can decipher these processes spectrally. This technique touted to be independent of the light transport regime allowed us to examine the hemodynamics and neuronal activity. The aim was then to test this technique and see if it produces results that were comparable to the well established Fd-NIRS in distinguishing physiological processes. Secondly, we wanted to prove that this technique was light transport regime independent which is not the case for the Fd-NIRS. The cat was chosen as an ideal test subject as its anatomy is such that photons are not fully diffusive before being detected as the total size of the grey matter in the cat is roughly 3mm thick. Additionally, we had a priori information about the activation of the visual cortex as a response to specific stimuli.

  5. Phenomenology of spectrally and temporally resolved infrared emissions from bomb detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Kevin; Dills, Anthony; Tuttle, Ron; Perram, Glen

    2002-10-01

    The remote sensing of infrared signatures from exothermic reactions during military operations, including missile launches, muzzle flashes, and bomb detonations has been studied using fast FTIR techniques. Battle space characterization includes the ability to classify the munitions type, size, and other characteristics. One possible approach to munitions classification is to understand the spectral and temporal signatures from explosive ordinance. To investigate this possibility, experimental data has been collected remotely from ground-based sensors, processed, and analyzed for several conventional munitions. Field observations of 56 detonation events included a set of aircraft delivered ordnance and a series of static ground detonations for a variety of bomb sizes, types and environmental conditions. The emission is well represented by a gray body with continuously decreasing temperature and characteristic decay times of 1-4 s, providing only limited variability with detonation conditions. However, the fireball size times the emissivity as a function of time can be determined from the spectra without imaging and provides a more sensitive signature. The degree of temporal overlap as a function of frequency for a pair of detonation events provides a very sensitive discriminator for explosion conditions. The temporal overlap decreases with increasing emission frequency for all the observed events, indicating more information content at higher frequencies. Finally, the temporal nature of the emissions has been analyzed, providing a significant reduction in the dimensionality of the data.

  6. Spatially Resolved WFC3/Grism Spectral Line Imaging of Gravitational Lensed Herschel-selected Luminous Dusty Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2013-10-01

    We propose WFC3 G102 and G141 grism spectral imaging of two gravitationally lensed dusty, starburst galaxies found with the 600 square degree Herschel-ATLAS survey. One galaxy is the brightest {both in far-IR at 250 micron and in near-IR in J/K-band}, while the second is the largest {11 arcsec on the sky} of the lensed sub-mm galaxies in a sample of 200 imaged with WFC3/F110W. The two galaxies are at redshifts that are optimal for grism observations with HST/WFC3. The lensing flux magnification and spatial enhancement makes them very unique for the study proposed hereand will increase the number of lensed galaxies imaged in spectral lines with WFC3 grisms to three from existing single serendipitous lens studied in HST-3D survey. With WFC3 grism spectra taken in a specific orientation to minimize foreground and lensing galaxy confusion we can map each of these galaxies in a variety of spatially-resolved spectral lines in the rest-frame optical, including impostant Balmer lines for studies on the interstellar medium. The grism spectra will allow us to determine the gas-phase metallicities of these two galaxies and to study the extinction of optically-thin regions compared to direct sub-mm emission seen in interferometric continuum images of optically thick dust in starbursting knots and clumps. With spatial resolution provided by gravitational lensing combined with HST/WFC3 resolution, we will be able to study the dependence of line ratios in high density/SFR regions to low dense diffuse environments.

  7. Modeling nonstationary longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Antón, V; Zimmerman, D L

    2000-09-01

    An important theme of longitudinal data analysis in the past two decades has been the development and use of explicit parametric models for the data's variance-covariance structure. A variety of these models have been proposed, of which most are second-order stationary. A few are flexible enough to accommodate nonstationarity, i.e., nonconstant variances and/or correlations that are not a function solely of elapsed time between measurements. We review five nonstationary models that we regard as most useful: (1) the unstructured covariance model, (2) unstructured antedependence models, (3) structured antedependence models, (4) autoregressive integrated moving average and similar models, and (5) random coefficients models. We evaluate the relative strengths and limitations of each model, emphasizing when it is inappropriate or unlikely to be useful. We present three examples to illustrate the fitting and comparison of the models and to demonstrate that nonstationary longitudinal data can be modeled effectively and, in some cases, quite parsimoniously. In these examples, the antedependence models generally prove to be superior and the random coefficients models prove to be inferior. We conclude that antedependence models should be given much greater consideration than they have historically received.

  8. Synchronization Analysis of Nonstationary Bivariate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurths, J.

    First the concept of synchronization in coupled complex systems is presented and it is shown that synchronization phenomena are abundant in science, nature, engineer- ing etc. We use this concept to treat the inverse problem and to reveal interactions between oscillating systems from observational data. First it is discussed how time varying phases and frequencies can be estimated from time series and second tech- niques for detection and quantification of hidden synchronization is presented. We demonstrate that this technique is effective for the analysis of systems' interrelation from noisy nonstationary bivariate data and provides other insights than traditional cross correlation and spectral analysis. For this, model examples and geophysical data are discussed.

  9. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: Förster resonant energy transfer global analysis with a one- and two-exponential donor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strat, Daniela; Dolp, Frank; von Einem, Bjorn; Steinmetz, Cornelia; von Arnim, Christine A. F.; Rueck, Angelika

    2011-02-01

    In many fields of life science, visualization of spatial proximity, as an indicator of protein interactions in living cells, is of outstanding interest. A method to accomplish this is the measurement of Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) by means of spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fluorescence lifetime is calculated using a multiple-wavelength fitting routine. The donor profile is assumed first to have a monoexponential time-dependent behavior, and the acceptor decay profile is solved analytically. Later, the donor profile is assumed to have a two-exponential time-dependent behavior and the acceptor decay profile is derived analytically. We develop and apply a multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis system for FRET global analysis with time-resolved and spectrally resolved techniques, including information from donor and acceptor channels in contrast to using just a limited spectral data set from one detector only and a model accounting only for the donor signal. This analysis is used to demonstrate close vicinity of β-secretase (BACE) and GGA1, two proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology. We attempt to verify if an improvement in calculating the donor lifetimes could be achieved when time-resolved and spectrally resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated.

  10. Spatially resolved Spitzer-IRS spectral maps of the superwind in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão, P.; Armus, L.; Lehnert, M. D.; Guillard, P.; Heckman, T.; Draine, B.; Hollenbach, D.; Walter, F.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D.; Shopbell, P.; Boulanger, F.; Surace, J.; Hoopes, C.; Engelbracht, C.

    2015-08-01

    We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with Spitzer - IRS. The spectral regions covered include the H2 S(1)-S(3), [Ne II], [Ne III] emission lines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. We estimate the total warm H2 mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between Mwarm ˜ 5 and 17 × 106 M⊙ and EK ˜ 6 and 20 × 1053 erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 μm PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of 5 across the wind region. The northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disc or the southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H2/PAH) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disc. This enhancement in the H2/PAH ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [Ne III]/[Ne II] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H2 in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H2 line intensities can be reproduced with low-velocity shocks (v < 40 km s-1) driven into moderately dense molecular gas (102 < nH < 104 cm-3) entrained in the outflow.

  11. Spectrally Resolved Flux Derived from Collocated AIRS and CERES Observations and its Application in Model Validation. Part I; Clear-Sky Over the Tropic Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xianglei; Yang, Wenze; Loeb, Norman G.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved outgoing IR flux, the integrand of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), has its unique value in evaluating model simulations. Here we describe an algorithm of deriving such clear-sky outgoing spectral flux through the whole IR region from the collocated Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Clouds & the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measurements over the tropical oceans. Based on the scene types and corresponding angular distribution models (ADMs) used in the CERES Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) dataset, spectrally-dependent ADMs are developed and used to estimate the spectral flux at each AIRS channel. A multivariate linear prediction scheme is then used to estimate spectral fluxes at frequencies not covered by the AIRS instrument. The whole algorithm is validated using synthetic spectra as well as the CERES OLR measurements. Using the GFDL AM2 model simulation as a case study, the application of the derived clear-sky outgoing spectral flux in model evaluation is illustrated. By comparing the observed and simulated spectral flux in 2004, compensating errors in the simulated OLR from different absorption bands can be revealed, so does the errors from frequencies within a given absorption band. Discrepancies between the simulated and observed spatial distributions and seasonal evolutions of the spectral fluxes at different spectral ranges are further discussed. The methodology described in this study can be applied to other surface types as well as cloudy-sky observations and corresponding model evaluations.

  12. Spatially and spectrally resolved particle swarm optimization for precise optical property estimation using diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kholodtsova, Maria N; Daul, Christian; Loschenov, Victor B; Blondel, Walter C P M

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients µa and µs) of biological tissues from spatially-resolved spectroscopy measurements. A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-based algorithm was implemented and firstly modified to deal with spatial and spectral resolutions of the data, and to solve the corresponding inverse problem. Secondly, the optimization was improved by fitting exponential decays to the two best points among all clusters of the "particles" randomly distributed all over the parameter space (µs, µa) of possible solutions. The consequent acceleration of all the groups of particles to the "best" curve leads to significant error decrease in the optical property estimation. The study analyzes the estimated optical property error as a function of the various PSO parameter combinations, and several performance criteria such as the cost-function error and the number of iterations in the algorithms proposed. The final one led to error values between ground truth and estimated values of µs and µa less than 6%. PMID:27410289

  13. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a "double bun" structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  14. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  15. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Transient Free Radicals in the Mid-Infrared Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjork, Bryce J.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Changala, Bryan; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Cossel, Kevin; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of transient free radicals, such as HOCO and Criegee intermediates, play important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. Establishing accurate kinetics models for these complex systems require knowledge of the reaction rates and lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. However, standard spectroscopic techniques lack a combination of sensitivity, frequency resolution, and adequate temporal resolution to survey these reactions on the μs timescale. To answer this challenge, we have developed time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS). This novel technique allows for the detection of transient intermediates with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We demonstrate this technique in the mid-infrared spectral region, at 3.7 μm, by studying the photolysis of deuterated acrylic acid. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of photoproducts trans-DOCO, HOD, and D_2O, identified through their unique rovibrational structure, with 5 × 1010 molecules cm-3 sensitivity, and with a time resolution of 25 μs. We aim to apply this technique to detect directly the formation of the DOCO intermediate in the OD + CO chemical reaction at atmospherically relevant pressures, in order to validate statistical rate models of this reaction.

  16. Experimental study of the phase-shift miscalibration error in phase-shifting interferometry: use of a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjit K; Kothiyal, Mahendra P

    2007-08-01

    The white-light interferogram in a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer is decomposed in its constituent spectral components by a spectrometer and displayed along its chromaticity axis. A piezoelectric transducer phase shifter in such an interferometer can give a desired phase shift of pi/2 only at one wavelength. The phase shift varies continuously at all other wavelengths along the chromaticity axis. This situation is ideal for an experimental study of the phase error due to the phase-shift error in the phase-shifting technique, as it will be shown in this paper.

  17. A BOINC based, citizen-science project for pixel spectral energy distribution fitting of resolved galaxies in multi-wavelength surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinsen, Kevin; Thilker, David

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present our experience from the first year of theSkyNet Pan-STARRS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS) project. This citizen-scientist driven research project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) middleware and thousands of Internet-connected computers to measure the resolved galactic structural properties of ˜100,000 low redshift galaxies. We are combining the spectral coverage of GALEX, Pan-STARRS1, SDSS, and WISE to generate a value-added, multi-wavelength UV-optical-NIR galaxy atlas for the nearby Universe. Specifically, we are measuring physical parameters (such as local stellar mass, star formation rate, and first-order star formation history) on a resolved pixel-by-pixel basis using spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting techniques in a distributed computing mode. Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

  18. Information retrieval for nonstationary data records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, M. Y.

    1971-01-01

    A review and a critical discussion are made on the existing methods for analysis of nonstationary time series, and a new algorithm for splitting nonstationary time series, is applied to the analysis of sunspot data.

  19. Spectrally resolved chromatic confocal interferometry for one-shot nano-scale surface profilometry with several tens of micrometric depth range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Chen, Yi-Shiuan; Chang, Yi-Wei; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Yeh, Sheng Lih

    2013-01-01

    In this research, new nano-scale measurement methodology based on spectrally-resolved chromatic confocal interferometry (SRCCI) was successfully developed by employing integration of chromatic confocal sectioning and spectrally-resolve white light interferometry (SRWLI) for microscopic three dimensional surface profilometry. The proposed chromatic confocal method (CCM) using a broad band while light in combination with a specially designed chromatic dispersion objective is capable of simultaneously acquiring multiple images at a large range of object depths to perform surface 3-D reconstruction by single image shot without vertical scanning and correspondingly achieving a high measurement depth range up to hundreds of micrometers. A Linnik-type interferometric configuration based on spectrally resolved white light interferometry is developed and integrated with the CCM to simultaneously achieve nanoscale axis resolution for the detection point. The white-light interferograms acquired at the exit plane of the spectrometer possess a continuous variation of wavelength along the chromaticity axis, in which the light intensity reaches to its peak when the optical path difference equals to zero between two optical arms. To examine the measurement accuracy of the developed system, a pre-calibrated accurate step height target with a total step height of 10.10 μm was measured. The experimental result shows that the maximum measurement error was verified to be less than 0.3% of the overall measuring height.

  20. Depth-resolved water column spectral absorption of sunlight by phytoplankon during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange (SOGasEx) Lagrangian tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Optical measurements made during gas exchange tracer experiments in the Southern Ocean, Atlantic sector near 51°S, 38°W from March-April 2008 (SOGasEx) were used to develop daily integrated depth- resolved PAR absorbed by phytoplankton. Particulate and phytoplankton pigment spectral absorption coefficients (ap and aph), and methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a concentrations (chl-a) from discrete samples within and below the upper mixed layer (40 stations) were combined with data from optical casts where chlorophyll-a and cdom fluorescence and PAR scalar irradiance were measured (11 stations), PAR Kd was measured from a buoy free of ship shadow for 0-5m (11 stations), and Wetlabs AC-9 whole water absorption coefficients to 150m were measured (14 stations, with 3 in common with fluorescence data) to estimate depth-resolved values for both total spectral absorption and spectral PAR irradiance. By combining depth-adjusted spectral absorption of phytoplankton pigments (aph) with depth-adjusted PAR spectral irradiance we estimated depth-resolved daily PAR irradiance absorbed by photosynthetic pigments. These data can be compared with time-integrated primary production measurements conducted on deck where solar exposure or lamp exposure was modified to simulate a range of depths. Such a synthesis should improve our estimates of depth-integrated daily primary production, and ultimately contribute to refining estimates of carbon export rates to be incorporated into a carbon budget and CO2 air-sea flux models for the SOGasEx experiments.

  1. Nonstationary statistical theory for multipactor

    SciTech Connect

    Anza, S.; Vicente, C.; Gil, J.

    2010-06-15

    This work presents a new and general approach to the real dynamics of the multipactor process: the nonstationary statistical multipactor theory. The nonstationary theory removes the stationarity assumption of the classical theory and, as a consequence, it is able to adequately model electron exponential growth as well as absorption processes, above and below the multipactor breakdown level. In addition, it considers both double-surface and single-surface interactions constituting a full framework for nonresonant polyphase multipactor analysis. This work formulates the new theory and validates it with numerical and experimental results with excellent agreement.

  2. Nonstationary signal analysis in episodic memory retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Y. G.; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    2004-04-01

    The problem of blind source separation from a mixture that has nonstationarity can be seen in signal processing, speech processing, spectral analysis and so on. This study analyzed EEG signal during episodic memory retrieval using ICA and TVAR. This paper proposes a method which combines ICA and TVAR. The signal from the brain not only exhibits the nonstationary behavior, but also contain artifacts. EEG data at the frontal lobe (F3) from the scalp is collected during the episodic memory retrieval task. The method is applied to EEG data for analysis. The artifact (eye movement) is removed by ICA, and a single burst (around 6Hz) is obtained by TVAR, suggesting that the single burst is related to the brain activity during the episodic memory retrieval.

  3. Shell stability and conditions analyzed using a new method of extracting shell areal density maps from spectrally resolved images of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Mayes, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    In warm target direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility, plastic micro-balloons doped with a titanium tracer layer in the shell and filled with deuterium gas were imploded using a low-adiabat shaped laser pulse. Continuum radiation emitted in the core is transmitted through the tracer layer and the resulting spectrum recorded with a gated multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI). Titanium K-shell line absorption spectra observed in the data are due to transitions in L-shell titanium ions driven by the backlighting continuum. The MMI data consist of an array of spectrally resolved images of the implosion. These 2-D space-resolved titanium spectral features constrain the plasma conditions and areal density of the titanium doped region of the shell. The MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and space resolved spectra of titanium spectral features. Shell areal density maps, ρL(x,y), extracted using a new method using both narrow-band images and space resolved spectra are confirmed to be consistent within uncertainties. We report plasma conditions in the titanium-doped region of electron temperature (Te) = 400 ± 28 eV, electron number density (Ne) = 8.5 × 1024 ± 2.5 × 1024 cm-3, and average areal density <ρR> = 86 ± 7 mg/cm2. Fourier analysis of areal density maps reveals shell modulations caused by hydrodynamic instability growth near the fuel-shell interface in the deceleration phase. We observe significant structure in modes l = 2-9, dominated by l = 2. We extract a target breakup fraction of 7.1 ± 1.5% from our Fourier analysis. A new method for estimating mix width is evaluated against existing literature and our target breakup fraction. We estimate a mix width of 10.5 ± 1 μm.

  4. Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry of photothermal, photocarrier, and photoluminescence response of CdSe crystals: Determination of optical, thermal, and electronic transport parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Pelzl, J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry (SR-MIRR) with super-band gap photoexcitation is introduced as a self-consistent method for semiconductor characterization (CdSe crystals grown under different conditions). Starting from a theoretical model combining the contributions of the photothermal (PT) and photocarrier (PC) signal components, an expression is derived for the thermal-to-plasma wave transition frequency ftc which is found to be wavelength-independent. The deviation of the PC component from the model at high frequency is quantitatively explained by a quasi-continuous distribution of carrier recombination lifetimes. The integral, broad frequency band (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) MIRR measurements simultaneously yielded the thermal diffusivity a, the effective IR optical absorption coefficient βeff, and the bulk carrier lifetime τc. Spectrally resolved frequency scans were conducted with interchangeable IR bandpass filters (2.2-11.3 μm) in front of the detector. The perfect spectral match of the PT and PC components is the direct experimental evidence of the key assumption in MIRR that de-exciting carriers are equivalent to blackbody (Planck) radiators. The exploitation of the β spectrum measured by MIRR allowed determining the background (equilibrium) free carrier concentration n0. At the shortest wavelength (3.3 μm), the photoluminescence (PL) component supersedes the PC one and has distinct features. The average sample temperature influences the PC component but not the PT one.

  5. Shell stability and conditions analyzed using a new method of extracting shell areal density maps from spectrally resolved images of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Mayes, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2016-01-25

    In warm target direct-drive ICF implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility, plastic microballoons doped with a titanium tracer layer in the shell and filled with deuterium gas were imploded using a low-adiabat shaped laser pulse. Continuum radiation emitted in the core is transmitted through the tracer layer and the resulting spectrum recorded with a gated multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI). Titanium K-shell line absorption spectra observed in the data are due to transitions in L-shell titanium ions driven by the backlighting continuum. The MMI data consist of an array of spectrally resolved images of the implosion. These 2-D space-resolvedmore » titanium spectral features constrain the plasma conditions and areal density of the titanium doped region of the shell. The MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and space resolved spectra of titanium spectral features. Shell areal density maps, ρL(x,y), extracted using a new method using both narrow-band images and space resolved spectra are confirmed to be consistent within uncertainties. We report plasma conditions in the titanium-doped region of electron temperature (Te) = 400±28eV, electron number density (Ne) = 8.5x1024±2.5x1024 cm-3, and average areal density <ρR> = 86±7mg/cm2. Fourier analysis of areal density maps reveals shell modulations caused by hydrodynamic instability growth near the fuel-shell interface in the deceleration phase. We observe significant structure in modes l = 2-9, dominated by l = 2. We extract a target breakup fraction of 7.1±1.5% from our Fourier analysis. A new method for estimating mix width is evaluated against existing literature and our target breakup fraction. We estimate a mix width of 10.5±1μm.« less

  6. Quantification of heart rate variability by discrete nonstationary non-Markov stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, Renat; Hänggi, Peter; Gafarov, Fail

    2002-04-01

    We develop the statistical theory of discrete nonstationary non-Markov random processes in complex systems. The objective of this paper is to find the chain of finite-difference non-Markov kinetic equations for time correlation functions (TCF) in terms of nonstationary effects. The developed theory starts from careful analysis of time correlation through nonstationary dynamics of vectors of initial and final states and nonstationary normalized TCF. Using the projection operators technique we find the chain of finite-difference non-Markov kinetic equations for discrete nonstationary TCF and for the set of nonstationary discrete memory functions (MF's). The last one contains supplementary information about nonstationary properties of the complex system on the whole. Another relevant result of our theory is the construction of the set of dynamic parameters of nonstationarity, which contains some information of the nonstationarity effects. The full set of dynamic, spectral and kinetic parameters, and kinetic functions (TCF, short MF's statistical spectra of non-Markovity parameter, and statistical spectra of nonstationarity parameter) has made it possible to acquire the in-depth information about discreteness, non-Markov effects, long-range memory, and nonstationarity of the underlying processes. The developed theory is applied to analyze the long-time (Holter) series of RR intervals of human ECG's. We had two groups of patients: the healthy ones and the patients after myocardial infarction. In both groups we observed effects of fractality, standard and restricted self-organized criticality, and also a certain specific arrangement of spectral lines. The received results demonstrate that the power spectra of all orders (n=1,2,...) MF mn(t) exhibit the neatly expressed fractal features. We have found out that the full sets of non-Markov, discrete and nonstationary parameters can serve as reliable and powerful means of diagnosis of the cardiovascular system states and can

  7. Retrieval of atomic oxygen and temperature in the thermosphere. Part 1: Feasibility of an experiment based on the spectrally resolved 147 micrometer limb emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachor, A. S.; Sharma, R. D.; Yap, B. K.; Riehl, J. P.

    1989-04-01

    The importance of atomic oxygen and translational temperature in mesospheric/thermospheric processes is the motivation to study the feasibility of recovering vertical profiles of the temperature and O-atom density from limb scan data obtained near 147 micrometer and/or 63 micrometer wavelength, corresponding to the oxygen atom ground electronic state (OI) transitions. The limb radiance data must be spectrally resolved to recover both temperature and atomic oxygen density if only one of the OI lines is used, which is the approach investigated in this report. We show how the two vertical profiles can be recovered by applying an onion-peeling method to synthetic data. The temperature and O-atom density in each peeled layer are obtained simultaneously by nonlinear least-squares spectrum fitting. Spectral data in the 147 micrometer line was found to yield reasonably accurate and stable profiles from 300 km down to an altitude between 130 and 90 km, depending on the noise level and spectral resolution, and gave better results than the stronger 63 micrometer data below 140 km. We estimate that the S/N and spectral resolution required for successful retrievals could be provided by a confocal Fabry-Perot system operating near 147 micrometer although retrievals down to 90 km from data obtained at orbital altitude would require cooled foreoptics roughly a meter in diameter.

  8. Time-resolved intensity and spectral changes in a wide-ridge terahertz quantum cascade laser by optical pulse injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakasegawa, Yohei; Saito, Shingo; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Ashida, Masaaki; Hosako, Iwao

    2016-10-01

    We report the intensity and spectral changes in a multi-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by injecting λ = 800 nm optical pulses through a cavity facet. We find that photogenerated carriers, via modulation of the intersubband gain, increase the threshold current by up to 0.2 A and cause spectral changes such that the individual peaks of the multi-lateral-mode spectra are varied in amplitude with different ratios. It is found that the indirect recombination of electron-hole pairs and thermal relaxation on timescales of ˜700 ns and ˜10 µs, respectively, are involved in the recovery kinetics.

  9. Spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections of aerosolized biological live agents and simulants using five excitation wavelengths in a BSL-3 laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C; Santarpia, Joshua L; Brinkley, Kelly; Sickler, Todd; Coleman, Mark; Williamson, Chatt; Gurton, Kris; Felton, Melvin; Pinnick, Ronald G; Baker, Neal; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hahn, Jerry; Smith, Emily; Alvarez, Ben; Prugh, Amber; Gardner, Warren

    2014-04-01

    A system for measuring spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections of single bioaerosol particles has been developed and employed in a biological safety level 3 (BSL-3) facility at Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC). It is used to aerosolize the slurry or solution of live agents and surrogates into dried micron-size particles, and to measure the fluorescence spectra and sizes of the particles one at a time. Spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections were measured for (1) bacterial spores: Bacillus anthracis Ames (BaA), B. atrophaeus var. globigii (BG) (formerly known as Bacillus globigii), B. thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), B. thuringiensis kurstaki (Btk), B. anthracis Sterne (BaS); (2) vegetative bacteria: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pantoea agglomerans (Eh) (formerly known as Erwinia herbicola), Yersinia rohdei (Yr), Yersinia pestis CO92 (Yp); and (3) virus preparations: Venezuelan equine encephalitis TC83 (VEE) and the bacteriophage MS2. The excitation wavelengths were 266 nm, 273 nm, 280 nm, 365 nm and 405 nm.

  10. Time-resolved imaging and spectral studies of an X-ray burst from the globular cluster Terzan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Marshall, H. L.; Hertz, P.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Ghosh, P.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.; Soltan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first image of an X-ray burst was recorded with the HRI detector at the Einstein Observatory while observing the globular cluster Terzan 2. The burst was coincident with a persistent X-ray source located near the center of the cluster (thus confirming an earlier suggested identification) and reached a peak luminosity exceeding 5 x 10 to the 38th (d/10 kpc) squared. After a rapid rise to peak luminosity, a double-peaked spectral variation was observed over the next approximately 20 s with anticorrelated changes in the apparent emission region radius and temperature derived from blackbody (and modified blackbody) spectral fits. A shell or disk geometry, which undergoes adiabatic expansion and contraction, may be implied for the burst emission region. Alternatively, Comptonization is required. It is also shown that the peak burst luminosity must exceed the Eddington limit.

  11. Using 2D Correlation Analysis to Enhance Spectral Information Available from Highly Spatially Resolved AFM-IR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm(-1) that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm(-1) due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 micrometer of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  12. Spectrally resolved comparison of TOMS estimates of surface UV irradiances with those of ground-based measurements at time of overpass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, Michael G.; Taylor, Thomas E.; Herman, Jay R.; Rives, John E.; Cannon, Blake; Meltzer, Richard S.

    2003-06-01

    Most comparisons of TOMS estimates of surface UV irradiation with measured values from ground-based instruments have indicated a bias of the TOMS estimates toward larger values. A portion of this bias results from absolute uncertainties in the ground-based instruments. The comparison reported here is based on ground-based data from four sites in the UGA/EPA Brewer network. The raw data from the ground-based instruments has been corrected for (1) stray light rejection, (2) the cosine errors associated with the full sky diffuser, (3) the temperature dependence of the response of the instruments and (4) the temporal variation in the instrument response reducing the estimated errors of the absolute irradiance values of each spectral measurement to < +/-7%. Comparisons of TOMS with the surface measurements are performed both at spectrally resolved wavelengths at the time of overpass and for erythemally-weighted daily-integrated doses. These comparisons are made for all days and for clear-sky days only. The comparisons are carried out using both linear regressions of scatter plots of the two sets of data and for mean differences with respect to both TOMS and the Brewer measurements. It is found that spectrally resolved comparisons suffer from inconsistencies at some of the sites that are believed to result from wavelength uncertainties in the Brewer; they are therefore of more limited use than wavelength integrated data. A comparison based on daily-integrated doses shows only a small positive TOMS bias (4%) for clear-sky days with a somewhat larger bias (8%) for data taken from all days.

  13. A spectral-timing analysis of the kHz QPOs in 4U 1636-53: the frequency-energy resolved RMS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Evandro M.; Mendez, Mariano; Zhang, Guo-Bao; De Avellar, Márcio G. B.

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) has been further advanced in the last few years by the use of combined spectral and timing techniques, and it is now clear that QPO properties are closely related to the spectral state of the source in which they appear. In this work we used all the available RXTE observations of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U~1636-53 to study the properties of the kilohertz QPO as a function of energy and frequency. By following the frequency evolution of the kHz QPOs we created frequency-resolved fractional RMS spectra. We also studied the connection between the frequency of the kHz QPOs and the parameters of the model that fits the X-ray energy spectrum. We show the dependence of the QPO properties in a multi-parameter space, and we discuss the implication of our results to the mechanism that produces the QPOs. Our results provide input to the next generation of spectral-timing models, which will help us understand the variability and the environment around the neutron star in these systems.

  14. RESOLVING THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND HOST EMISSION IN THE MID-INFRARED USING A MODEL-INDEPENDENT SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Hönig, Sebastian F.; González-Martín, Omaira; Esquej, Pilar

    2015-04-20

    We present results on the spectral decomposition of 118 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra from local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a large set of Spitzer/IRS spectra as templates. The templates are themselves IRS spectra from extreme cases where a single physical component (stellar, interstellar, or AGN) completely dominates the integrated mid-infrared emission. We show that a linear combination of one template for each physical component reproduces the observed IRS spectra of AGN hosts with unprecedented fidelity for a template fitting method with no need to model extinction separately. We use full probability distribution functions to estimate expectation values and uncertainties for observables, and find that the decomposition results are robust against degeneracies. Furthermore, we compare the AGN spectra derived from the spectral decomposition with sub-arcsecond resolution nuclear photometry and spectroscopy from ground-based observations. We find that the AGN component derived from the decomposition closely matches the nuclear spectrum with a 1σ dispersion of 0.12 dex in luminosity and typical uncertainties of ∼0.19 in the spectral index and ∼0.1 in the silicate strength. We conclude that the emission from the host galaxy can be reliably removed from the IRS spectra of AGNs. This allows for unbiased studies of the AGN emission in intermediate- and high-redshift galaxies—currently inaccesible to ground-based observations—with archival Spitzer/IRS data and in the future with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope. The decomposition code and templates are available at http://denebola.org/ahc/deblendIRS.

  15. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Temporally- and Spectrally-Resolved Irradiance from Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Youngblood, Allison; Linsky, Jeffrey; MUSCLES Treasury Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to near-UV; 5 - 3200 Ang) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential "biomarker" gases. It has been shown that the atmospheric signatures of potentially habitable planets around low-mass stars may be significantly different from planets orbiting Sun-like stars owing to the different UV spectral energy distribution. I will present results from a panchromatic survey (Hubble/Chandra/XMM/optical) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts, the MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems). We reconstruct the Lyman-alpha and extreme-UV (100-900 Ang) radiation lost to interstellar attenuation and create 5 Angstrom to 5 micron stellar irradiance spectra; these data will be publically available as a High-Level Science Product on MAST. We find that all low-mass exoplanet host stars exhibit significant chromospheric/transition region/coronal emission -- no "UV inactive" M dwarfs are observed. The F(far-UV)/F(near-UV) flux ratio, a driver for possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, increases by ~3 orders of magnitude as the habitable zone moves inward from 1 to 0.1 AU, while the incident far-UV (912 - 1700 Ang) and XUV (5 - 900 Ang) radiation field strengths decrease by factors of a few across this range. Far-UV flare activity is common in 'optically inactive' M dwarfs; statistics from the entire sample indicate that large UV flares (E(300 - 1700 Ang) >= 10^31 erg) occur several times per day on typical M dwarf exoplanet hosts.

  16. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, I.; Reinsch, K.; Schwope, A. D.; Schwarz, R.; Walter, F. M.; Burwitz, V.

    2014-02-01

    Context. RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Aims: Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. Methods: We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results: Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36 eV and 7 keV. The spectral fits give evidence of a partially absorbing and a reflection component. Multitemperature models, covering a broader temperature range in the X-ray emitting accretion regions, reproduce the spectra appropriately well. Including archival data, we describe the spectral energy distribution with a combination of models based on a consistent set of parameters and derive a lower limit estimate of the distance d ≳ 750 pc. Conclusions: The high bolometric soft-to-hard flux ratios and short-term variability of the (X-ray) light curves are characteristic of inhomogeneous accretion. RS Cae clearly belongs in the group of polars that show a very strong soft X-ray flux compared to their hard X-ray flux. The different black-body fluxes and similar hard X-ray and optical fluxes during the XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations show that soft and hard X-ray emission are not directly correlated. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  17. Non-Markovian dynamics of an open quantum system with nonstationary coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, S. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Kanokov, Z.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2011-04-15

    The spectral, dissipative, and statistical properties of the damped quantum oscillator are studied in the case of non-Markovian and nonstationary system-heat bath coupling. The dissipation of collective energy is shown to be slowed down, and the decoherence rate and entropy grow with modulation frequency.

  18. Scaling in nonstationary voltammetry representations.

    PubMed

    Anastassiou, Costas A; Parker, Kim H; O'Hare, Danny

    2007-12-20

    Despite the widespread use of voltammetry for a range of chemical, biological, environmental, and industrial applications, there is still a lack of understanding regarding the functionality between the applied voltage and the resulting patterns in the current response. This is due to the highly nonlinear relation between the applied voltage and the nonstationary current response, which casts a direct association nonintuitive. In this Article, we focus on large-amplitude/high-frequency ac voltammetry, a technique that has shown to offer increased voltammetric detail compared to alternative methods, to study heterogeneous electrochemical reaction-diffusion cases using a nonstationary time-series analysis, the Hilbert transform, and symmetry considerations. We show that application of this signal processing technique minimizes the significant capacitance contribution associated with rapid voltammetric measurements. From a series of numerical simulations conducted for different voltage excitation parameters as well as kinetic, thermodynamic, and mass transport parameters, a number of scaling laws arise that are related to the underlying parameters/dynamics of the process. Under certain conditions, these observations allow the determination of all underlying parameters very rapidly, experiment duration typically

  19. Nonstationary Approaches to Hydrologic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Richard; Hecht, Jory; Read, Laura

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a generalized framework for evaluating the risk, reliability and return period of hydrologic events in a nonstationary world. A heteroscedastic regression model is introduced as an elegant and general framework for modeling trends in the mean and/or variance of hydrologic records using ordinary least squares regression methods. A regression approach to modeling trends has numerous advantages over other methods including: (1) ease of application, (2) considers linear or nonlinear trends, (3) graphical display of trends, (4) analytical estimate of the power of the trend test and prediction intervals associated with trend extrapolation. Traditional statements of risk, reliability and return periods which assume that the annual probability of a flood event remains constant throughout the project horizon are revised to include the impacts of trends in the mean and/or variance of hydrologic records. Our analyses reveal that in a nonstationary world, meaningful expressions of the likelihood of future hydrologic events are unlikely to result from knowledge of return periods whereas knowledge of system reliability over future planning horizons can effectively communicate the likelihood of future hydrologic events of interest.

  20. Evidence of non-LTE Effects in Mesospheric Water Vapor from Spectrally-Resolved Emissions Observed by CIRRIS-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, D. K.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Zaragoza, G.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of non-LTE effects in mesospheric water vapor as determined by infrared spectral emission measurements taken from the space shuttle is reported. A cryogenic Michelson interferometer in the CIRRIS-1A shuttle payload yielded high quality, atmospheric infrared spectra. These measurements demonstrate the enhanced daytime emissions of H2O (020-010) which are the result of non-LTE processes and in agreement with non-LTE models. The radiance ratios of H2O (010 to 000) and (020 to 010) Q(1) transitions during daytime are compared with non-LTE model calculations to assess the vibration-to-vibration exchange rate between H2O and O2 in the mesosphere. An exchange rate of 1.2 x 10(exp -12)cc/s is derived.

  1. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2016-07-01

    We compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1-35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.

  2. Spectral and spatial resolving of photoelectric property of femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSb(1-x)Bi(x).

    PubMed

    Pan, C B; Zha, F X; Song, Y X; Shao, J; Dai, Y; Chen, X R; Ye, J Y; Wang, S M

    2015-07-15

    Femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSbBi were characterized by the joint measurements of photoconductivity (PC) spectroscopy and laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping. The excitation light in PC was focused down to 60 μm presenting the spectral information of local electronic property of individual holes. A redshift of energy band edge of about 6-8 meV was observed by the PC measurement when the excitation light irradiated on the laser drilled holes. The spatial resolving of photoelectric property was achieved by the LBIC mapping which shows "pseudo-holes" with much larger dimensions than the geometric sizes of the holes. The reduced LBIC current with the pseudo-holes is associated with the redshift effect indicating that the electronic property of the rim areas of the holes is modified by the femtosecond laser drilling.

  3. Spectral and spatial resolving of photoelectric property of femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSb(1-x)Bi(x).

    PubMed

    Pan, C B; Zha, F X; Song, Y X; Shao, J; Dai, Y; Chen, X R; Ye, J Y; Wang, S M

    2015-07-15

    Femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSbBi were characterized by the joint measurements of photoconductivity (PC) spectroscopy and laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping. The excitation light in PC was focused down to 60 μm presenting the spectral information of local electronic property of individual holes. A redshift of energy band edge of about 6-8 meV was observed by the PC measurement when the excitation light irradiated on the laser drilled holes. The spatial resolving of photoelectric property was achieved by the LBIC mapping which shows "pseudo-holes" with much larger dimensions than the geometric sizes of the holes. The reduced LBIC current with the pseudo-holes is associated with the redshift effect indicating that the electronic property of the rim areas of the holes is modified by the femtosecond laser drilling. PMID:26176477

  4. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  5. Efficient Spectral Diffusion at the Air/Water Interface Revealed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-05-19

    Femtosecond vibrational dynamics at the air/water interface is investigated by time-resolved heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (TR-HD-VSFG) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The low- and high-frequency sides of the hydrogen-bonded (HB) OH stretch band at the interface are selectively excited with special attention to the bandwidth and energy of the pump pulses. Narrow bleach is observed immediately after excitation of the high-frequency side of the HB OH band at ∼3500 cm(-1), compared to the broad bleach observed with excitation of the low-frequency side at ∼3300 cm(-1). However, the time-resolved spectra observed with the two different excitations become very similar at 0.5 ps and almost indistinguishable by 1.0 ps. This reveals that efficient spectral diffusion occurs regardless of the difference of the pump frequency. The experimental observations are well-reproduced by complementary MD simulation. There is no experimental and theoretical evidence that supports extraordinary slow dynamics in the high-frequency side of the HB OH band, which was reported before. PMID:27120559

  6. Combined soot optical characterization using 2-D multi-angle light scattering and spectrally resolved line-of-sight attenuation and its implication on soot color-ratio pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-10-01

    Soot characterization using multiple techniques has been performed in a series of nitrogen-diluted ethylene coflow laminar diffusion flames. Soot aggregate sizes have been measured in two dimensions, as opposed to traditional point measurements, by a newly developed two-dimensional multi-angle light scattering technique where image processing was applied to align images for Guinier analysis. Extinction measurements have also been performed using spectrally resolved line-of-sight attenuation with an imaging spectrometer. Spectrally and spatially resolved extinction measurements have been obtained as well. Combined with previously obtained time-resolved laser-induced incandescence measurements of primary particle diameters, the scattering and absorption components of extinction can be estimated. The so-called dispersion exponent that describes the wavelength dependence of spectral emissivity was determined in two dimensions and found to improve the accuracy of soot color-ratio pyrometry measurements.

  7. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below approximately 1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonized thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess is seen to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission is attributed to recombination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. This new analysis underlines the importance of fully accounting for absorption in characterizing AGN X-ray spectra.

  8. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer.

  9. Spectral sensitivity of guppy visual pigments reconstituted in vitro to resolve association of opsins with cone cell types.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shoji; Kasagi, Satoshi; Kasai, Daisuke; Tezuka, Ayumi; Shoji, Ayako; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Imai, Hiroo; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-10-01

    The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) shows remarkable variation of photoreceptor cells in the retina, especially those sensitive to middle-to-long wavelengths of light. Microspectrophotometry (MSP) has revealed varying "green", "green-yellow" and "yellow" cone cells among guppies in Trinidad and Venezuela (Cumana). In the guppy genome, there are four "long-wave" opsin loci (LWS-1, -2, -3 and -4). Two LWS-1 alleles have potentially differing spectral sensitivity (LWS-1/180Ser and LWS-1/180Ala). In addition, two "middle-wave" loci (RH2-1 and -2), two "short-wave" loci (SWS2-A and -B), and a single "ultraviolet" locus (SWS1) as well as a single "rhodopsin" locus (RH1) are present. However, the absorption spectra of these photopigments have not been measured directly and the association of cell types with these opsins remains speculative. In the present study, we reconstituted these opsin photopigments in vitro. The wavelengths of maximal absorbance (λmax) were 571nm (LWS-1/180Ser), 562nm (LWS-1/180Ala), 519nm (LWS-3), 516nm (LWS-2), 516nm (RH2-1), 476nm (RH2-2), 438nm (SWS2-A), 408nm (SWS2-B), 353nm (SWS1) and 503nm (RH1). The λmax of LWS-3 is much shorter than the value expected (560nm) from the "five-sites" rule. The two LWS-1 alleles could explain difference of the reported MSP λmax values for the yellow cone class between Trinidad and Cumana guppies. Absence of the short-wave-shifted LWS-3 and the green-yellow cone in the green swordtail supports the hypothesis that this cell class of the guppy co-expresses the LWS-1 and LWS-3. These results reveal the basis of variability in the guppy visual system and provide insight into the behavior and ecology of these tropical fishes.

  10. Spectral sensitivity of guppy visual pigments reconstituted in vitro to resolve association of opsins with cone cell types.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shoji; Kasagi, Satoshi; Kasai, Daisuke; Tezuka, Ayumi; Shoji, Ayako; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Imai, Hiroo; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-10-01

    The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) shows remarkable variation of photoreceptor cells in the retina, especially those sensitive to middle-to-long wavelengths of light. Microspectrophotometry (MSP) has revealed varying "green", "green-yellow" and "yellow" cone cells among guppies in Trinidad and Venezuela (Cumana). In the guppy genome, there are four "long-wave" opsin loci (LWS-1, -2, -3 and -4). Two LWS-1 alleles have potentially differing spectral sensitivity (LWS-1/180Ser and LWS-1/180Ala). In addition, two "middle-wave" loci (RH2-1 and -2), two "short-wave" loci (SWS2-A and -B), and a single "ultraviolet" locus (SWS1) as well as a single "rhodopsin" locus (RH1) are present. However, the absorption spectra of these photopigments have not been measured directly and the association of cell types with these opsins remains speculative. In the present study, we reconstituted these opsin photopigments in vitro. The wavelengths of maximal absorbance (λmax) were 571nm (LWS-1/180Ser), 562nm (LWS-1/180Ala), 519nm (LWS-3), 516nm (LWS-2), 516nm (RH2-1), 476nm (RH2-2), 438nm (SWS2-A), 408nm (SWS2-B), 353nm (SWS1) and 503nm (RH1). The λmax of LWS-3 is much shorter than the value expected (560nm) from the "five-sites" rule. The two LWS-1 alleles could explain difference of the reported MSP λmax values for the yellow cone class between Trinidad and Cumana guppies. Absence of the short-wave-shifted LWS-3 and the green-yellow cone in the green swordtail supports the hypothesis that this cell class of the guppy co-expresses the LWS-1 and LWS-3. These results reveal the basis of variability in the guppy visual system and provide insight into the behavior and ecology of these tropical fishes. PMID:27476645

  11. Non-Stationary Signals: Phase-Energy APPROACH—THEORY and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Ingman, D.; Braun, S.

    2001-11-01

    Modern time-frequency methods are intended to deal with a variety of non-stationary signals. One specific class, prevalent in the area of rotating machines, is that of harmonic signals of varying frequencies and amplitude. This paper presents a new adaptive phase-energy (APE) approach for time-frequency representation of varying harmonic signals. It is based on the concept of phase (frequency) paths and the instantaneous power spectral density (PSD). It is this path which represents the dynamic behaviour of the system generating the observed signal. The proposed method utilises dynamic filters based on an extended Nyquist theorem, enabling to extract signal components with optimal signal-to-noise ratio. The APE detects the most energetic harmonic components (frequency paths) in the analysed signal. Tests on simulated signals show the superiority of the APE in resolution and resolving power as compared to STFT and wavelets wave-packet decomposition. The dynamic filters also enable the reconstruction of the signal components (paths) from the noisy signal. A quantitative comparison was performed both for the detected path in the time-frequency plane as well as for the reconstructed signal, demonstrating the performance of the APE.

  12. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-05-15

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper.

  13. A Bayesian compound stochastic process for modeling nonstationary and nonhomogeneous sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Blanquart, Samuel; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2006-11-01

    Variations of nucleotidic composition affect phylogenetic inference conducted under stationary models of evolution. In particular, they may cause unrelated taxa sharing similar base composition to be grouped together in the resulting phylogeny. To address this problem, we developed a nonstationary and nonhomogeneous model accounting for compositional biases. Unlike previous nonstationary models, which are branchwise, that is, assume that base composition only changes at the nodes of the tree, in our model, the process of compositional drift is totally uncoupled from the speciation events. In addition, the total number of events of compositional drift distributed across the tree is directly inferred from the data. We implemented the method in a Bayesian framework, relying on Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms, and applied it to several nucleotidic data sets. In most cases, the stationarity assumption was rejected in favor of our nonstationary model. In addition, we show that our method is able to resolve a well-known artifact. By Bayes factor evaluation, we compared our model with 2 previously developed nonstationary models. We show that the coupling between speciations and compositional shifts inherent to branchwise models may lead to an overparameterization, resulting in a lesser fit. In some cases, this leads to incorrect conclusions, concerning the nature of the compositional biases. In contrast, our compound model more flexibly adapts its effective number of parameters to the data sets under investigation. Altogether, our results show that accounting for nonstationary sequence evolution may require more elaborate and more flexible models than those currently used.

  14. Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2009-02-01

    Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes is investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise-coordinate transformation (GTT). It is shown in general that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on time and angle. Further, we find that the chemical potential in the thermal-radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative-energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for general nonstationary black holes.

  15. THE SPECTRALLY RESOLVED Lyα EMISSION OF THREE Lyα-SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2.4 FROM THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Chonis, Taylor S.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gebhardt, Karl; Overzier, Roderik A.; Song, Mimi; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Adams, Joshua J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2013-10-01

    We present new results on the spectrally resolved Lyα emission of three Lyα-emitting field galaxies at z ∼ 2.4 with high Lyα equivalent width (>100 Å) and Lyα luminosity (∼10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}). At 120 km s{sup –1} (FWHM) spectral resolution, the prominent double-peaked Lyα profile straddles the systemic velocity, where the velocity zero point is determined from spectroscopy of the galaxies' rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The average velocity offset from systemic of the stronger redshifted emission component for our sample is 176 km s{sup –1} while the average total separation between the redshifted and main blueshifted emission components is 380 km s{sup –1}. These measurements are a factor of ∼2 smaller than for UV-continuum-selected galaxies that show Lyα in emission with lower Lyα equivalent widths. We compare our Lyα spectra to the predicted line profiles of a spherical 'expanding shell' Lyα radiative transfer grid that models large-scale galaxy outflows. Specifically, blueward of the systemic velocity where two galaxies show a weak, highly blueshifted (by ∼1000 km s{sup –1}) tertiary emission peak, the model line profiles are a relatively poor representation of the observed spectra. Since the neutral gas column density has a dominant influence over the shape of the Lyα line profile, we caution against equating the observed Lyα velocity offset with a physical outflow velocity, especially at lower spectral resolution where the unresolved Lyα velocity offset is a convoluted function of several degenerate parameters. Referring to rest-frame ultraviolet and optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we find that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role in inducing a starburst that results in copious Lyα emission as well as perturbing the gas distribution and velocity field, both of which have strong influence over the Lyα emission line profile.

  16. Effects of oxygen background pressure on the stoichiometry of a LaGaO3 laser ablation plume investigated by time and spectrally resolved two-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambri, A.; Aruta, C.; Di Gennaro, E.; Wang, X.; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Miletto Granozio, F.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-03-01

    The plume expansion dynamics strongly affects the growth and the chemistry of pulsed laser deposited thin films. The interaction with the background gas determines the kinetic energy of the species impinging on the substrate, their angular broadening, the plasma chemistry, and eventually the cations stoichiometric ratio in oxide films. Here, we exploit two-dimensional, spectrally resolved plume imaging to characterize the diverse effects of the oxygen background pressure on the expansion dynamics of La, Ga, and LaO species during pulsed laser deposition of LaGaO3. The propagation of the ablated species towards the substrate is studied for background oxygen pressures ranging from high vacuum up to ≈10-1 mbar. Our experimental results show specie-dependent effects of the background gas on the angular distribution of the precursors within the plume. These findings suggest that even in the presence of a stoichiometric ablation and of a globally stoichiometric plume, cations off-stoichiometry can take place in the forefront portion of the plume impinging on the substrate. We show that such effect can be compensated by a proper choice of process parameters.

  17. Spectrally resolved intraband transitions on two-step photon absorption in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Ryo Shoji, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshitaka; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2014-08-18

    Two-step photon absorption processes in a self-organized In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cell have been investigated by monitoring the mid-infrared (IR) photoinduced modulation of the external quantum efficiency (ΔEQE) at low temperature. The first step interband and the second step intraband transitions were both spectrally resolved by scanning photon energies of visible to near-IR CW light and mid-IR pulse lasers, respectively. A peak centered at 0.20 eV corresponding to the transition to virtual bound states and a band above 0.42 eV probably due to photoexcitation to GaAs continuum states were observed in ΔEQE spectra, when the interband transition was above 1.4 eV, directly exciting wetting layers or GaAs spacer layers. On the other hand, resonant excitation of the ground state of QDs at 1.35 eV resulted in a reduction of EQE. The sign of ΔEQE below 1.40 eV changed from negative to positive by increasing the excitation intensity of the interband transition. We ascribe this to the filling of higher energy trap states.

  18. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  19. Semi-blind nonstationary deconvolution: Joint reflectivity and Q estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Source signature deconvolution and attenuation or inverse quality factor- (Q-) filtering are two challenging problems in seismic data analysis which are used for extending the temporal bandwidth of the data. The separate estimates of the wavelet and, especially, the Earth Q model are by themselves problematic and add further uncertainties to inverse problems which are clearly ill-conditioned. The two problems are formulated in the framework of polynomial extrapolation and a closed form solution is provided based on the Lagrange interpolation. Analysis of the stability issue shows that the errors in the estimated results grow exponentially with both the problem size N and the inverse of Q. In order to circumvent both the instability and uncertainty of the Q model, these problems are addressed in a unified formulation as a semi-blind nonstationary deconvolution (SeND) to decompose the observed trace into the least number of nonstationary wavelets selected from a dictionary via a basis pursuit algorithm. The dictionary is constructed from the known source wavelet with different propagation times, each attenuated with a range of possible Q values. Using the Horner's rule, an efficient algorithm is also provided for application of the dictionary and its adjoint. SeND is an extension of the conventional sparse spike deconvolution to its nonstationary form, which provides the reflectivity and Q models simultaneously without requiring a-priori Q information. Assuming that the wavelet and attenuation mechanism are both known, the numerical data SeND allows to estimate both the original reflectivity and the Q models with higher accuracy, especially with respect to conventional spectral ratio techniques. The application of the algorithm to field data finally indicates a substantial improvement in temporal resolution on a seismic record.

  20. Whole-body multicolor spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging for development of target-specific optical contrast agents using genetically engineered probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Urano, Yasuteru; Choyke, Peter L.

    2007-02-01

    Target-specific contrast agents are being developed for the molecular imaging of cancer. Optically detectable target-specific agents are promising for clinical applications because of their high sensitivity and specificity. Pre clinical testing is needed, however, to validate the actual sensitivity and specificity of these agents in animal models, and involves both conventional histology and immunohistochemistry, which requires large numbers of animals and samples with costly handling. However, a superior validation tool takes advantage of genetic engineering technology whereby cell lines are transfected with genes that induce the target cell to produce fluorescent proteins with characteristic emission spectra thus, identifying them as cancer cells. Multicolor fluorescence imaging of these genetically engineered probes can provide rapid validation of newly developed exogenous probes that fluoresce at different wavelengths. For example, the plasmid containing the gene encoding red fluorescent protein (RFP) was transfected into cell lines previously developed to either express or not-express specific cell surface receptors. Various antibody-based or receptor ligand-based optical contrast agents with either green or near infrared fluorophores were developed to concurrently target and validate cancer cells and their positive and negative controls, such as β-D-galactose receptor, HER1 and HER2 in a single animal/organ. Spectrally resolved fluorescence multicolor imaging was used to detect separate fluorescent emission spectra from the exogenous agents and RFP. Therefore, using this in vivo imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the target-specific optical contrast agents, thus reducing the number of animals needed to conduct these experiments.

  1. AXISYMMETRIC, NONSTATIONARY BLACK HOLE MAGNETOSPHERES: REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yoo Geun; Park, Seok Jae E-mail: sjpark@kasi.re.kr

    2015-10-10

    An axisymmetric, stationary, general-relativistic, electrodynamic engine model of an active galactic nucleus was formulated by Macdonald and Thorne that consisted of a supermassive black hole surrounded by a plasma magnetosphere and a magnetized accretion disk. Based on this initial formulation, a nonstationary, force-free version of their model was constructed by Park and Vishniac (PV), with the simplifying assumption that the poloidal component of the magnetic field line velocity be confined along the radial direction in cylindrical polar coordinates. In this paper, we derive the new, nonstationary “Transfield Equation,” which was not specified in PV. If we can solve this “Transfield Equation” numerically, then we will understand the axisymmetric, nonstationary black hole magnetosphere in more rigorous ways.

  2. Axisymmetric, Nonstationary Black Hole Magnetospheres: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yoo Geun; Park, Seok Jae

    2015-10-01

    An axisymmetric, stationary, general-relativistic, electrodynamic engine model of an active galactic nucleus was formulated by Macdonald and Thorne that consisted of a supermassive black hole surrounded by a plasma magnetosphere and a magnetized accretion disk. Based on this initial formulation, a nonstationary, force-free version of their model was constructed by Park & Vishniac (PV), with the simplifying assumption that the poloidal component of the magnetic field line velocity be confined along the radial direction in cylindrical polar coordinates. In this paper, we derive the new, nonstationary “Transfield Equation,” which was not specified in PV. If we can solve this “Transfield Equation” numerically, then we will understand the axisymmetric, nonstationary black hole magnetosphere in more rigorous ways.

  3. Ubiquity of, and geostatistics for, nonstationary increment random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Daniel; Cushman, John H.

    2013-07-01

    Nonstationary random fields such as fractional Brownian motion and fractional Lévy motion have been studied extensively in the hydrology literature. On the other hand, random fields that have nonstationary increments have seen little study. A mathematical argument is presented that demonstrates processes with stationary increments are the exception and processes with nonstationary increments are far more abundant. The abundance of nonstationary increment processes has important implications, e.g., in kriging where a translation-invariant variogram implicitly assumes stationarity of the increments. An approach to kriging for processes with nonstationary increments is presented and accompanied by some numerical results.

  4. Revealing the radiative and non-radiative relaxation rates of the fluorescent dye Atto488 in a λ/2 Fabry-Pérot-resonator by spectral and time resolved measurements.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Alexander; Metzger, Michael; Kern, Andreas M; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J

    2016-08-14

    Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level.

  5. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    Although time-dependent quantum systems have been studied since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, they continue to attract the attention of many researchers, and almost every decade new important discoveries or new fields of application are made. Among the impressive results or by-products of these studies, one should note the discovery of the path integral method in the 1940s, coherent and squeezed states in the 1960-70s, quantum tunneling in Josephson contacts and SQUIDs in the 1960s, the theory of time-dependent quantum invariants in the 1960-70s, different forms of quantum master equations in the 1960-70s, the Zeno effect in the 1970s, the concept of geometric phase in the 1980s, decoherence of macroscopic superpositions in the 1980s, quantum non-demolition measurements in the 1980s, dynamics of particles in quantum traps and cavity QED in the 1980-90s, and time-dependent processes in mesoscopic quantum devices in the 1990s. All these topics continue to be the subject of many publications. Now we are witnessing a new wave of interest in quantum non-stationary systems in different areas, from cosmology (the very first moments of the Universe) and quantum field theory (particle pair creation in ultra-strong fields) to elementary particle physics (neutrino oscillations). A rapid increase in the number of theoretical and experimental works on time-dependent phenomena is also observed in quantum optics, quantum information theory and condensed matter physics. Time-dependent tunneling and time-dependent transport in nano-structures are examples of such phenomena. Another emerging direction of study, stimulated by impressive progress in experimental techniques, is related to attempts to observe the quantum behavior of macroscopic objects, such as mirrors interacting with quantum fields in nano-resonators. Quantum effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of nano-electromechanical systems; they are dominant in the quite new and very promising field of circuit

  6. Revealing the radiative and non-radiative relaxation rates of the fluorescent dye Atto488 in a λ/2 Fabry-Pérot-resonator by spectral and time resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Alexander; Metzger, Michael; Kern, Andreas M.; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J.

    2016-07-01

    Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level.Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02380K

  7. Resolution enhancement of non-stationary seismic data using amplitude-frequency partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yujiang; Liu, Gao

    2015-02-01

    As the Earth's inhomogeneous and viscoelastic properties, seismic signal attenuation we are trying to mitigate is a long-standing problem facing with high-resolution techniques. For addressing such a problem in the fields of time-frequency transform, Gabor transform methods such as atom-window method (AWM) and molecular window method (MWM) have been reported recently. However, we observed that these methods might be much better if we partition the non-stationary seismic data into adaptive stationary segments based on the amplitude and frequency information of the seismic signal. In this study, we present a new method called amplitude-frequency partition (AFP) to implement this process in the time-frequency domain. Cases of a synthetic and field seismic data indicated that the AFP method could partition the non-stationary seismic data into stationary segments approximately, and significantly, a high-resolution result would be achieved by combining the AFP method with conventional spectral-whitening method, which could be considered superior to previous resolution-enhancement methods like time-variant spectral whitening method, the AWM and the MWM as well. This AFP method presented in this study would be an effective resolution-enhancement tool for the non-stationary seismic data in the fields of an adaptive time-frequency transform.

  8. Assessment of Power Quality based on Fuzzy Logic and Discrete Wavelet Transform for Nonstationary Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Pampa; Nath, Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    The main aspects of power system delivery are reliability and quality. If all the customers of a power system get uninterrupted power through the year then the system is considered to be reliable. The term power quality may be referred to as maintaining near sinusoidal voltage at rated frequency at the consumers end. The power component definitions are defined according to the IEEE Standard 1459-2000 both for single phase and three phase unbalanced systems based on Fourier Transform (FFT). In the presence of nonstationary power quality (PQ) disturbances results in accurate values due to its sensitivity to the spectral leakage problem. To overcome these limitations the power quality components are calculated using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). In order to handle the uncertainties associated with electric power systems operations fuzzy logic has been incorporated in this paper. A new power quality index has been introduced here which can assess the power quality under nonstationary disturbances.

  9. Algebraic Rossby Solitary Waves Excited by Non-Stationary External Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Wei; Yin, Bao-Shu; Dong, Huan-He; Shi, Yun-Long

    2012-09-01

    The paper deals with the effects of non-stationary external source forcing and dissipation on algebraic Rossby solitary waves. From quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity equation, basing on the multiple-scale method, an inhomogeneous Korteweg-de Vries—Benjamin—Ono—Burgers (KdV-B-O-Burgers) equation is obtained. This equation has not been previously derived for Rossby waves. By analysis and calculation, four conservation laws associated with the above equation are first obtained. With the help of pseudo-spectral method, the waterfall plots are obtained and the evolutional characters of algebraic Rossby solitary waves are studied. The results show that non-stationary external source and dissipation have great effect on the generation and evolution of algebraic solitary Rossby waves.

  10. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, L.; Vogel, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Studies from the natural hazards literature indicate that many natural processes, including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow and earthquakes, show evidence of nonstationary behavior such as trends in magnitudes through time. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on partial duration series (PDS) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e. that the probability of exceedance is constant through time. Given evidence of trends and the consequent expected growth in devastating impacts from natural hazards across the world, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (x) with its failure time series (t), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose PDS magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied Poisson-GP model. We derive a 2-parameter Generalized Pareto hazard model and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard event series x, with corresponding failure time series t, should have application to a wide class of natural hazards.

  11. Time-frequency filtering for classifying targets in nonstationary clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Vikram Thiruneermalai; Loughlin, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Classifying underwater targets from their sonar backscatter is often complicated by induced or self-noise (i.e. clutter, reverberation) arising from the scattering of the sonar pulse from non-target objects. Because clutter is inherently nonstationary, and because the propagation environment can induce nonstationarities as well, in addition to any nonstationarities / time-varying spectral components of the target echo itself, a joint phase space approach to target classification has been explored. In this paper, we apply a previously developed minimum mean square time-frequency spectral estimation method to design a bank of time-frequency filters from training data to distinguish targets from clutter. The method is implemented in the ambiguity domain in order to reduce computational requirements. In this domain, the optimal filter (more commonly called a "kernel" in the time-frequency literature) multiples the ambiguity function of the received signal, and then the mean squared distance to each target class is computed. Simulations demonstrate that the class-specific optimal kernel better separates each target from the clutter and other targets, compared to a simple mean-squared distance measure with no kernel processing.

  12. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  13. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, L. K.; Vogel, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e. that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied Generalized Pareto (GP) model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard event series X, with corresponding failure time series T, should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with rich opportunities for future extensions.

  14. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Laura K.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2016-04-01

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e., that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk, and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied generalized Pareto model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard random variable X with corresponding failure time series T should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with opportunities for future extensions.

  15. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Read, Laura K.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2016-04-11

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e., that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field ofmore » hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk, and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied generalized Pareto model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. As a result, our theoretical analysis linking hazard random variable X with corresponding failure time series T should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with opportunities for future extensions.« less

  16. Multiaxis Rainflow Fatigue Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, T.

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical structures and components may be subjected to cyclical loading conditions, including sine and random vibration. Such systems must be designed and tested according. Rainflow cycle counting is the standard method for reducing a stress time history to a table of amplitude-cycle pairings prior to the Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage calculation. The damage calculation is straightforward for sinusoidal stress but very complicated for random stress, particularly for nonstationary vibration. This paper evaluates candidate methods and makes a recommendation for further study of a hybrid technique.

  17. Harmonic demodulation of nonstationary shot noise.

    PubMed

    Gray, M B; Stevenson, A J; Bachor, H A; McClelland, D E

    1993-05-15

    We report on experimental demodulation of nonstationary shot noise, which is associated with strongly modulated light. For sinusoidal modulation and demodulation, measurements confirm theoretical predictions of 1.8-dB excess noise in the modulation quadrature and 3-dB noise reduction in the opposite quadrature, relative to the standard quantum limit. Demodulation with a third harmonic produces noise correlated with that which is due to the fundamental. Reducing excess noise by 0.8 dB in the modulation quadrature, by combining the fundamental and third harmonics in a 2:1 ratio, is shown to be feasible. PMID:19802263

  18. Multiaxis Rainflow Fatigue Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, T.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical structures and components may be subjected to cyclical loading conditions, including sine and random vibration. Such systems must be designed and tested accordingly. Rainflow cycle counting is the standard method for reducing a stress time history to a table of amplitude-cycle pairings prior to the Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage calculation. The damage calculation is straightforward for sinusoidal stress but very complicated for random stress, particularly for nonstationary vibration. This paper evaluates candidate methods and makes a recommendation for further study of a hybrid technique.

  19. Overembedding Method for Modeling Nonstationary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Verdes, P.F.

    2006-03-24

    We propose a general overembedding method for modeling and prediction of nonstationary systems. It basically enlarges the standard time-delay-embedding space by inclusion of the (unknown) slow driving signal, which is estimated simultaneously with the intrinsic stationary dynamics. Our method can be implemented with any modeling tool. Using, in particular, artificial neural networks, its application to both synthetic and real-world time series shows that it is highly efficient, leading to much more accurate results and longer prediction horizons than other existing overembedding methods in the literature.

  20. Charge transfer mechanism in nonstationary granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioselevich, A. S.; Sivak, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a nonstationary array of conductors, connected by resistances that fluctuate with time. The charge transfer between a particular pair of conductors is supposed to be dominated by electrical breakdowns—the moments when the corresponding resistance is close to zero. An amount of charge, transferred during a particular breakdown, is controlled by the condition of minimum for the electrostatic energy of the system. We find the conductivity, relaxation rate, and fluctuations for such a system within the classical approximation, valid, if the typical transferred charge is large compared to e . We discuss possible realizations of the model for colloidal systems and arrays of polymer-linked grains.

  1. The Stokes phenomenon and quantum tunneling for de Sitter radiation in nonstationary coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2010-09-01

    We study quantum tunneling for the de Sitter radiation in the planar coordinates and global coordinates, which are nonstationary coordinates and describe the expanding geometry. Using the phase-integral approximation for the Hamilton-Jacobi action in the complex plane of time, we obtain the particle-production rate in both coordinates and derive the additional sinusoidal factor depending on the dimensionality of spacetime and the quantum number for spherical harmonics in the global coordinates. This approach resolves the factor of two problem in the tunneling method.

  2. Retrieval of atomic oxygen and temperature in the thermosphere. I - Feasibility of an experiment based on the spectrally resolved 147 micron limb emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachor, A. S.; Sharma, R. D.

    1989-11-01

    Consideration is given to the possibility of recovering vertical profiles of the temperature and O-atom density from limb scan data obtained near 147 and/or 63 microns wavelength. It is shown that the two vertical profiles may be recovered by applying an onion-peeling method to synthetic data. The temperature and O-atom density are obtained simultaneously by a nonlinear least-squares spectrum fitting. It is found that spectral data in the 147-micron line from 300 km down to 130-90 km in altitude produces better results than the 63-micron data below 140 km. It is suggested that a confocal Fabry-Perot system operating near 147 microns could provide the S/N ratio and spectral resolution needed for successful retrievals. Retrievals down to 90 km from data obtained at orbital altitude would require cooled foreoptics with a diameter of about 1 meter.

  3. Nonstationary sparsity-constrained seismic deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xue-Kai; Sam, Zandong Sun; Xie, Hui-Wen

    2014-12-01

    The Robinson convolution model is mainly restricted by three inappropriate assumptions, i.e., statistically white reflectivity, minimum-phase wavelet, and stationarity. Modern reflectivity inversion methods (e.g., sparsity-constrained deconvolution) generally attempt to suppress the problems associated with the first two assumptions but often ignore that seismic traces are nonstationary signals, which undermines the basic assumption of unchanging wavelet in reflectivity inversion. Through tests on reflectivity series, we confirm the effects of nonstationarity on reflectivity estimation and the loss of significant information, especially in deep layers. To overcome the problems caused by nonstationarity, we propose a nonstationary convolutional model, and then use the attenuation curve in log spectra to detect and correct the influences of nonstationarity. We use Gabor deconvolution to handle nonstationarity and sparsity-constrained deconvolution to separating reflectivity and wavelet. The combination of the two deconvolution methods effectively handles nonstationarity and greatly reduces the problems associated with the unreasonable assumptions regarding reflectivity and wavelet. Using marine seismic data, we show that correcting nonstationarity helps recover subtle reflectivity information and enhances the characterization of details with respect to the geological record.

  4. Time-frequency representation of a highly nonstationary signal via the modified Wigner distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T. F.; Jones, J. H.; Jong, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new signal analysis technique called the modified Wigner distribution (MWD) is presented. The new signal processing tool has been very successful in determining time frequency representations of highly non-stationary multicomponent signals in both simulations and trials involving actual Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high frequency data. The MWD departs from the classic Wigner distribution (WD) in that it effectively eliminates the cross coupling among positive frequency components in a multiple component signal. This attribute of the MWD, which prevents the generation of 'phantom' spectral peaks, will undoubtedly increase the utility of the WD for real world signal analysis applications which more often than not involve multicomponent signals.

  5. Waves, shocks and non-stationary phenomena in the outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansteen, V. H.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of the solar chromosphere, transition region and corona were investigated. The consequences of the solar dynamics on the formation of spectral features in solar atmosphere regions are discussed. Data mainly from the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) instrument, showing signatures of non-stationary processes, are presented. These data are compared to the predictions of numerical models of the chromosphere and transition region. The observations seem to support the importance of upwardly propagating acoustic shocks in the heating of the chromosphere.

  6. Performance and Prospects of Khayyam, A Tunable Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) for High Spectral Resolving Power Observation of Extended Planetary Targets in Optical Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Harris, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present initial results, calibration and data reduction process from observations of wide-field targets using Khayyam at Mt. Hamilton, a new instrument based on a reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) at the focus of the Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT). SHS instruments are common path two-beam Fourier transform spectrometers that produce 2-D spatial interference patterns without the requirement for moving parts. The utility of SHS comes from its combination of a wide input acceptance angle (0.5-1°), high resolving power (of order ~105), compact format, high dynamic range, and relaxed optical tolerances compared with other interferometer designs. This combination makes them extremely useful for velocity resolved for observations of wide field targets from both small and large telescopes. This report focuses on the tunable instrument at Mt Hamilton, The CAT provides a test case for on-axis use of SHS, and the impact of the resulting field non-uniformity caused by the spider pattern will be discussed. Observations of several targets will be presented that demonstrate the capabilities of SHS, including comet C/2014 E2 (Jacques), Jupiter, and both the day sky and night glow. Raw interferometric data and transformed power spectra will be shown and evaluated in terms of instrumental stability.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Aspects of Data Acquisition and Processing in Application to Temperature Resolved 3-D Sub-Millimeter Spectroscopy for Astrophysics and Spectral Assignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Ivan R.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    Experimental determination of the lower state energy for every transition in molecular spectra, made possible by temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy, opens new frontiers in our ability to predict molecular spectra over a wide range of temperatures and to assign rotational spectra in many vibrational states. Our improved collisional cooling cell design extends temperature coverage of this technique to 77 K. This enhances our ability to simulate molecular spectra at temperatures of astronomical relevance. We are reporting on experimental and numerical aspects of dealing with exceptionally high information content of these spectra. New data reduction algorithms allow us to process this data in timely fashion in an attempt to make them available to astronomical community.

  8. Online updating and uncertainty quantification using nonstationary output-only measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Ka-Veng; Kuok, Sin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Extended Kalman filter (EKF) is widely adopted for state estimation and parametric identification of dynamical systems. In this algorithm, it is required to specify the covariance matrices of the process noise and measurement noise based on prior knowledge. However, improper assignment of these noise covariance matrices leads to unreliable estimation and misleading uncertainty estimation on the system state and model parameters. Furthermore, it may induce diverging estimation. To resolve these problems, we propose a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm for online estimation of the noise parameters which are used to characterize the noise covariance matrices. There are three major appealing features of the proposed approach. First, it resolves the divergence problem in the conventional usage of EKF due to improper choice of the noise covariance matrices. Second, the proposed approach ensures the reliability of the uncertainty quantification. Finally, since the noise parameters are allowed to be time-varying, nonstationary process noise and/or measurement noise are explicitly taken into account. Examples using stationary/nonstationary response of linear/nonlinear time-varying dynamical systems are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. Furthermore, comparison with the conventional usage of EKF will be provided to reveal the necessity of the proposed approach for reliable model updating and uncertainty quantification.

  9. Credibility of statistical downscaling under nonstationary climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Kaustubh; Ghosh, Subimal; Ganguly, Auroop R.

    2016-03-01

    Statistical downscaling (SD) establishes empirical relationships between coarse-resolution climate model simulations with higher-resolution climate variables of interest to stakeholders. These statistical relations are estimated based on historical observations at the finer resolutions and used for future projections. The implicit assumption is that the SD relations, extracted from data are stationary or remain unaltered, despite non-stationary change in climate. The validity of this assumption relates directly to the credibility of SD. Falsifiability of climate projections is a challenging proposition. Calibration and verification, while necessary for SD, are unlikely to be able to reproduce the full range of behavior that could manifest at decadal to century scale lead times. We propose a design-of-experiments (DOE) strategy to assess SD performance under nonstationary climate and evaluate the strategy via a transfer-function based SD approach. The strategy relies on selection of calibration and validation periods such that they represent contrasting climatic conditions like hot-versus-cold and ENSO-versus-non-ENSO years. The underlying assumption is that conditions such as warming or predominance of El Niño may be more prevalent under climate change. In addition, two different historical time periods are identified, which resemble pre-industrial and the most severe future emissions scenarios. The ability of the empirical relations to generalize under these proxy conditions is considered an indicator of their performance under future nonstationarity. Case studies over two climatologically disjoint study regions, specifically India and Northeast United States, reveal robustness of DOE in identifying the locations where nonstationarity prevails as well as the role of effective predictor selection under nonstationarity.

  10. Time-resolved spectral studies of blue-green fluorescence of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. Var. Scolymus) leaves: identification of chlorogenic acid as one of the major fluorophores and age-mediated changes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fermín; Cartelat, Aurélie; Alvarez-Fernández, Ana; Moya, Ismael; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2005-12-14

    Synchrotron radiation and the time-correlated single-photon counting technique were used to investigate the spectral and time-resolved characteristics of blue-green fluorescence (BGF) of artichoke leaves. Leaves emitted BGF under ultraviolet (UV) excitation; the abaxial side was much more fluorescent than the adaxial side, and in both cases, the youngest leaves were much more fluorescent than the oldest ones. The BGF of artichoke leaves was dominated by the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids. A decrease in the percentage of BGF attributable to the very short kinetic component (from 42 to 20%), in the shape of the BGF excitation spectra, and chlorogenic acid concentrations indicate that there is a loss of hydroxycinnamic acid with leaf age. Studies on excitation, emission, and synchronized fluorescence spectra of leaves and trichomes and chlorogenic acid contents indicate that chlorogenic acid is one of the main blue-green fluorophores in artichoke leaves. Results of the present study indicate that 20-42% (i.e., the very short kinetic component) of the overall BGF is emitted by chlorogenic acid. Time-resolved BGF measurements could be a means to extract information on chlorogenic acid fluorescence from the overall leaf BGF.

  11. VLTI-AMBER velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis imaging of η Carinae with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Studies of the primary star wind and innermost wind-wind collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; Gull, T.; Heininger, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Hummel, C. A.; Kraus, S.; Madura, T.; Mehner, A.; Mérand, A.; Millour, F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ohnaka, K.; Patru, F.; Petrov, R. G.; Rengaswamy, S.; Richardson, N. D.; Rivinius, T.; Schöller, M.; Teodoro, M.; Wittkowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. η Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims: We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of η Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of ~6 mas (~14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods: Observations of η Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results: We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 different spectral channels distributed across the Brγ 2.166 μm emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to - 376 km s-1 measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of - 277 km s-1, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is ~126°. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (~18.8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (~13.6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  12. Ground roll attenuation using non-stationary matching filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shebao; Chen, Yangkang; Bai, Min; Yang, Wencheng; Wang, Erying; Gan, Shuwei

    2015-12-01

    Conventional approaches based on adaptive subtraction for ground roll attenuation first predict an initial model for ground rolls and then adaptively subtract it from the original data using a stationary matching filter (MF). Because of the non-stationary property of seismic data and ground rolls, the application of a traditional stationary MF is not physically plausible. Thus, in the case of highly non-stationary seismic reflections and ground rolls, a stationary MF cannot obtain satisfactory results. In this paper, we apply a non-stationary matching filter (NMF) to adaptively subtract the ground rolls. The NMF can be obtained by solving a highly under-determined inversion problem using non-stationary autoregression. We apply the proposed approach to one synthetic example and two field data examples, and demonstrate a much improved performance compared with the traditional MF approach.

  13. On the nonstationary Stokes system in a cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Vladimir; Rossmann, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The authors consider the Dirichlet problem for the nonstationary Stokes system in a threedimensional cone. They obtain existence and uniqueness results for solutions in weighted Sobolev spaces and prove a regularity assertion for the solutions.

  14. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system.

  15. Tunnelling effect of the non-stationary Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Zheng; Chen, De-You

    2008-03-01

    Extending Parikh and Wilczek's work to the non-stationary black hole, we study the Hawking radiation of the non-stationary Kerr black hole by the Hamilton-Jacobi method. The result shows that the radiation spectrum is not purely thermal and the tunnelling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, which gives a correction to the Hawking thermal radiation of the black hole.

  16. VEGA/CHARA interferometric observations of Cepheids. I. A resolved structure around the prototype classical Cepheid δ Cep in the visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Mérand, A.; Mourard, D.; Storm, J.; Gieren, W.; Fouqué, P.; Gallenne, A.; Graczyk, D.; Kervella, P.; Neilson, H.; Pietrzynski, G.; Pilecki, B.; Breitfelder, J.; Berio, P.; Challouf, M.; Clausse, J.-M.; Ligi, R.; Mathias, P.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Spang, A.; Stee, P.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. The underlying assumption is that the photospheres probed in the infrared and in the visible are located at the same layer in the star whatever the pulsation phase. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. Aims: This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Methods: Observations of δ Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. Results: These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of θCSE = 8.9 ± 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of fCSE = 0.07 ± 0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2σ) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, φ = 0.0 - 0.8 and φ = 0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Conclusions: For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around δ Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and

  17. Time-frequency analysis of non-stationary fusion plasma signals using an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangqing Tan, Yi; Xie, Huiqiao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-07-15

    An improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is developed to the time-frequency analysis of non-stationary signals in tokamak plasmas. Maximal overlap discrete wavelet packet transform rather than wavelet packet transform is proposed as a preprocessor to decompose a signal into various narrow-band components. Then, a correlation coefficient based selection method is utilized to eliminate the irrelevant intrinsic mode functions obtained from empirical mode decomposition of those narrow-band components. Subsequently, a time varying vector autoregressive moving average model instead of Hilbert spectral analysis is performed to compute the Hilbert spectrum, i.e., a three-dimensional time-frequency distribution of the signal. The feasibility and effectiveness of the improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is demonstrated by analyzing a non-stationary simulated signal and actual experimental signals in fusion plasmas.

  18. Time-frequency analysis of non-stationary fusion plasma signals using an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Xie, Huiqiao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    An improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is developed to the time-frequency analysis of non-stationary signals in tokamak plasmas. Maximal overlap discrete wavelet packet transform rather than wavelet packet transform is proposed as a preprocessor to decompose a signal into various narrow-band components. Then, a correlation coefficient based selection method is utilized to eliminate the irrelevant intrinsic mode functions obtained from empirical mode decomposition of those narrow-band components. Subsequently, a time varying vector autoregressive moving average model instead of Hilbert spectral analysis is performed to compute the Hilbert spectrum, i.e., a three-dimensional time-frequency distribution of the signal. The feasibility and effectiveness of the improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is demonstrated by analyzing a non-stationary simulated signal and actual experimental signals in fusion plasmas.

  19. The Ar-HCl potential energy surface from a global map-facilitated inversion of state-to-state rotationally resolved differential scattering cross sections and rovibrational spectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia, J. M.; Rabitz, H.

    2001-11-01

    A recently developed global, nonlinear map-facilitated quantum inversion procedure is used to obtain the interaction potential for Ar-HCl(v=0) based on the rotationally resolved state-to-state inelastic cross sections of Lorenz, Westley, and Chandler [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2, 481 (2000)] as well as rovibrational spectral data. The algorithm adopted here makes use of nonlinear potential→observable maps to reveal the complete family of surfaces that reproduce the observed scattering and spectral data to within its experimental error. A nonlinear analysis is performed on the error propagation from the measured data to the recovered family of potentials. The family of potentials extracted from the inversion data is compared to the Hutson H6(4,3,0) surface [Phys. Chem. 96, 4237 (1992)], which was unable to fully account for the inelastic scattering data [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2, 481 (2000)]. There is excellent agreement with H6(4,3,0) in the attractive well, where Hutson's surface is considered most reliable. There is also good long-range agreement. However, it is shown that H6(4,3,0) predicts too soft a wall for the linear Ar-HCl configuration and significantly too steep a wall for linear Ar-ClH. These differences account for the systematically backscattered inelastic cross sections computed using the H6(4,3,0) surface. The new, nonlinear inversion results provide a global Ar-HCl interaction potential with reliable error bars that are consistent with all of the experimental data.

  20. Comparative angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of CaRuO3 and SrRuO3 thin films: Pronounced spectral weight transfer and possible precursor of lower Hubbard band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. F.; Fan, C. C.; Liu, Z. T.; Yao, Q.; Li, M. Y.; Liu, J. S.; Jiang, M. H.; Shen, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    In the prototypical 4 d system (Sr ,Ca ) RuO3 , the degree and origin of electron correlations, and how they correlate with physical properties, still remain elusive, though extensive studies have been performed. In this work we present a comparative electronic structure study of high-quality epitaxial CaRuO3 and SrRuO3 thin films, by means of reactive molecular beam epitaxy and in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We found that while SrRuO3 possesses sharp features signaling the Fermi liquid state, the isostructural CaRuO3 exhibits broad features and its spectral weight is markedly transferred from the Fermi level to -1.2 eV forming a "hump" structure which resembles the Mott-Hubbard system (Sr ,Ca ) VO3 . We suggest that this hump is the precursor of the lower Hubbard band, and the U /W (U and W represent the on-site Coulomb interactions and bandwidth, respectively) of our CaRuO3 thin film is much larger than that of SrRuO3. In addition, we discuss the origin of electron correlations as well as the ferromagnetism in SrRuO3 which is absent in CaRuO3. Our findings put constraints on future studies, and also show that perovskite ruthenates are indeed an experimentally tunable system for the study of electron correlations.

  1. Non-stationary random ground vibration due to loads moving along a railway track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Gao, Qiang; Lin, J. H.; Williams, F. W.

    2006-11-01

    The pseudo-excitation method (PEM) and the precise integration algorithm are combined to compute the non-stationary random ground vibration caused by loads moving along a railway track at constant speed. The rails are modeled as a single infinite Euler beam connected to sleepers and hence to ballast. This ballast rests on the ground, which is assumed to consist of layered transversely isotropic soil. The equations of motion of the system are established in a Cartesian coordinate system which moves with the loads. The non-stationary power spectral density and the time-dependent standard deviation can be derived conveniently by means of PEM, while the precise integration algorithm for two-point boundary value problems is applied to the solution of the equations of motion in the frequency/wavenumber domain. By virtue of the transverse isotropic property of the layered soils, the threefold iteration process in the frequency/wavenumber domain is reduced into a twofold iteration process. Hence the computational efficiency is improved considerably.

  2. Non-Stationary Internal Tides Observed with Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal variability of the internal tide is inferred from a 17-year combined record of Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellite altimeters. A global sampling of along-track sea-surface height wavenumber spectra finds that non-stationary variance is generally 25% or less of the average variance at wavenumbers characteristic of mode-l tidal internal waves. With some exceptions the non-stationary variance does not exceed 0.25 sq cm. The mode-2 signal, where detectable, contains a larger fraction of non-stationary variance, typically 50% or more. Temporal subsetting of the data reveals interannual variability barely significant compared with tidal estimation error from 3-year records. Comparison of summer vs. winter conditions shows only one region of noteworthy seasonal changes, the northern South China Sea. Implications for the anticipated SWOT altimeter mission are briefly discussed.

  3. Theory, implementation and applications of nonstationary Gabor frames

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, P.; Dörfler, M.; Jaillet, F.; Holighaus, N.; Velasco, G.

    2011-01-01

    Signal analysis with classical Gabor frames leads to a fixed time–frequency resolution over the whole time–frequency plane. To overcome the limitations imposed by this rigidity, we propose an extension of Gabor theory that leads to the construction of frames with time–frequency resolution changing over time or frequency. We describe the construction of the resulting nonstationary Gabor frames and give the explicit formula for the canonical dual frame for a particular case, the painless case. We show that wavelet transforms, constant-Q transforms and more general filter banks may be modeled in the framework of nonstationary Gabor frames. Further, we present the results in the finite-dimensional case, which provides a method for implementing the above-mentioned transforms with perfect reconstruction. Finally, we elaborate on two applications of nonstationary Gabor frames in audio signal processing, namely a method for automatic adaptation to transients and an algorithm for an invertible constant-Q transform. PMID:22267893

  4. Learning geotemporal nonstationary failure and recovery of power distribution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yun; Ji, Chuanyi; Galvan, Floyd; Couvillon, Stephen; Orellana, George; Momoh, James

    2014-01-01

    Smart energy grid is an emerging area for new applications of machine learning in a nonstationary environment. Such a nonstationary environment emerges when large-scale failures occur at power networks because of external disruptions such as hurricanes and severe storms. Power distribution networks lie at the edge of the grid, and are especially vulnerable to external disruptions. Quantifiable approaches are lacking and needed to learn nonstationary behaviors of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. This paper studies such nonstationary behaviors in three aspects. First, a novel formulation is derived for an entire life cycle of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. Second, spatial-temporal models of failure and recovery of power distribution are developed as geolocation-based multivariate nonstationary GI(t)/G(t)/∞ queues. Third, the nonstationary spatial-temporal models identify a small number of parameters to be learned. Learning is applied to two real-life examples of large-scale disruptions. One is from Hurricane Ike, where data from an operational network is exact on failures and recoveries. The other is from Hurricane Sandy, where aggregated data is used for inferring failure and recovery processes at one of the impacted areas. Model parameters are learned using real data. Two findings emerge as results of learning: 1) failure rates behave similarly at the two different provider networks for two different hurricanes but differently at the geographical regions and 2) both the rapid and slow-recovery are present for Hurricane Ike but only slow recovery is shown for a regional distribution network from Hurricane Sandy.

  5. On the temporal variability of the surface solar radiation by means of spectral representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the temporal variability of daily means of the global broadband surface solar irradiance (SSI) impinging on a horizontal plane by studying a decennial time-series of high-quality measurements recorded at a BSRN ground station. Since the data have a non-linear and non-stationary character, two time-frequency-energy representations of signal processing are compared in their ability to resolve the temporal variability of the pyranometric signal. First, the continuous wavelet transform is used to construct the wavelet power spectrum of the data. Second, the adaptive, noise-assisted empirical mode decomposition is employed to extract the intrinsic mode functions of the signal, followed by Hilbert spectral analysis. In both spectral representations, the temporal variability of the SSI is portrayed having clearly distinguishable features: a plateau between scales of two days and two-three months that has decreasing power with increasing scale, a large spectral peak corresponding to the annual variability cycle, and a low power regime in between the previous two. It is shown that the data-driven, noise-assisted method yields a somewhat more sparse representation and that it is a suitable tool for inspecting the temporal variability of SSI measurements.

  6. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  7. Comparison study of seizure detection using stationary and nonstationary methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Liu, Wentai

    2014-01-01

    We present an accurate seizure detection algorithm, and make a detailed comparison of two frequency analysis methods: a widely used stationary method - Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and a relatively new nonstationary method - Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT). Two public databases and one our own database were tested. The results show that our algorithm has very high accuracy compared with the state-of-the-art. More interestingly, it shows that the nonstationary method HHT offers better performance than the stationary method FFT in seizure detection. Therefore we propose that we should pay attention to the nonstationarity of EEG signal, since the "stationary assumption" may introduce some inaccuracy.

  8. Time-varying autoregressive modelling for nonstationary acoustic signal and its frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodsri, Chukiet

    2003-06-01

    A time-varying autoregressive (TVAR) approach is used for modeling nonstationary signals, and frequency information is then extracted from the TVAR parameters. Two methods may be used for estimating the TVAR parameters: the adaptive algorithm approach and the basis function approach. Adaptive algorithms, such as the least mean square (LMS) and the recursive least square (RLS), use a dynamic model for adapting the TVAR parameters and are capable of tracking time-varying frequency, provided that the variation is slow. It is observed that, if the signals have a single time-frequency component, the RLS with a fixed pole on the unit circle yields the fastest convergence. The basis function method employs an explicit model for the TVAR parameter variation, and model parameters are estimated via a block calculation. We proposed a modification to the basis function method by utilizing both forward and backward predictors for estimating the time-varying spectral density of nonstationary signals. It is shown that our approach yields better accuracy than the existing basis function approach, which uses only the forward predictor. The selection of the basis functions and limitations are also discussed in this thesis. Finally, the proposed approach is applied to analyze violin vibrato. Our results showed superior frequency resolution and spectral line smoothness using the proposed approach, compared to conventional analysis with the short time Fourier transform (STFT) whose frequency resolution is very limited. It was also found that frequency modulation of vibrato occurs at the rate of 6 Hz, and the frequency variations for each partial are different and increase nonlinearly with the partial number.

  9. Redefine Water Infrastructure Adaptation to a Nonstationary Climate (Editorial)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The statement “Climate Stationarity is Dead” by Milly et al. (2008) stresses the need to evaluate and when necessary, incorporate non-stationary hydroclimatic changes into water resources and infrastructure planning and engineering. Variations of this theme echo in several other ...

  10. Nonstationary Gas Flow in Thin Pipes of Variable Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guderley, G.

    1948-01-01

    Characteristic methods for nonstationary flows have been published only for the special case of the isentropic flow up until the present, althought they are applicable in various places to more difficult questions too. This report derives the characteristic method for the flows which depend only on the position coordinates and time. At the same time the treatment of compression shocks is shown.

  11. Time reversibility from visibility graphs of nonstationary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Flanagan, Ryan

    2015-08-01

    Visibility algorithms are a family of methods to map time series into networks, with the aim of describing the structure of time series and their underlying dynamical properties in graph-theoretical terms. Here we explore some properties of both natural and horizontal visibility graphs associated to several nonstationary processes, and we pay particular attention to their capacity to assess time irreversibility. Nonstationary signals are (infinitely) irreversible by definition (independently of whether the process is Markovian or producing entropy at a positive rate), and thus the link between entropy production and time series irreversibility has only been explored in nonequilibrium stationary states. Here we show that the visibility formalism naturally induces a new working definition of time irreversibility, which allows us to quantify several degrees of irreversibility for stationary and nonstationary series, yielding finite values that can be used to efficiently assess the presence of memory and off-equilibrium dynamics in nonstationary processes without the need to differentiate or detrend them. We provide rigorous results complemented by extensive numerical simulations on several classes of stochastic processes.

  12. Spectral correlations of fractional Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Oigaard, Tor Arne; Hanssen, Alfred; Scharf, Louis L.

    2006-09-15

    Fractional Brownian motion (fBm) is a ubiquitous nonstationary model for many physical processes with power-law time-averaged spectra. In this paper, we exploit the nonstationarity to derive the full spectral correlation structure of fBm. Starting from the time-varying correlation function, we derive two different time-frequency spectral correlation functions (the ambiguity function and the Kirkwood-Rihaczek spectrum), and one dual-frequency spectral correlation function. The dual-frequency spectral correlation has a surprisingly simple structure, with spectral support on three discrete lines. The theoretical predictions are verified by spectrum estimates of Monte Carlo simulations and of a time series of earthquakes with a magnitude of 7 and higher.

  13. Spatially resolved scattering polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Kohlgraf-Owens, Thomas; Dogariu, Aristide

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact, spatially resolved polarimeter based on a coherent optical fiber bundle coupled with a thin layer of scattering centers. The use of scattering for polarization encoding allows the polarimeter to work across broad angular and spectral domains. Optical fiber bundles provide high spatial resolution of the incident field. Because neighboring elements of the bundle interact with the incident field differently, only a single interaction of the fiber bundle with the unknown field is needed to perform the measurement. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the capability to perform imaging polarimetry. PMID:19412259

  14. Overall coherence and coherent-mode expansion of spectrally partially coherent plane-wave pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Tervo, Jani; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2004-11-01

    The modal theory for spectrally partially coherent nonstationary plane waves is introduced. The theory is first developed in the space-frequency domain and then extended to the space-time domain. Propagation properties of the coherent modes are analyzed. The concept of the overall degree of coherence is extended to the domain of nonstationary fields, and it is shown that the overall degree of coherence of partially coherent plane-wave pulses is the same in the space-frequency and space-time domains. The theory is applied to the recently introduced concept of spectrally Gaussian Schell-model plane-wave pulses.

  15. Overall coherence and coherent-mode expansion of spectrally partially coherent plane-wave pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajunen, Hanna; Tervo, Jani; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2004-11-01

    The modal theory for spectrally partially coherent nonstationary plane waves is introduced. The theory is first developed in the space-frequency domain and then extended to the space-time domain. Propagation properties of the coherent modes are analyzed. The concept of the overall degree of coherence is extended to the domain of nonstationary fields, and it is shown that the overall degree of coherence of partially coherent plane-wave pulses is the same in the space-frequency and space-time domains. The theory is applied to the recently introduced concept of spectrally Gaussian Schell-model plane-wave pulses.

  16. Non-stationary frequency domain system identification using time-frequency representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-05-01

    System properties of buildings and bridges may vary with time due to temperature changes, aging or extreme loadings. To identify these time-varying system properties, this study proposes a new output-only non-stationary system identification (SI) framework based on instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the time-frequency representation, e.g., short time Fourier or wavelet transform. Spectra derived from these time-frequency representations are very popular in tracking time-varying frequencies; however, they have seldom been used to identify the time-varying damping ratio because a short window needed to capture the time-varying information amplifies the bandwidth significantly, which may lead to considerably overestimating the damping ratio. To overcome this shortcoming, this study modifies the theoretical frequency response function (FRF) to explicitly account for the windowing effect, and therefore enables SI directly using instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the wavelet or short time Fourier transform. The response spectrum estimated using the short time window and the modified FRF are both influenced by the same time window, thus the instantaneous or time-localized marginal spectrum of response can be fitted to the modified FRF to identify frequency and damping ratio at each time instant. This spectral-based SI framework can reliably identify damping in time-varying systems under non-stationary excitations. The efficacy of the proposed framework is demonstrated by both numerical and full-scale examples, and also compared to the time-domain SI method, stochastic subspace identification (SSI), since the time-domain SI approaches and their extensions are popular in identifying time-varying systems utilizing recursive algorithms or moving windows.

  17. An Adaptive Wavelet-Based Denoising Algorithm for Enhancing Speech in Non-stationary Noise Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Ching

    Traditional wavelet-based speech enhancement algorithms are ineffective in the presence of highly non-stationary noise because of the difficulties in the accurate estimation of the local noise spectrum. In this paper, a simple method of noise estimation employing the use of a voice activity detector is proposed. We can improve the output of a wavelet-based speech enhancement algorithm in the presence of random noise bursts according to the results of VAD decision. The noisy speech is first preprocessed using bark-scale wavelet packet decomposition (BSWPD) to convert a noisy signal into wavelet coefficients (WCs). It is found that the VAD using bark-scale spectral entropy, called as BS-Entropy, parameter is superior to other energy-based approach especially in variable noise-level. The wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) of each subband is then temporally adjusted according to the result of VAD approach. In a speech-dominated frame, the speech is categorized into either a voiced frame or an unvoiced frame. A voiced frame possesses a strong tone-like spectrum in lower subbands, so that the WCs of lower-band must be reserved. On the contrary, the WCT tends to increase in lower-band if the speech is categorized as unvoiced. In a noise-dominated frame, the background noise can be almost completely removed by increasing the WCT. The objective and subjective experimental results are then used to evaluate the proposed system. The experiments show that this algorithm is valid on various noise conditions, especially for color noise and non-stationary noise conditions.

  18. Climate variance influence on the non-stationary plankton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Juan Carlos; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Bonnet, Delphine

    2013-08-01

    We examined plankton responses to climate variance by using high temporal resolution data from 1988 to 2007 in the Western English Channel. Climate variability modified both the magnitude and length of the seasonal signal of sea surface temperature, as well as the timing and depth of the thermocline. These changes permeated the pelagic system yielding conspicuous modifications in the phenology of autotroph communities and zooplankton. The climate variance envelope, thus far little considered in climate-plankton studies, is closely coupled with the non-stationary dynamics of plankton, and sheds light on impending ecological shifts and plankton structural changes. Our study calls for the integration of the non-stationary relationship between climate and plankton in prognostic models on the productivity of marine ecosystems.

  19. Quantum tunneling of the non-stationary BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Yang, Shu Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The semi-classical tunneling method is extended to study the Hawking tunneling radiation from the non-stationary BTZ black hole via general tortoise coordination transformation and WKB approximation. In this paper, we simplify the spin-0 scalar field equation and the spin-1/2 Dirac equation at the event horizon of this black hole, and then the quantum tunneling probability and Hawking temperature are obtained. Finally, the correctional tunneling rate is researched, and the results show that after considering the changed background space-time of the non-stationary BTZ black hole, the tunneling rate depends not only on the entropy change but also on the integral about {\\dot r}_H .

  20. Hawking's radiation in non-stationary rotating de Sitter background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibohal, N.; Ibungochouba, T.

    2011-05-01

    Hawking's radiation effect of Klein-Gordon scalar field, Dirac particles and Maxwell's electromagnetic field in the non-stationary rotating de Sitter cosmological space-time is investigated by using a method of generalized tortoise co-ordinates transformation. The locations and the temperatures of the cosmological horizons of the non-stationary rotating de Sitter model are derived. It is found that the locations and the temperatures of the rotating cosmological model depend not only on the time but also on the angle. The stress-energy regularization techniques are applied to the two dimensional analog of the de Sitter metrics and the calculated stress-energy tensor contains the thermal radiation effect.

  1. ADSL Transceivers Applying DSM and Their Nonstationary Noise Robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Bogaert, Etienne Van; Bostoen, Tom; Verlinden, Jan; Cendrillon, Raphael; Moonen, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Dynamic spectrum management (DSM) comprises a new set of techniques for multiuser power allocation and/or detection in digital subscriber line (DSL) networks. At the Alcatel Research and Innovation Labs, we have recently developed a DSM test bed, which allows the performance of DSM algorithms to be evaluated in practice. With this test bed, we have evaluated the performance of a DSM level-1 algorithm known as iterative water-filling in an ADSL scenario. This paper describes the results of, on the one hand, the performance gains achieved with iterative water-filling, and, on the other hand, the nonstationary noise robustness of DSM-enabled ADSL modems. It will be shown that DSM trades off nonstationary noise robustness for performance improvements. A new bit swap procedure is then introduced to increase the noise robustness when applying DSM.

  2. Compounding approach for univariate time series with nonstationary variances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Rudi; Barkhofen, Sonja; Guhr, Thomas; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of nonstationary systems is the time dependence of their statistical parameters. Measured time series may exhibit Gaussian statistics on short time horizons, due to the central limit theorem. The sample statistics for long time horizons, however, averages over the time-dependent variances. To model the long-term statistical behavior, we compound the local distribution with the distribution of its parameters. Here, we consider two concrete, but diverse, examples of such nonstationary systems: the turbulent air flow of a fan and a time series of foreign exchange rates. Our main focus is to empirically determine the appropriate parameter distribution for the compounding approach. To this end, we extract the relevant time scales by decomposing the time signals into windows and determine the distribution function of the thus obtained local variances.

  3. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  4. Estimation of Parameters from Discrete Random Nonstationary Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, H.; Nakamura, T.

    For the analysis of nonstationary stochastic time series we introduce a formulation to estimate the underlying time-dependent parameters. This method is designed for random events with small numbers that are out of the applicability range of the normal distribution. The method is demonstrated for numerical data generated by a known system, and applied to time series of traffic accidents, batting average of a baseball player and sales volume of home electronics.

  5. Macroscopic vacuum effects in an inhomogeneous and nonstationary electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, D.V.; Nikitina, N.S.

    1983-04-01

    Macroscopic effects of vacuum polarization by a strong nonuniform and nonstationary fields, which are kinematically forbidden in the case of a uniform magnetic field, are considered. Calculations are perfomed for the deflection of a light beam in the field of a magnetic dipole, for the production of photon pairs by an inclined rotator, and for doubling and modulation of the frequency in scattering of low-frequency electromagnetic waves by the magnetic field of an inclined rotator.

  6. Tracking nonstationary visual appearances by data-driven adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Fan, Zhimin; Fan, Jialue; Wu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Without any prior about the target, the appearance is usually the only cue available in visual tracking. However, in general, the appearances are often nonstationary which may ruin the predefined visual measurements and often lead to tracking failure in practice. Thus, a natural solution is to adapt the observation model to the nonstationary appearances. However, this idea is threatened by the risk of adaptation drift that originates in its ill-posed nature, unless good data-driven constraints are imposed. Different from most existing adaptation schemes, we enforce three novel constraints for the optimal adaptation: 1) negative data, 2) bottom-up pair-wise data constraints, and 3) adaptation dynamics. Substantializing the general adaptation problem as a subspace adaptation problem, this paper presents a closed-form solution as well as a practical iterative algorithm for subspace tracking. Extensive experiments have demonstrated that the proposed approach can largely alleviate adaptation drift and achieve better tracking results for a large variety of nonstationary scenes. PMID:19473941

  7. Nonstationary evolution and compositional heterogeneity in beetle mitochondrial phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Nathan C; Song, Hojun; Cameron, Stephen L; Whiting, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Many published phylogenies are based on methods that assume equal nucleotide composition among taxa. Studies have shown, however, that this assumption is often not accurate, particularly in divergent lineages. Nonstationary sequence evolution, when taxa in different lineages evolve in different ways, can lead to unequal nucleotide composition. This can cause inference methods to fail and phylogenies to be inaccurate. Recent advancements in phylogenetic theory have proposed new models of nonstationary sequence evolution; these models often outperform equivalent stationary models. A variety of new phylogenetic software implementing such models has been developed, but the studies employing the new methodology are still few. We discovered convergence of nucleotide composition within mitochondrial genomes of the insect order Coleoptera (beetles). We found variation in base content both among species and among genes in the genome. To this data set, we have applied a broad range of phylogenetic methods, including some traditional stationary models of evolution and all the more recent nonstationary models. We compare 8 inference methods applied to the same data set. Although the more commonly used methods universally fail to recover established clades, we find that some of the newer software packages are more appropriate for data of this nature. The software packages p4, PHASE, and nhPhyML were able to overcome the systematic bias in our data set, but parsimony, MrBayes, NJ, LogDet, and PhyloBayes were not.

  8. Application of nonstationary generalized logistic models for analyzing the annual maximum rainfall data in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Joo, K.; Kim, H.; Heo, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the various approaches for the nonstationary frequency analysis have been studied since the effect of climate change was widely recognized for hydrologic data. Most nonstationary studies proposed the nonstationary general extreme value (GEV) and generalized Pareto models for the annual maximum and POT (peak-over-threshold) data, respectively. However, various alternatives is needed to analyze the nonstationary hydrologic data because of the complicated influence of climate change. This study proposed the nonstationary generalized logistic models containing time-dependent location and scale parameters. These models contain only or both nonstationary location and scale parameters that change linearly over time. The parameters are estimated using the method of maximum likelihood based on the Newton-Raphson method. In addition, the proposed models apply to the annual maximum rainfall data of Korea in order to evaluate the applicability of the proposed models.

  9. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Cryderman, Kate; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis conducted include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WDD's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near-infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  10. Non-intrusive rattle noise detection in non-stationary conditions by an angle/time cyclostationary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Sophie; Rémond, Didier; Antoni, Jérôme; Sauvage, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes an original non-intrusive approach to detect and quantify rattle noise in automotive gearboxes operating under non-stationary conditions by means of vibration or instantaneous angular speed measurements. Rattle noise is produced by vibro impacts between teeth of unloaded gears excited by the engine acyclism. It appears during acceleration or deceleration phases and its detection requires the analysis of non-stationary signals. In order to take advantage of the repetitive nature of the impacts, an angle/time cyclostationary approach is introduced. Rattle noise is thus characterized through the angle/time duality: the cyclic frequency expressed in events per revolution is directly linked to the periodicity of the impacts while their frequency content is expressed in Hertz. The proposed detection method uses an order/frequency spectral coherence and may be applied either on vibration signals or instantaneous angular speed signals. For validation purposes, a specific instrumentation of a gearbox is set up. The relative speed of the unloaded meshing gears is observed by means of optical encoders to directly detect the instants of impact which then serve as a basis for validation of the non-intrusive detection method proposed in this paper.

  11. Travelling wave and non-stationary response in nonlinear vibrations of water-filled circular cylindrical shells: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Marco; Balasubramanian, Prabakaran; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear vibrations of a water-filled circular cylindrical shell subjected to radial harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest resonances are investigated experimentally and numerically by using a seamless aluminium sample. The experimental boundary conditions are close to simply supported edges. The presence of exact one-to-one internal resonance, giving rise to a travelling wave response around the shell circumference and non-stationary vibrations, is experimentally observed and the nonlinear response is numerically reproduced. The travelling wave is measured by means of state-of-the-art laser Doppler vibrometers applied to multiple points on the structure simultaneously. Chaos is detected in the frequency region where the travelling wave response is present. The reduced-order model is based on the Novozhilov nonlinear shell theory retaining in-plane inertia and the nonlinear equations of motion are numerically studied (i) by using a code based on arclength continuation method that allows bifurcation analysis in case of stationary vibrations, (ii) by a continuation code based on direct integration and Poincaré maps that evaluates also the maximum Lyapunov exponent in case of non-stationary vibrations. The comparison of experimental and numerical results is particularly satisfactory.

  12. Modal analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom dynamic system based on non-stationary response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Da; Wang, Zhihao; Yue, Qianjin; Shi, Zhongmin; Feng, Jiaguo

    2015-07-01

    In connection with the nonstationarity of the huge offshore structure monitoring data, a method of constructing structure free response based on the non-stationary response data is proposed. This method uses a unilateral moving average to stabilize loads and the response data in the dynamic model of the multi-degree-of-freedom (mdof) structure, analyzes spectral characteristics of moving averages in some orders, researches filtering effects when the order q = 1 (difference) and q > 1 and constructs the free vibration equation of the structure by the random decrement technique (RDT). Through the identification of the second-order linear system simulation model, a comparison of modal parameters with the theoretical values is given, which are identified by different methods, and it shows good effects on the analysis of non-stationary response data using this method. Finally, the method is applied to the mode identification of the Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) single-point mooring structure, the distribution of the modal parameters of single-point mooring structure is analyzed and modal parameters identified by different values of q are compared.

  13. Non-stationary probabilistic characterization of drought events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, Brunella; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Probabilistic characterization of droughts is an essential step for designing and implementing appropriate mitigation strategies. Traditionally, probabilistic characterization of droughts has been carried out assuming stationarity for the underlying hydrological series. In particular, under the stationary framework, probability distributions and moments of hydrological processes are assumed to be invariant with time. However many studies in the past decades have highlighted the presence of non-stationary patterns (such as trends or shifts) in hydrological records, leading to question the stationarity paradigm. Regardless of the causes (either anthropogenic or natural), the need arises to develop new statistical concepts and tools able to deal with such non-stationarity. In the present work, an analytical framework for deriving probabilities and return periods of droughts, assuming non-stationarity in the underlying hydrological series, is developed. In particular, exact and approximate analytical expressions for the moments and probability distributions of drought characteristics (i.e. length and accumulated deficit), are derived as a function of the non-stationary probability distribution of the hydrological process under investigation, as well as of the threshold level. Furthermore, capitalizing on previous developments suggested in the statistical and climate change literature, the concept of return period is revisited to take into account non-stationarity, as well as the multivariate nature of droughts which requires to consider different characteristics simultaneously. The derived expressions are applied to several precipitation series in Sicily Italy, exhibiting trends. Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed methodology to compute probabilities and return periods of drought characteristics in a non-stationary context.

  14. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray O.

    2012-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph- mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize C!Jmponent and integrated system performance. Ray will be assisting with component testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments. He will be developing procedures to guide these tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, he will gain experience with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis Ray will conduct include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WOO's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. In this Research and Technology environment, Ray will be asked to problem solve real-time as issues arise. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, Ray will be utilizing his chemical engineering background to

  15. Nonstationary Dynamics Data Analysis with Wavelet-SVD Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Marty; Groutage, Dale; Bessette, Denis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonstationary time-frequency analysis is used for identification and classification of aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic dynamics. Time-frequency multiscale wavelet processing generates discrete energy density distributions. The distributions are processed using the singular value decomposition (SVD). Discrete density functions derived from the SVD generate moments that detect the principal features in the data. The SVD standard basis vectors are applied and then compared with a transformed-SVD, or TSVD, which reduces the number of features into more compact energy density concentrations. Finally, from the feature extraction, wavelet-based modal parameter estimation is applied.

  16. Theoretical Analysis of Radiographic Images by Nonstationary Poisson Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Yamada, Isao; Uchida, Suguru

    1980-12-01

    This paper deals with the noise analysis of radiographic images obtained in the usual fluorescent screen-film system. The theory of nonstationary Poisson processes is applied to the analysis of the radiographic images containing the object information. The ensemble averages, the autocorrelation functions, and the Wiener spectrum densities of the light-energy distribution at the fluorescent screen and of the film optical-density distribution are obtained. The detection characteristics of the system are evaluated theoretically. Numerical examples of the one-dimensional image are shown and the results are compared with those obtained under the assumption that the object image is related to the background noise by the additive process.

  17. Nonstationary combustion of condensed substances subjected to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zarko, V.E.; Simonenko, V.N.; Kiskin, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the nonstationary combustion of condensed substances are represented, where the double-based propellants H, H + 1% C, H + 1% PbO and miscible compositions on an ammonium perchlorate base were the substances. Attention was paid to the specifics of physical and mathematical modeling of the processes under irradiation and interrelation of the responses of the burning system to pressure and radiation flux perturbations, and the possibilities of quantitative predictions of the combustion rate under irradiation were analyzed. A xenon lamp, a carbon dioxide laser, and a neodymium laser were used as the radiation sources.

  18. Stationary and non-stationary occurrences of miniature end plate potentials are well described as stationary and non-stationary Poisson processes in the mollusc Navanax inermis.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S; Spray, D C; Bennett, M V

    1988-06-28

    Protractor muscles in the gastropod mollusc Navanax inermis exhibit typical spontaneous miniature end plate potentials with mean amplitude 1.71 +/- 1.19 (standard deviation) mV. The evoked end plate potential is quantized, with a quantum equal to the miniature end plate potential amplitude. When their rate is stationary, occurrence of miniature end plate potentials is a random, Poisson process. When non-stationary, spontaneous miniature end plate potential occurrence is a non-stationary Poisson process, a Poisson process with the mean frequency changing with time. This extends the random Poisson model for miniature end plate potentials to the frequently observed non-stationary occurrence. Reported deviations from a Poisson process can sometimes be accounted for by the non-stationary Poisson process and more complex models, such as clustered release, are not always needed.

  19. A nonlinear model of newborn EEG with nonstationary inputs.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, N J; Mesbah, M; Boylan, G B; Colditz, P B; Boashash, B

    2010-09-01

    Newborn EEG is a complex multiple channel signal that displays nonstationary and nonlinear characteristics. Recent studies have focussed on characterizing the manifestation of seizure on the EEG for the purpose of automated seizure detection. This paper describes a novel model of newborn EEG that can be used to improve seizure detection algorithms. The new model is based on a nonlinear dynamic system; the Duffing oscillator. The Duffing oscillator is driven by a nonstationary impulse train to simulate newborn EEG seizure and white Gaussian noise to simulate newborn EEG background. The use of a nonlinear dynamic system reduces the number of parameters required in the model and produces more realistic, life-like EEG compared with existing models. This model was shown to account for 54% of the linear variation in the time domain, for seizure, and 85% of the linear variation in the frequency domain, for background. This constitutes an improvement in combined performance of 6%, with a reduction from 48 to 4 model parameters, compared to an optimized implementation of the best performing existing model. PMID:20405217

  20. A Model for Nonstationary Market Dynamics with Nontrivial Dynamical Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2008-03-01

    In a recent empirical analysis of the Euro/Dollar exchange rate [Bassler, et al., PNAS 104, 17287 (2007)] it was found that during certain periods of the day the market returns scale with Hurst exponents H that are significantly different from 1/2. In some of these periods it is less than 1/2, while in others it is greater than 1/2. In this talk we will propose a possible origin for this behavior and other stylized market facts, including short time negative autocorrelations of returns, in terms of a nonstationary compound Poisson process with a time-dependent intensity rate function that results from a changing bid-ask spread in the microscopic market. The model correctly describes the dynamic scaling behavior of a simple reaction-diffusion model of a limit-order book. That model, like the Euro/Dollar exchange rate, has nonstationary return increments and a Hurst exponent H not equal to 1/2.

  1. Incremental learning of concept drift in nonstationary environments.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Ryan; Polikar, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We introduce an ensemble of classifiers-based approach for incremental learning of concept drift, characterized by nonstationary environments (NSEs), where the underlying data distributions change over time. The proposed algorithm, named Learn(++). NSE, learns from consecutive batches of data without making any assumptions on the nature or rate of drift; it can learn from such environments that experience constant or variable rate of drift, addition or deletion of concept classes, as well as cyclical drift. The algorithm learns incrementally, as other members of the Learn(++) family of algorithms, that is, without requiring access to previously seen data. Learn(++). NSE trains one new classifier for each batch of data it receives, and combines these classifiers using a dynamically weighted majority voting. The novelty of the approach is in determining the voting weights, based on each classifier's time-adjusted accuracy on current and past environments. This approach allows the algorithm to recognize, and act accordingly, to the changes in underlying data distributions, as well as to a possible reoccurrence of an earlier distribution. We evaluate the algorithm on several synthetic datasets designed to simulate a variety of nonstationary environments, as well as a real-world weather prediction dataset. Comparisons with several other approaches are also included. Results indicate that Learn(++). NSE can track the changing environments very closely, regardless of the type of concept drift. To allow future use, comparison and benchmarking by interested researchers, we also release our data used in this paper.

  2. Estimating the population local wavelet spectrum with application to non-stationary functional magnetic resonance imaging time series.

    PubMed

    Gott, Aimee N; Eckley, Idris A; Aston, John A D

    2015-12-20

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a dynamic four-dimensional imaging modality. However, in almost all fMRI analyses, the time series elements of this data are assumed to be second-order stationary. In this paper, we examine, using time series spectral methods, whether such stationary assumptions can be made and whether estimates of non-stationarity can be used to gain understanding into fMRI experiments. A non-stationary version of replicated stationary time series analysis is proposed that takes into account the replicated time series that are available from nearby voxels in a region of interest (ROI). These are used to investigate non-stationarities in both the ROI itself and the variations within the ROI. The proposed techniques are applied to simulated data and to an anxiety-inducing fMRI experiment.

  3. Nonlinear and nonstationary framework for feature extraction and classification of motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Trad, Dalila; Al-ani, Tarik; Monacelli, Eric; Jemni, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigate a nonlinear approach for feature extraction of Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to classify motor imagery for Brain Computer Interface (BCI). This approach is based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and band power (BP). The EMD method is a data-driven technique to analyze non-stationary and nonlinear signals. It generates a set of stationary time series called Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) to represent the original data. These IMFs are analyzed with the power spectral density (PSD) to study the active frequency range correspond to the motor imagery for each subject. Then, the band power is computed within a certain frequency range in the channels. Finally, the data is reconstructed with only the specific IMFs and then the band power is employed on the new database. The classification of motor imagery was performed by using two classifiers, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). The results obtained show that the EMD method allows the most reliable features to be extracted from EEG and that the classification rate obtained is higher and better than using only the direct BP approach.

  4. Spectral and correlation analysis with applications to middle-atmosphere radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, Prabhat K.

    1989-01-01

    The correlation and spectral analysis methods for uniformly sampled stationary random signals, estimation of their spectral moments, and problems arising due to nonstationary are reviewed. Some of these methods are already in routine use in atmospheric radar experiments. Other methods based on the maximum entropy principle and time series models have been used in analyzing data, but are just beginning to receive attention in the analysis of radar signals. These methods are also briefly discussed.

  5. Channel characterization and object classification in non-stationary and uncertain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Vikram Thiruneermalai

    Classification of SONAR targets in underwater environments has long been a challenging problem. These are mainly due to the presence of undesirable effects like dispersion, attenuation and self-noise. Furthermore, we also have to contend with range dependent environ- ments, like the continental shelf/littoral regions, where most of the human and aquatic life's activities occur. Our work consists of analyzing the propagation in these environments from a pulse-evolution perspective. We look at cases where characterizing wave propagation using conventional Fourier-spectral analysis is infeasible for practical applications and instead resort to a phase-space approximation for it. We derive the phase-space approximations for a variety of propagating waves and limiting boundary conditions. We continue our past work on invariant features to enhance classification performance; we simulate the derived features for waves with cylindrical spreading. Another area of our work includes looking at the equation governing the wave propagation from a phase space perspective. It has been shown before that reformulating the classical wave equation in the phase-space provides interesting insights to the solution of the equation. It has been posited that this would be especially useful for non-stationary functions, like the ones governing SONAR propagation underwater. We perform classification of real world SONAR data measured by the JRP ( DRDC- Atlantic, NURC, ARL-PSU, NRL) program. We use a 'classic' MPE classifier on the given non-stationary and contrast its performance with an MPE classifier augmented by a Linear Time Varying (LTV) filter, to assess the impact of adding a time-varying pre-filter to a classidfier (MPE) deemed optimal for stationary additive white Gaussian noise. We show that the addition of the time-varying pre-filter to augment the standard MPE classifier does increase the performance of the classifier. Finally, we look at the self-noise problem that is commonly

  6. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  7. Spectral ladar as a UGV navigation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate new results using our Spectral LADAR prototype, which highlight the benefits of this sensor for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) navigation applications. This sensor is an augmentation of conventional LADAR and uses a polychromatic source to obtain range-resolved 3D spectral point clouds. These point cloud images can be used to identify objects based on combined spatial and spectral features in three dimensions and at long standoff range. The Spectral LADAR transmits nanosecond supercontinuum pulses generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Backscatter from distant targets is dispersed into 25 spectral bands, where each spectral band is independently range resolved with multiple return pulse recognition. Our new results show that Spectral LADAR can spectrally differentiate hazardous terrain (mud) from favorable driving surfaces (dry ground). This is a critical capability, since in UGV contexts mud is potentially hazardous, requires modified vehicle dynamics, and is difficult to identify based on 3D spatial signatures. Additionally, we demonstrate the benefits of range resolved spectral imaging, where highly cluttered 3D images of scenes (e.g. containing camouflage, foliage) are spectrally unmixed by range separation and segmented accordingly. Spectral LADAR can achieve this unambiguously and without the need for stereo correspondence, sub-pixel detection algorithms, or multi-sensor registration and data fusion.

  8. Spectral multigrid methods for the solution of homogeneous turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    New three-dimensional spectral multigrid algorithms are analyzed and implemented to solve the variable coefficient Helmholtz equation. Periodicity is assumed in all three directions which leads to a Fourier collocation representation. Convergence rates are theoretically predicted and confirmed through numerical tests. Residual averaging results in a spectral radius of 0.2 for the variable coefficient Poisson equation. In general, non-stationary Richardson must be used for the Helmholtz equation. The algorithms developed are applied to the large-eddy simulation of incompressible isotropic turbulence.

  9. Nonstationary elementary-field light randomly triggered by Poisson impulses.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2013-05-01

    A stochastic theory of nonstationary light describing the random emission of elementary pulses is presented. The emission is governed by a nonhomogeneous Poisson point process determined by a time-varying emission rate. The model describes, in the appropriate limits, stationary, cyclostationary, locally stationary, and pulsed radiation, and reduces to a Gaussian theory in the limit of dense emission rate. The first- and second-order coherence theories are solved after the computation of second- and fourth-order correlation functions by use of the characteristic function. The ergodicity of second-order correlations under various types of detectors is explored and a number of observables, including optical spectrum, amplitude, and intensity correlations, are analyzed. PMID:23695325

  10. General solutions of optimum problems in nonstationary flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    A general method concerning optimum problems in nonstationary flight is developed and discussed. Best flight techniques are determined for the following conditions: climb with minimum time, climb with minimum fuel consumption, steepest climb, descending and gliding flight with maximum time or with maximum distance. Optimum distributions of speed with altitude are derived assuming constant airplane weight and neglecting curvatures and squares of path inclination in the projection of the equation of motion on the normal to the flight path. The results of this paper differ from the well-known results obtained by neglecting accelerations with one exception, namely the case of gliding with maximum range. The paper is concluded with criticisms and remarks concerning the physical nature of the solutions and their usefulness for practical applications.

  11. Nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures by nonstationary thermal wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Panda, Soma Sekhara Balaji; Mude, Rupla Naik; Amarnath, Muniyappa

    2012-06-01

    Reinforced concrete structures (RCS) have potential application in civil engineering and with the advent of nuclear engineering RCS to be capable enough to withstanding a variety of adverse environmental conditions. However, failures/loss of durability of designed structures due to premature reinforcement corrosion of rebar is a major constrain. Growing concern of safety of structure due to pre-mature deterioration has led to a great demand for development of non-destructive and non-contact testing techniques for monitoring and assessing health of RCS. This paper presents an experimental investigation of rebar corrosion by non-stationary thermal wave imaging. Experimental results have been proven, proposed approach is an effective technique for identification of corrosion in rebar in the concrete samples.

  12. Quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Irom Ablu; Singh, T. Ibungochouba; Singh, K. Yugindro

    2014-08-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method a study of quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model is carried out. It is shown that there exist seas of positive and negative energy states in the vicinity of the cosmological event horizon and there also exists a forbidden energy gap between the two seas. The forbidden energy gap vanishes on the surface of the cosmological event horizon so that the positive and negative energy levels overlap. The width of the forbidden energy gap and the energy of the particle at the cosmological event horizon are found to depend on the cosmological constant, the rotation parameter, positions of the particle and the cosmological event horizon, angular momentum of the particle, evaporation rate and shape of the cosmological event horizon. The tunneling probability of the emitted particles constituting Hawking radiation is also deduced for stationary nonrotating de Sitter cosmological model and the standard Hawking temperature is recovered.

  13. System for monitoring non-coincident, nonstationary process signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    2005-01-04

    An improved system for monitoring non-coincident, non-stationary, process signals. The mean, variance, and length of a reference signal is defined by an automated system, followed by the identification of the leading and falling edges of a monitored signal and the length of the monitored signal. The monitored signal is compared to the reference signal, and the monitored signal is resampled in accordance with the reference signal. The reference signal is then correlated with the resampled monitored signal such that the reference signal and the resampled monitored signal are coincident in time with each other. The resampled monitored signal is then compared to the reference signal to determine whether the resampled monitored signal is within a set of predesignated operating conditions.

  14. Importance Sampling Approach for the Nonstationary Approximation Error Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, J. M. J.; Lehikoinen, A.; Hämäläinen, J.; Kaipio, J. P.

    2010-09-01

    The approximation error approach has been earlier proposed to handle modelling, numerical and computational errors in inverse problems. The idea of the approach is to include the errors to the forward model and compute the approximate statistics of the errors using Monte Carlo sampling. This can be a computationally tedious task but the key property of the approach is that the approximate statistics can be calculated off-line before measurement process takes place. In nonstationary problems, however, information is accumulated over time, and the initial uncertainties may turn out to have been exaggerated. In this paper, we propose an importance weighing algorithm with which the approximation error statistics can be updated during the accumulation of measurement information. As a computational example, we study an estimation problem that is related to a convection-diffusion problem in which the velocity field is not accurately specified.

  15. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  16. Nonstationary LPV control for trajectory tracking: a double pendulum example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhood, Mazen

    2012-05-01

    This article focusses on the implementation of recently developed nonstationary linear-parameter varying (NSLPV) control algorithms for the regulation of nonlinear systems about pre-specified trajectories. The trajectories of interest eventually settle into periodic orbits, and hence are duly called eventually periodic trajectories. Parameterising the nonlinear system equations about such trajectories results in eventually periodic NSLPV models, and then NSLPV controllers are designed for these models to ensure accurate trajectory tracking despite various disturbances and uncertainties. These control algorithms will be applied to control a double pendulum where a vessel containing fluid is rigidly attached to the end of the second link of the pendulum. The mass of the fluid varies in time and, together with its rate of variation, is available for measurement during plant operation.

  17. Multipurpose spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, F; Lorentzen, D A; Heia, K; Svenøe, T

    2000-06-20

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 A. One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system's front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m). PMID:18345245

  18. Multipurpose spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, F; Lorentzen, D A; Heia, K; Svenøe, T

    2000-06-20

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 A. One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system's front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m).

  19. A Nonstationary Markov Model Detects Directional Evolution in Hymenopteran Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Directional evolution has played an important role in shaping the morphological, ecological, and molecular diversity of life. However, standard substitution models assume stationarity of the evolutionary process over the time scale examined, thus impeding the study of directionality. Here we explore a simple, nonstationary model of evolution for discrete data, which assumes that the state frequencies at the root differ from the equilibrium frequencies of the homogeneous evolutionary process along the rest of the tree (i.e., the process is nonstationary, nonreversible, but homogeneous). Within this framework, we develop a Bayesian approach for testing directional versus stationary evolution using a reversible-jump algorithm. Simulations show that when only data from extant taxa are available, the success in inferring directionality is strongly dependent on the evolutionary rate, the shape of the tree, the relative branch lengths, and the number of taxa. Given suitable evolutionary rates (0.1–0.5 expected substitutions between root and tips), accounting for directionality improves tree inference and often allows correct rooting of the tree without the use of an outgroup. As an empirical test, we apply our method to study directional evolution in hymenopteran morphology. We focus on three character systems: wing veins, muscles, and sclerites. We find strong support for a trend toward loss of wing veins and muscles, while stationarity cannot be ruled out for sclerites. Adding fossil and time information in a total-evidence dating approach, we show that accounting for directionality results in more precise estimates not only of the ancestral state at the root of the tree, but also of the divergence times. Our model relaxes the assumption of stationarity and reversibility by adding a minimum of additional parameters, and is thus well suited to studying the nature of the evolutionary process in data sets of limited size, such as morphology and ecology. PMID:26272507

  20. `Shaking' of an atom in a non-stationary cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, A. M.; Narozhny, N. B.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2000-09-01

    We consider an atom interacting with a quantized electromagnetic field inside a cavity with variable parameters. The atom in the ground state located in the initially empty cavity can be excited by variation of cavity parameters. We have discovered two mechanisms of atomic excitation. The first arises due to the interaction of the atom with the non-stationary electromagnetic field created by modulation of cavity parameters. If the characteristic time of variation of cavity parameters is of the order of the atomic transition time, the processes of photon creation and atomic excitation are going on simultaneously and hence excitation of the atom cannot be reduced to trivial absorption of the photons produced by the dynamical Casimir effect. The second mechanism is `shaking' of the atom due to fast modulation of its ground state Lamb shift which takes place as a result of fast variation of cavity parameters. The last mechanism has no connection with the vacuum dynamical Casimir effect. Moreover, it opens a new channel of photon creation in the non-stationary cavity. Nevertheless, the process of photon creation is altered by the presence of the atom in the cavity, even if one disregards the existence of the new channel. In particular, it removes the restriction for creation of only even number of photons and also changes the expectation value for the number of created photons. Our consideration is based on a simple model of a two-level atom interacting with a single mode of the cavity field. Qualitatively our results are valid for a real atom in a physical cavity.

  1. A Nonstationary Markov Model Detects Directional Evolution in Hymenopteran Morphology.

    PubMed

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2015-11-01

    Directional evolution has played an important role in shaping the morphological, ecological, and molecular diversity of life. However, standard substitution models assume stationarity of the evolutionary process over the time scale examined, thus impeding the study of directionality. Here we explore a simple, nonstationary model of evolution for discrete data, which assumes that the state frequencies at the root differ from the equilibrium frequencies of the homogeneous evolutionary process along the rest of the tree (i.e., the process is nonstationary, nonreversible, but homogeneous). Within this framework, we develop a Bayesian approach for testing directional versus stationary evolution using a reversible-jump algorithm. Simulations show that when only data from extant taxa are available, the success in inferring directionality is strongly dependent on the evolutionary rate, the shape of the tree, the relative branch lengths, and the number of taxa. Given suitable evolutionary rates (0.1-0.5 expected substitutions between root and tips), accounting for directionality improves tree inference and often allows correct rooting of the tree without the use of an outgroup. As an empirical test, we apply our method to study directional evolution in hymenopteran morphology. We focus on three character systems: wing veins, muscles, and sclerites. We find strong support for a trend toward loss of wing veins and muscles, while stationarity cannot be ruled out for sclerites. Adding fossil and time information in a total-evidence dating approach, we show that accounting for directionality results in more precise estimates not only of the ancestral state at the root of the tree, but also of the divergence times. Our model relaxes the assumption of stationarity and reversibility by adding a minimum of additional parameters, and is thus well suited to studying the nature of the evolutionary process in data sets of limited size, such as morphology and ecology.

  2. Broadband ringdown spectral photography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, J J; Paul, J B; Jiao, H; O'Keefe, A

    2001-12-20

    A new technique that enables frequency-resolved cavity ringdown absorption spectra to be obtained over a large optical bandwidth by a single laser shot is described. The technique, ringdown spectral photography (RSP), simultaneously employs two key principles to record the time and frequency response of an optical cavity along orthogonal axes of a CCD array detector. Previously, the principles employed in RSP were demonstrated with narrow-band laser light that was scanned in frequency [Chem. Phys. Lett. 292, 143 (1998)]. Here, the RSP method is demonstrated using single pulses of broadband visible laser light. The ability to obtain broad as well as rotationally resolved spectra over a large bandwidth with high sensitivity is demonstrated. PMID:18364983

  3. Quantum theory of optical coherence of nonstationary light in the space-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Wolf, Emil

    2010-10-15

    Classical theories of coherence for statistically stationary, as well as, nonstationary optical fields are frequently discussed both in the space-time and in the space-frequency domains. However, the quantum treatment of coherence theory is generally carried out in the space-time domain. In this paper, we present a quantum-mechanical theory of first-order coherence for statistically nonstationary light in the space-frequency domain.

  4. ANGEL program: Solution of large systems of linear differential equations describing nonstationary processes using CUDA technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moryakov, A. V. Pylyov, S. S.

    2012-12-15

    This paper presents the formulation of the problem and the methodical approach for solving large systems of linear differential equations describing nonstationary processes with the use of CUDA technology; this approach is implemented in the ANGEL program. Results for a test problem on transport of radioactive products over loops of a nuclear power plant are given. The possibilities for the use of the ANGEL program for solving various problems that simulate arbitrary nonstationary processes are discussed.

  5. A frequency measurement algorithm for non-stationary signals by using wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Oh, Dong Keun

    2016-11-01

    Scalogram is widely used to measure instantaneous frequencies of non-stationary signals. However, the basic property of the scalogram is observed only for stationary sinusoidal functions. A property of the scalogram for non-stationary signal is analytically derived in this paper. Based on the property, a new frequency measurement algorithm is proposed. In addition, a filter that can separate two similar frequency signals is developed based on the wavelet transform.

  6. Analyzing nonstationary financial time series via hilbert-huang transform (HHT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus, computer program product and method of analyzing non-stationary time varying phenomena. A representation of a non-stationary time varying phenomenon is recursively sifted using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) to extract intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The representation is filtered to extract intrinsic trends by combining a number of IMFs. The intrinsic trend is inherent in the data and identifies an IMF indicating the variability of the phenomena. The trend also may be used to detrend the data.

  7. Discriminant non-stationary signal features' clustering using hard and fuzzy cluster labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraani, Behnaz; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2012-12-01

    Current approaches to improve the pattern recognition performance mainly focus on either extracting non-stationary and discriminant features of each class, or employing complex and nonlinear feature classifiers. However, little attention has been paid to the integration of these two approaches. Combining non-stationary feature analysis with complex feature classifiers, this article presents a novel direction to enhance the discriminatory power of pattern recognition methods. This approach, which is based on a fusion of non-stationary feature analysis with clustering techniques, proposes an algorithm to adaptively identify the feature vectors according to their importance in representing the patterns of discrimination. Non-stationary feature vectors are extracted using a non-stationary method based on time-frequency distribution and non-negative matrix factorization. The clustering algorithms including the K-means and self-organizing tree maps are utilized as unsupervised clustering methods followed by a supervised labeling. Two labeling methods are introduced: hard and fuzzy labeling. The article covers in detail the formulation of the proposed discriminant feature clustering method. Experiments performed with pathological speech classification, T-wave alternans evaluation from the surface electrocardiogram, audio scene analysis, and telemonitoring of Parkinson's disease problems produced desirable results. The outcome demonstrates the benefits of non-stationary feature fusion with clustering methods for complex data analysis where existing approaches do not exhibit a high performance.

  8. Prestack nonstationary deconvolution based on variable-step sampling in the radial trace domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Wang, Shou-Dong; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chang; Zheng, Qiang

    2013-12-01

    The conventional nonstationary convolutional model assumes that the seismic signal is recorded at normal incidence. Raw shot gathers are far from this assumption because of the effects of offsets. Because of such problems, we propose a novel prestack nonstationary deconvolution approach. We introduce the radial trace (RT) transform to the nonstationary deconvolution, we estimate the nonstationary deconvolution factor with hyperbolic smoothing based on variable-step sampling (VSS) in the RT domain, and we obtain the high-resolution prestack nonstationary deconvolution data. The RT transform maps the shot record from the offset and traveltime coordinates to those of apparent velocity and traveltime. The ray paths of the traces in the RT better satisfy the assumptions of the convolutional model. The proposed method combines the advantages of stationary deconvolution and inverse Q filtering, without prior information for Q. The nonstationary deconvolution in the RT domain is more suitable than that in the space-time (XT) domain for prestack data because it is the generalized extension of normal incidence. Tests with synthetic and real data demonstrate that the proposed method is more effective in compensating for large-offset and deep data.

  9. Extracting stationary segments from non-stationary synthetic and cardiac signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, María. G.; Ledezma, Carlos A.; Perpiñán, Gilberto; Wong, Sara; Altuve, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological signals are commonly the result of complex interactions between systems and organs, these interactions lead to signals that exhibit a non-stationary behaviour. For cardiac signals, non-stationary heart rate variability (HRV) may produce misinterpretations. A previous work proposed to divide a non-stationary signal into stationary segments by looking for changes in the signal's properties related to changes in the mean of the signal. In this paper, we extract stationary segments from non-stationary synthetic and cardiac signals. For synthetic signals with different signal-to-noise ratio levels, we detect the beginning and end of the stationary segments and the result is compared to the known values of the occurrence of these events. For cardiac signals, RR interval (cardiac cycle length) time series, obtained from electrocardiographic records during stress tests for two populations (diabetic patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and control subjects), were divided into stationary segments. Results on synthetic signals reveal that the non-stationary sequence is divided into more stationary segments than needed. Additionally, due to HRV reduction and exercise intolerance reported on diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy patients, non-stationary RR interval sequences from these subjects can be divided into longer stationary segments compared to the control group.

  10. Non-Stationary Effects and Cross Correlations in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    In this paper within the framework of the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) we consider the dynamic properties of the solar activity by analyzing the Zurich sunspot numbers. As is well-known astrophysics objects are the non-stationary open systems, whose evolution are the quite individual and have the alternation effects. The main difference of FNS compared to other related methods is the separation of the original signal reflecting the dynamics of solar activity into three frequency bands: system-specific "resonances" and their interferential contributions at lower frequencies, chaotic "random walk" ("irregularity-jump") components at larger frequencies, and chaotic "irregularity-spike" (inertial) components in the highest frequency range. Specific parameters corresponding to each of the bands are introduced and calculated. These irregularities as well as specific resonance frequencies are considered as the information carriers on every hierarchical level of the evolution of a complex natural system with intermittent behavior, consecutive alternation of rapid chaotic changes in the values of dynamic variables on small time intervals with small variations of the values on longer time intervals ("laminar" phases). The jump and spike irregularities are described by power spectra and difference moments (transient structural functions) of the second order. FNS allows revealing the most crucial points of the solar activity dynamics by means of "spikiness" factor. It is shown that this variable behaves as the predictor of crucial changes of the sunspot number dynamics, particularly when the number comes up to maximum value. The change of averaging interval allows revealing the non-stationary effects depending by 11-year cycle and by inside processes in a cycle. To consider the cross correlations between the different variables of solar activity we use the Zurich sunspot numbers and the sequence of corona's radiation energy. The FNS-approach allows extracting the

  11. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a New Emission Component and Absorption by Cold Dense Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below -1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission can be attributed to re- combination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuum source in a luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy.

  12. Theory of dynamic absorption spectroscopy of nonstationary states. 4. Application to 12-fs resonant impulsive Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, W.T.; Peteanu, L.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-07-23

    A time-dependent theory for femtosecond dynamic absorption spectroscopy is used to describe the creation and observation of molecular ground-state vibrational coherence through the resonance impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism. Model calculations show that the oscillatory absorption signal that arises from this ground-state coherence is maximized for a limited range of pulse lengths and that there is a complex relationship between the probe wavelength and the strength of the spectral oscillations. The generalized time-dependent linear susceptibility of the nonstationary system created by the impulsive pump pulse is defined and used to discuss the strong dependence of the measured signals on the properties of the probe pulse. Finally, calculations are presented to analyze the high-frequency oscillations ({approximately}20-fs period) recently observed in the transient absorption spectra of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR{sub 568}) following excitation with a 12-fs optical pulse. At the probe wavelengths used in this experiment, the contribution of stimulated emission is negligible at long times because of the extremely rapid excited-state isomerization; as a result, the spectral oscillations observed after this time are due to the impulsive excitation of coherent vibrations in the ground state. The transient response observed for BR{sub 568} is calculated using a 29-mode harmonic potential surface derived from a prior resonance Raman intensity analysis. Both the oscillatory signals and their dependence on the probe wavelength are satisfactorily reproduced. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Laplace Approximation for Divisive Gaussian Processes for Nonstationary Regression.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Luis; Lázaro-Gredilla, Miguel; Figueiras-Vidal, Aníbal R

    2016-03-01

    The standard Gaussian Process regression (GP) is usually formulated under stationary hypotheses: The noise power is considered constant throughout the input space and the covariance of the prior distribution is typically modeled as depending only on the difference between input samples. These assumptions can be too restrictive and unrealistic for many real-world problems. Although nonstationarity can be achieved using specific covariance functions, they require a prior knowledge of the kind of nonstationarity, not available for most applications. In this paper we propose to use the Laplace approximation to make inference in a divisive GP model to perform nonstationary regression, including heteroscedastic noise cases. The log-concavity of the likelihood ensures a unimodal posterior and makes that the Laplace approximation converges to a unique maximum. The characteristics of the likelihood also allow to obtain accurate posterior approximations when compared to the Expectation Propagation (EP) approximations and the asymptotically exact posterior provided by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo implementation with Elliptical Slice Sampling (ESS), but at a reduced computational load with respect to both, EP and ESS.

  14. Wavelet analysis for non-stationary, nonlinear time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Justin A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for detecting and quantifying nonlinearities in nonstationary time series are introduced and developed. In particular, higher-order wavelet analysis was applied to an ideal time series and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) time series. Multiple-testing problems inherent in wavelet analysis were addressed by controlling the false discovery rate. A new local autobicoherence spectrum facilitated the detection of local nonlinearities and the quantification of cycle geometry. The local autobicoherence spectrum of the QBO time series showed that the QBO time series contained a mode with a period of 28 months that was phase coupled to a harmonic with a period of 14 months. An additional nonlinearly interacting triad was found among modes with periods of 10, 16 and 26 months. Local biphase spectra determined that the nonlinear interactions were not quadratic and that the effect of the nonlinearities was to produce non-smoothly varying oscillations. The oscillations were found to be skewed so that negative QBO regimes were preferred, and also asymmetric in the sense that phase transitions between the easterly and westerly phases occurred more rapidly than those from westerly to easterly regimes.

  15. Progress in Operational Analysis of Launch Vehicles in Nonstationary Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Kaouk, Mo; Cao, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents recent results in an ongoing effort to understand and develop techniques to process launch vehicle data, which is extremely challenging for modal parameter identification. The primary source of difficulty is due to the nonstationary nature of the situation. The system is changing, the environment is not steady, and there is an active control system operating. Hence, the primary tool for producing clean operational results (significant data lengths and data averaging) is not available to the user. This work reported herein uses a correlation-based two step operational modal analysis approach to process the relevant data sets for understanding and development of processes. A significant drawback for such processing of short time histories is a series of beating phenomena due to the inability to average out random modal excitations. A recursive correlation process coupled to a new convergence metric (designed to mitigate the beating phenomena) is the object of this study. It has been found in limited studies that this process creates clean modal frequency estimates but numerically alters the damping.

  16. Nonstationary model of an axisymmetric mirror trap with nonequilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, D. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    The DOL nonstationary model intended to describe plasma processes in axisymmetric magnetic mirror traps is considered. The model uses averaging over the bounce period in order to take into account the dependence of plasma parameters on the coordinate along the facility axis. Examples of calculations of trap parameters by means of the DOL code based on this model are presented. Among the features of the DOL model, one can single out two points: first, the capability of calculating the terms of the collision integral with the use of a non-Maxwellian scattering function while evaluating the distribution function of fast ions and, second, concerning the background plasma, the capability of calculating the longitudinal particle and energy fluxes in confinement modes with the particle mean free path being on the order of the trap length. The influence of the scattering function approximation used to calculate the collision integral on the solution to the kinetic equation is analyzed. The dependences of plasma parameters on the power of heating injectors and the length of the fast-ion turning zone are presented as calculation examples. The longitudinal profile of the fusion reaction rate in the case of a trap with a long fast-ion turning zone is shown to depend strongly on the input parameters of the model.

  17. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  18. Nonstationary Gravity Wave Forcing of the Stratospheric Zonal Mean Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The role of gravity wave forcing in the zonal mean circulation of the stratosphere is discussed. Starting from some very simple assumptions about the momentum flux spectrum of nonstationary (non-zero phase speed) waves at forcing levels in the troposphere, a linear model is used to calculate wave propagation through climatological zonal mean winds at solstice seasons. As the wave amplitudes exceed their stable limits, a saturation criterion is imposed to account for nonlinear wave breakdown effects, and the resulting vertical gradient in the wave momentum flux is then used to estimate the mean flow forcing per unit mass. Evidence from global, assimilated data sets are used to constrain these forcing estimates. The results suggest the gravity-wave-driven force is accelerative (has the same sign as the mean wind) throughout most of the stratosphere above 20 km. The sense of the gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere is thus opposite to that in the mesosphere, where gravity wave drag is widely believed to play a principal role in decelerating the mesospheric jets. The forcing estimates are further compared to existing gravity wave parameterizations for the same climatological zonal mean conditions. Substantial disagreement is evident in the stratosphere, and we discuss the reasons for the disagreement. The results suggest limits on typical gravity wave amplitudes near source levels in the troposphere at solstice seasons. The gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere appears to have a substantial effect on lower stratospheric temperatures during southern hemisphere summer and thus may be relevant to climate.

  19. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  20. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  1. On the Application of Hilbert Spectral Analysis for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Hilbert spectral analysis (Huang et al, 1998, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, A 454, pp 903-995) consisted of two steps: First, the data has to be reduced into a finite number of Intrinsic Mode Function by the Empirical Mode Decomposition method, then the resulting Intrinsic Mode Functions are converted to time-frequency-energy distribution through Hilbert transform. In this approach, the Empirical Mode Functions served as the basis functions with which the data is expanded. This basis function is adaptive, and the decomposition is nonlinear. Furthermore, as the Hilbert transform is a singular transform, it retains a high degree of local information. The instantaneous frequency is determined by differentiation of the phase function; therefore, there is no restriction of the 'uncertainty principle' for all the time-frequency analysis resulting from a priori basis approach. With the adaptive basis and the instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert Spectral analysis can represent data from nonlinear and nonstationary processes without resorting to the harmonics. Another advantage of using instantaneous frequency is the ability to find out frequency from limited length of data, which is a critical problem in climate studies. As the processes driving the climate changes could be both nonlinear and nonstationary, the Hilbert Spectral Analysis could be of great use in examining the underlying mechanisms. A preliminary study based on the length of day data will be presented as example for the application of the Hilbert Spectral Analysis for climate study.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of nonstationary vibration signals for deployable structures by using the constant-Q nonstationary gabor transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yan, Shaoze; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Deployable structures have been widely used in on-orbit servicing spacecrafts, and the vibration properties of such structures have become increasingly important in the aerospace industry. The constant-Q nonstationary Gabor transform (CQ-NSGT) is introduced in this paper to accurately evaluate the variation in the frequency and amplitude of vibration signals along with time. First, an example signal is constructed on the basis of the vibration properties of deployable structures and is processed by the short-time Fourier transform, Wigner-Ville distribution, Hilbert-Huang transform, and CQ-NSGT. Results show that time and frequency resolutions are simultaneously fine only by employing CQ-NSGT. Subsequently, a zero padding operation is conducted to correct the calculation error at the end of the transform results. Finally, a set of experimental devices is constructed. The vibration signal of the experimental mode is processed by CQ-NSGT. On this basis, the experimental signal properties are discussed. This time-frequency method may be useful for formulating the dynamics for complex deployable structures.

  3. EDITORIAL: The nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2005-03-01

    This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics contains 16 contributions devoted to quantum systems with moving boundaries. In a broad sense, the papers continue the studies opened exactly 100 years ago by Einstein in his seminal work on the electrodynamics of moving bodies and the quantum nature of light. Another jubilee which we wish to celebrate by launching this issue is the 80th anniversary of the publication of two papers, where the first solutions of the classical Maxwell equations in a one-dimensional cavity with moving boundaries were obtained, by T H Havelock (1924 Some dynamical illustrations of the pressure of radiation and of adiabatic invariance Phil. Mag. 47 754-71) and by E L Nicolai (1925 On a dynamical illustration of the pressure of radiation Phil. Mag. 49 171-7). As was shown by Einstein, studying the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field inevitably leads one to its quantum (corpuscular) nature. Many papers in this issue deal with problems where moving boundaries produce parametric excitation of vacuum fluctuations of the field, which could result in several different observable effects, like the modification of the famous Casimir force, or the creation of real quanta from the vacuum. It is worth emphasizing that these phenomena, frequently referred to as nonstationary (or dynamical) Casimir effects, are no longer the province only of pure theorists: some experimental groups have already started long-term work aimed at observing such effects in the laboratory. Of course, many difficult problems remain to be resolved before this dream becomes reality. Several papers here show both important progress in this direction, and possible difficulties still to be tackled. Problems that have been considered include, in particular, decoherence, entanglement, and the roles of geometry and polarization. Other papers deal with fundamental problems like the Unruh effect, the interaction of accelerated relativistic atoms with

  4. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  5. Non-stationary background intensity and Caribbean seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmy, Larissa; Vaillant, Jean

    2014-05-01

    We consider seismic risk calculation based on models with non-stationary background intensity. The aim is to improve predictive strategies in the framework of seismic risk assessment from models describing at best the seismic activity in the Caribbean arc. Appropriate statistical methods are required for analyzing the volumes of data collected. The focus is on calculating earthquakes occurrences probability and analyzing spatiotemporal evolution of these probabilities. The main modeling tool is the point process theory in order to take into account past history prior to a given date. Thus, the seismic event conditional intensity is expressed by means of the background intensity and the self exciting component. This intensity can be interpreted as the expected event rate per time and / or surface unit. The most popular intensity model in seismology is the ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence) model introduced and then generalized by Ogata [2, 3]. We extended this model and performed a comparison of different probability density functions for the triggered event times [4]. We illustrate our model by considering the CDSA (Centre de Données Sismiques des Antilles) catalog [1] which contains more than 7000 seismic events occurred in the Lesser Antilles arc. Statistical tools for testing the background intensity stationarity and for dynamical segmentation are presented. [1] Bengoubou-Valérius M., Bazin S., Bertil D., Beauducel F. and Bosson A. (2008). CDSA: a new seismological data center for the French Lesser Antilles, Seismol. Res. Lett., 79 (1), 90-102. [2] Ogata Y. (1998). Space-time point-process models for earthquake occurrences, Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 50 (2), 379-402. [3] Ogata, Y. (2011). Significant improvements of the space-time ETAS model for forecasting of accurate baseline seismicity, Earth, Planets and Space, 63 (3), 217-229. [4] Valmy L. and Vaillant J. (2013). Statistical models in seismology: Lesser Antilles arc case

  6. Climate Informed Low Flow Frequency Analysis Using Nonstationary Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Guo, S.; Lian, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stationarity is often assumed for frequency analysis of low flows in water resources management and planning. However, many studies have shown that flow characteristics, particularly the frequency spectrum of extreme hydrologic events,were modified by climate change and human activities and the conventional frequency analysis without considering the non-stationary characteristics may lead to costly design. The analysis presented in this paper was based on the more than 100 years of daily flow data from the Yichang gaging station 44 kilometers downstream of the Three Gorges Dam. The Mann-Kendall trend test under the scaling hypothesis showed that the annual low flows had significant monotonic trend, whereas an abrupt change point was identified in 1936 by the Pettitt test. The climate informed low flow frequency analysis and the divided and combined method are employed to account for the impacts from related climate variables and the nonstationarities in annual low flows. Without prior knowledge of the probability density function for the gaging station, six distribution functions including the Generalized Extreme Values (GEV), Pearson Type III, Gumbel, Gamma, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions have been tested to find the best fit, in which the local likelihood method is used to estimate the parameters. Analyses show that GEV had the best fit for the observed low flows. This study has also shown that the climate informed low flow frequency analysis is able to exploit the link between climate indices and low flows, which would account for the dynamic feature for reservoir management and provide more accurate and reliable designs for infrastructure and water supply.

  7. Nonstationary Effects at Photovoltaic Module Characterization Using Pulsed Solar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsirivanich, N.; Chenvidhya, D.; Kirtikara, K.; Sriprapha, K.; Sritharathikhun, J.; Songprakorp, R.; Jivacate, C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the dynamic characteristic of a tandem silicon/amorphous silicon (a-Si:H/a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module measured in the nonstationary regime. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the PV module are generally measured by using a pulsed solar simulator. Distortions of the I-V curves can often be observed when measurements are done under the solar simulator with different pulse durations or different sweeping rates of the curve tracing, a direction of the curve tracing from short circuit to open circuit (SCOC), or from open circuit to short circuit (OCSC). In this paper, the measurements were made on the a-Si:H/a-Si:H tandem PV module consisting of 40 cells in series connection. The PV module area is 0.78 m2. Dissimilarities of the I-V curves of the PV modules can be observed by the deviation of power at maximum point (Pm) and fill factor (FF). From the experimental results, it is found that the largest deviation of Pm is 6.12% for 1 ms sweeping duration with OCSC direction of the curve tracing. Dissimilarities of the I-V curves can be explained by charging and discharging capacitive currents due to a voltage dependence of solar cell parameters. Moreover, the capacitance effects can be described by a dynamic impedance measurement of the PV module in the dark with forward and reverse biasing. The voltage and time-dependent parameters are the diffusion capacitance (CD), transient or junction capacitance (CT), series resistance (Rs), and shunt resistance (Rsh),which can be revealed by an impedance plot.

  8. Spectral theory and spectral gaps for periodic Schrödinger operators on product graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Floquet theory and its applications to spectral theory are developed for periodic Schrödinger operators on product graphs {\\mathbb {G}} \\times {\\mathbb {Z}} , where {\\mathbb {G}} is a finite graph. The resolvent and the spectrum have detailed descriptions which involve the eigenvalues and singularities of the meromorphic Floquet matrix function. Existence and size estimates for sequences of spectral gaps are established.

  9. Separation of stationary and non-stationary sources with a generalized eigenvalue problem.

    PubMed

    Hara, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Washio, Takashi; von Bünau, Paul; Tokunaga, Terumasa; Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2012-09-01

    Non-stationary effects are ubiquitous in real world data. In many settings, the observed signals are a mixture of underlying stationary and non-stationary sources that cannot be measured directly. For example, in EEG analysis, electrodes on the scalp record the activity from several sources located inside the brain, which one could only measure invasively. Discerning stationary and non-stationary contributions is an important step towards uncovering the mechanisms of the data generating system. To that end, in Stationary Subspace Analysis (SSA), the observed signal is modeled as a linear superposition of stationary and non-stationary sources, where the aim is to separate the two groups in the mixture. In this paper, we propose the first SSA algorithm that has a closed form solution. The novel method, Analytic SSA (ASSA), is more than 100 times faster than the state-of-the-art, numerically stable, and guaranteed to be optimal when the covariance between stationary and non-stationary sources is time-constant. In numerical simulations on wide range of settings, we show that our method yields superior results, even for signals with time-varying group-wise covariance. In an application to geophysical data analysis, ASSA extracts meaningful components that shed new light on the Pi 2 pulsations of the geomagnetic field. PMID:22551683

  10. Causal Inference Based on the Analysis of Events of Relations for Non-stationary Variables

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yu; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The main concept behind causality involves both statistical conditions and temporal relations. However, current approaches to causal inference, focusing on the probability vs. conditional probability contrast, are based on model functions or parametric estimation. These approaches are not appropriate when addressing non-stationary variables. In this work, we propose a causal inference approach based on the analysis of Events of Relations (CER). CER focuses on the temporal delay relation between cause and effect, and a binomial test is established to determine whether an “event of relation” with a non-zero delay is significantly different from one with zero delay. Because CER avoids parameter estimation of non-stationary variables per se, the method can be applied to both stationary and non-stationary signals. PMID:27389921

  11. Causal Inference Based on the Analysis of Events of Relations for Non-stationary Variables.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The main concept behind causality involves both statistical conditions and temporal relations. However, current approaches to causal inference, focusing on the probability vs. conditional probability contrast, are based on model functions or parametric estimation. These approaches are not appropriate when addressing non-stationary variables. In this work, we propose a causal inference approach based on the analysis of Events of Relations (CER). CER focuses on the temporal delay relation between cause and effect, and a binomial test is established to determine whether an "event of relation" with a non-zero delay is significantly different from one with zero delay. Because CER avoids parameter estimation of non-stationary variables per se, the method can be applied to both stationary and non-stationary signals. PMID:27389921

  12. Recognizing Non-Stationary Walking based on Gait Analysis using Laser Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Shao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huijing; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    In this paper the authors propose a method for recognizing non-stationary walking based on a gait analysis using multiple laser range scanners. The proposed method consists of the following procedures: (1) people tracking; (2) detection of gait features; (3) recognition of non-stationary walking. First, people tracking is performed by recognizing patterns in which the range data obtained near ankle rhythmically. Next, gait analysis is performed by the spatio-temporal clustering using Mean Shift algorithm. Finally, One Class Support Vector Machine (One Class SVM) is applied for learning and classifying a non-stationary walking. The experiment in a station concourse in Tokyo shows the overall accuracy of 98.4% by the proposed method.

  13. Nonstationary desertification dynamics of desert oasis under climate change and human interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guohe; Qin, Xiaosheng; He, Li; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yongping; Li, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Desertification is becoming a major ecological concern in arid and semiarid regions, especially under climate change. Globally, it is burning up lands for human habitats with a rapidly spreading tendency. Many scientists have been struggling to explore the related mechanisms. Challenges remain in revealing the fundamental principle in terms of desert-oasis interactions that are associated with nonstationary variations. Here we present a theory of desertification dynamics through examining nonstationary effects of climate change and human interference. We hypothesize that such dynamics can be described as the fate and transport of dry air mass continuously generated from desert. We simulate a region in northwestern China and reveal that dynamics of the nonstationary desertification process is subject to interactive impacts from a variety of factors. Our study moves forward the field of desertification studies through initiation of the dynamics and nonstationarity concepts which allow the fundamental mechanism to be disclosed.

  14. The evolution of the electric field at a nonstationary perpendicular shock

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z. W.; Lu, Q. M.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations evidenced that supercritical, quasiperpendicular shocks are nonstationary and may suffer a self-reformation on the ion gyroscale. In this brief communication, we investigate the evolution of the electric field at a nonstationary, supercritial perpendicular shock. The contributions of the ion Lorentz, Hall, and electron pressure terms to the electric field are analyzed. During the evolution of the perpendicular shock, a new ramp may be formed in front of the old ramp, and its amplitude becomes larger and larger. At last, the new ramp exceeds the old one, and such a nonstationary process can be formed periodically. When the new ramp begins to be formed in front of the old ramp, the Hall term becomes more and more important. The electric field E{sub x} is dominated by the Hall term when the new ramp exceeds the old one. The significance of the evolution of the electric field on shock acceleration is also discussed.

  15. Surface Stress with Non-stationary Weak Winds and Stable Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind, stably-stratified, boundary layer over land is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs. These field programs include towers ranging from 12 to 20 m in height and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and non-stationary submeso motions is investigated from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected partly due to enhancement of the turbulence by submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases in the downward transport of momentum.

  16. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  17. Calculation of non-stationary aerodynamic forces in the near sonic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teipel, I.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a mathematical method for calculating nonstationary supersonic flow in the near-sonic range is described. A perturbation formula is derived based on the exact stationary values; it is applicable to the equation for potential. The problem can thus be divided into stationary and nonstationary fields. The pressure distribution in an oscillating profile is determined, based on hyperbolic differential equations. It is shown that there are important corollaries concerning the application of linear theory. With suitable extrapolations, linear theory can be used up to about Mach 0.8. Linear theory is not applicable, however, when determining the moment coefficients; for this case, a special technique is described.

  18. Formation of periodic phase structures in a photopolymerizable layer by nonstationary light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensov, S. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Polushtaitsev, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Photopolymerization of a composite containing a nonpolymerizable component under the action of nonstationary optical radiation is studied. It is shown that the diffusion displacement of the nonpolymerizable component at the illuminated region boundary is caused by the appearance of the monomer concentration gradient, which, in turn, is induced by nonuniform photoinitiation. The action of radiation with a nonstationary intensity distribution makes it possible to form a periodic refractive index structure in the volume of the photopolymerizable material. The possibility of optical formation of polymer phase gratings by moving the shadow boundary stepwise along the polymerizable layer is studied numerically and experimentally.

  19. Extended trigonometric Cherednik algebras and nonstationary Schrödinger equations with delta-potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. T.; Stokman, J. V.

    2013-02-01

    We realize an extended version of the trigonometric Cherednik algebra as affine Dunkl operators involving Heaviside functions. We use the quadratic Casimir element of the extended trigonometric Cherednik algebra to define an explicit nonstationary Schrödinger equation with delta-potential. We use coordinate Bethe ansatz methods to construct solutions of the nonstationary Schrödinger equation in terms of generalized Bethe wave functions. It is shown that the generalized Bethe wave functions satisfy affine difference Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations as functions of the momenta. The relation to the vector valued root system analogs of the quantum Bose gas on the circle with delta-function interactions is indicated.

  20. Parity retransmission hybrid ARQ using rate 1/2 convolutional codes on a nonstationary channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugand, Laurent R.; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.; Deng, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A parity retransmission hybrid automatic repeat request (ARQ) scheme is proposed which uses rate 1/2 convolutional codes and Viterbi decoding. A protocol is described which is capable of achieving higher throughputs than previously proposed parity retransmission schemes. The performance analysis is based on a two-state Markov model of a nonstationary channel. This model constitutes a first approximation to a nonstationary channel. The two-state channel model is used to analyze the throughput and undetected error probability of the protocol presented when the receiver has both an infinite and a finite buffer size. It is shown that the throughput improves as the channel becomes more bursty.

  1. Charged particle tunnels from the stationary and non-stationary Kerr-Newman black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deyou; Yang, Shuzheng

    2007-09-01

    Considering the unfixed background space-time and self-gravitational interaction, we view the Hawking radiation of a stationary Kerr-Newman black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method. Meanwhile, extending this work to non-stationary black holes, we attempt to investigate the Hawking radiation of the non-stationary Kerr-Newman black hole. Both of the results show the tunneling probabilities are related to the change of Bekenstein- Hawking entropy and the radiation spectrums deviate from the purely thermal one, which is in accordance with the known result.

  2. Extended trigonometric Cherednik algebras and nonstationary Schroedinger equations with delta-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J. T.; Stokman, J. V.

    2013-02-15

    We realize an extended version of the trigonometric Cherednik algebra as affine Dunkl operators involving Heaviside functions. We use the quadratic Casimir element of the extended trigonometric Cherednik algebra to define an explicit nonstationary Schroedinger equation with delta-potential. We use coordinate Bethe ansatz methods to construct solutions of the nonstationary Schroedinger equation in terms of generalized Bethe wave functions. It is shown that the generalized Bethe wave functions satisfy affine difference Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations as functions of the momenta. The relation to the vector valued root system analogs of the quantum Bose gas on the circle with delta-function interactions is indicated.

  3. Experimental study of nonstationary regimes of ascent of a single bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Vasenin, I. M.; Usanina, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    Results of experimental study of the dynamics of ascent of a single spherical bubble in a viscous fluid at small Reynolds numbers (Re < 1) have been presented. A refined empirical dependence has been obtained for the resistance coefficient in a stationary regime of motion of the bubble. The influence of nonstationary and "hereditary" effects on the dynamics of ascent of the bubble has been evaluated. A substantial influence of the Basset force on the characteristic of a nonstationary regime of motion of the bubble, in particular, on the characteristic time of dynamic relaxation, in the region of small Reynolds numbers has been shown.

  4. APEX observations of supernova remnants. I. Non-stationary magnetohydrodynamic shocks in W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, S.; Gusdorf, A.; Güsten, R.

    2014-09-01

    Context. When supernova blast waves interact with nearby molecular clouds, they send slower shocks into these clouds. The resulting interaction regions provide excellent environments for the use of MHD shock models to constrain the physical and chemical conditions in these regions. Aims: The interaction of supernova remnants (SNRs) with molecular clouds gives rise to strong molecular emission in the far-IR and sub-mm wavelength regimes. The application of MHD shock models in the interpretation of this line emission can yield valuable information on the energetic and chemical impact of SNRs. Methods: New mapping observations with the APEX telescope in 12CO (3-2), (4-3), (6-5), (7-6), and 13CO (3-2) towards two regions in the SNR W44 are presented. Integrated intensities are extracted on five different positions, corresponding to local maxima of CO emission. The integrated intensities are compared to the outputs of a grid of models, which combine an MHD shock code with a radiative transfer module based on the large velocity gradient approximation. Results: All extracted spectra show ambient and line-of-sight components as well as blue- and red-shifted wings indicating the presence of shocked gas. Basing the shock model fits only on the highest-lying transitions that unambiguously trace the shock-heated gas, we find that the observed CO line emission is compatible with non-stationary shocks and a pre-shock density of 104 cm-3. The ages of the modelled shocks scatter between values of ~1000 and ~3000 years. The shock velocities in W44F are found to lie between 20 km s-1 and 25 km s-1, while in W44E fast shocks (30-35 km s-1) as well as slower shocks (~20 km s-1) are compatible with the observed spectral line energy diagrams. The pre-shock magnetic field strength components perpendicular to the line of sight in both regions have values between 100 μG and 200 μG. Our best-fitting models allow us to predict the full ladder of CO transitions, the shocked gas mass in one

  5. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendargo, Hansford C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is a functional extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT) using common-path interferometry to produce phase-referenced images of dynamic samples. Like OCT, axial resolution in SDPM is determined by the source coherence length, while lateral resolution is limited by diffraction in the microscope optics. However, the quantitative phase information SDPM generates is sensitive to nanometer-scale displacements of scattering structures. The use of a common-path optical geometry yields an imaging system with high phase stability. Due to coherence gating, SDPM can achieve full depth discrimination, allowing for independent motion resolution of subcellular structures throughout the sample volume. Here we review the basic theory of OCT and SDPM along with applications of SDPM in cellular imaging to measure topology, Doppler flow in single-celled organisms, time-resolved motions, rheological information of the cytoskeleton, and optical signaling of neural activation. Phase imaging limitations, artifacts, and sensitivity considerations are discussed.

  6. Spectrally Resolved Intensities of Ultra-Dense Hot Aluminum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, J. M.; Rodriguez, R.; Florido, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E.; Sauvan, P.; Angelo, P.; Dalimier, E.; Schott, R.; Mancini, R.

    2008-10-22

    We present a first study of spectroscopic determination of electron temperature and density spatial profiles of aluminum K-shell line emission spectra from laser-shocked aluminum experiments performed at LULI. The radiation emitted by the aluminum plasma was dispersed with an ultra-high resolution spectrograph ({lambda}/{delta}{lambda}{approx_equal}6000). From the recorded films one can extract a set of time-integrated emission lineouts associated with the corresponding spatial region of the plasma. The observed spectra include the Ly{alpha}, He{beta}, He{gamma}, Ly{beta} and Ly{gamma} line emissions and their associated He- and Li-like satellites thus covering a photon energy range from 1700 eV to 2400 eV approximately. The data analysis rely on the ABAKO/RAPCAL computational package, which has been recently developed at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and takes into account non-equilibrium collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes and radiation transport calculations.

  7. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  8. Time-Resolved Spectral Analysis of Blazar 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosamaria; Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    As electromagnetic (EM) waves from sources such as blazars travel through the intergalactic medium (IGM), they are slowed by electrons; a phenomenon called dispersion delay [2]. We study the propagation effects in emissions of EM waves from blazar source BL 0716+714 by estimating the average electron density, or dispersion measure (DM), of the IGM on a line of sight to the blazar. Measuring the variations in these effects with time allow us to understand the properties of the intervening material. Toward this goal we analyzed months of archived observations of BL 0716+714 taken by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The ATA's correlator produces cross-power vs. frequency spectra for every baseline (distance between a pair of antennas) in ten-second intervals. To reduce this immense load of data we used a technique based on interferometry called bispectrum, which does not depend on complicated array calibration and simplifies our work. The bispectrum multiplies baselines, three at a time, so that they form a closed loop, then the cube root of spectra are averaged [1]. This technique is independent of phase errors associated with any individual antenna and has a better SNR ratio than simply taking the average of all the baselines. We developed a numerical analysis program that takes in archived blazar files containing correlation data, computes the bispectrum, and outputs FITS images for each day of observations. The results show that our observations do not have sufficient sensitivity to reveal blazar variations in the frequency ranges that were studied. It is suggested that future observations at higher frequencies and/or with another telescope having greater sensitivity would reveal the time/frequency dependence of emission structure that would allow measurements of electron content. This work shows that but bispectrum is a useful tool for rapid characterization of interferometer data that does not require interferometer caclibration which could introduce artifacts into radio light curves.References:[1] Law C.J. and Bower G.C. (2012) Astrophysical Journal, 749:143[2] Rani B. et al. (2013) A&A, ms, 1-25.

  9. Spectrally Resolved Intensities of Ultra-Dense Hot Aluminum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, J. M.; Rodríguez, R.; Florido, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Mínguez, E.; Sauvan, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.

    2008-10-01

    We present a first study of spectroscopic determination of electron temperature and density spatial profiles of aluminum K-shell line emission spectra from laser-shocked aluminum experiments performed at LULI. The radiation emitted by the aluminum plasma was dispersed with an ultra-high resolution spectrograph (λ/Δλ≈6000). From the recorded films one can extract a set of time-integrated emission lineouts associated with the corresponding spatial region of the plasma. The observed spectra include the Lyα, Heβ, Heγ, Lyβ and Lyγ line emissions and their associated He- and Li-like satellites thus covering a photon energy range from 1700 eV to 2400 eV approximately. The data analysis rely on the ABAKO/RAPCAL computational package, which has been recently developed at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and takes into account non-equilibrium collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes and radiation transport calculations.

  10. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Santra, Robin

    2013-04-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)], 10.1073/pnas.1202226109. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  11. Multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a spectrally resolved photoacoustic imaging method, namely multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography (PAET) for quantifying the physiological parameters and elastic modulus of biological tissues. We theoretically and experimentally examined the PAET imaging method using simulations and in vitro experimental tests. Our simulation and in vitro experimental results indicated that the reconstructions were quantitatively accurate in terms of sizes, the physiological and elastic properties of the targets. PMID:27699101

  12. Multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a spectrally resolved photoacoustic imaging method, namely multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography (PAET) for quantifying the physiological parameters and elastic modulus of biological tissues. We theoretically and experimentally examined the PAET imaging method using simulations and in vitro experimental tests. Our simulation and in vitro experimental results indicated that the reconstructions were quantitatively accurate in terms of sizes, the physiological and elastic properties of the targets.

  13. Decoupled schemes for a non-stationary mixed Stokes-Darcy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Mo; Zhu, Xiaohong

    2010-04-01

    We study numerical methods for solving a non-stationary mixed Stokes-Darcy problem that models coupled fluid flow and porous media flow. A decoupling approach based on interface approximation via temporal extrapolation is proposed for devising decoupled marching algorithms for the mixed model. Error estimates are derived and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the computational effectiveness of the decoupling approach.

  14. Self-Consistent Non-Stationary Theory of Multipactor in DLA Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, O. V.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.; Kishek, R.

    2009-01-22

    In this paper a non-stationary self-consistent theoretical model of multipactor in dielectric loaded accelerator structures is proposed. In comparison with our previous work, the effects of the cylindricity are included. The corresponding numerical implementation of the model is described and some simulation results are shown.

  15. On limitations of the spectrogram in the representation of the amplitude of nonstationary fusion plasma signals

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, Antonio C. A.; Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2006-10-15

    The spectrogram capability to track the amplitude of signal components is discussed. A study using theoretical signal models shows that significant discrepancies may exist between the evolutions of the amplitude of a nonstationary signal component and of the magnitude of the corresponding spectrogram. To illustrate the practical consequences of this spectrogram shortcoming, the growth of magnetohydrodynamic modes observed in the JET tokamak is addressed.

  16. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-03

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  17. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  18. Stationary and non-stationary nonlinear optical spectroscopy on surface polaritons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponath, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological theory is given for non-stationary electromagnetic surface waves propagating along the boundary plane between two homogeneous isotropic media. The description of nonlinear optical effects using shortened wave equations is demonstrated for spontaneous and simulated Raman scattering processes on surface polaritons.

  19. Vaidya black hole in non-stationary de Sitter space: Hawking's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishwarchandra, Ngangbam; Singh, K. Yugindro

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a class of non-stationary solutions of Einstein's field equations describing embedded Vaidya-de Sitter black holes with a cosmological variable function Λ( u). The Vaidya-de Sitter black hole is interpreted as the radiating Vaidya black hole is embedded into the non-stationary de Sitter space with variable Λ( u). The energy-momentum tensor of the Vaidya-de Sitter black hole is expressed as the sum of the energy-momentum tensors of the Vaidya null fluid and that of the non-stationary de Sitter field, and satisfies the energy conservation law. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor. We find the violation of the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure and leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field associated with Λ( u) in the space-time. We also find that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Vaidya-de Sitter space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. It is also found that the space-time geometry of non-stationary Vaidya-de Sitter solution with variable Λ( u) is Petrov type D in the classification of space-times. We also find the Vaidya-de Sitter black hole radiating with a thermal temperature proportional to the surface gravity and entropy also proportional to the area of the cosmological black hole horizon.

  20. Fermions Tunneling from Non-Stationary Dilaton-Maxwell Black Hole via General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kai; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Fermions tunneling of the non-stationary Dilaton-Maxwell black hole is investigated with general tortoise coordinate transformation. The Dirac equation is simplified by semiclassical approximation so that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is generated. Finally the tunneling rate and the Hawking temperature is calculated.

  1. Bivariate Frequency Analysis with Nonstationary Gumbel/GEV Marginal Distributions for Rainfall Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyungwon; Kim, Sunghun; Kim, Hanbeen; Ahn, Hyunjun; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2016-04-01

    Multivariate frequency analysis has been developing for hydrological data recently. Particularly, the copula model has been used as an effective method which has no limitation on deciding marginal distributions. The time-series rainfall data can be characterized to rainfall event by inter-event time definition and each rainfall event has rainfall depth and duration. In addition, changes in rainfall depth have been studied recently due to climate change. The nonstationary (time-varying) Gumbel and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) have been developed and their performances have been investigated from many studies. In the current study, bivariate frequency analysis has performed for rainfall depth and duration using Archimedean copula on stationary and nonstationary hourly rainfall data to consider the effect of climate change. The parameter of copula model is estimated by inference function for margin (IFM) method and stationary/nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions are used for marginal distributions. As a result, level curve of copula model is obtained and goodness-of-fit test is performed to choose appropriate marginal distribution among the applied stationary and nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions.

  2. Theory for the development of methods for calculating nonstationary heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoi, P. V.

    1986-06-01

    An approach for solving problems in nonstationary heat transfer in duct flows of liquids is proposed which combines integral transformations in terms of one-sided parabolic variables with the finite element method for the remaining two-sided elliptic coordinates. The efficiency of the approach is demonstrated by applying it to direct and inverse heat conduction problems for a semiinfinite rod.

  3. Non-stationary dynamics of climate variability in synchronous influenza epidemics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal variation in the incidence of influenza is widely assumed. However, few studies have examined non-stationary relationships between global climate factors and influenza epidemics. We examined the monthly incidence of influenza in Fukuoka, Japan, from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the patterns of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The monthly incidence of influenza showed cycles of 1 year with the IOD and 2 years with ENSO indices (Multivariate, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4). These associations were non-stationary and appeared to have major influences on the synchrony of influenza epidemics. Our study provides quantitative evidence that non-stationary associations have major influences on synchrony between the monthly incidence of influenza and the dynamics of the IOD and ENSO. Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary patterns of association between influenza cases and climatic factors in early warning systems.

  4. PHYSICAL BASIS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Reflection of electromagnetic waves from nonstationary media (exactly solvable models)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsburg, Aleksandr B.

    1998-03-01

    An analysis is made of propagation of electromagnetic waves in media which are nonstationary because of relaxation of the refractive index. A series of models of oscillatory and transient regimes of such relaxation is developed. Several characteristic times are used in these models and exact analytic solutions of the Maxwell equations can be obtained for these regimes. In contrast to the traditional approaches, the exact solutions are obtained without assuming smallness or slowness of temporal variations of the parameters of the medium and these solutions are valid even when the characteristic relaxation time is comparable with the period of oscillations of the wave field. A nonstationary generalisation of the Fresnel formulae is derived. It is shown that waves reflected from a nonstationary surface experience amplitude and frequency modulation, and the modulation effect is localised in an interval of the order of one relaxation time. It is shown that a short broadband perturbation pulse forms in the reflected wave and that this pulse contains one or several oscillations of the field. It should be possible to use nonstationary broadening of the spectrum of a probe wave reflected from a surface perturbed by a powerful laser pulse in estimating the relaxation times of fast optical processes.

  5. Robust H∞ control of active vehicle suspension under non-stationary running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhang, Li-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Due to complexity of the controlled objects, the selection of control strategies and algorithms in vehicle control system designs is an important task. Moreover, the control problem of automobile active suspensions has been become one of the important relevant investigations due to the constrained peculiarity and parameter uncertainty of mathematical models. In this study, after establishing the non-stationary road surface excitation model, a study on the active suspension control for non-stationary running condition was conducted using robust H∞ control and linear matrix inequality optimization. The dynamic equation of a two-degree-of-freedom quarter car model with parameter uncertainty was derived. The H∞ state feedback control strategy with time-domain hard constraints was proposed, and then was used to design the active suspension control system of the quarter car model. Time-domain analysis and parameter robustness analysis were carried out to evaluate the proposed controller stability. Simulation results show that the proposed control strategy has high systemic stability on the condition of non-stationary running and parameter uncertainty (including suspension mass, suspension stiffness and tire stiffness). The proposed control strategy can achieve a promising improvement on ride comfort and satisfy the requirements of dynamic suspension deflection, dynamic tire loads and required control forces within given constraints, as well as non-stationary running condition.

  6. Self-Consistent Non-Stationary Theory of Multipactor in DLA Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, O. V.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.; Kishek, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a non-stationary self-consistent theoretical model of multipactor in dielectric loaded accelerator structures is proposed. In comparison with our previous work, the effects of the cylindricity are included. The corresponding numerical implementation of the model is described and some simulation results are shown.

  7. Weighted Least Squares Estimates of the Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions from Nonstationary Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stodt, John A.

    1982-11-01

    Magnetotelluric field measurements can generally be viewed as sums of signal and additive random noise components. The standard unweighted least squares estimates of the impedance and tipper functions which are usually calculated from noisy data are not optimal when the measured fields are nonstationary. The nonstationary behavior of the signals and noises should be exploited by weighting the data appropriately to reduce errors in the estimates of the impedances and tippers. Insight into the effects of noise on the estimates is gained by careful development of a statistical model, within a linear system framework, which allows for nonstationary behavior of both the signal and noise components of the measured fields. The signal components are, by definition, linearly related to each other by the impedance and tipper functions. It is therefore appropriate to treat them as deterministic parameters, rather than as random variables, when analyzing the effects of noise on the calculated impedances and tippers. From this viewpoint, weighted least squares procedures are developed to reduce the errors in impedances and tippers which are calculated from nonstationary data.

  8. Experimental Investigations of Non-Stationary Properties In Radiometer Receivers Using Measurements of Multiple Calibration References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul; Lang, Roger; Zhang, Zhao-Nan; Zacharias, David; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Radiometers must be periodically calibrated because the receiver response fluctuates. Many techniques exist to correct for the time varying response of a radiometer receiver. An analytical technique has been developed that uses generalized least squares regression (LSR) to predict the performance of a wide variety of calibration algorithms. The total measurement uncertainty including the uncertainty of the calibration can be computed using LSR. The uncertainties of the calibration samples used in the regression are based upon treating the receiver fluctuations as non-stationary processes. Signals originating from the different sources of emission are treated as simultaneously existing random processes. Thus, the radiometer output is a series of samples obtained from these random processes. The samples are treated as random variables but because the underlying processes are non-stationary the statistics of the samples are treated as non-stationary. The statistics of the calibration samples depend upon the time for which the samples are to be applied. The statistics of the random variables are equated to the mean statistics of the non-stationary processes over the interval defined by the time of calibration sample and when it is applied. This analysis opens the opportunity for experimental investigation into the underlying properties of receiver non stationarity through the use of multiple calibration references. In this presentation we will discuss the application of LSR to the analysis of various calibration algorithms, requirements for experimental verification of the theory, and preliminary results from analyzing experiment measurements.

  9. System identification through nonstationary data using Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-06-01

    Classical output-only system identification (SI) methods are based on the assumption of stationarity of the system response. However, measured response of buildings and bridges is usually non-stationary due to strong winds (e.g. typhoon, and thunder storm etc.), earthquakes and time-varying vehicle motions. Accordingly, the response data may have time-varying frequency contents and/or overlapping of modal frequencies due to non-stationary colored excitation. This renders traditional methods problematic for modal separation and identification. To address these challenges, a new SI technique based on Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation (TFBSS) is proposed. By selectively utilizing "effective" information in local regions of the time-frequency plane, where only one mode contributes to energy, the proposed technique can successfully identify mode shapes and recover modal responses from the non-stationary response where the traditional SI methods often encounter difficulties. This technique can also handle response with closely spaced modes which is a well-known challenge for the identification of large-scale structures. Based on the separated modal responses, frequency and damping can be easily identified using SI methods based on a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system. In addition to the exclusive advantage of handling non-stationary data and closely spaced modes, the proposed technique also benefits from the absence of the end effects and low sensitivity to noise in modal separation. The efficacy of the proposed technique is demonstrated using several simulation based studies, and compared to the popular Second-Order Blind Identification (SOBI) scheme. It is also noted that even some non-stationary response data can be analyzed by the stationary method SOBI. This paper also delineates non-stationary cases where SOBI and the proposed scheme perform comparably and highlights cases where the proposed approach is more advantageous. Finally, the performance of the

  10. Spectral variability on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Older ground-based observations are reprocessed in order to assess the spectral variability of Ceres surface before the beginning of observations by the Dawn spacecraft. Ceres was observed with NACO on the VLT in 2004 and 2005, producing resolved spectra of the disk under different attitudes. The data cover the range from 0.91-3.80 µm (J, H, K, and L bands), except in the telluric regions. They consist in spectral scans of the dayside, typically with 15 lines of 20 samples, an actual resolution of ~ 100 km, and a spectral resolution R~500 to 1500. A specific calibration scheme has been applied to preprocess the data and to evidence small compositional variations at the surface of Ceres. The major signatures observed are two bands centered at 3.06 and 3.30 µm, which exhibit significant spatial variations at this scale (5 to 10%). These features are best fit by ammoniated minerals (phyllosilicates or feldspars), although the lack of secondary hydration bands seems to rule out phyllosilicates. No significant absorption or variation is observed in J, H and K bands, consistently with [1]. No presence of ices (H2O, C02…) is detected, even at the poles. If Ceres was once rich in ices (e.g., [2]), this suggests a global resurfacing with melting of ices in the subsurface, and alteration under the influence of H2O and perhaps NH3, with reduced production of phyllosilicates. References [1] Carry et al (2012) Icarus 217, 20 [2] McCord, T. B. and C. Sotin (2005) JGR 110, 05009.

  11. Nonstationary Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Drainge Infrastructure Coping with Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Sik; Jeung, Se Jin; Lee, Dong Seop; Han, Woo Suk

    2015-04-01

    As the abnormal rainfall condition has been more and more frequently happen and serious by climate change and variabilities, the question whether the design of drainage system could be prepared with abnormal rainfall condition or not has been on the rise. Usually, the drainage system has been designed by rainfall I-D-F (Intensity-Duration-Frequency) curve with assumption that I-D-F curve is stationary. The design approach of the drainage system has limitation not to consider the extreme rainfall condition of which I-D-F curve is non-stationary by climate change and variabilities. Therefore, the assumption that the I-D-F curve is stationary to design drainage system maybe not available in the climate change period, because climate change has changed the characteristics of extremes rainfall event to be non-stationary. In this paper, design rainfall by rainfall duration and non-stationary I-D-F curve are derived by the conditional GEV distribution considering non-stationary of rainfall characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of designed peak flow with increase of rainfall intensity was analyzed by distributed rainfall-runoff model, S-RAT(Spatial Runoff Assessment Tool). Although there are some difference by rainfall duration, the traditional I-D-F curves underestimates the extreme rainfall events for high-frequency rainfall condition. As a result, this paper suggest that traditional I-D-F curves could not be suitable for the design of drainage system under climate change condition. Keywords : Drainage system, Climate Change, non-stationary, I-D-F curves This research was supported by a grant 'Development of multi-function debris flow control technique considering extreme rainfall event' [NEMA-Natural-2014-74] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, National Emergency Management Agency of KOREA

  12. Nutrient export from catchments on forested landscapes reveals complex nonstationary and stationary climate signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, Samson G.; Quick, Christopher G.; Creed, Irena F.

    2013-06-01

    Headwater catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry are influenced by climate, including linear trends (nonstationary signals) and climate oscillations (stationary signals). We used an analytical framework to detect nonstationary and stationary signals in yearly time series of nutrient export [dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate (NO3--N), and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP)] in forested headwater catchments with differential water loading and water storage potential at the Turkey Lakes Watershed in Ontario, Canada. We tested the hypotheses that (1) climate has nonstationary and stationary effects on nutrient export, the combination of which explains most of the variation in nutrient export; (2) more metabolically active nutrients (e.g., DON, NO3--N, and TDP) are more sensitive to these signals; and (3) catchments with relatively low water loading and water storage capacity are more sensitive to these signals. Both nonstationary and stationary signals were identified, and the combination of both explained the majority of the variation in nutrient export data. More variation was explained in more labile nutrients (DON, NO3--N, and TDP), which were also more sensitive to climate signals. The catchment with low-water storage potential and low water loading was most sensitive to nonstationary and stationary climatic oscillations, suggesting that these hydrologic features are characteristic of the most effective sentinels of climate change. The observed complex links between climate change, climatic oscillations, and water nutrient fluxes in headwater catchments suggest that climate may have considerable influence on the productivity and biodiversity of surface waters, in addition to other drivers such as atmospheric pollution.

  13. On the joint spectral density of bivariate random sequences. Thesis Technical Report No. 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aalfs, David D.

    1995-01-01

    For univariate random sequences, the power spectral density acts like a probability density function of the frequencies present in the sequence. This dissertation extends that concept to bivariate random sequences. For this purpose, a function called the joint spectral density is defined that represents a joint probability weighing of the frequency content of pairs of random sequences. Given a pair of random sequences, the joint spectral density is not uniquely determined in the absence of any constraints. Two approaches to constraining the sequences are suggested: (1) assume the sequences are the margins of some stationary random field, (2) assume the sequences conform to a particular model that is linked to the joint spectral density. For both approaches, the properties of the resulting sequences are investigated in some detail, and simulation is used to corroborate theoretical results. It is concluded that under either of these two constraints, the joint spectral density can be computed from the non-stationary cross-correlation.

  14. The spectral analysis of cyclo-non-stationary signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Baudin, S.; Antoni, J.; Rémond, D.; Eltabach, M.; Sauvage, O.

    2016-06-01

    Condition monitoring of rotating machines in speed-varying conditions remains a challenging task and an active field of research. Specifically, the produced vibrations belong to a particular class of non-stationary signals called cyclo-non-stationary: although highly non-stationary, they contain hidden periodicities related to the shaft angle; the phenomenon of long term modulations is what makes them different from cyclostationary signals which are encountered under constant speed regimes. In this paper, it is shown that the optimal way of describing cyclo-non-stationary signals is jointly in the time and the angular domains. While the first domain describes the waveform characteristics related to the system dynamics, the second one reveals existing periodicities linked to the system kinematics. Therefore, a specific class of signals - coined angle-time cyclostationary is considered, expressing the angle-time interaction. Accordingly, the related spectral representations, the order-frequency spectral correlation and coherence functions are proposed and their efficiency is demonstrated on two industrial cases.

  15. TIMESCALE-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF Cyg X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Li, T. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Wang, T. S.; Liu, H.

    2009-04-20

    We propose the timescale-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) as a new method to combine the timing and spectral study. The TRS is based on the time domain power spectrum and reflects the variable amplitudes of spectral components on different timescales. We produce the TRS with the RXTE PCA data for Cyg X-1 and study the spectral parameters (the power-law photon index and the equivalent width of the iron fluorescent line) as a function of timescale. The results of TRS and frequency-resolved spectra have been compared, and similarities have been found for the two methods with the identical motivations. We also discover the correspondences between the evolution of photon index with timescale and the evolution of the equivalent width with timescale. The observations can be divided into three types according to the correspondences and different type is connected with different spectral state.

  16. Spectral ladar: towards active 3D multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present our Spectral LADAR concept, an augmented implementation of traditional LADAR. This sensor uses a polychromatic source to obtain range-resolved 3D spectral images which are used to identify objects based on combined spatial and spectral features, resolving positions in three dimensions and up to hundreds of meters in distance. We report on a proof-of-concept Spectral LADAR demonstrator that generates spectral point clouds from static scenes. The demonstrator transmits nanosecond supercontinuum pulses generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Currently we use a rapidly tuned receiver with a high-speed InGaAs APD for 25 spectral bands with the future expectation of implementing a linear APD array spectrograph. Each spectral band is independently range resolved with multiple return pulse recognition. This is a critical feature, enabling simultaneous spectral and spatial unmixing of partially obscured objects when not achievable using image fusion of monochromatic LADAR and passive spectral imagers. This enables higher identification confidence in highly cluttered environments such as forested or urban areas (e.g. vehicles behind camouflage or foliage). These environments present challenges for situational awareness and robotic perception which can benefit from the unique attributes of Spectral LADAR. Results from this demonstrator unit are presented for scenes typical of military operations and characterize the operation of the device. The results are discussed here in the context of autonomous vehicle navigation and target recognition.

  17. Numerical method for solution of systems of non-stationary spatially one-dimensional nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morozov, S. K.; Krasitskiy, O. P.

    1978-01-01

    A computational scheme and a standard program is proposed for solving systems of nonstationary spatially one-dimensional nonlinear differential equations using Newton's method. The proposed scheme is universal in its applicability and its reduces to a minimum the work of programming. The program is written in the FORTRAN language and can be used without change on electronic computers of type YeS and BESM-6. The standard program described permits the identification of nonstationary (or stationary) solutions to systems of spatially one-dimensional nonlinear (or linear) partial differential equations. The proposed method may be used to solve a series of geophysical problems which take chemical reactions, diffusion, and heat conductivity into account, to evaluate nonstationary thermal fields in two-dimensional structures when in one of the geometrical directions it can take a small number of discrete levels, and to solve problems in nonstationary gas dynamics.

  18. Predicting the ocurrence probability of freak waves baed on buoy data and non-stationary extreme value models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, A.; Menendez, M.; Mendez, F. J.; Coco, G.; Losada, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades, freak or rogue waves have become an important topic in engineering and science. Forecasting the occurrence probability of freak waves is a challenge for oceanographers, engineers, physicists and statisticians. There are several mechanisms responsible for the formation of freak waves, and different theoretical formulations (primarily based on numerical models with simplifying assumption) have been proposed to predict the occurrence probability of freak wave in a sea state as a function of N (number of individual waves) and kurtosis (k). On the other hand, different attempts to parameterize k as a function of spectral parameters such as the Benjamin-Feir Index (BFI) and the directional spreading (Mori et al., 2011) have been proposed. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) develop a statistical model to describe the uncertainty of maxima individual wave height, Hmax, considering N and k as covariates; (2) obtain a predictive formulation to estimate k as a function of aggregated sea state spectral parameters. For both purposes, we use free surface measurements (more than 300,000 20-minutes sea states) from the Spanish deep water buoy network (Puertos del Estado, Spanish Ministry of Public Works). Non-stationary extreme value models are nowadays widely used to analyze the time-dependent or directional-dependent behavior of extreme values of geophysical variables such as significant wave height (Izaguirre et al., 2010). In this work, a Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) statistical model for the dimensionless maximum wave height (x=Hmax/Hs) in every sea state is used to assess the probability of freak waves. We allow the location, scale and shape parameters of the GEV distribution to vary as a function of k and N. The kurtosis-dependency is parameterized using third-order polynomials and the model is fitted using standard log-likelihood theory, obtaining a very good behavior to predict the occurrence probability of freak waves (x>2). Regarding the

  19. Assessing instantaneous synchrony of nonlinear nonstationary oscillators in the brain.

    PubMed

    Fine, Ananda S; Nicholls, David P; Mogul, David J

    2010-01-30

    Neuronal populations throughout the brain achieve levels of synchronous electrophysiological activity as a consequence of both normal brain function as well as during pathological states such as in epileptic seizures. Understanding this synchrony and being able to quantitatively assess the dynamics with which neuronal oscillators across the brain couple their activity is a critical component toward decoding such complex behavior. Commonly applied techniques to resolve relationships between oscillators typically make assumptions of linearity and stationarity that are likely not to be valid for complex neural signals. In this study, intracranial electroencephalographic activity was recorded bilaterally in both hippocampi and in anteromedial thalamus of rat under normal conditions and during hypersynchronous seizure activity induced by focal injection of the epileptogenic agent kainic acid. Nonlinear oscillators were first extracted using empirical mode decomposition. The technique of eigenvalue decomposition was used to assess global phase synchrony of the highest energy oscillators. The Hilbert analytical technique was then used to measure instantaneous phase synchrony of these oscillators as they evolved in time. To test the reliability of this method, we first applied it to a system of two coupled Rössler attractors under varying levels of coupling with small frequency mismatch. The application of these analytical techniques to intracranially recorded brain signals provides a means for assessing how complex oscillatory behavior in the brain evolves and changes during both normal activity and as a consequence of diseased states without making restrictive and possibly erroneous assumptions of the linearity and stationarity of the underlying oscillatory activity.

  20. Non-stationary dynamics in the bouncing ball: A wavelet perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Abhinna K. Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    The non-stationary dynamics of a bouncing ball, comprising both periodic as well as chaotic behavior, is studied through wavelet transform. The multi-scale characterization of the time series displays clear signatures of self-similarity, complex scaling behavior, and periodicity. Self-similar behavior is quantified by the generalized Hurst exponent, obtained through both wavelet based multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier methods. The scale dependent variable window size of the wavelets aptly captures both the transients and non-stationary periodic behavior, including the phase synchronization of different modes. The optimal time-frequency localization of the continuous Morlet wavelet is found to delineate the scales corresponding to neutral turbulence, viscous dissipation regions, and different time varying periodic modulations.

  1. Characteristics of Quantum Radiation of Slowly Varying Nonstationary Kerr-Newman Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    Quantum radiative characteristics of slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes are investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. It is shown that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on the time and the angle. Further, we reveal a previously ignored relationship between thermal radiation and nonthermal radiation, which is that the chemical potential in the thermal radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes. Also, we show that the deduced general results can be degenerated to the known conclusion of stationary Kerr-Newman black holes.

  2. Entropy of Non-stationary and Slowly Changing Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying Dirac equation near the horizon, Hawking temperature is obtained by applying a new tortoise coordinate transformation. Using the improved thin film brick-wall model and WKB approximation, the entropy of Dirac field in the non-stationary and slowly changing Reissner-Nordström black hole is calculated. The result shows that the entropy of the black hole is still proportional to the horizon area, and black hole entropy is just identical to the entropy of the quantum state at the horizon. In addition, the new tortoise coordinate transformation can make the cut-off parameter introduced in solving the entropy of non-stationary black hole simplified to the same as that in the static and stationary cases.

  3. Time-frequency analysis of nonlinear and non-stationary weak signals of corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Shanghe; Wei, Ming; Hu, Xiao Feng

    2013-03-01

    It is very useful to study the signals radiated from corona discharges for the purposes of high-voltage line monitoring. Time-frequency analysis can clearly reveal the time-varying spectrum characteristics of such signals, which is very useful for analyzing and processing the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals, such as the signals radiated from corona discharges. Several time-frequency analysis methods, such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Wigner-Ville distribution and the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) and so on, are used in this paper. The simulation data with the same and different amplitudes are comparatively analyzed by these time-frequency distribution methods. It can be concluded that the time-frequency analysis method based on HHT is more efficient to identify and suitable for the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals.

  4. Detection of Unusual Events and Trends in Complex Non-Stationary Data Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rafael B; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Worley, Brian Addison; Perez, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The search for unusual events and trends hidden in multi-component, nonlinear, non-stationary, noisy signals is extremely important for a host of different applications, ranging from nuclear power plant and electric grid operation to internet traffic and implementation of non-proliferation protocols. In the context of this work, we define an unusual event as a local signal disturbance and a trend as a continuous carrier of information added to and different from the underlying baseline dynamics. The goal of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of detecting hidden intermittent events inside non-stationary signal data sets corrupted by high levels of noise, by using the Hilbert-Huang empirical mode decomposition method.

  5. Nonstationary phase boundary estimation in electrical impedance tomography using unscented Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect

    Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Lee, Jeong Seong; Kim, Sin; Kim, Kyung Youn

    2008-07-20

    In this paper, an effective nonstationary phase boundary estimation scheme in electrical impedance tomography is presented based on the unscented Kalman filter. The inverse problem is treated as a stochastic nonlinear state estimation problem with the nonstationary phase boundary (state) being estimated online with the aid of unscented Kalman filter. This research targets the industrial applications, such as imaging of stirrer vessel for detection of air distribution or detecting large air bubbles in pipelines. Within the domains, there exist 'voids' having zero conductivity. The design variables for phase boundary estimation are truncated Fourier coefficients. Computer simulations and experimental results are provided to evaluate the performance of unscented Kalman filter in comparison with extended Kalman filter to show a better performance of the unscented Kalman filter approach.

  6. Gradient radial basis function networks for nonlinear and nonstationary time series prediction.

    PubMed

    Chng, E S; Chen, S; Mulgrew, B

    1996-01-01

    We present a method of modifying the structure of radial basis function (RBF) network to work with nonstationary series that exhibit homogeneous nonstationary behavior. In the original RBF network, the hidden node's function is to sense the trajectory of the time series and to respond when there is a strong correlation between the input pattern and the hidden node's center. This type of response, however, is highly sensitive to changes in the level and trend of the time series. To counter these effects, the hidden node's function is modified to one which detects and reacts to the gradient of the series. We call this new network the gradient RBF (GRBF) model. Single and multistep predictive performance for the Mackey-Glass chaotic time series were evaluated using the classical RBF and GRBF models. The simulation results for the series without and with a tine-varying mean confirm the superior performance of the GRBF predictor over the RBF predictor.

  7. Non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis based on the reconstruction of extreme hydrological series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. M.; Liang, Z. M.; Jiang, X. L.; Bu, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for non-stationary hydrological frequency analysis is proposed. The approach is due to the following consideration that, at present the data series used to detect mutation characteristic is very short, which may only reflect the partial characteristic of the population. That is to say, the mutation characteristic of short series may not fully represent the mutation characteristic of population, such as the difference of mutation degree between short sample and population. In this proposed method, an assumption is done that the variation hydrological series in a big time window owns an expected vibration center (EVC), which is a linear combination of the two mean values of the two subsample series obtained through separating the original hydrological series by a novel optimal segmentation technique (change rate of slope method). Then using the EVC to reconstruct non-stationary series to meet the requirement of stationary, and further ensure the conventional frequency analysis methods is valid.

  8. Nonstationary dynamics of the heliospheric termination shock in presence of pick up ions: PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand; Lu, Quanming

    2014-05-01

    The nonstationary dynamic of the heliospheric termination shock in presence of pick up ions (PUI) is analyzed with the help of a one-dimensional PIC (particle-in-cell) simulation code. This work is initially stimulated by Voyager 2 data which evidenced the nonstationary behavior of the termination shock (TS) [Burlaga et al., 2008]. Recent hybrid and PIC simulation [Wu et al., 2010; Scholer and Matsukyio, 2011] have clarified the strong contribution of PUI in the global energy partition at the TS. Present work focusses on the nonstationary behavior of the shock front in presence of PUI (with different percentages) and its impact on the global energy partition (between protons and PUI) in the downstream region. Solar wind (SW) protons and PUI are described respectively as Maxwellian and a shell distributions. Present results (i) evidence that the TS front is still nonstationary (selfreformation of the shock front driven by the accumulation of SW ions) even in presence of 25% of PUI and even for a moderate supercritical Ma regime, (ii) confirm in average that 15% and 85% of the upstream SW energy is respectively transferred to protons and to PUI in the downstream region for a shock profile at a given time, (iii) analyzes the energy partition between reflected (R) and directly transmitted (DT) ions separately for SWI and PUI, and (iv) quantifies the impact of the nonstationarity of the shock front on local ion distribution. Moreover, present results show also quantitatively how the energy partition may vary between the SW protons and PUI in the heliosheath because of the front selfreformation. These results provide quantitative inputs on the strongly turbulent state (both in space and in time) of the heliosheath before it interacts with the heliopause.

  9. Quantum Radiation of a Non-stationary Kerr Newman Black Hole in de Sitter Space Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2006-12-01

    Hawking radiation of Klein-Gordon and Dirac particles in a non-stationary Kerr-Newman-de-Sitter black hole is studied by introducing a new tortoise coordinate transformation. The result shows that the Fermi-Dirac radiant spectrum displays a new term that represents the interaction between the spin of spinor particles and the rotation of black holes, which is absent in the Bose-Einstein distribution of Klein-Gordon particles.

  10. Quantum memory for nonstationary light fields based on controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.; Tittel, W.; Gisin, N.; Nilsson, M.; Kroell, S.; Cirac, J. I.

    2006-02-15

    We propose a method for efficient storage and recall of arbitrary nonstationary light fields, such as, for instance, single photon time-bin qubits or intense fields, in optically dense atomic ensembles. Our approach to quantum memory is based on controlled, reversible, inhomogeneous broadening and relies on a hidden time-reversal symmetry of the optical Bloch equations describing the propagation of the light field. We briefly discuss experimental realizations of our proposal.

  11. Variance fluctuations in nonstationary time series: a comparative study of music genres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Heather D.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; De Martins, Allan M.; da Silva, P. C.; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    An important problem in physics concerns the analysis of audio time series generated by transduced acoustic phenomena. Here, we develop a new method to quantify the scaling properties of the local variance of nonstationary time series. We apply this technique to analyze audio signals obtained from selected genres of music. We find quantitative differences in the correlation properties of high art music, popular music, and dance music. We discuss the relevance of these objective findings in relation to the subjective experience of music.

  12. An Improved Approach for Nonstationary Strong Ground Motion Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Wang, Guoxin

    2016-05-01

    A new stochastic ground motion model for generating a suite of ground motion time history with both temporal and frequency nonstationarities for specified earthquake and site characteristics is proposed based on the wavelet method. This new model is defined in terms of 6 key parameters that characterize the duration, evolving intensity, predominant frequency, bandwidth and frequency variation of the ground acceleration process. All parameters, except for peak ground acceleration (PGA), are identified manually from a database of 2444 recorded horizontal accelerations. The two-stage regression analysis method is used to investigate the inter- and intra-event residuals. For any given earthquake and site characteristics in terms of the fault mechanism, moment magnitude, Joyner and Boore distance and site shear-wave velocity, sets of the model parameters are generated and used, in turn, by the stochastic model to generate strong ground motion accelerograms, which can capture and properly embody the primary features of real strong ground motions, including the duration, evolving intensity, spectral content, frequency variation and peak values. In addition, it is shown that the characteristics of the simulated and observed response spectra are similar, and the amplitude of the simulated response spectra are in line with the predicted values from the published seismic ground motion prediction equations (SGMPE) after a systematic comparison. The proposed method can be used to estimate the strong ground motions as inputs for structural seismic dynamic analysis in engineering practice in conjunction with or instead of recorded ground motions.

  13. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  14. "Novel Techniques in Non-Stationary Analysis of Rotorcraft Vibration Signitures"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    This research effort produced new methods to analyze the performance of linear predictors that track non-stationary processes. Specifically, prediction methods have been applied to the vibration pattern of rotorcraft drivetrains. This analysis is part or a larger rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) that can diagnose immediate failures of the subsystems, as indicated by abrupt change in the vibration signature, and prognosticate future health, by examining the vibration patterns against long-term trends. This problem is described by a earlier joint paper co-authored by members of the funding agency and the recipient institutions prior to this grant effort. Specific accomplishments under this grant include the following: (1) Definition of a framework for analysis of non-stationary time-series estimation using the coefficients of an adaptive filter. (2) Description of a novel method of combining short-term predictor error and long-term regression error to analyze the performance of a non-stationary predictor. (3) Formulation of a multi-variate probability density function that quantifies the performance of a adaptive predictor by using the short- and long-term error variables in a Gamma function distribution. and (4) Validation of the mathematical formulations with empirical data from NASA flight tests and simulated data to illustrate the utility beyond the domain of vibrating machinery.

  15. An explicit time-domain approach for sensitivity analysis of non-stationary random vibration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Su, Cheng; Chen, Taicong; Ma, Haitao

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an explicit time-domain method for sensitivity analysis of structural responses under non-stationary random excitations. Based on time-domain explicit expressions of dynamic responses, a new and more concise time-domain explicit expression of response sensitivity is derived using the direct differentiation method (DDM). Then a more efficient algorithm for direct construction of the explicit expression of response sensitivity is developed based on the physical meanings of the coefficient matrices in the formulation. The adjoint variable method (AVM) is further used to establish the explicit expression of the sensitivity of an arbitrary response. Finally, based on the time-domain explicit expressions for both dynamic response and its sensitivity, an efficient time-domain approach is proposed to calculate the sensitivity of variance responses of a structure subjected to non-stationary random excitations. Numerical examples of different structural systems under non-stationary random excitations are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Self-organising mixture autoregressive model for non-stationary time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Ni, He; Yin, Hujun

    2008-12-01

    Modelling non-stationary time series has been a difficult task for both parametric and nonparametric methods. One promising solution is to combine the flexibility of nonparametric models with the simplicity of parametric models. In this paper, the self-organising mixture autoregressive (SOMAR) network is adopted as a such mixture model. It breaks time series into underlying segments and at the same time fits local linear regressive models to the clusters of segments. In such a way, a global non-stationary time series is represented by a dynamic set of local linear regressive models. Neural gas is used for a more flexible structure of the mixture model. Furthermore, a new similarity measure has been introduced in the self-organising network to better quantify the similarity of time series segments. The network can be used naturally in modelling and forecasting non-stationary time series. Experiments on artificial, benchmark time series (e.g. Mackey-Glass) and real-world data (e.g. numbers of sunspots and Forex rates) are presented and the results show that the proposed SOMAR network is effective and superior to other similar approaches. PMID:19145663

  17. Studying the Dynamics of Non-stationary Jet Streams Formation in the Northern Hemisphere Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, Sergey; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we investigate dynamics of non-stationary jets formation in troposphere by means of mesoscale simulations in the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) modeling system, analyzing jet streams that affected the territory of Belarus over the time period of 2010-2012. For that purpose, we perform modeling on domains with 5 km, 3 km and 1 km grid steps and 35 vertical coordinate levels with an upper boundary of 10 hPa. We focus our attention to identification of basic regularities in formation, movements and transformations of jet streams, as well as to analysis of their characteristic features, geographical position and underlying atmospheric processes and their classification. On the basis of these regularities, we define basic meteorological parameters that can be used to directly or indirectly (as well as qualitatively and quantitatively) identify the presence of jet streams in the specific region of troposphere, and also to determine their localization, stage of development and other characteristics. Furthermore, we estimate energetic parameters of the identified jet streams and their impact on synoptic situation in the surrounding region. Analyzing meteorological fields obtained from satellite observations, we elaborate a methodology of operational detection and localization of non-stationary jet streams from satellite data. Validation of WRF modeling results with these data proves that mesoscale simulations with WRF are able to provide quite successful forecasts of non-stationary tropospheric jet streams occurrence and also determination of their localization and main characteristics up to 3 days in advance.

  18. Time-varying nonstationary multivariate risk analysis using a dynamic Bayesian copula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Burn, Donald H.; Concepción Ausín, María.; Wiper, Michael P.

    2016-03-01

    A time-varying risk analysis is proposed for an adaptive design framework in nonstationary conditions arising from climate change. A Bayesian, dynamic conditional copula is developed for modeling the time-varying dependence structure between mixed continuous and discrete multiattributes of multidimensional hydrometeorological phenomena. Joint Bayesian inference is carried out to fit the marginals and copula in an illustrative example using an adaptive, Gibbs Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. Posterior mean estimates and credible intervals are provided for the model parameters and the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) is used to select the model that best captures different forms of nonstationarity over time. This study also introduces a fully Bayesian, time-varying joint return period for multivariate time-dependent risk analysis in nonstationary environments. The results demonstrate that the nature and the risk of extreme-climate multidimensional processes are changed over time under the impact of climate change, and accordingly the long-term decision making strategies should be updated based on the anomalies of the nonstationary environment.

  19. Non-stationary noise estimation using dictionary learning and Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, James M.; Rockmore, Daniel N.; Wang, Yang

    2014-02-01

    Stationarity of the noise distribution is a common assumption in image processing. This assumption greatly simplifies denoising estimators and other model parameters and consequently assuming stationarity is often a matter of convenience rather than an accurate model of noise characteristics. The problematic nature of this assumption is exacerbated in real-world contexts, where noise is often highly non-stationary and can possess time- and space-varying characteristics. Regardless of model complexity, estimating the parameters of noise dis- tributions in digital images is a difficult task, and estimates are often based on heuristic assumptions. Recently, sparse Bayesian dictionary learning methods were shown to produce accurate estimates of the level of additive white Gaussian noise in images with minimal assumptions. We show that a similar model is capable of accu- rately modeling certain kinds of non-stationary noise processes, allowing for space-varying noise in images to be estimated, detected, and removed. We apply this modeling concept to several types of non-stationary noise and demonstrate the model's effectiveness on real-world problems, including denoising and segmentation of images according to noise characteristics, which has applications in image forensics.

  20. Nonstationary Influence of El Niño on the Synchronous Dengue Epidemics in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Several factors, including environmental and climatic factors, influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases. Nevertheless, the identification and relative importance of climatic factors for vector-borne diseases remain controversial. Dengue is the world's most important viral vector-borne disease, and the controversy about climatic effects also applies in this case. Here we address the role of climate variability in shaping the interannual pattern of dengue epidemics. Methods and Findings We have analysed monthly data for Thailand from 1983 to 1997 using wavelet approaches that can describe nonstationary phenomena and that also allow the quantification of nonstationary associations between time series. We report a strong association between monthly dengue incidence in Thailand and the dynamics of El Niño for the 2–3-y periodic mode. This association is nonstationary, seen only from 1986 to 1992, and appears to have a major influence on the synchrony of dengue epidemics in Thailand. Conclusion The underlying mechanism for the synchronisation of dengue epidemics may resemble that of a pacemaker, in which intrinsic disease dynamics interact with climate variations driven by El Niño to propagate travelling waves of infection. When association with El Niño is strong in the 2–3-y periodic mode, one observes high synchrony of dengue epidemics over Thailand. When this association is absent, the seasonal dynamics become dominant and the synchrony initiated in Bangkok collapses. PMID:15839751

  1. A New Method for Nonlinear and Nonstationary Time Series Analysis: The Empirical Mode Decomposition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part of the method is the Empirical Mode Decomposition method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF). An IMF is defined as any function having the same numbers of zero-crossing and extrema, and also having symmetric envelopes defined by the local maxima and minima respectively. The IMF also admits well-behaved Hilbert transform. This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. Since the decomposition is based on the local characteristic time scale of the data, it is applicable to nonlinear and nonstationary processes. With the Hilbert transform, the Intrinsic Mode Functions yield instantaneous frequencies as functions of time that give sharp identifications of imbedded structures. The final presentation of the results is an energy-frequency-time distribution, designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. Classical nonlinear system models are used to illustrate the roles played by the nonlinear and nonstationary effects in the energy-frequency-time distribution.

  2. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  3. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  4. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  5. Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy: a differential absorption approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Bassi, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    A method was developed to estimate spectral changes of the absorption properties of turbid media from time-resolved reflectance/transmittance measurements. It was derived directly from the microscopic Beer-Lambert law, and tested against simulations and phantom measurements.

  6. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  7. Depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer based on structured light illumination and Fourier transform interferometry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan; Matsudaira, Paul T; So, Peter T C

    2014-10-01

    A depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer can provide depth resolved imaging both in the spatial and the spectral domain. Images acquired through a standard imaging Fourier transform spectrometer do not have the depth-resolution. By post processing the spectral cubes (x, y, λ) obtained through a Sagnac interferometer under uniform illumination and structured illumination, spectrally resolved images with depth resolution can be recovered using structured light illumination algorithms such as the HiLo method. The proposed scheme is validated with in vitro specimens including fluorescent solution and fluorescent beads with known spectra. The system is further demonstrated in quantifying spectra from 3D resolved features in biological specimens. The system has demonstrated depth resolution of 1.8 μm and spectral resolution of 7 nm respectively.

  8. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  9. Resource Prospector: The RESOLVE Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J.; Smith, J.; J., Captain; Paz, A.; Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R.; Zacny, K.

    2015-10-01

    NASA has been developing a lunar volatiles exploration payload named RESOLVE. Now the primary science payload on-board the Resource Prospector (RP) mission, RESOLVE, consists of several instruments that evaluate lunar volatiles.

  10. Damage detection using transient trajectories in phase-space with extended random decrement technique under non-stationary excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a damage detection method based on the geometrical variation of transient trajectories in phase-space, and the proposed methodology is compatible with non-stationary excitations (e.g., earthquake-induced ground motion). The work presented assumes zero-mean non-stationary excitation, and extends the random decrement technique to convert non-stationary response signals of the structure into free-vibration data. Transient trajectories of the structure are reconstructed via the embedding theorem from the converted free-vibration data, and trajectories are mapped successively into phase-space to enhance statistical analysis. Based upon the characterized system dynamics in terms of phase-space, the time prediction error is adopted as the damage index. To identify the presence and severity of damage in a statistically rigorous way, receiver operating characteristic curves and the Bhattacharyya distance are employed. The results from both numerical simulations and experiments validate the proposed framework, when the test structures are subject to non-stationary excitations. The extension achieved in this paper enables the phase-space damage detection approach to be compatible with non-stationary scenarios, such as traffic, wind, and earthquake loadings. Moreover, the results indicate that this phase-state-based method is able to identify damage-induced nonlinearity in response, which is an intrinsic characteristic associated with most structural damage types.

  11. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  12. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  13. Time-Spectral Rotorcraft Simulations on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua I.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The Time-Spectral method is derived as a Fourier collocation scheme and applied to NASA's overset Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver OVERFLOW. The paper outlines the Time-Spectral OVERFLOWimplementation. Successful low-speed laminar plunging NACA 0012 airfoil simulations demonstrate the capability of the Time-Spectral method to resolve the highly-vortical wakes typical of more expensive three-dimensional rotorcraft configurations. Dealiasing, in the form of spectral vanishing viscosity (SVV), facilitates the convergence of Time-Spectral calculations of high-frequency flows. Finally, simulations of the isolated V-22 Osprey tiltrotor for both hover and forward (edgewise) flight validate the three-dimensional Time-Spectral OVERFLOW implementation. The Time-Spectral hover simulation matches the time-accurate calculation using a single harmonic. Significantly more temporal modes and SVV are required to accurately compute the forward flight case because of its more active, high-frequency wake.

  14. Partial spectral analysis of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukić, D.; Denić-Jukić, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryHydrological time series comprise the influences of numerous processes involved in the transfer of water in hydrological cycle. It implies that an ambiguity with respect to the processes encoded in spectral and cross-spectral density functions exists. Previous studies have not paid attention adequately to this issue. Spectral and cross-spectral density functions represent the Fourier transforms of auto-covariance and cross-covariance functions. Using this basic property, the ambiguity is resolved by applying a novel approach based on the spectral representation of partial correlation. Mathematical background for partial spectral density, partial amplitude and partial phase functions is presented. The proposed functions yield the estimates of spectral density, amplitude and phase that are not affected by a controlling process. If an input-output relation is the subject of interest, antecedent and subsequent influences of the controlling process can be distinguished considering the input event as a referent point. The method is used for analyses of the relations between the rainfall, air temperature and relative humidity, as well as the influences of air temperature and relative humidity on the discharge from karst spring. Time series are collected in the catchment of the Jadro Spring located in the Dinaric karst area of Croatia.

  15. Spectral topography of histopathological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Jeremy M.; Lu, Thomas T.; Vari, Sandor G.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of imaging spectroscopy is to obtain independent spectra from individual objects in a field-of-view. In the case of biological materials, such as histopathology samples, it has been well established that spectral characteristic can be indicative of specific diseases including cancer. Diagnosis can be enhanced by the use of probes and stains to indicate the presence of individual genome or other biologically active cell components or substances. To assess a specimen through a microscope is directly analogous to serving the Earth from space to assess natural features. This paper describes a simple and inexpensive imaging spectrometer, with an origin in remote sensing, that demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly identify evidence of disease in histopathology samples using spatially resolved spectral data. The PARISS imaging spectrometer enables a researcher to acquire multi-spectral images that yield functional maps, showing what and where biological molecules are located within a structure. It is the powerful combination of imaging and spectroscopy that provides the tools not readily available to the Life Sciences. The PARISS system incorporates a powerful hybrid neural network analysis to break the data logjam that is often associated with the acquisition and processing of multiple spectra.

  16. Tracer breakthrough curves in a complex lysimeter system: evidence of non-stationary transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Botter, G.; Rao, P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the outcomes of a lysimeter experiment aimed at the measurement of travel time distributions of water and certain nonreactive solutes under non-stationary conditions to examine the kinematics of age mixing. In order to simulate the release of a compound in a receiving water body, it is common in hydrology to attribute a travel time probability distribution to each particle, which reflects the response of a catchment unit to a solute input. Hence, the concentration measured at a control section becomes the convolution between the travel time distribution and the concentration of the inputs throughout the past. This study aims at experimentally demonstrating that the tracer travel time probability distribution is, in fact, strongly dependent on the antecedent conditions at the time of tracer injection and the subsequent states experienced in the system. It is therefore a function of numerous transient processes such as hydrologic filtering in soils, climatic forcing or evapotranspiration patterns. A 2-meter deep weighing lysimeter was equipped with a discharge measurement system coupled with a sample collector, an array of water content sensors and an array of porous cups for soil water sampling at three different depths. Controlled random rainfall following a Poisson process was generated, and evapotranspiration losses from two willow trees planted in the lysimeter created an important soil-water storage deficit. Five species of fluorobenzoic acids were used as tracers, and sequentially injected through rainfall at different times. The measurement system installed allowed a precise and accurate monitoring of every input and output flux and water storage, which is crucial to determine the conditions influencing the travel time distribution and to calculate the mass loads and recovery rates. Breakthrough curves for multiple tracers measured at several depths within the lysimeter and at the lysimeter outlet provide support for non-stationary tracer travel

  17. Estimating Ocean Surface Level using the Intrinsic Non-stationary Covariance Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, C. A.; Pavlovic, V.; Kopp, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    A spatio-temporal estimation of the ocean surface level poses a challenging problem for reasons including non-stationarity, non-uniformly smooth spatial boundaries and a short range in the temporal dimension of the densely measured satellite altimeter dataset. Gaussian processes using a non-stationary covariance function have shown promise for such a task, as the covariance function adapts to the variable smoothness of the underlying distribution. We present a novel framework which employs the intrinsic non-stationary covariance function for a Gaussian process regression. The intrinsic non-stationary covariance function evaluates intrinsic statistics of the local distribution by assuming that the distribution lies on a Riemannian manifold of positive definite matrices; thereby, the non-stationarity and the non-uniformly spatial variability of the data are captured. Additionally, the framework improves the short range temporal estimates by assimilating data from a correlated process of a temporally longer range dataset. For such a data-assimilation technique, we used the dataset of tide gauge records that measure coastal sea bed levels at a geospatially sparse distribution of global sites. Experiments on satellite altimeter measurements of ocean surface level across the world from 1993 onwards demonstrate improvements in the error metrics for the regression estimates when using our novel framework. Furthermore, assimilating the tide gauge measurements from 1802 onwards gives better estimates for the long-term trends of the ocean surface level. These spatio-temporal estimates of past records of the ocean surface level will enable us to more accurately assess risks arising due to climate change.

  18. Non-stationary discharge patterns in motor cortex under subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Sabato; Montgomery, Erwin B; Gale, John T; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) directly modulates the basal ganglia (BG), but how such stimulation impacts the cortex upstream is largely unknown. There is evidence of cortical activation in 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA)-lesioned rodents and facilitation of motor evoked potentials in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, but the impact of the DBS settings on the cortical activity in normal vs. Parkinsonian conditions is still debated. We use point process models to analyze non-stationary activation patterns and inter-neuronal dependencies in the motor and sensory cortices of two non-human primates during STN DBS. These features are enhanced after treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which causes a consistent PD-like motor impairment, while high-frequency (HF) DBS (i.e., ≥100 Hz) strongly reduces the short-term patterns (period: 3-7 ms) both before and after MPTP treatment, and elicits a short-latency post-stimulus activation. Low-frequency DBS (i.e., ≤50 Hz), instead, has negligible effects on the non-stationary features. Finally, by using tools from the information theory [i.e., receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and information rate (IR)], we show that the predictive power of these models is dependent on the DBS settings, i.e., the probability of spiking of the cortical neurons (which is captured by the point process models) is significantly conditioned on the timely delivery of the DBS input. This dependency increases with the DBS frequency and is significantly larger for high- vs. low-frequency DBS. Overall, the selective suppression of non-stationary features and the increased modulation of the spike probability suggest that HF STN DBS enhances the neuronal activation in motor and sensory cortices, presumably because of reinforcement mechanisms, which perhaps involve the overlap between feedback antidromic and feed-forward orthodromic responses along the BG-thalamo-cortical loop.

  19. Modeling channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity under non-stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Call, B.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional floodplain inundation models typically rely on the assumption of stationary flood frequency distributions and static channel geometries. However, changes in climate, land cover, or water management have been shown to systematically shift the mean and variance of flood flows. Further, changes in flood magnitudes have been shown to cause systematic changes in channel widths and depths. Therefore, some amount of change in the flood regime will be absorbed by changes in channel conveyance, but the subsequent changes to the frequency and magnitude of floodplain inundation are not obvious. This work presents a numerical model of channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity under non-stationary conditions. Specifically, the model predicts the width of floodplain inundation in response to a time series of synthetically generated floods. Flood time series are generated via generalized extreme value probability density functions (PDFs) with specified mean, variance, and skew parameters. To simulate non-stationary conditions, we modify the mean, variance, and/or skew systematically during each run. Throughout each model run, the geometry of the alluvial channel changes in response to flood flows according to simple hydraulic geometry relations. Results suggest that a river's inundation regime is more sensitive to changes in the variance parameter of a governing PDF than to changes in the mean parameter. Simple changes in the mean of the governing PDF result in changes to channel geometry (e.g. channel widening or narrowing), but the frequency and magnitude of inundation may adjust with time after the onset of non-stationary hydrology towards a state of dynamic equilibrium similar to the previous inundation regime. However, changes in the PDF's variance parameter can induce greater variation in channel geometry, often resulting in less frequent, but greater magnitudes of floodplain inundation.

  20. Fast and simple spectral FLIM for biochemical and medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Popleteeva, Marina; Haas, Kalina T; Stoppa, David; Pancheri, Lucio; Gasparini, Leonardo; Kaminski, Clemens F; Cassidy, Liam D; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Esposito, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (λFLIM) has powerful potential for biochemical and medical imaging applications. However, long acquisition times, low spectral resolution and complexity of λFLIM often narrow its use to specialized laboratories. Therefore, we demonstrate here a simple spectral FLIM based on a solid-state detector array providing in-pixel histrogramming and delivering faster acquisition, larger dynamic range, and higher spectral elements than state-of-the-art λFLIM. We successfully apply this novel microscopy system to biochemical and medical imaging demonstrating that solid-state detectors are a key strategic technology to enable complex assays in biomedical laboratories and the clinic.

  1. Identification of the structure parameters using short-time non-stationary stochastic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarczewska, Kamila; Koszela, Piotr; Śniady, PaweŁ; Korzec, Aleksandra

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to the flexural stiffness or eigenvalue frequency identification of a linear structure using a non-stationary stochastic excitation process. The idea of the proposed approach lies within time domain input-output methods. The proposed method is based on transforming the dynamical problem into a static one by integrating the input and the output signals. The output signal is the structure reaction, i.e. structure displacements due to the short-time, irregular load of random type. The systems with single and multiple degrees of freedom, as well as continuous systems are considered.

  2. On the functional optimization of a certain class of nonstationary spatial functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.; Paraskevopoulos, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures are developed in order to obtain optimal estimates of linear functionals for a wide class of nonstationary spatial functions. These procedures rely on well-established constrained minimum-norm criteria, and are applicable to multidimensional phenomena which are characterized by the so-called hypothesis of inherentity. The latter requires elimination of the polynomial, trend-related components of the spatial function leading to stationary quantities, and also it generates some interesting mathematics within the context of modelling and optimization in several dimensions. The arguments are illustrated using various examples, and a case study computed in detail. ?? 1987 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  3. Bayesian-based deconvolution fluorescence microscopy using dynamically updated nonstationary expectation estimates

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alexander; Wang, Xiao Yu; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is widely used for the study of biological specimens. Deconvolution can significantly improve the resolution and contrast of images produced using fluorescence microscopy; in particular, Bayesian-based methods have become very popular in deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. An ongoing challenge with Bayesian-based methods is in dealing with the presence of noise in low SNR imaging conditions. In this study, we present a Bayesian-based method for performing deconvolution using dynamically updated nonstationary expectation estimates that can improve the fluorescence microscopy image quality in the presence of noise, without explicit use of spatial regularization. PMID:26054051

  4. Information transfer with rate-modulated Poisson processes: a simple model for nonstationary stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, I

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic resonance in a simple model of information transfer is studied for sensory neurons and ensembles of ion channels. An exact expression for the information gain is obtained for the Poisson process with the signal-modulated spiking rate. This result allows one to generalize the conventional stochastic resonance (SR) problem (with periodic input signal) to the arbitrary signals of finite duration (nonstationary SR). Moreover, in the case of a periodic signal, the rate of information gain is compared with the conventional signal-to-noise ratio. The paper establishes the general nonequivalence between both measures notwithstanding their apparent similarity in the limit of weak signals.

  5. Information transfer with rate-modulated Poisson processes: A simple model for nonstationary stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic resonance in a simple model of information transfer is studied for sensory neurons and ensembles of ion channels. An exact expression for the information gain is obtained for the Poisson process with the signal-modulated spiking rate. This result allows one to generalize the conventional stochastic resonance (SR) problem (with periodic input signal) to the arbitrary signals of finite duration (nonstationary SR). Moreover, in the case of a periodic signal, the rate of information gain is compared with the conventional signal-to-noise ratio. The paper establishes the general nonequivalence between both measures notwithstanding their apparent similarity in the limit of weak signals.

  6. Solution to the backward-Kolmogorov equation for a nonstationary oscillation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomos, G. P.; Spanos, P.-T. D.

    1982-01-01

    The transition probability density function of a Markovian approximation of the response amplitude of an oscillator under nonstationary excitation is determined in an analytical form. A solution is presented for the associated backward-Kolmogorov equation by transforming the equation into a form amenable to solution by the method of the separation of variables. This procedure results in a boundary value problem which is then solved by using an infinite series of Laguerre polynomials. It is found that the infinite series solution is equivalent to a closed-form solution involving a Bessel function.

  7. Nonstationary heat transfer in a channel containing saturated He II: stepped heat loading

    SciTech Connect

    Shaposhnikov, V.A.; Mikhailov, I.I.; Efimova, L.N.; Romchenko, D.G.

    1988-09-01

    Measurements have been made on the nonstationary temperature distribution in a channel containing saturated superfluid He II under countercurrent conditions with local heat input to the middle of the channel as a stepped function. A numerical method has been developed which incorporates the variable thermophysical parameters for the helium. Those parameters include local heat flux and thermal conductivity related to internal component convection, heat flux density, specific enthalpy and entropy, the Goerter-Mellink friction constant, and the Kapitza conductivity coefficient. Agreement of the variable-property calculations with experiment is evaluated. It is concluded that saturated He II responds to pulse loading as does underheated He II.

  8. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary heat and mass transfer in disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, L. A.; Krasnoperov, S. Y.; Kalashnikov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The work describes mathematical model of non-stationary heat and mass transfer processes in dispersed environment, taking into account the phase transition; presents the results of numeric modelling for conditions of direct reduction in high-temperature reducing atmosphere, corresponding to the direct reduction in the jet-emulsion unit according to the principles of self-organization. The method was developed for calculation of heat and mass transfer of the aggregate of iron material particles in accordance with the given distribution law.

  9. Hawking radiation temperatures in non-stationary Kerr black holes with different tortoise coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, X. G.; Jiang, Q. Q.; Wei, L. F.

    2012-04-01

    We apply the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method to study the Hawking radiations of scalar and Dirac particles in non-stationary Kerr black holes under different tortoise coordinate transformations. We found that all the relevant Hawking radiation spectra show still the blackbody ones, while the Hawking temperatures are strongly related to the used tortoise coordinate transformations. The properties of these dependences are discussed analytically and numerically. Our results imply that proper selections of tortoise coordinate transformations should be important in the studies of Hawking radiations and the correct selection would be given by the experimental observations in the future.

  10. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of non-stationary quantum states in waveguiding photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, David; Liñares, Jesús; Nistal, María C.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode non-stationary states based on their optical field-strength probability distributions is presented. The quantum generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of a multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to quantum states generated in multimode linear and nonlinear waveguiding (integrated) photonic devices, such as multimode waveguiding directional couplers and waveguiding parametric amplifiers, whose modes fulfill a spatial modal orthogonality. In particular, the generalized polarization degree of coherent, squeezed and Schrödinger's cat states is analyzed.

  11. Continuous wavelet transform for non-stationary vibration detection with phase-OTDR.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zengguang; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-08-27

    We propose the continuous wavelet transform for non-stationary vibration measurement by distributed vibration sensor based on phase optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR). The continuous wavelet transform approach can give simultaneously the frequency and time information of the vibration event. Frequency evolution is obtained by the wavelet ridge detection method from the scalogram of the continuous wavelet transform. In addition, a novel signal processing algorithm based on the global wavelet spectrum is used to determine the location of vibration. Distributed vibration measurements of 500 Hz and 500 Hz to 1 kHz sweep events over 20 cm fiber length are demonstrated using a single mode fiber.

  12. Dynamical Invariants and Robertson-Schroedinger Correlated States of Electromagnetic Field in Nonstationary Linear Media

    SciTech Connect

    Trifonov, Dimitar A.; Angelow, Andrey K.

    2011-04-07

    Dynamical invariants and statistical properties of the quantized electromagnetic field in nonstationary linear media (dielectric and/or conductive) are considered in the framework of Choi-Yeon quantization scheme. It is shown that in the eigenstates of linear dynamical invariant the Robertson-Schroedinger uncertainty relation is minimized, both for the photon annihilation operator quadratures and for the electric and magnetic field components. The time evolution of initial Glauber coherent states and Fock (photon number) states is considered. On an initial coherent state the medium conductivity and the time-dependent electric permeability both are shown to act as squeezing and correlating factors.

  13. Robust nonstationary jammer mitigation for GPS receivers with instantaneous frequency error tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben; Zhang, Yimin D.; Qin, Si; Amin, Moeness G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonstationary jammer suppression method for GPS receivers when the signals are sparsely sampled. Missing data samples induce noise-like artifacts in the time-frequency (TF) distribution and ambiguity function of the received signals, which lead to reduced capability and degraded performance in jammer signature estimation and excision. In the proposed method, a data-dependent TF kernel is utilized to mitigate the artifacts and sparse reconstruction methods are then applied to obtain instantaneous frequency (IF) estimation of the jammers. In addition, an error tolerance of the IF estimate is applied is applied to achieve robust jammer suppression performance in the presence of IF estimation inaccuracy.

  14. A New View of Earthquake Ground Motion Data: The Hilbert Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A brief description of the newly developed Empirical Mode Decomposition (ENID) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) method will be given. The decomposition is adaptive and can be applied to both nonlinear and nonstationary data. Example of the method applied to a sample earthquake record will be given. The results indicate those low frequency components, totally missed by the Fourier analysis, are clearly identified by the new method. Comparisons with Wavelet and window Fourier analysis show the new method offers much better temporal and frequency resolutions.

  15. Nonstationary patterns of isolation-by-distance: inferring measures of local genetic differentiation with Bayesian kriging.

    PubMed

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Blum, Michael G B

    2014-04-01

    Patterns of isolation-by-distance (IBD) arise when population differentiation increases with increasing geographic distances. Patterns of IBD are usually caused by local spatial dispersal, which explains why differences of allele frequencies between populations accumulate with distance. However, spatial variations of demographic parameters such as migration rate or population density can generate nonstationary patterns of IBD where the rate at which genetic differentiation accumulates varies across space. To characterize nonstationary patterns of IBD, we infer local genetic differentiation based on Bayesian kriging. Local genetic differentiation for a sampled population is defined as the average genetic differentiation between the sampled population and fictive neighboring populations. To avoid defining populations in advance, the method can also be applied at the scale of individuals making it relevant for landscape genetics. Inference of local genetic differentiation relies on a matrix of pairwise similarity or dissimilarity between populations or individuals such as matrices of FST between pairs of populations. Simulation studies show that maps of local genetic differentiation can reveal barriers to gene flow but also other patterns such as continuous variations of gene flow across habitat. The potential of the method is illustrated with two datasets: single nucleotide polymorphisms from human Swedish populations and dominant markers for alpine plant species.

  16. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method. PMID:26936560

  17. Dempster-Shafer fusion of multisensor signals in nonstationary Markovian context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaren, Mohamed El Yazid; Monfrini, Emmanuel; Pieczynski, Wojciech; Aïssani, Amar

    2012-12-01

    The latest developments in Markov models' theory and their corresponding computational techniques have opened new rooms for image and signal modeling. In particular, the use of Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence within Markov models has brought some keys to several challenging difficulties that the conventional hidden Markov models cannot handle. These difficulties are concerned mainly with two situations: multisensor data, where the use of the Dempster-Shafer fusion is unworkable; and nonstationary data, due to the mismatch between the estimated stationary model and the actual data. For each of the two situations, the Dempster-Shafer combination rule has been applied, thanks to the triplet Markov models' formalism, to overcome the drawbacks of the standard Bayesian models. However, so far, both situations have not been considered in the same time. In this article, we propose an evidential Markov chain that uses the Dempster-Shafer combination rule to bring the effect of contextual information into segmentation of multisensor nonstationary data. We also provide the Expectation-Maximization parameters' estimation and the maximum posterior marginal's restoration procedures. To validate the proposed model, experiments are conducted on some synthetic multisensor data and noised images. The obtained segmentation results are then compared to those obtained with conventional approaches to bring out the efficiency of the present model.

  18. Nonstationary regimes in a Duffing oscillator subject to biharmonic forcing near a primary resonance.

    PubMed

    Starosvetsky, Y; Manevitch, L I

    2011-04-01

    An analytical investigation of nonstationary processes in a Duffing oscillator subject to biharmonic forcing, under conditions of primary resonance, is carried out. The earlier developed methodology of limiting phase trajectories (LPTs) for studying highly nonstationary regimes, characterized by intense energy exchanges between the different degrees of freedom, is successfully applied to the system under investigation. Two distinct types of LPT trajectories are described in the first part of the study. Conditions for the recurrent transitions in time from one type of LPT to another were derived in the first part of the analysis corresponding to the undamped case. An approximation of the LPT related to the higher amplitude of oscillations was derived using nonsmooth transformations. An analysis carried out in the study has revealed the necessary and sufficient conditions for excitation of relaxation oscillations exhibited by a lightly damped system. It was also demonstrated that the mechanism of relaxations may be approximated and explained by the methodology of LPTs, characterized by strong energy exchanges between the coupled oscillators or, alternatively, a single oscillator and an external source of energy. The results of analytical approximations and numerical simulations are observed to be in quite satisfactory agreement. PMID:21599274

  19. Iterative generalized synchrosqueezing transform for fault diagnosis of wind turbine planetary gearbox under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chen, Xiaowang; Liang, Ming

    2015-02-01

    The synchrosqueezing transform can effectively improve the readability of time-frequency representation of mono-component and constant frequency signals. However, for multi-component and time-variant frequency signals, it still suffers from time-frequency blurs. In order to address this issue, the synchrosqueezing transform is improved using iterative generalized demodulation. Firstly, the complex nonstationary signal is decomposed into mono-components of constant frequency by iterative generalized demodulation. Then, the instantaneous frequency of each mono-component is accurately estimated via the synchrosqueezing transform, by exploiting its merit of enhanced time-frequency resolution. Finally, the time-frequency representation of the original signal is obtained by superposing the time-frequency representations of all the mono-components with restored instantaneous frequency. This proposed method generalizes the synchrosqueezing transform to multi-component and time-variant frequency signals, and it has fine time-frequency resolution and is free of cross-term interferences. The proposed method was validated using both numerically simulated and lab experimental vibration signals of planetary gearboxes under nonstationary conditions. The time-variant planetary gearbox characteristic frequencies were effectively identified, and the gear faults were correctly diagnosed.

  20. Independence and symbolic independence of nonstationary heartbeat series during atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarota, Camillo; Rogora, Enrico

    2005-08-01

    Heartbeat intervals during atrial fibrillation are commonly believed to form a series of almost independent variables. The series extracted from 24 h Holter recordings show a nonstationary behavior. Because of nonstationarity it is difficult to give a quantitative measure of independence. In this paper, we use and compare two methods for this. The first is a classical method which models a nonstationary series using a linear Gaussian state space model. In this framework, the independence is tested on the stationary sequence of the residuals. The second method codes data into permutations and tests the uniformity of their distribution. This test assumes as null hypothesis a weaker form of independence which we call symbolic independence. We discuss some advantages of symbolic independence in the context of heartbeat series. We analyze the time series of heartbeat intervals from 24 h Holter recordings of nine subjects with chronic atrial fibrillation and find that the detrended series is a zero or one memory process for 83% of regular segments and is symbolically independent for 93% of segments.

  1. Uncovering the evolution of nonstationary stochastic variables: The example of asset volume-price fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Paulo; Raischel, Frank; Boto, João P.; Lind, Pedro G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a framework for describing the evolution of stochastic observables having a nonstationary distribution of values. The framework is applied to empirical volume-prices from assets traded at the New York Stock Exchange, about which several remarks are pointed out from our analysis. Using Kullback-Leibler divergence we evaluate the best model out of four biparametric models commonly used in the context of financial data analysis. In our present data sets we conclude that the inverse Γ distribution is a good model, particularly for the distribution tail of the largest volume-price fluctuations. Extracting the time series of the corresponding parameter values we show that they evolve in time as stochastic variables themselves. For the particular case of the parameter controlling the volume-price distribution tail we are able to extract an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck equation which describes the fluctuations of the highest volume-prices observed in the data. Finally, we discuss how to bridge the gap from the stochastic evolution of the distribution parameters to the stochastic evolution of the (nonstationary) observable and put our conclusions into perspective for other applications in geophysics and biology.

  2. Statistical approaches to nonstationary EEGs for the detection of slow vertex responses.

    PubMed

    Fujikake, M; Ninomija, S P; Fujita, H

    1989-06-01

    A slow vertex response (SVR) is an electric auditory evoked response used for an objective hearing power test. One of the aims of an objective hearing power test is to find infants whose hearing is less than that of normal infants. Early medical treatment is important for infants with a loss of hearing so that they do not have retarded growth. To measure SVRs, we generally use the averaged summation method of an electroencephalogram (EEG), because the signal-to-noise ratio (SVR to EEG and etc.) is very poor. To increase the reliability and stability of measured SVRs, and at the same time, to make the burden of testing light, it is necessary to device an effective measurement method of SVR. Two factors must be considered: (1) SVR waveforms change following the changes of EEGs caused by sleeping and (2) EEGs are considered as nonstationary data in prolonged measurement. In this paper, five statistical methods are used on two different models; a stationary model and a nonstationary model. Through the comparison of waves obtained by each method, we will clarify the statistical characteristics of the original data (EEGs including SVRs), and consider the conditions that effect the measurement method of an SVR. PMID:2794816

  3. Sporadic randomness: the transition from the stationary to the nonstationary condition.

    PubMed

    Ignaccolo, M; Grigolini, P; Rosa, A

    2001-08-01

    We address the study of sporadic randomness by means of the Manneville map. We point out that the Manneville map is the generator of fluctuations yielding the Lévy processes, and that these processes are currently regarded by some authors as statistical manifestations of a nonextensive form of thermodynamics. For this reason we study the sensitivity to initial conditions with the help of a nonextensive form of the Lyapunov coefficient. The purpose of this research is twofold. The former is to assess whether a finite diffusion coefficient might emerge from the nonextensive approach. This property, at first sight, seems to be plausible in the nonstationary case, where conventional Kolmogorov-Sinai analysis predicts a vanishing Lyapunov coefficient. The latter purpose is to confirm or reject conjectures about the nonextensive nature of Lévy processes. We find that the adoption of a nonextensive approach does not serve any predictive purpose: It does not even signal a transition from a stationary to a nonstationary regime. These conclusions are reached by means of both numerical and analytical calculations that shed light on why the Lévy processes do not imply any need to depart from the adoption of traditional complexity measures. PMID:11497680

  4. Uncovering the evolution of nonstationary stochastic variables: The example of asset volume-price fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Paulo; Raischel, Frank; Boto, João P; Lind, Pedro G

    2016-05-01

    We present a framework for describing the evolution of stochastic observables having a nonstationary distribution of values. The framework is applied to empirical volume-prices from assets traded at the New York Stock Exchange, about which several remarks are pointed out from our analysis. Using Kullback-Leibler divergence we evaluate the best model out of four biparametric models commonly used in the context of financial data analysis. In our present data sets we conclude that the inverse Γ distribution is a good model, particularly for the distribution tail of the largest volume-price fluctuations. Extracting the time series of the corresponding parameter values we show that they evolve in time as stochastic variables themselves. For the particular case of the parameter controlling the volume-price distribution tail we are able to extract an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck equation which describes the fluctuations of the highest volume-prices observed in the data. Finally, we discuss how to bridge the gap from the stochastic evolution of the distribution parameters to the stochastic evolution of the (nonstationary) observable and put our conclusions into perspective for other applications in geophysics and biology. PMID:27300845

  5. A novel data-driven learning method for radar target detection in nonstationary environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Akcakaya, Murat; Nehorai, Arye; Sen, Satyabrata

    2016-04-12

    Most existing radar algorithms are developed under the assumption that the environment (clutter) is stationary. However, in practice, the characteristics of the clutter can vary enormously depending on the radar-operational scenarios. If unaccounted for, these nonstationary variabilities may drastically hinder the radar performance. Therefore, to overcome such shortcomings, we develop a data-driven method for target detection in nonstationary environments. In this method, the radar dynamically detects changes in the environment and adapts to these changes by learning the new statistical characteristics of the environment and by intelligibly updating its statistical detection algorithm. Specifically, we employ drift detection algorithms to detectmore » changes in the environment; incremental learning, particularly learning under concept drift algorithms, to learn the new statistical characteristics of the environment from the new radar data that become available in batches over a period of time. The newly learned environment characteristics are then integrated in the detection algorithm. Furthermore, we use Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the developed method provides a significant improvement in the detection performance compared with detection techniques that are not aware of the environmental changes.« less

  6. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method.

  7. Local multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis for non-stationary image's texture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Li, Zong-shou; Li, Jin-wei

    2014-12-01

    Feature extraction plays a great important role in image processing and pattern recognition. As a power tool, multifractal theory is recently employed for this job. However, traditional multifractal methods are proposed to analyze the objects with stationary measure and cannot for non-stationary measure. The works of this paper is twofold. First, the definition of stationary image and 2D image feature detection methods are proposed. Second, a novel feature extraction scheme for non-stationary image is proposed by local multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (Local MF-DFA), which is based on 2D MF-DFA. A set of new multifractal descriptors, called local generalized Hurst exponent (Lhq) is defined to characterize the local scaling properties of textures. To test the proposed method, both the novel texture descriptor and other two multifractal indicators, namely, local Hölder coefficients based on capacity measure and multifractal dimension Dq based on multifractal differential box-counting (MDBC) method, are compared in segmentation experiments. The first experiment indicates that the segmentation results obtained by the proposed Lhq are better than the MDBC-based Dq slightly and superior to the local Hölder coefficients significantly. The results in the second experiment demonstrate that the Lhq can distinguish the texture images more effectively and provide more robust segmentations than the MDBC-based Dq significantly.

  8. Signal Restoration of Non-stationary Acoustic Signals in the Time Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babkin, Alexander S.

    1988-01-01

    Signal restoration is a method of transforming a nonstationary signal acquired by a ground based microphone to an equivalent stationary signal. The benefit of the signal restoration is a simplification of the flight test requirements because it could dispense with the need to acquire acoustic data with another aircraft flying in concert with the rotorcraft. The data quality is also generally improved because the contamination of the signal by the propeller and wind noise is not present. The restoration methodology can also be combined with other data acquisition methods, such as a multiple linear microphone array for further improvement of the test results. The methodology and software are presented for performing the signal restoration in the time domain. The method has no restrictions on flight path geometry or flight regimes. Only requirement is that the aircraft spatial position be known relative to the microphone location and synchronized with the acoustic data. The restoration process assumes that the moving source radiates a stationary signal, which is then transformed into a nonstationary signal by various modulation processes. The restoration contains only the modulation due to the source motion.

  9. Non-stationary model residuals: information, disinformation and measures of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beven, K.

    2012-12-01

    We expect error in applying hydrological models. They are approximate representations of hydrological processes, driven by approximate estimates of boundary fluxes and compared against uncertain observations of discharge (and perhaps other observables). We should expect, from the nonlinear dynamics of hydrological responses and the epistemic nature of many of the sources of uncertainty, that the residuals should be non-stationary in character. This suggests that it might be difficult to find a simple representation of the error characteristics that could be used, for example, to define a likelihood function for parameter estimation. This is often ignored: the likelihood functions used in hydrology have generally been simple, aleatory and stationary (albeit that this is not a conceptual limitation - as one referee put it, in principle an error model can be infinitely complex!). However, the epistemic nature of the uncertainty does raise the issue of how far nonstationary model residuals might be informative about change in the system and how far they reflect epistemic disinformation in inferring the true nature of the system. Some periods of potential calibration data are clearly disinformative in inference (even if informative about observational techniques), but other unusual events might be particularly revealing about the process responses. Is it therefore possible to define measures of information that can reflect some of these difficulties prior to running a model, or must we resort to data assimilation conditional on a model in detecting nonstationarity?

  10. Detection and attribution of urbanization effect on flood extremes using nonstationary flood‐frequency models

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, T. R.; Miller, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigates whether long‐term changes in observed series of high flows can be attributed to changes in land use via nonstationary flood‐frequency analyses. A point process characterization of threshold exceedances is used, which allows for direct inclusion of covariates in the model; as well as a nonstationary model for block maxima series. In particular, changes in annual, winter, and summer block maxima and peaks over threshold extracted from gauged instantaneous flows records in two hydrologically similar catchments located in proximity to one another in northern England are investigated. The study catchment is characterized by large increases in urbanization levels in recent decades, while the paired control catchment has remained undeveloped during the study period (1970–2010). To avoid the potential confounding effect of natural variability, a covariate which summarizes key climatological properties is included in the flood‐frequency model. A significant effect of the increasing urbanization levels on high flows is detected, in particular in the summer season. Point process models appear to be superior to block maxima models in their ability to detect the effect of the increase in urbanization levels on high flows. PMID:26877559

  11. Non-Stationary Hydrologic Frequency Analysis using B-Splines Quantile Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, B.; St-Hilaire, A.; Bouezmarni, T.; Ouarda, T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic frequency analysis is commonly used by engineers and hydrologists to provide the basic information on planning, design and management of hydraulic structures and water resources system under the assumption of stationarity. However, with increasing evidence of changing climate, it is possible that the assumption of stationarity would no longer be valid and the results of conventional analysis would become questionable. In this study, we consider a framework for frequency analysis of extreme flows based on B-Splines quantile regression, which allows to model non-stationary data that have a dependence on covariates. Such covariates may have linear or nonlinear dependence. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used to estimate quantiles and their posterior distributions. A coefficient of determination for quantiles regression is proposed to evaluate the estimation of the proposed model for each quantile level. The method is applied on annual maximum and minimum streamflow records in Ontario, Canada. Climate indices are considered to describe the non-stationarity in these variables and to estimate the quantiles in this case. The results show large differences between the non-stationary quantiles and their stationary equivalents for annual maximum and minimum discharge with high annual non-exceedance probabilities. Keywords: Quantile regression, B-Splines functions, MCMC, Streamflow, Climate indices, non-stationarity.

  12. Control-nonlinear-nonstationary structural response and radiation near a supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1994-01-01

    This paper is on the control of nonlinear-nonstationary vibration of a frame-stringer structure resulting from high levels of excitaation from a nearby supersonic jet exhaust. The structure exhibits periodic, chaotic, or random behaviors when forced by high-intensity sound from a supersonic jet exhaust with shock loading superimposed on the broadband response. The time history of the pressure, showing the rotation and flapping of the shock structure in the jet column due to large-scale instabilities, indicates that the response is not only nonlinear but also nonstationary. The acoustic pressure radiated by the structure also contains shocks and the formation of harmonics with distance. Control of the structural response is achieved by actively forcing the structure with an actuator at the shock oscillation frequency whose amplitude is locked into a self-control cycle. Results show that the peak power level is reduced by a factor of 63, or 18 dB. As a result, new broadband components emerge with at least four harmonics. At accelerating and decelerating supersonic speeds, the exhaust from the jet induces higher transient loading on the nearby flexible structure due to the occurence of multiple shocks from the jet.

  13. Control-nonlinear-nonstationary structural response and radiation near a supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1994-01-01

    This paper is on the control of nonlinear-nonstationary vibration of a frame-stringer structure resulting from high levels of excitation from a nearby supersonic jet exhaust. The structure exhibits periodic, chaotic, or random behaviors when forced by high-intensity sound from a supersonic jet exhaust with 'shock' loading superimposed on a broadband response. The time history of the pressure, showing the rotation and flapping of the shock structure in the jet column due to large-scale instabilities, indicates that the response is not only nonlinear but also nonstationary. The acoustic pressure radiated by the structure also contains shocks and the formation of harmonics with distance. Control of the structural response is achieved by actively forcing the structure with an actuator at the shock oscillation frequency whose amplitude is locked into a self-control cycle. Results show that the peak power level is reduced by a factor of 63, or 18 dB. As a result, new broadband components emerge with at least four harmonics. At accelerating and decelerating supersonic speeds, the exhaust from the jet induces higher transient loading on the nearby flexible structure due to the occurrence of multiple shock from the jet.

  14. Non-stationary nonparametric inference of river-to-groundwater travel-time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijie; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2014-11-01

    The travel-time distribution between rivers and groundwater observation points and the mixing of freshly infiltrated river water with groundwater of other origin is of high relevance in riverbank filtration. These characteristics usually are inferred from the analysis of natural-tracer time series, typically relying on a stationary input-output relationship. However, non-stationarity is a significant feature of the riparian zone causing time-varying river-to-groundwater transfer functions. We present a non-stationary extension of nonparametric deconvolution by performing stationary deconvolution with windowed time series, enforcing smoothness of the determined transfer function in time and travel time. The nonparametric approach facilitates the identification of unconventional features in travel-time distributions, such as broad peaks, and the sliding-window approach is an easy way to accommodate the method to dynamic changes of the system under consideration. By this, we obtain time-varying signal-recovery rates and travel-time distributions, from which we derive the mean travel time and the spread of the distribution as function of time. We apply our method to electric-conductivity data collected at River Thur, Switzerland, and adjacent piezometers. The non-stationary approach reproduces the groundwater observations significantly better than the stationary one, both in terms of overall metrics and in matching individual peaks. We compare characteristics of the transient transfer function to base flow which indicates shorter travel times at higher river stages.

  15. A Critical Examination of Wind-Wave Spectral Functional Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, data from random ocean waves are presented in spectral functions. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean waves are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the wave field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous

  16. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  17. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  18. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a combined spectral and attenuation model can be used to predict the presence of lipid in OFDI images. PMID:24009991

  19. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  20. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  1. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  2. Spectral methods for compressible reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, David; Gottlieb, Sigal

    2005-01-01

    High order simulations are necessary in order to capture fine details in resolving supersonic reactive flows. However, high Mach number compressible flows feature sharp gradients and discontinuities, which present a challenge to successful simulations using high order methods. Spectral methods have proven a powerful tool in simulation of incompressible turbulent flows, and recent advances allow the application of spectral methods to compressible reactive flows. We review the recent advances in the theory and application of spectral methods which allow stable computations of discontinuous phenomena, and the recovery of high order information via postprocessing, and present applications of high Mach number reactive flows. To cite this article: D. Gottlieb, S. Gottlieb, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  3. Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Long, C. N.; Flynn, C.

    2011-04-01

    The spectral changes of the shortwave total, direct and diffuse cloud radiative forcing (CRF) at surface are examined for the first time using spectrally resolved all-sky flux observations and clear-sky fluxes. The latter are computed applying a physically based approach, which accounts for the spectral changes of aerosol optical properties and surface albedo. Application of this approach to 13 summertime days with single-layer continental cumuli demonstrates: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and also can be applied for estimation of the shortwave broadband CRF.

  4. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26502383

  5. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-01-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  6. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-12-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  7. Suppressing non-stationary random noise in microseismic data by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition and permutation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Rui-Sheng; Liang, Yong-Quan; Hua, Yu-Cong; Sun, Hong-Mei; Xia, Fang-Fang

    2016-10-01

    Microseismic signal is inevitably mixed with non-stationary random noise in the process of acquisition, which is difficult to be separated from non-stationary random noise by using the traditional methods of linear filtering and spectrum analysis. Thus a suppressing method of non-stationary random noise is proposed. It firstly conducts the multi-scale decomposition of microseismic signal containing noises based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD). Several components of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) are obtained and they are arranged in descending order according to their frequencies. In order to accurately identify the signals and noises in these IMF components and compare the normal microseismic signals with noises, the quantity of permutation entropy is introduced to describe the characteristics of normal microseismic signal. The threshold value of permutation entropy is used to extract the IMF components conforming to the characteristics of microseismic signal. These IMF components are reconstructed to suppress the noise. Through simulation and the test for the practical microseismic monitoring data, it is indicated that the method has a better treatment effect for non-stationary random noise in microseismic signal.

  8. The RATIO method for time-resolved Laue crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Pitak, Mateusz; Gembicky, Milan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Scheins, Stephan; Benedict, Jason; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Chollet, Matthieu; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    A RATIO method for analysis of intensity changes in time-resolved pump–probe Laue diffraction experiments is described. The method eliminates the need for scaling the data with a wavelength curve representing the spectral distribution of the source and removes the effect of possible anisotropic absorption. It does not require relative scaling of series of frames and removes errors due to all but very short term fluctuations in the synchrotron beam. PMID:19240334

  9. Time resolved optical spectra from MIG welding arc ignitions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, P.

    1985-03-01

    Optical radiation from MIG (GMAW) welding arc ignitions has been measured with a rapid scan spectrometer. The time resolved spectral measurements reveal a substantial overshoot of ultraviolet radiation during the ignition phase of a 200 A aluminum arc. Calculations which follow the ACGIH guidelines show that, at a welding current of 300 A, the unprotected eye at a distance of 0.5 m may suffer a flash after the reception of radiation from only one ignition.

  10. The transformed-stationary approach: a generic and simplified methodology for non-stationary extreme value analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentaschi, Lorenzo; Vousdoukas, Michalis; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Sartini, Ludovica; Feyen, Luc; Besio, Giovanni; Alfieri, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Statistical approaches to study extreme events require, by definition, long time series of data. In many scientific disciplines, these series are often subject to variations at different temporal scales that affect the frequency and intensity of their extremes. Therefore, the assumption of stationarity is violated and alternative methods to conventional stationary extreme value analysis (EVA) must be adopted. Using the example of environmental variables subject to climate change, in this study we introduce the transformed-stationary (TS) methodology for non-stationary EVA. This approach consists of (i) transforming a non-stationary time series into a stationary one, to which the stationary EVA theory can be applied, and (ii) reverse transforming the result into a non-stationary extreme value distribution. As a transformation, we propose and discuss a simple time-varying normalization of the signal and show that it enables a comprehensive formulation of non-stationary generalized extreme value (GEV) and generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) models with a constant shape parameter. A validation of the methodology is carried out on time series of significant wave height, residual water level, and river discharge, which show varying degrees of long-term and seasonal variability. The results from the proposed approach are comparable with the results from (a) a stationary EVA on quasi-stationary slices of non-stationary series and (b) the established method for non-stationary EVA. However, the proposed technique comes with advantages in both cases. For example, in contrast to (a), the proposed technique uses the whole time horizon of the series for the estimation of the extremes, allowing for a more accurate estimation of large return levels. Furthermore, with respect to (b), it decouples the detection of non-stationary patterns from the fitting of the extreme value distribution. As a result, the steps of the analysis are simplified and intermediate diagnostics are

  11. Flood frequency analysis of historical flood data under stationary and non-stationary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, M. J.; Botero, B. A.; López, J.; Francés, F.; Díez-Herrero, A.; Benito, G.

    2015-06-01

    Historical records are an important source of information on extreme and rare floods and fundamental to establish a reliable flood return frequency. The use of long historical records for flood frequency analysis brings in the question of flood stationarity, since climatic and land-use conditions can affect the relevance of past flooding as a predictor of future flooding. In this paper, a detailed 400 yr flood record from the Tagus River in Aranjuez (central Spain) was analysed under stationary and non-stationary flood frequency approaches, to assess their contribution within hazard studies. Historical flood records in Aranjuez were obtained from documents (Proceedings of the City Council, diaries, chronicles, memoirs, etc.), epigraphic marks, and indirect historical sources and reports. The water levels associated with different floods (derived from descriptions or epigraphic marks) were computed into discharge values using a one-dimensional hydraulic model. Secular variations in flood magnitude and frequency, found to respond to climate and environmental drivers, showed a good correlation between high values of historical flood discharges and a negative mode of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. Over the systematic gauge record (1913-2008), an abrupt change on flood magnitude was produced in 1957 due to constructions of three major reservoirs in the Tagus headwaters (Bolarque, Entrepeñas and Buendia) controlling 80% of the watershed surface draining to Aranjuez. Two different models were used for the flood frequency analysis: (a) a stationary model estimating statistical distributions incorporating imprecise and categorical data based on maximum likelihood estimators, and (b) a time-varying model based on "generalized additive models for location, scale and shape" (GAMLSS) modelling, which incorporates external covariates related to climate variability (NAO index) and catchment hydrology factors (in this paper a reservoir index; RI). Flood frequency

  12. Modelling hydrological extremes under non-stationary conditions using climate covariates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliades, Lampros; Galiatsatou, Panagiota; Loukas, Athanasios

    2013-04-01

    Extreme value theory is a probabilistic theory that can interpret the future probabilities of occurrence of extreme events (e.g. extreme precipitation and streamflow) using past observed records. Traditionally, extreme value theory requires the assumption of temporal stationarity. This assumption implies that the historical patterns of recurrence of extreme events are static over time. However, the hydroclimatic system is nonstationary on time scales that are relevant to extreme value analysis, due to human-mediated and natural environmental change. In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum daily rainfall and streamflow timeseries at selected meteorological and hydrometric stations in Greece and Cyprus. The GEV distribution parameters (location, scale, and shape) are specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN) as proposed by Cannon (2010). The CDN is a probabilistic extension of the multilayer perceptron neural network. Model parameters are estimated via the generalized maximum likelihood (GML) approach using the quasi-Newton BFGS optimization algorithm, and the appropriate GEV-CDN model architecture for the selected meteorological and hydrometric stations is selected by fitting increasingly complicated models and choosing the one that minimizes the Akaike information criterion with small sample size correction. For all case studies in Greece and Cyprus different formulations are tested with combinational cases of stationary and nonstationary parameters of the GEV distribution, linear and non-linear architecture of the CDN and combinations of the input climatic covariates. Climatic indices such as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), which describes atmospheric circulation in the eastern tropical pacific related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index that varies on an interdecadal

  13. Non-stationary resonance dynamics of a nonlinear sonic vacuum with grounding supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroleva (Kikot), I. P.; Manevitch, L. I.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2015-11-01

    In a recent work [L.I. Manevitch, A.F.Vakakis, Nonlinear oscillatory acoustic vacuum, SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics 74(6) (2014), 1742-1762] it was shown that a periodic chain of linearly coupled particles performing low-energy in-plane transverse oscillations behaves as a strongly nonlinear sonic vacuum (with corresponding speed of sound equal to zero). In this work we consider the grounded version of this system by coupling each particle to the ground through lateral springs in order to study the effect of the grounding stiffness on the strongly nonlinear dynamics. In that context we consider the simplest possible such system consisting of two coupled particles and present analytical and numerical studies of the non-stationary planar dynamics. The most significant limiting case corresponding to predominant low energy transversal excitations is considered by taking into account leading order geometric nonlinearities. Then we show that the grounded system behaves as a nonlinear sonic vacuum due to the purely cubic stiffness nonlinearities in the governing equations of motion and the complete absence of any linear stiffness terms. Under certain assumptions the nonlinear normal modes (i.e., the time-periodic nonlinear oscillations) in the configuration space of this system coincide with those of the corresponding linear one, so they obey the same orthogonality relations. Moreover, we analytically find that there are two transitions in the dynamics of this system, with the parameter governing these transitions being the relation between the lateral (grounding) and the interchain stiffnesses. The first transition concerns a bifurcation of one of the nonlinear normal modes (NNMs), whereas the second provides conditions for intense energy transfers and mixing between the NNMs. The drastic effects of these bifurcations on the non-stationary resonant dynamics are discussed. Specifically, the second transition relates to strongly non-stationary dynamics, and signifies

  14. Flood frequency analysis of historical flood data under stationary and non-stationary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, M. J.; Botero, B. A.; López, J.; Francés, F.; Díez-Herrero, A.; Benito, G.

    2015-01-01

    Historical records are an important source of information about extreme and rare floods with a great value to establish a reliable flood return frequency. The use of long historic records for flood frequency analysis brings in the question of flood stationarity, since climatic and land-use conditions can affect the relevance of past flooding as a predictor of future flooding. In this paper, a detailed 400 year flood record from the Tagus River in Aranjuez (Central Spain) was analysed under stationary and non-stationary flood frequency approaches, to assess their implications on hazard studies. Historical flood records in Aranjuez were obtained from documents (Proceedings of the City Council, diaries, chronicles, memoirs, etc.), epigraphic marks, and indirect historical sources and reports. The water levels associated with different floods (derived from descriptions or epigraphic marks) were computed into discharge values using a one-dimensional hydraulic model. Secular variations on flood magnitude and frequency, found to respond to climate and environmental drivers, showed a good correlation between high values of historical flood discharges and a negative mode of the North Atlantic Oscillation index (NAO index). Over the systematic gauge record (1913-2008), an abrupt change on flood magnitude was produced in 1957 due to constructions of three major reservoirs in the Tagus headwaters (Bolarque, Entrepeñas and Buendia) controlling 80% of the watershed surface draining to Aranjuez. Two different models were used for the flood frequency analysis: (a) a stationary model estimating statistical distributions incorporating imprecise and categorical data based on maximum likelihood estimators; (b) a time-varying model based on "generalized additive models for location, scale and shape" (GAMLSS) modelling, that incorporates external covariates related to climate variability (NAO index) and catchment hydrology factors (in this paper a reservoir index; RI). Flood frequency

  15. A Decision-Oriented Approach for Detecting and Modeling Non-Stationary Flood Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, J. S.; Vogel, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the frequency of extreme floods have been observed and anticipated in many hydrologic settings in response to numerous drivers of environmental change, including climate, land cover, and infrastructure. To help decision-makers design flood control infrastructure in settings with non-stationary hydrologic regimes, a parsimonious approach for detecting and modeling trends in extreme floods is needed. An approach using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression can accommodate nonstationarity in both the mean and variance of flood series while simultaneously offering a means of (i) analytically evaluating type I and type II trend detection errors, (ii) analytically generating expressions of uncertainty, such as confidence and prediction intervals, (iii) providing updated estimates of the frequency of floods exceeding the flood of record, (iv) accommodating a wide range of non-linear functions through ladder of powers transformations, and (v) communicating hydrologic changes in a single graphical image. Previous research has shown that the two-parameter lognormal distribution can adequately model the annual maximum flood distribution of both stationary and non-stationary hydrologic regimes in many regions of the United States. A simple logarithmic transformation of annual maximum flood series makes an OLS regression modeling approach especially suitable for creating a non-stationary flood frequency distribution with parameters that are conditional upon time or a physically meaningful covariate. While the heteroscedasticity of some OLS models may be viewed as an impediment, it also presents an opportunity for characterizing both the conditional mean and variance of annual maximum floods. Through a case study of an urbanizing watershed, we demonstrate that accounting for trends in both the mean and variance can yield substantially different estimates of time-dependent extreme flood quantiles than only considering trends in the mean. When applied to risk

  16. Sub pixel location identification using super resolved multilooking CHRIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahithi, V. S.; Agrawal, S.

    2014-11-01

    CHRIS /Proba is a multiviewing hyperspectral sensor that monitors the earth in five different zenith angles +55°, +36°, nadir, -36° and -55° with a spatial resolution of 17 m and within a spectral range of 400-1050 nm in mode 3. These multiviewing images are suitable for constructing a super resolved high resolution image that can reveal the mixed pixel of the hyperspectral image. In the present work, an attempt is made to find the location of various features constituted within the 17m mixed pixel of the CHRIS image using various super resolution reconstruction techniques. Four different super resolution reconstruction techniques namely interpolation, iterative back projection, projection on to convex sets (POCS) and robust super resolution were tried on the -36, nadir and +36 images to construct a super resolved high resolution 5.6 m image. The results of super resolution reconstruction were compared with the scaled nadir image and bicubic convoluted image for comparision of the spatial and spectral property preservance. A support vector machine classification of the best super resolved high resolution image was performed to analyse the location of the sub pixel features. Validation of the obtained results was performed using the spectral unmixing fraction images and the 5.6 m classified LISS IV image.

  17. Resolving the Moth at Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchêne, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as "The Moth," is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back "wings" thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the "wings" observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  18. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  19. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  20. Stability of nonstationary states of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Maekelae, H.; Lundh, E.; Johansson, M.; Zelan, M.

    2011-10-15

    The stability of nonstationary states of homogeneous spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates is studied by performing Bogoliubov analysis in a frame of reference where the state is stationary. In particular, the effect of an external magnetic field is examined. It is found that a nonzero magnetic field introduces instability in a {sup 23}Na condensate. The wavelengths of this instability can be controlled by tuning the strength of the magnetic field. In a {sup 87}Rb condensate this instability is present already at zero magnetic field. Furthermore, an analytical bound for the size of a stable condensate is found, and a condition for the validity of the single-mode approximation is presented. Realization of the system in a toroidal trap is discussed, and the full time development is simulated.

  1. Non-stationary time series modeling on caterpillars pest of palm oil for early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyowati, Susi; Nugraha, Rida F.; Mukhaiyar, Utriweni

    2015-12-01

    The oil palm production has an important role for the plantation and economic sector in Indonesia. One of the important problems in the cultivation of oil palm plantation is pests which causes damage to the quality of fruits. The caterpillar pest which feed palm tree's leaves will cause decline in quality of palm oil production. Early warning system is needed to minimize losses due to this pest. Here, we applied non-stationary time series modeling, especially the family of autoregressive models to predict the number of pests based on its historical data. We realized that there is some uniqueness of these pests data, i.e. the spike value that occur almost periodically. Through some simulations and case study, we obtain that the selection of constant factor has a significance influence to the model so that it can shoot the spikes value precisely.

  2. Nonstationary Precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Infrastructure Design in a Changing Climate

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Linyin; AghaKouchak, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Extreme climatic events are growing more severe and frequent, calling into question how prepared our infrastructure is to deal with these changes. Current infrastructure design is primarily based on precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with the so-called stationary assumption, meaning extremes will not vary significantly over time. However, climate change is expected to alter climatic extremes, a concept termed nonstationarity. Here we show that given nonstationarity, current IDF curves can substantially underestimate precipitation extremes and thus, they may not be suitable for infrastructure design in a changing climate. We show that a stationary climate assumption may lead to underestimation of extreme precipitation by as much as 60%, which increases the flood risk and failure risk in infrastructure systems. We then present a generalized framework for estimating nonstationary IDF curves and their uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The methodology can potentially be integrated in future design concepts. PMID:25403227

  3. Quantifying two-dimensional nonstationary signal with power-law correlations by detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qingju; Wu, Yonghong

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a new method for the multifractal characterization of two-dimensional nonstationary signal, which is based on the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). By applying to two artificially generated signals of two-component ARFIMA process and binomial multifractal model, we show that the new method can reliably determine the multifractal scaling behavior of two-dimensional signal. We also illustrate the applications of this method in finance and physiology. The analyzing results exhibit that the two-dimensional signals under investigation are power-law correlations, and the electricity market consists of electricity price and trading volume is multifractal, while the two-dimensional EEG signal in sleep recorded for a single patient is weak multifractal. The new method based on the detrended fluctuation analysis may add diagnostic power to existing statistical methods.

  4. Robust suppression of nonstationary power-line interference in electrocardiogram signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojun; Zeng, Xiaopin; Zhou, Xiaona; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Guojin; Zhou, Xichuan

    2012-07-01

    It is a challenge to suppress time-varying power-line interference (PLI) with various levels in electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. Most previous attempts of tracking and suppressing the nonstationary PLI signal are based on the least-squares (LS) algorithm. This makes these methods susceptible to QRS complex in suppressing a low-level PLI signal which is frequently coupled in battery-operated ECG equipment. To address the limitation of LS-based methods, this study presents a robust PLI suppression system based on a robust extension of the Kalman filter. In addition, we used an improved version of empirical mode decomposition to further attenuate the QRS complex. Experiments show that our system could effectively suppress the PLI while preserving meaningful ECG components at various interference levels.

  5. A nonstationary Markov transition model for computing the relative risk of dementia before death.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Griffith, William S; Tyas, Suzanne L; Snowdon, David A; Kryscio, Richard J

    2010-03-15

    This paper investigates the long-term behavior of the k-step transition probability matrix for a nonstationary discrete-time Markov chain in the context of modeling transitions from intact cognition to dementia with mild cognitive impairment and global impairment as intervening cognitive states. The authors derive formulas for the following absorption statistics: (1) the relative risk of absorption between competing absorbing states and (2) the mean and variance of the number of visits among the transient states before absorption. As absorption is not guaranteed, sufficient conditions are discussed to ensure that the substochastic matrix associated with transitions among transient states converges to zero in limit. Results are illustrated with an application to the Nun Study, a cohort of 678 participants, 75-107 years of age, followed longitudinally with up to 10 cognitive assessments over a 15-year period.

  6. EM algorithm applied for estimating non-stationary region boundaries using electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambampati, A. K.; Rashid, A.; Kim, B. S.; Liu, Dong; Kim, S.; Kim, K. Y.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been used for the dynamic estimation of organ boundaries. One specific application in this context is the estimation of lung boundaries during pulmonary circulation. This would help track the size and shape of lungs of the patients suffering from diseases like pulmonary edema and acute respiratory failure (ARF). The dynamic boundary estimation of the lungs can also be utilized to set and control the air volume and pressure delivered to the patients during artificial ventilation. In this paper, the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used as an inverse algorithm to estimate the non-stationary lung boundary. The uncertainties caused in Kalman-type filters due to inaccurate selection of model parameters are overcome using EM algorithm. Numerical experiments using chest shaped geometry are carried out with proposed method and the performance is compared with extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results show superior performance of EM in estimation of the lung boundary.

  7. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  8. Scaling in non-stationary time series. (II). Teen birth phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignaccolo, M.; Allegrini, P.; Grigolini, P.; Hamilton, P.; West, B. J.

    2004-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of statistical mechanics raised by the analysis of an issue of sociological interest: the teen birth phenomenon. It is expected that these data are characterized by correlated fluctuations, reflecting the cooperative properties of the process. However, the assessment of the anomalous scaling generated by these correlations is made difficult, and ambiguous as well, by the non-stationary nature of the data that shows a clear dependence on seasonal periodicity (periodic component) and an average changing slowly in time (slow component) as well. We use the detrending techniques described in the companion paper [The earlier companion paper], to safely remove all the biases and to derive the genuine scaling of the teen birth phenomenon.

  9. Quantum radiation of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field in nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum radiation properties of nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black hole is investigated using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The locations of horizons and the temperature of the thermal radiation as well as the maximum energy of the nonthermal radiation are derived. It is found that the surface gravity and the Hawking temperature depend on both time and different angles. An extra coupling effect is obtained in the thermal radiation spectrum of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations which is absent in the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Further, the chemical potential derived from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particle has been found to be equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of the scalar particle in the nonthermal radiation for KdS black hole. It is also shown that the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation produces a constant term in the expression of the surface gravity and Hawking temperature.

  10. A non-stationary model for simulating the dynamics of ocular aberrations.

    PubMed

    Leahy, C; Dainty, C

    2010-09-27

    The time-evolution of ocular aberrations has been the subject of many studies, but so far there has been little discussion involving the modelling of the underlying temporal statistics. This paper presents a non-stationary modelling approach based on a coloured-noise generator, which can be applied to ocular aberration dynamics. The model parameters are computed from measured ocular aberration data. A custom-built aberrometer based on a Shack-Hartmann sensor was used for measurement. We present simulations based on our modelling approach, and validate them through comparison to real data. This work could be useful in areas such as the testing of ophthalmic devices and the development of improved algorithms for laser refractive surgery.

  11. A New Family of Interpolatory Non-Stationary Subdivision Schemes for Curve Design in Geometric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Costanza; Romani, Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Univariate subdivision schemes are efficient iterative methods to generate smooth limit curves starting from a sequence of arbitrary points. Aim of this paper is to present and investigate a new family of 6-point interpolatory non-stationary subdivision schemes capable of reproducing important curves of great interest in geometric modeling and engineering applications, if starting from uniformly spaced initial samples. This new family can reproduce conic sections since it is obtained by a parameter depending affine combination of the cubic exponential B-spline symbol generating functions in the space V4,γ = {1,x,etx,e-tx} with t∈{0,s,is|s>0}. Moreover, the free parameter can be chosen to reproduce also other interesting analytic curves by imposing the algebraic conditions for the reproduction of an additional pair of exponential polynomials giving rise to different extensions of the space V4,γ.

  12. Spurious cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling in nonstationary, nonlinear signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hu, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies of brain activities show that cross-frequency coupling (CFC) plays an important role in memory and learning. Many measures have been proposed to investigate the CFC phenomenon, including the correlation between the amplitude envelopes of two brain waves at different frequencies - cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC). In this short communication, we describe how nonstationary, nonlinear oscillatory signals may produce spurious cross-frequency AAC. Utilizing the empirical mode decomposition, we also propose a new method for assessment of AAC that can potentially reduce the effects of nonlinearity and nonstationarity and, thus, help to avoid the detection of artificial AACs. We compare the performances of this new method and the traditional Fourier-based AAC method. We also discuss the strategies to identify potential spurious AACs.

  13. INCA: a computational platform for isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: 13C flux analysis studies have become an essential component of metabolic engineering research. The scope of these studies has gradually expanded to include both isotopically steady-state and transient labeling experiments, the latter of which are uniquely applicable to photosynthetic organisms and slow-to-label mammalian cell cultures. Isotopomer network compartmental analysis (INCA) is the first publicly available software package that can perform both steady-state metabolic flux analysis and isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis. The software provides a framework for comprehensive analysis of metabolic networks using mass balances and elementary metabolite unit balances. The generation of balance equations and their computational solution is completely automated and can be performed on networks of arbitrary complexity. Availability and implementation: MATLAB p-code files are freely available for non-commercial use and can be downloaded at http://mfa.vueinnovations.com. Commercial licenses are also available. Contact: j.d.young@vanderbilt.edu PMID:24413674

  14. Stationary and non-stationary autoregressive processes with external inputs for predicting trends in water quality.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Jean Louis; Dubus, Igor G

    2008-08-20

    An autoregressive approach for the prediction of water quality trends in systems subject to varying meteorological conditions and short observation periods is discussed. Under these conditions, the dynamics of the system can be reliably forecast, provided their internal processes are understood and characterized independently of the external inputs. A methodology based on stationary and non-stationary autoregressive processes with external inputs (ARX) is proposed to assess and predict trends in hydrosystems which are at risk of contamination by organic and inorganic pollutants, such as pesticides or nutrients. The procedures are exemplified for the transport of atrazine and its main metabolite deethylatrazine in a small agricultural catchment in France. The approach is expected to be of particular value to assess current and future trends in water quality as part of the European Water Framework Directive and Groundwater Directives.

  15. A copula-based nonstationary frequency analysis for the 2012-2015 drought in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Han; Lall, Upmanu

    2016-07-01

    Using a multicentury reconstruction of drought, we investigate how rare the 2012-2015 California drought is. A Bayesian approach to a nonstationary, bivariate probabilistic model, including the estimation of copula parameters is used to assess the time-varying return period of the current drought. Both the duration and severity of drought exhibit similar multicentury trends. The period from 800 to 1200 A.D. was perhaps more similar to the recent period than the period from 1200 to 1800 A.D. The median return period of the recent drought accounting for both duration and severity, varies from approximately 667-2652 years, if the model parameters from the different time periods are considered. However, we find that the recent California drought is of unprecedented severity, especially given the relatively modest duration of the drought. The return period of the severity of the recent drought given its 4 year duration is estimated to be nearly 21,000 years.

  16. Nonstationary relationship between the Euro-Mediterranean rainfall and the El Niño phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Parages, Jorge; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belén

    2013-04-01

    The precipitation over Europe and the Mediterranean region has been usually associated to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). However, several studies have shown how, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which is the globally dominant climate mode at interannual timescales, also influences the Euro-Mediterranean Rainfall variability (iEMedR). An interesting point is that, at interannual timescales, the regional atmospheric spatial pattern at surface levels over the Euro-Mediterranean region associated with the Pacific El Niño presents a similar structure to the one associated with the NAO (Brönnimann, 2007, García-Serrano et al., 2011). In this way, although most of the NAO signal has an internal origin, external contributions associated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST) changes in the Pacific can have a determinant impact on the centers of action of the NAO, which makes difficult distinguish between NAO and ENSO signals over the Mediterranean. Other studies have found nonstationary features in these signals along the 20th century (Mariotti et al., 2002, Zanchettin et al., 2008, Vicente-Serrano et al., 2008). Specifically, this study represents a continuation of the results recently published by the same authors (Lopez-Parages and Rodríguez-Fonseca, 2012), where they presented statistically significant evidences about how the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) seem to play and important role in the nonstationary relationship between El Niño phenomena and the leading mode of variability of the iEMedR. Although this study point to the fact of considering the changes in the mean state as the modulator factor of ENSO teleconnections, many questions, mainly related to the possible mechanisms which could explain the nonstationary relationship identified, remain open. Here, new analysis based on observations and also on the CMIP5 simulations of the CNRM-CM5 model have been done. The analysis of the long control run

  17. Nonstationary precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves for infrastructure design in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Linyin; AghaKouchak, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Extreme climatic events are growing more severe and frequent, calling into question how prepared our infrastructure is to deal with these changes. Current infrastructure design is primarily based on precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with the so-called stationary assumption, meaning extremes will not vary significantly over time. However, climate change is expected to alter climatic extremes, a concept termed nonstationarity. Here we show that given nonstationarity, current IDF curves can substantially underestimate precipitation extremes and thus, they may not be suitable for infrastructure design in a changing climate. We show that a stationary climate assumption may lead to underestimation of extreme precipitation by as much as 60%, which increases the flood risk and failure risk in infrastructure systems. We then present a generalized framework for estimating nonstationary IDF curves and their uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The methodology can potentially be integrated in future design concepts. PMID:25403227

  18. Non-stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2011-10-15

    The non-stationary self-focusing of high intense laser beam in under-dense plasma with upward increasing density ramp is investigated. The obtained results show that slowly increasing plasma density ramp is very important in enhancing laser self-focusing. Also, the spot size oscillations of laser beam in front and rear of the pulse for two different density profiles are shown. We have selected density profiles that already were used by Sadighi-Bonabi et al.[Phys. Plasmas 16, 083105 (2009)]. Ramp density profile causes the laser beam to become more focused and penetrations deeps into the plasma by reduction of diffraction effects. Our computations show more reliable results in comparison to the previous works.

  19. Stabilization of hydrocarbon fuel combustion by non-stationary electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, V. S.; Tretyakov, P. K.; Tupikin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The research results of a non-stationary weak electric field effect on diffusion combustion of gas hydrocarbons are presented in the paper. The main attention was focused on the study of electric field parameters effect on a flame stabilization. The two field types were considered: pulse-periodic and with variable direction of an electric vector. In the experiments the direct photography and the video shooting were used, as well as the spectrozonal photography of the own flame luminescence (at the wavelengths of excited OH* and CH* radicals emission). It was shown that the stabilization zone tends to the place of the largest electric field strength. The rotation of the electric vector leads to the flame stabilization in the electrodes plane and the local intensification of combustion.

  20. A non-stationary panel data investigation of the unemployment-crime relationship.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Johan; Westerlund, Joakim

    2014-03-01

    Many empirical studies of the economics of crime focus solely on the determinants thereof, and do not consider the dynamic and cross-sectional properties of their data. As a response to this, the current paper offers an in-depth analysis of this issue using data covering 21 Swedish counties from 1975 to 2010. The results suggest that the crimes considered are non-stationary, and that this cannot be attributed to county-specific disparities alone, but that there are also a small number of common stochastic trends to which groups of counties tend to revert. In an attempt to explain these common stochastic trends, we look for a long-run cointegrated relationship between unemployment and crime. Overall, the results do not support cointegration, and suggest that previous findings of a significant unemployment-crime relationship might be spurious. PMID:24468438

  1. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  2. Efficient transfer entropy analysis of non-stationary neural time series.

    PubMed

    Wollstadt, Patricia; Martínez-Zarzuela, Mario; Vicente, Raul; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco J; Wibral, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Information theory allows us to investigate information processing in neural systems in terms of information transfer, storage and modification. Especially the measure of information transfer, transfer entropy, has seen a dramatic surge of interest in neuroscience. Estimating transfer entropy from two processes requires the observation of multiple realizations of these processes to estimate associated probability density functions. To obtain these necessary observations, available estimators typically assume stationarity of processes to allow pooling of observations over time. This assumption however, is a major obstacle to the application of these estimators in neuroscience as observed processes are often non-stationary. As a solution, Gomez-Herrero and colleagues theoretically showed that the stationarity assumption may be avoided by estimating transfer entropy from an ensemble of realizations. Such an ensemble of realizations is often readily available in neuroscience experiments in the form of experimental trials. Thus, in this work we combine the ensemble method with a recently proposed transfer entropy estimator to make transfer entropy estimation applicable to non-stationary time series. We present an efficient implementation of the approach that is suitable for the increased computational demand of the ensemble method's practical application. In particular, we use a massively parallel implementation for a graphics processing unit to handle the computationally most heavy aspects of the ensemble method for transfer entropy estimation. We test the performance and robustness of our implementation on data from numerical simulations of stochastic processes. We also demonstrate the applicability of the ensemble method to magnetoencephalographic data. While we mainly evaluate the proposed method for neuroscience data, we expect it to be applicable in a variety of fields that are concerned with the analysis of information transfer in complex biological, social, and

  3. A Non-Stationary 1981-2015 AVHRR NDVI3g Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzon, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term records of vegetation indices from Earth Observing instruments play a major role in monitoring terrestrial ecosystems and further our understanding on the varying effects of climate on vegetation. We describe 34+ years of an improved non-stationary 8-km normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) produced from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments that extends from 1981 to the present. The AVHRR instruments have flown or are flying on fourteen polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and are currently flying on two European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, MetOp-A and MetOp-B. This long AVHRR record is comprised of data from two different sensors: the AVHRR/2 instrument that spans July 1981 to November 2000 and the AVHRR/3 instrument that continues these measurements from November 2000 to the present. The main difficulty in processing AVHRR NDVI data is to properly deal with limitations of the AVHRR instruments. Complicating among-instrument AVHRR inter-calibration of channels one and two is the dual gain introduced in late 2000 on the AVHRR/3 instruments for both these channels. We have processed NDVI data derived from the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) from 1997 to 2010 to overcome among-instrument AVHRR calibration difficulties. We use Bayesian methods with high quality well-calibrated SeaWiFS NDVI data for deriving AVHRR NDVI calibration parameters. Evaluation of the uncertainties of our resulting NDVI values gives an error of ± 0.005 NDVI units for our 1981 to present data set that is independent of time within our AVHRR NDVI continuum and has resulted in a non-stationary climate data set.

  4. Efficient Transfer Entropy Analysis of Non-Stationary Neural Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Raul; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco J.; Wibral, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Information theory allows us to investigate information processing in neural systems in terms of information transfer, storage and modification. Especially the measure of information transfer, transfer entropy, has seen a dramatic surge of interest in neuroscience. Estimating transfer entropy from two processes requires the observation of multiple realizations of these processes to estimate associated probability density functions. To obtain these necessary observations, available estimators typically assume stationarity of processes to allow pooling of observations over time. This assumption however, is a major obstacle to the application of these estimators in neuroscience as observed processes are often non-stationary. As a solution, Gomez-Herrero and colleagues theoretically showed that the stationarity assumption may be avoided by estimating transfer entropy from an ensemble of realizations. Such an ensemble of realizations is often readily available in neuroscience experiments in the form of experimental trials. Thus, in this work we combine the ensemble method with a recently proposed transfer entropy estimator to make transfer entropy estimation applicable to non-stationary time series. We present an efficient implementation of the approach that is suitable for the increased computational demand of the ensemble method's practical application. In particular, we use a massively parallel implementation for a graphics processing unit to handle the computationally most heavy aspects of the ensemble method for transfer entropy estimation. We test the performance and robustness of our implementation on data from numerical simulations of stochastic processes. We also demonstrate the applicability of the ensemble method to magnetoencephalographic data. While we mainly evaluate the proposed method for neuroscience data, we expect it to be applicable in a variety of fields that are concerned with the analysis of information transfer in complex biological, social, and

  5. A theory for how sensorimotor skills are learned and retained in noisy and nonstationary neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ajemian, Robert; D’Ausilio, Alessandro; Moorman, Helene; Bizzi, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    During the process of skill learning, synaptic connections in our brains are modified to form motor memories of learned sensorimotor acts. The more plastic the adult brain is, the easier it is to learn new skills or adapt to neurological injury. However, if the brain is too plastic and the pattern of synaptic connectivity is constantly changing, new memories will overwrite old memories, and learning becomes unstable. This trade-off is known as the stability–plasticity dilemma. Here a theory of sensorimotor learning and memory is developed whereby synaptic strengths are perpetually fluctuating without causing instability in motor memory recall, as long as the underlying neural networks are sufficiently noisy and massively redundant. The theory implies two distinct stages of learning—preasymptotic and postasymptotic—because once the error drops to a level comparable to that of the noise-induced error, further error reduction requires altered network dynamics. A key behavioral prediction derived from this analysis is tested in a visuomotor adaptation experiment, and the resultant learning curves are modeled with a nonstationary neural network. Next, the theory is used to model two-photon microscopy data that show, in animals, high rates of dendritic spine turnover, even in the absence of overt behavioral learning. Finally, the theory predicts enhanced task selectivity in the responses of individual motor cortical neurons as the level of task expertise increases. From these considerations, a unique interpretation of sensorimotor memory is proposed—memories are defined not by fixed patterns of synaptic weights but, rather, by nonstationary synaptic patterns that fluctuate coherently. PMID:24324147

  6. Flood frequency analysis for nonstationary annual peak records in an urban drainage basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villarini, G.; Smith, J.A.; Serinaldi, F.; Bales, J.; Bates, P.D.; Krajewski, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood frequency analysis in urban watersheds is complicated by nonstationarities of annual peak records associated with land use change and evolving urban stormwater infrastructure. In this study, a framework for flood frequency analysis is developed based on the Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape parameters (GAMLSS), a tool for modeling time series under nonstationary conditions. GAMLSS is applied to annual maximum peak discharge records for Little Sugar Creek, a highly urbanized watershed which drains the urban core of Charlotte, North Carolina. It is shown that GAMLSS is able to describe the variability in the mean and variance of the annual maximum peak discharge by modeling the parameters of the selected parametric distribution as a smooth function of time via cubic splines. Flood frequency analyses for Little Sugar Creek (at a drainage area of 110 km2) show that the maximum flow with a 0.01-annual probability (corresponding to 100-year flood peak under stationary conditions) over the 83-year record has ranged from a minimum unit discharge of 2.1 m3 s- 1 km- 2 to a maximum of 5.1 m3 s- 1 km- 2. An alternative characterization can be made by examining the estimated return interval of the peak discharge that would have an annual exceedance probability of 0.01 under the assumption of stationarity (3.2 m3 s- 1 km- 2). Under nonstationary conditions, alternative definitions of return period should be adapted. Under the GAMLSS model, the return interval of an annual peak discharge of 3.2 m3 s- 1 km- 2 ranges from a maximum value of more than 5000 years in 1957 to a minimum value of almost 8 years for the present time (2007). The GAMLSS framework is also used to examine the links between population trends and flood frequency, as well as trends in annual maximum rainfall. These analyses are used to examine evolving flood frequency over future decades. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Non-stationary rainfall and natural flows modeling at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egüen, M.; Aguilar, C.; Solari, S.; Losada, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    In areas in which natural water resources are variable over time, tools that determine the probability distribution of hydrological variables are required to evaluate various management alternatives. In this article, a stochastic simulation framework of hydrological variables through atmospheric pressure modeling is proposed. This methodology employs the mean value of the atmospheric pressure in the winter to differentiate the wet, medium and dry years in terms of rainfall and flow at different temporal scales. Monthly mean and daily maximum rainfall and flow data series are stochastically replicated. To achieve this replication, a non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model that combines a Weibull and a Normal distribution is fitted to the univariate distribution of the atmospheric pressure. This model includes interannual variability through two covariables: extraterrestrial solar radiation and the NAO index. This model is applied to the Guadalete River Basin in southern Spain, in which the river flow regime is influenced by the highly seasonal precipitation regime typically found in the Mediterranean area. The non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model with the two covariables showed a good fit to the observed sea level pressure, displaying an important reduction on the BIC. A good correlation was obtained between the average sea level pressure in winter and the accumulated precipitation and flow (r = -0.8 for monthly values and -0.6 for maximum daily values). The statistical similarity indicated that the synthetic series of precipitation and flow preserved the distribution trends in the observed data. The identical methodology can be applied in other watersheds once the direct relationship between the mean atmospheric pressure and the hydrology of the area is known.

  8. Real-time reservoir operation considering non-stationary inflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, W.; Cai, X.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Stationarity of inflow has been a basic assumption for reservoir operation rule design, which is now facing challenges due to climate change and human interferences. This paper proposes a modeling framework to incorporate non-stationary inflow prediction for optimizing the hedging operation rule of large reservoirs with multiple-year flow regulation capacity. A multi-stage optimization model is formulated and a solution algorithm based on the optimality conditions is developed to incorporate non-stationary annual inflow prediction through a rolling, dynamic framework that updates the prediction from period to period and adopt the updated prediction in reservoir operation decision. The prediction model is ARIMA(4,1,0), in which parameter 4 stands for the order of autoregressive, 1 represents a linear trend, and 0 is the order of moving average. The modeling framework and solution algorithm is applied to the Miyun reservoir in China, determining a yearly operating schedule during the period from 1996 to 2009, during which there was a significant declining trend of reservoir inflow. Different operation policy scenarios are modeled, including standard operation policy (SOP, matching the current demand as much as possible), hedging rule (i.e., leaving a certain amount of water for future to avoid large risk of water deficit) with forecast from ARIMA (HR-1), hedging (HR) with perfect forecast (HR-2 ). Compared to the results of these scenarios to that of the actual reservoir operation (AO), the utility of the reservoir operation under HR-1 is 3.0% lower than HR-2, but 3.7% higher than the AO and 14.4% higher than SOP. Note that the utility under AO is 10.3% higher than that under SOP, which shows that a certain level of hedging under some inflow prediction or forecast was used in the real-world operation. Moreover, the impacts of discount rate and forecast uncertainty level on the operation will be discussed.

  9. A Flexible Nonlinear Modelling Framework for Nonstationary Generalized Extreme Value Analysis in Hydrology and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Parameters in a Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution are specified as a function of covariates using a conditional density network (CDN), which is a probabilistic extension of the multilayer perceptron neural network. If the covariate is time, or is dependent on time, then the GEV-CDN model can be used to perform nonlinear, nonstationary GEV analysis of hydrological or climatological time series. Due to the flexibility of the neural network architecture, the model is capable of representing a wide range of nonstationary relationships. Model parameters are estimated by generalized maximum likelihood, an approach that is tailored to the estimation of GEV parameters from geophysical time series. Model complexity is identified using the Bayesian information criterion and the Akaike information criterion with small sample size correction. Monte Carlo simulations are used to validate GEV-CDN performance on four simple synthetic problems. The model is then demonstrated on precipitation data from southern California, a series that exhibits nonstationarity due to interannual/interdecadal climatic variability. A hierarchy of models can be defined by adjusting three aspects of the GEV-CDN model architecture: (i) by specifying either a linear or a nonlinear hidden-layer activation function; (ii) by adjusting the number of hidden-layer nodes; or (iii) by disconnecting weights leading to output-layer nodes. To illustrate, five GEV-CDN models are shown here in order of increasing complexity for the case of a single covariate, which, in this case, is assumed to be time. The shape parameter is assumed to be constant in all models, although this is not a requirement of the GEV-CDN framework.

  10. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  11. Ocean wavenumber estimation from wave-resolving time series imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, N.G.; Holland, K.T.; Haller, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    We review several approaches that have been used to estimate ocean surface gravity wavenumbers from wave-resolving remotely sensed image sequences. Two fundamentally different approaches that utilize these data exist. A power spectral density approach identifies wavenumbers where image intensity variance is maximized. Alternatively, a cross-spectral correlation approach identifies wavenumbers where intensity coherence is maximized. We develop a solution to the latter approach based on a tomographic analysis that utilizes a nonlinear inverse method. The solution is tolerant to noise and other forms of sampling deficiency and can be applied to arbitrary sampling patterns, as well as to full-frame imagery. The solution includes error predictions that can be used for data retrieval quality control and for evaluating sample designs. A quantitative analysis of the intrinsic resolution of the method indicates that the cross-spectral correlation fitting improves resolution by a factor of about ten times as compared to the power spectral density fitting approach. The resolution analysis also provides a rule of thumb for nearshore bathymetry retrievals-short-scale cross-shore patterns may be resolved if they are about ten times longer than the average water depth over the pattern. This guidance can be applied to sample design to constrain both the sensor array (image resolution) and the analysis array (tomographic resolution). ?? 2008 IEEE.

  12. PHL 5038: a spatially resolved white dwarf + brown dwarf binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Farihi, J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Jameson, R. F.; Dobbie, P. D.; Barstow, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    A near-infrared excess is detected at the white dwarf PHL 5038 in UKIDSS photometry, consistent with the presence of a cool, substellar companion. We have obtained H- and K-grism spectra and images of PHL 5038 using NIRI on Gemini North. The target is spatially and spectrally resolved into two components: an 8000 K DA white dwarf, and a likely L8 brown dwarf companion, separated by 0.94 arcsec. The spectral type of the secondary was determined using standard spectral indices for late L and T dwarfs. The projected orbital separation of the binary is 55 AU, so it becomes only the second known wide WD+dL binary to be found after GD 165AB. This object could potentially be used as a benchmark for testing substellar evolutionary models at intermediate to older ages.

  13. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  14. The Splatalogue (Spectral Line Catalogue) and Calibase (Calibration Source Database)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick-Kemper, Andrew J.; Remijan, A. J.; Fomalont, E.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of powerful millimeter/submillimeter observatories (ALMA, Herschel) require extensive resources to help identify spectral line transitions and suitable calibration sources. We describe the compilation of a spectral line catalogue and calibration source database. The Calibase is an extensible repository of measurements of radio and submm calibration sources, building on the SMA, PTCS, VLA and VLBA lists. The Splatalogue is a comprehensive transition-resolved compilation of observed, measured and calculated spectral lines. Extending the JPL and CDMS lists, and updating the Lovas/NIST list of observed astrophysical transitions, it adds atomic and recombination lines, template spectra, and is completely VO-compliant, queryable under the IVOA SLAP standard.

  15. Influence of signals length and noise in power spectral densities computation using Hilbert-Huang Transform in synthetic HRV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, María. G.; Altuve, Miguel; Lollett, Carlos; Wong, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Among non-invasive techniques, heart rate variability (HRV) analysis has become widely used for assessing the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Research in this area has not stopped and alternative tools for the study and interpretation of HRV, are still being proposed. Nevertheless, frequency-domain analysis of HRV is controversial when the heartbeat sequence is non-stationary. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is a relative new technique for timefrequency analyses of non-linear and non-stationary signals. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of time serieś length and noise in HRV from synthetic signals, using HHT and to compare it with Welch method. Synthetic heartbeat time series with different sizes and levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR) were investigated. Results shows i) sequencés length did not affect the estimation of HRV spectral parameter, ii) favorable performance for HHT for different SNR. Additionally, HHT can be applied to non-stationary signals from nonlinear systems and it will be useful to HRV analysis to interpret autonomic activity when acute and transient phenomena are assessed.

  16. New type of wavelet-based spectral analysis by which modes with different toroidal mode number are separated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdachi, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new type of wavelet-based analysis for the magnetic fluctuations by which toroidal mode number can be resolved is proposed. By using a wavelet, having a different phase toroidally, a spectrogram with a specific toroidal mode number can be obtained. When this analysis is applied to the measurement of the fluctuations observed in the large helical device, MHD activities having similar frequency in the laboratory frame can be separated from the difference of the toroidal mode number. It is useful for the non-stationary MHD activity. This method is usable when the toroidal magnetic probes are not symmetrically distributed.

  17. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  18. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  19. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  20. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  1. Probing Electronic and Vibrational Dynamics in Molecules by Time-Resolved Photoelectron, Auger-Electron, and X-ray Photon Scattering Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified description for time-resolved electron and photon scattering spectroscopies from molecules prepared in nonstationary states. Signals are expressed in terms of superoperator Green’s functions and a systematic procedure for treating various degrees of freedom consistently at different levels of theory is developed. The standard Fermi Golden Rule expressions for photelectron spectra, which are limited to broad, slowly-varying signals, are obtained as a limiting case of our more general theory that applies to broader parameter regimes. PMID:25730500

  2. Mesospheric nightglow spectral survey taken by the ISO spectral spatial imager on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.; Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Chang, T.; Fennelly, J. A.; Richards, P. G.; Morgan, M. F.; Baldridge, T. W.; Fellows, C. W.; Dougani, H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the first comprehensive spectral survey of the mesospheric airglow between 260 and 832 nm taken by the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory on the ATLAS 1 mission. We select data taken in the spectral window between 275 and 300 nm to determine the variation with altitude of the Herzberg I bands originating from the vibrational levels v-prime = 3 to 8. These data provide the first spatially resolved spectral measurements of the system. The data are used to demonstrate that to within an uncertainty of +/- 10 percent, the vibrational distribution remains invariant with altitude. The deficit reported previously for the v-prime = 5 level is not observed although there is a suggestion of depletion in v-prime = 6. The data could be used to place tight constraints on the vibrational dependence of quenching rate coefficients, and on the abundance of atomic oxygen.

  3. Mesospheric nightglow spectral survey taken by the ISO spectral spatial imager on Atlas 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.; Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Chang, T.; Fennelly, J. A.; Richards, P. G.; Morgan, M. F.; Baldridge, T. W.; Dougani, H.; Swift, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the first comprehensive spectral survey of the mesospheric airglow between 260 and 832 nm taken by the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) on the ATLAS I mission. We select data taken in the spectral window between 275 and 300 nm to determine the variation with altitude of the Herzberg I bands originating from the vibrational levels v' = 3 to 8. These data provide the first spatially resolved spectral measurements of the system. The data are used to demonstrate that to within an uncertainty of + 10%, the vibrational distribution remains invariant with altitude. The deficit reported previously for the v' = 5 level is not observed although there is a suggestion of depletion in v' = 6. The data could be used to place tight constraints on the vibrational dependence of quenching rate coefficients, and on the abundance of atomic oxygen.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Non-Stationary Hydraulic Process Occurring in the Gas Centrifuge Cascade During the Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Ushakov, A. A.; Sovach, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  5. High spectral resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; King, Trude V. V.; Klejwa, Matthew; Swayze, Gregg A.; Vergo, Norma

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of minerals are studied as a function of spectral resolution in the range from 0.2 to 3.0 microns. Selected absorption bands were studied at resolving powers as high as 2240. At resolving powers of approximately 1000, many OH-bearing minerals show diagnostic sharp absorptions at the resolution limit. At low resolution, some minerals may not be distinguishable, but as the resolution is increased, most can be easily identified. As the resolution is increased, many minerals show fine structure, particularly in the OH-stretching overtone region near 1.4 micron. The fine structure can enhance the ability to discriminate between minerals, and in some cases the fine structure can be used to determine elemental composition.

  6. Transmission grating based extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for time and space resolved impurity measurements.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Stutman, Dan; Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael; Tarrio, Charles; Grantham, Steven

    2010-10-01

    A free standing transmission grating based imaging spectrometer in the extreme ultraviolet range has been developed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The spectrometer operates in a survey mode covering the approximate spectral range from 30 to 700 Å and has a resolving capability of δλ/λ on the order of 3%. Initial results from space resolved impurity measurements from NSTX are described in this paper.

  7. Spin- and angle-resolved spectroscopy of S 2p photoionization in the hydrogen sulfide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Turri, G.; Snell, G.; Canton, S.E.; Bilodeau, R.C.; Langer, B.; Martins, M.; Kukk, E.; Cherepkov, N.; Bozek, J.D.; Kilcoyne, A.L.; Berrah, N.

    2004-08-01

    Angle- and spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with circularly and linearly polarized synchrotron radiation were used to study the electronic structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecule. A strong effect of the molecular environment appears in the spin-resolved measurements and, although less clearly, in the angular distribution of the sulfur 2p photoelectrons. The anisotropy and spin parameters of the three main spectral components have been obtained. The validity of simple atomic models in explaining the results is discussed.

  8. A comparison between advanced time-frequency analyses of non-stationary magnetization dynamics in spin-torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siracusano, Giulio; Corte, Aurelio La

    2014-02-01

    We report re`sults of different time-frequency analyses (Wavelet and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT)) of voltage measurements related to a spin-torque oscillator working in a regime of non-stationary dynamics. Our results indicate that the Wavelet analysis identifies the non-stationary magnetization dynamics revealing the existence of intermittent and independent excited modes while the HHT is able to accurately extract the time domain traces of each independent mode. Overall performance indicates a route for a complete characterization of time-frequency domain data of a STO, pointing out that the combined Wavelet-HHT methodology developed is general and can be also used for a variety of other different scenarios.

  9. Spectrally nonselective holographic objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardosanidze, Zurab V.

    1991-10-01

    Reflection holograms and holographic optical elements fabricated by the Denisyuk method are spectrally selective. In certain applications there may be a need for the development of holographic structures that are not selective in terms of the spectral composition of the reconstructing light. This paper describes the possibility of creating spectral nonselective optical elements and reflection holograms on a dichromate gelatin layer (DGL). The essential condition for achieving nonselectivity in this case is a strong absorption of actinic radiation in the initial emulsion layer conditioning the strongly damping character of the summary field in thickness.

  10. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  11. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Florido, R.; Mayes, D.; Tommasini, R.; Koch, J. A.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-05-15

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  12. Investigation of the influence of specimen diameter on the explosive transformation development behind a weak nonstationary shock front

    SciTech Connect

    Kat'kov, Y.V.; Khabarov, I.P.; Novikov, S.A.; Pogorelov, A.P.; Sinitsyn, V.A.

    1983-11-01

    The process of explosive transformation behind a shock front is investigated in a number of experiments with cylinder specimens of different diameters. The dependences of the specimen diameters on the pressure at the shock front is studied, and it is found that a certain value of specimen diameter exists for the nonstationary explosive transformation process, for a smaller value of which the explosive transformation would cease.

  13. New Tortoise Coordinate and Hawking Radiation of Dirac Particles in a Non-stationary Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xiao-Gang

    2012-04-01

    The Hawking effect of Dirac particles in a non-stationary Kerr-Newman black hole is investigated using an improved Damour-Ruffini method with a new tortoise coordinate transformation. In contrast with the old tortoise coordinate, the new one satisfies the dimensional requirement. It is interesting to note that the Hawking emission spectrum remains a blackbody one with a correction term ξ existing in the Hawking temperature. Compared with the old tortoise coordinate transformation, our results appears more accurate and reliable.

  14. Fault Detection in Gear Drives with Non-Stationary Rotational Speed - Part II: the Time-Quefrency Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, G.; Ivanov, Yu. Ye.

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the recognition of faults in toothing during non-stationary start up and run down of gear drives. In the first part, this task was solved by means of the time-frequency analysis. A planetary gear was used as a case study. Part II contains a new approach using the time-quefrency analysis. The same example was successfully subjected in this procedure.

  15. Seismic response of structures: from non-stationary to non-linear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Mucciarelli, Marco; Smith, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The need for an effective seismic protection of buildings, and all the problems related to their management and maintenance over time, have led to a growing interest associated to develop of new integrated techniques for structural health monitoring and for damage detection and location during both ambient vibration and seismic events. It is well known that the occurrence of damage on any kind of structure is able to modify its dynamic characteristics. Indeed, the main parameters affected by the changes in stiffness characteristics are: periods of vibration, mode shapes and all the related equivalent viscous damping factors. With the aim to evaluate structural dynamic characteristics, their variation over time and after earthquakes, several Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed in the last years. Most of these are based on simplified relationship that provide the maximum inter-story drift evaluated combining structural variations in terms of: peak ground acceleration and/or structural eigenfrequencies and/or equivalent viscous damping factors related the main modes of the monitored structure. The NDE methods can be classified into four different levels. The progress of the level increases the quality and the number of the information. The most popular are certainly Level I methods being simple in implementation and economic in management. These kinds of methods are mainly based on the fast variation (less than 1 minute) of the structural fundamental frequency and the related variation of the equivalent viscous damping factor. Generally, it is possible to distinguish two types of variations: the long term variations, which may also be linked to external factors (temperature change, water content in the foundation soils, etc.) and short period variations (for example, due to seismic events), where apparent frequencies variations could occurred due to non-stationary phenomena (particular combination of input and structural response). In these

  16. Can we identify non-stationary dynamics of trial-to-trial variability?

    PubMed

    Balaguer-Ballester, Emili; Tabas-Diaz, Alejandro; Budka, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Identifying sources of the apparent variability in non-stationary scenarios is a fundamental problem in many biological data analysis settings. For instance, neurophysiological responses to the same task often vary from each repetition of the same experiment (trial) to the next. The origin and functional role of this observed variability is one of the fundamental questions in neuroscience. The nature of such trial-to-trial dynamics however remains largely elusive to current data analysis approaches. A range of strategies have been proposed in modalities such as electro-encephalography but gaining a fundamental insight into latent sources of trial-to-trial variability in neural recordings is still a major challenge. In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept study to the analysis of trial-to-trial variability dynamics founded on non-autonomous dynamical systems. At this initial stage, we evaluate the capacity of a simple statistic based on the behaviour of trajectories in classification settings, the trajectory coherence, in order to identify trial-to-trial dynamics. First, we derive the conditions leading to observable changes in datasets generated by a compact dynamical system (the Duffing equation). This canonical system plays the role of a ubiquitous model of non-stationary supervised classification problems. Second, we estimate the coherence of class-trajectories in empirically reconstructed space of system states. We show how this analysis can discern variations attributable to non-autonomous deterministic processes from stochastic fluctuations. The analyses are benchmarked using simulated and two different real datasets which have been shown to exhibit attractor dynamics. As an illustrative example, we focused on the analysis of the rat's frontal cortex ensemble dynamics during a decision-making task. Results suggest that, in line with recent hypotheses, rather than internal noise, it is the deterministic trend which most likely underlies the observed trial

  17. Forecasting Non-Stationary Diarrhea, Acute Respiratory Infection, and Malaria Time-Series in Niono, Mali

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Daniel C.; Findley, Sally E.; Guindo, Boubacar; Doumbia, Seydou

    2007-01-01

    Background Much of the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, exhibits high levels of morbidity and mortality associated with diarrhea, acute respiratory infection, and malaria. With the increasing awareness that the aforementioned infectious diseases impose an enormous burden on developing countries, public health programs therein could benefit from parsimonious general-purpose forecasting methods to enhance infectious disease intervention. Unfortunately, these disease time-series often i) suffer from non-stationarity; ii) exhibit large inter-annual plus seasonal fluctuations; and, iii) require disease-specific tailoring of forecasting methods. Methodology/Principal Findings In this longitudinal retrospective (01/1996–06/2004) investigation, diarrhea, acute respiratory infection of the lower tract, and malaria consultation time-series are fitted with a general-purpose econometric method, namely the multiplicative Holt-Winters, to produce contemporaneous on-line forecasts for the district of Niono, Mali. This method accommodates seasonal, as well as inter-annual, fluctuations and produces reasonably accurate median 2- and 3-month horizon forecasts for these non-stationary time-series, i.e., 92% of the 24 time-series forecasts generated (2 forecast horizons, 3 diseases, and 4 age categories = 24 time-series forecasts) have mean absolute percentage errors circa 25%. Conclusions/Significance The multiplicative Holt-Winters forecasting method: i) performs well across diseases with dramatically distinct transmission modes and hence it is a strong general-purpose forecasting method candidate for non-stationary epidemiological time-series; ii) obliquely captures prior non-linear interactions between climate and the aforementioned disease dynamics thus, obviating the need for more complex disease-specific climate-based parametric forecasting methods in the district of Niono; furthermore, iii) readily decomposes time-series into seasonal components thereby

  18. Modeling fire spatial non-stationary in Portugal using GWR and GAMLSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, Ana C. L.; Amaral Turkman, Maria A.; Bistinas, Ioannis; Pereira, José M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Portuguese wildfires are responsible for large environmental, ecological and socio-economic impacts and, in the last decade, vegetation fires consumed on average 140.000ha/year. Portugal has a unique fires-atlas of burnt scar perimeters covering the 1975-2009 period, which allows the assessment of the fire most affected areas. It's crucial to understand the influence of the main drivers of forest fires and its spatial distribution in order to set new management strategies to reduce its impacts. Thus, this study aims at evaluating the spatial stationarity of the fire-environment relationship using two statistical approaches: Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) and Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). Analysis was performed using a regular 2kmx2km cell size grid, a total of 21293 observations overlaying the mainland of Portugal. Fire incidence was determined as the number of times each grid cell burned in the 35 years period. For the GWR analysis the group of environmental variables selected as predictors are: ignition source (population density (PD)); vegetation (proportion of forest and shrubland (FORSHR)); and weather (total precipitation of the coldest quarter (PCQ). Results showed that the fire-environment relationship is non-stationary, thus the coefficient estimates of all the predictors vary spatially, both in magnitude and sign. The most statistically significant predictor is FORSHR, followed by the PCQ. Despite the relationship between fire incidence and PD is non-stationary, only 9% of the observations are statistically significant at a 95% level of confidence. When compared with the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) global model, 53% of the R2 statistic is above the 26% global estimated value, meaning a better explanation of the fire incidence variance with the local model approach. Using the same environmental variables, fire incidence was also modeled using GAMLSS to characterize nonstationarities in fire incidence. It is

  19. Can We Identify Non-Stationary Dynamics of Trial-to-Trial Variability?

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Ballester, Emili; Tabas-Diaz, Alejandro; Budka, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Identifying sources of the apparent variability in non-stationary scenarios is a fundamental problem in many biological data analysis settings. For instance, neurophysiological responses to the same task often vary from each repetition of the same experiment (trial) to the next. The origin and functional role of this observed variability is one of the fundamental questions in neuroscience. The nature of such trial-to-trial dynamics however remains largely elusive to current data analysis approaches. A range of strategies have been proposed in modalities such as electro-encephalography but gaining a fundamental insight into latent sources of trial-to-trial variability in neural recordings is still a major challenge. In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept study to the analysis of trial-to-trial variability dynamics founded on non-autonomous dynamical systems. At this initial stage, we evaluate the capacity of a simple statistic based on the behaviour of trajectories in classification settings, the trajectory coherence, in order to identify trial-to-trial dynamics. First, we derive the conditions leading to observable changes in datasets generated by a compact dynamical system (the Duffing equation). This canonical system plays the role of a ubiquitous model of non-stationary supervised classification problems. Second, we estimate the coherence of class-trajectories in empirically reconstructed space of system states. We show how this analysis can discern variations attributable to non-autonomous deterministic processes from stochastic fluctuations. The analyses are benchmarked using simulated and two different real datasets which have been shown to exhibit attractor dynamics. As an illustrative example, we focused on the analysis of the rat's frontal cortex ensemble dynamics during a decision-making task. Results suggest that, in line with recent hypotheses, rather than internal noise, it is the deterministic trend which most likely underlies the observed trial

  20. Non-stationary and Trend Assessment of Flash Flood in the Carolinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, S.; Martin, T.; Meadows, M.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence that frequency of flash flood is increasing at the global scale has strengthened considerably in recent years. Our study provides insight into how changes in maximum precipitation and large-scale atmospheric circulations modulated the modes of regional scale short- and long-term flood magnitudes during last several decades (i.e.1920-2015) in North and South Carolina. The non-stationary univariate/bivariate extreme value analysis (EVA) models were fit to the short-term (5-day and 11-day) and long-term (monthly, seasonal and annual) maximum flows by incorporating linear/non-linear combination of covariates like maximum precipitation and large scale atmospheric circulations (the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnection and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)). Eleven of 13 piedmont and the coastal plain gauges show upward trends in short-term (5-day and 11-day) flood magnitudes with changes in the location (mean), scale (standard deviation) and shape (skewness) parameters of the probability distribution. In addition, the trend and nonstationarity in annual flood magnitudes of mountain gauges are monotonically positive potentially leading to increased rainfall induced annual floods. Incorporating large scale covariates in the functionality of the EVA procedure indicated a lagged positive relationship between fall to early winter ENSO and PDO with winter (Jan- Mar) flood magnitudes and frequency. Many study gauges show evidence for step increases in flood frequency around 1940 and 1980 for long- and short-term periods of major catchments in the Carolinas. Our study further used copulas to model the bivariate dependence between ENSO and flood anomaly and the trivariate dependence between ENSO, PDO, and flood anomaly. Both the bivariate and trivariate copulas resulted with almost the same interquartile ranges and simultaneously predicted flood magnitude and frequency. Our results indicated that the greatest monotonic trends occurred in both short