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Sample records for resonance energy transfer-based

  1. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  2. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  3. Resonant-energy-transfer-based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivalent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance- dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant fluorescence energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GMI has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction.

  4. Development of Time Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Assay for FXR Antagonist Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donna D.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5,000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists. PMID:23688559

  5. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  6. Development of time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for FXR antagonist discovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donna D; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng; Forman, Barry M

    2013-07-15

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor, NRIH4), a nuclear receptor, plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. FXR ligands have been investigated in preclinical studies for targeted therapy against metabolic diseases, but have shown limitations. Therefore, there is a need for new agonist or antagonist ligands of FXR, both for potential clinical applications, as well as to further elucidate its biological functions. Here we describe the use of the X-ray crystal structure of FXR complexed with the potent small molecule agonist GW4064 to design and synthesize a novel fluorescent, high-affinity probe (DY246) for time resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. We then used the TR-FRET assay for high throughput screening of a library of over 5000 bioactive compounds. From this library, we identified 13 compounds that act as putative FXR transcriptional antagonists.

  7. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13 μg mL- 1 and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program.

  8. Förster resonance energy transfer-based sensor targeting endoplasmic reticulum reveals highly oxidative environment

    PubMed Central

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Leslie, Matthew T; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Sheehan, Bridget M; Kenis, Paul J A; Gaskins, H Rex

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione thiol/disulfide couple is the major redox buffer in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, mechanisms by which it contributes to the tightly regulated redox environment of this intracellular organelle are poorly understood. The recent development of genetically encoded, ratiometric, single green fluorescent protein-based redox-sensitive (roGFP) sensors adjusted for more oxidative environments enables non-invasive measurement of the ER redox environment in living cells. In turn, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors based on two fluorophore probes represent an alternative strategy for ratiometric signal acquisition. In previous work, we described the FRET-based redox sensor CY-RL7 with a relatively high midpoint redox potential of −143 mV, which is required for monitoring glutathione potentials in the comparatively high oxidative environment of the ER. Here, the efficacy of the CY-RL7 probe was ascertained in the cytosol and ER of live cells with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The sensor was found to be fully reduced at steady state in the cytosol and became fully oxidized in response to treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a depletor of reduced glutathione (GSH). In contrast, the probe was strongly oxidized (88%) upon expression in the ER of cultured cells. We also examined the responsiveness of the ER sensor to perturbations in cellular glutathione homeostasis. We observed that the reductive level of the FRET sensor was increased two-fold to about 28% in cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine, a substrate for GSH synthesis. Finally, we evaluated the responsiveness of CY-RL7 and roGFP1-iL to various perturbations of cellular glutathione homeostasis to address the divergence in the specificity of these two probes. Together, the present data generated with genetically encoded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based glutathione probes highlight the complexity of the ER redox environment and indicate that the ER

  9. Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based reporter reveals differential calcineurin activation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bazzazi, Hojjat; Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yang, Wanjun; Yue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded reporters of calcineurin are constructed by fusing the two subunits of calcineurin with P2A-based linkers retaining the expected native conformation of calcineurin. Calcineurin reporters display robust responses to calcium transients in HEK293 cells. The sensor responses are correlated with NFATc1 translocation dynamics in HEK293 cells. The sensors are uniformly distributed in neonatal myocytes and respond efficiently to single electrically evoked calcium transients and show cumulative activation at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. In adult myocytes, the calcineurin sensors appear to be localized to the cardiac z-lines, and respond to cumulative calcium transients at frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz. The phosphatase calcineurin is a central component of many calcium signalling pathways, relaying calcium signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. It has critical functions in a multitude of systems, including immune, cardiac and neuronal. Given the widespread importance of calcineurin in both normal and pathological conditions, new tools that elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcineurin activity would be invaluable. Here we develop two separate genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors of calcineurin activation, DuoCaN and UniCaN. Both sensors showcase a large dynamic range and rapid response kinetics, differing primarily in the linker structure between the FRET pairs. Both sensors were calibrated in HEK293 cells and their responses correlated well with NFAT translocation to the nucleus, validating the biological relevance of the sensor readout. The sensors were subsequently expressed in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and acutely isolated adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Both sensors demonstrated robust responses in myocytes and revealed kinetic differences in calcineurin activation during changes in pacing rate for neonatal versus adult myocytes

  10. Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based reporter reveals differential calcineurin activation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bazzazi, Hojjat; Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yang, Wanjun; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The phosphatase calcineurin is a central component of many calcium signalling pathways, relaying calcium signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. It has critical functions in a multitude of systems, including immune, cardiac and neuronal. Given the widespread importance of calcineurin in both normal and pathological conditions, new tools that elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcineurin activity would be invaluable. Here we develop two separate genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors of calcineurin activation, DuoCaN and UniCaN. Both sensors showcase a large dynamic range and rapid response kinetics, differing primarily in the linker structure between the FRET pairs. Both sensors were calibrated in HEK293 cells and their responses correlated well with NFAT translocation to the nucleus, validating the biological relevance of the sensor readout. The sensors were subsequently expressed in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and acutely isolated adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Both sensors demonstrated robust responses in myocytes and revealed kinetic differences in calcineurin activation during changes in pacing rate for neonatal versus adult myocytes. Finally, mathematical modelling combined with quantitative FRET measurements provided novel insights into the kinetics and integration of calcineurin activation in response to myocyte Ca transients. In all, DuoCaN and UniCaN stand as valuable new tools for understanding the role of calcineurin in normal and pathological signalling. Key points Novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded reporters of calcineurin are constructed by fusing the two subunits of calcineurin with P2A-based linkers retaining the expected native conformation of calcineurin. Calcineurin reporters display robust responses to calcium transients in HEK293 cells. The sensor responses are correlated with NFATc1 translocation dynamics in HEK293 cells. The

  11. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  12. Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric protease assays with fusion proteins of firefly luciferase and red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Ablamsky, Danielle M; Taylor, Kelsey P; Southworth, Tara L; Linder, Samantha J

    2011-07-15

    We report here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyze yellow-green (560nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41nM for caspase 3, 1.0nM for thrombin, and 58nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence can be employed to assay physiologically important protease activities.

  13. Graphene quantum dot antennas for high efficiency Förster resonance energy transfer based dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Alagesan; Pan, Zhenghui; Rong, Genlan; Li, Hongfei; Zhou, Lisha; Li, Wanfei; Qiu, Yongcai; Xu, Yijun; Hou, Yuan; Zheng, Zhaozhao; Zhang, Yuegang

    2017-03-01

    The light harvesting efficiency of an acceptor dye can be enhanced by judicious choice and/or design of donor materials in the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this work, we explore graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as energy relay antennas for the high power conversion efficiency Ru-based N719 acceptor dyes. The absorption, emission, and time decay spectral results evidence the existence of the FRET, the radiative energy transfer (RET), and a synergistic interaction between GQDs and N719 dye. The FRET efficiency is measured to be 27%. The GQDs co-sensitized DSSC achieves an efficiency (ƞ) of 7.96% with a Jsc of 16.54 mAcm-2, which is 30% higher than that of a N719-based DSSC. GQDs also reduce the charge recombination, which results in an increased open-circuit voltage up to 770 mV. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency and UV-Vis absorption measurement reveal that the enhanced absorption of the GQDs antennas is responsible for the improved Jsc in the whole UV-Visible region, while the RET/FRET and the synergistic effect contribute to the significant increase of Jsc in the UV region.

  14. Determination of biological activity of gonadotropins hCG and FSH by Förster resonance energy transfer based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga; Allikalt, Anni; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Salumets, Andres; Rinken, Ago

    2017-01-01

    Determination of biological activity of gonadotropin hormones is essential in reproductive medicine and pharmaceutical manufacturing of the hormonal preparations. The aim of the study was to adopt a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signal transduction pathway based assay for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins. We focussed on studying human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as these hormones are widely used in clinical practice. Receptor-specific changes in cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, second messenger in GPCR signalling) were monitored by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor protein TEpacVV in living cells upon activation of the relevant gonadotropin receptor. The BacMam gene delivery system was used for biosensor protein expression in target cells. In the developed assay only biologically active hormones initiated GPCR-mediated cellular signalling. High assay sensitivities were achieved for detection of hCG (limit of detection, LOD: 5 pM) and FSH (LOD: 100 pM). Even the small-scale conformational changes caused by thermal inactivation and reducing the biological activity of the hormones were registered. In conclusion, the proposed assay is suitable for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins and is a good alternative to antibody- and animal-testing-based assays used in pharmaceutical industry and clinical research. PMID:28181555

  15. Determination of biological activity of gonadotropins hCG and FSH by Förster resonance energy transfer based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mazina, Olga; Allikalt, Anni; Tapanainen, Juha S; Salumets, Andres; Rinken, Ago

    2017-02-09

    Determination of biological activity of gonadotropin hormones is essential in reproductive medicine and pharmaceutical manufacturing of the hormonal preparations. The aim of the study was to adopt a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signal transduction pathway based assay for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins. We focussed on studying human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as these hormones are widely used in clinical practice. Receptor-specific changes in cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, second messenger in GPCR signalling) were monitored by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor protein (T)Epac(VV) in living cells upon activation of the relevant gonadotropin receptor. The BacMam gene delivery system was used for biosensor protein expression in target cells. In the developed assay only biologically active hormones initiated GPCR-mediated cellular signalling. High assay sensitivities were achieved for detection of hCG (limit of detection, LOD: 5 pM) and FSH (LOD: 100 pM). Even the small-scale conformational changes caused by thermal inactivation and reducing the biological activity of the hormones were registered. In conclusion, the proposed assay is suitable for quantification of biological activity of gonadotropins and is a good alternative to antibody- and animal-testing-based assays used in pharmaceutical industry and clinical research.

  16. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays on Paper-Based Platforms Using Emissive Nanoparticles as Donors.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Samer; Noor, M Omair; Han, Yi; Krull, Ulrich J

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) commonly used in bioassays and biosensors as resonance energy transfer (RET) donors. The narrow and tunable emissions of both QDs and UCNPs make them versatile RET donors that can be paired with a wide range of acceptors. Ratiometric signal processing that compares donor and acceptor emission in RET-based transduction offers improved precision, as it accounts for fluctuations in the absolute photoluminescence (PL) intensities of the donor and acceptor that can result from experimental and instrumental variations. Immobilizing NPs on a solid support avoids problems such as those that can arise with their aggregation in solution, and allows for facile layer-by-layer assembly of the interfacial chemistry. Paper is an attractive solid support for the development of point-of-care diagnostic assays given its ubiquity, low-cost, and intrinsic fluid transport by capillary action. Integration of nanomaterials with paper-based analytical devices (PADs) provides avenues to augment the analytical performance of PADs, given the unique optoelectronic properties of nanomaterials. Herein, we describe methodology for the development of PADs using QDs and UCNPs as RET donors for optical transduction of nucleic acid hybridization. Immobilization of green-emitting QDs (gQDs) on imidazole functionalized cellulose paper is described for use as RET donors with Cy3 molecular dye as acceptors for the detection of SMN1 gene fragment. We also describe the covalent immobilization of blue-emitting UCNPs on aldehyde modified cellulose paper for use as RET donors with orange-emitting QDs (oQDs) as acceptors for the detection of HPRT1 gene fragment. The data described herein is acquired using an epifluorescence microscope, and can also be collected using technology such as a typical electronic camera.

  17. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome-lysosome retrograde fusion events.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A M; Goldman, S D B; Krise, J P

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome-lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders-Niemann-Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff's disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Selective ligand activity at Nur/retinoid X receptor complexes revealed by dimer-specific bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based sensors

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Xavier C; Cotnoir-White, David; Mader, Sylvie; Lévesque, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXR) play a role as master regulators due to their capacity to form heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Accordingly, retinoid signaling is involved in multiple biological processes, including development, cell differentiation, metabolism and cell death. However, the role and functions of RXR in different heterodimer complexes remain unsolved, mainly because most RXR drugs (called rexinoids) are not selective to specific heterodimer complexes. This also strongly limits the use of rexinoids for specific therapeutic approaches. In order to better characterize rexinoids at specific nuclear receptor complexes, we have developed and optimized luciferase protein complementation-based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assays, which can directly measure recruitment of a co-activator motif fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by specific nuclear receptor dimers. To validate the assays, we compared rexinoid modulation of co-activator recruitment by RXR homodimer, and heterodimers Nur77/RXR and Nurr1/RXR. Results reveal that some rexinoids display selective co-activator recruitment activities with homo- or hetero-dimer complexes. In particular, SR11237 (BMS649) has increased potency for recruitment of co-activator motif and transcriptional activity with the Nur77/RXR heterodimer compared to other complexes. This technology should prove useful to identify new compounds with specificity for individual dimeric species formed by nuclear receptors. PMID:26148973

  19. Compact and versatile nickel-nitrilotriacetate-modified quantum dots for protein imaging and Förster resonance energy transfer based assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Young; Kim, Keumhyun; Hong, Sukmin; Kim, Heeyeon; Choi, Youngseon; Ryu, Jiyoung; Kwon, Doyoon; Grailhe, Regis; Song, Rita

    2010-05-18

    The generation of compact quantum dots (QDs) probes is of critical importance for visualizing molecular interaction occurring in biological context, particularly when using the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach. This Article reports novel water-soluble compact CdSe/ZnS QDs prepared by ligand exchange reaction using thiolated nitrilotriacetate (NTA). The resulting NTA-QDs revealed higher stability and remarkable conjugation efficiency compared to the other QDs prepared with different ligands by using the ligand exchange method. The Ni-NTA group is a well-known binding moiety for the detection and purification of oligohistidine-tagged recombinant proteins. We demonstrated that NiNTA-QDs prepared by Ni(2+) complexation exhibited highly specific binding ability toward 6-histidine (His)-tagged peptides present in various experimental conditions (buffer solution, agarose beads, and HEK cells). Importantly, the compact NiNTA-QDs serve as an efficient FRET donor. These results suggest that the stable and highly selective multifunctional NTA-QDs can be useful for labeling and tracking molecular interactions within biological context.

  20. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Molecular Switch Designed Using a Systematic Design Process Based on Monte Carlo Methods and Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallapalli, Arjun

    A RET network consists of a network of photo-active molecules called chromophores that can participate in inter-molecular energy transfer called resonance energy transfer (RET). RET networks are used in a variety of applications including cryptographic devices, storage systems, light harvesting complexes, biological sensors, and molecular rulers. In this dissertation, we focus on creating a RET device called closed-diffusive exciton valve (C-DEV) in which the input to output transfer function is controlled by an external energy source, similar to a semiconductor transistor like the MOSFET. Due to their biocompatibility, molecular devices like the C-DEVs can be used to introduce computing power in biological, organic, and aqueous environments such as living cells. Furthermore, the underlying physics in RET devices are stochastic in nature, making them suitable for stochastic computing in which true random distribution generation is critical. In order to determine a valid configuration of chromophores for the C-DEV, we developed a systematic process based on user-guided design space pruning techniques and built-in simulation tools. We show that our C-DEV is 15x better than C-DEVs designed using ad hoc methods that rely on limited data from prior experiments. We also show ways in which the C-DEV can be improved further and how different varieties of C-DEVs can be combined to form more complex logic circuits. Moreover, the systematic design process can be used to search for valid chromophore network configurations for a variety of RET applications. We also describe a feasibility study for a technique used to control the orientation of chromophores attached to DNA. Being able to control the orientation can expand the design space for RET networks because it provides another parameter to tune their collective behavior. While results showed limited control over orientation, the analysis required the development of a mathematical model that can be used to determine the

  1. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Tetrahedron Nanotweezer for Highly Reliable Detection of Tumor-Related mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Lu, Dan-Qing; Liang, Hao; Xie, Sitao; Luo, Can; Hu, Miaomiao; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-30

    Accurate detection and imaging of tumor-related mRNA in living cells hold great promise for early cancer detection. However, currently, most probes designed to image intracellular mRNA confront intrinsic interferences arising from complex biological matrices and resulting in inevitable false-positive signals. To circumvent this problem, an intracellular DNA nanoprobe, termed DNA tetrahedron nanotweezer (DTNT), was developed to reliably image tumor-related mRNA in living cells based on the FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) "off" to "on" signal readout mode. DTNT was self-assembled from four single-stranded DNAs. In the absence of target mRNA, the respectively labeled donor and acceptor fluorophores are separated, thus inducing low FRET efficiency. However, in the presence of target mRNA, DTNT alters its structure from the open to closed state, thus bringing the dual fluorophores into close proximity for high FRET efficiency. The DTNT exhibited high cellular permeability, fast response and excellent biocompatibility. Moreover, intracellular imaging experiments showed that DTNT could effectively distinguish cancer cells from normal cells and, moreover, distinguish among changes of mRNA expression levels in living cells. The DTNT nanoprobe also exhibits minimal effect of probe concentration, distribution and laser power as other ratiometric probe. More importantly, as a result of the FRET "off" to "on" signal readout mode, the DTNT nanoprobe almost entirely avoids false-positive signals due to intrinsic interferences, such as nuclease digestion, protein binding and thermodynamic fluctuations in complex biological matrices. This design blueprint can be applied to the development of powerful DNA nanomachines for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis.

  2. Wireless power transfer based on dielectric resonators with colossal permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mingzhao; Belov, Pavel; Kapitanova, Polina

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system based on dielectric disk resonators made of colossal permittivity (ɛ = 1000) and low loss (tan δ = 2.5 × 10-4) microwave ceramic is experimentally investigated. The system operates at the magnetic dipole mode excited in the resonators providing maximal power transfer efficiency of 90% at the frequency 232 MHz. By applying an impedance matching technique, the efficiency of 50% is achieved within the separation between the resonators d = 16 cm (3.8 radii of the resonator). The separation, misalignment and rotation dependencies of wireless power transfer efficiency are experimentally studied.

  3. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  4. Dual-Recognition Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Based Platform for One-Step Sensitive Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using Fluorescent Vancomycin-Gold Nanoclusters and Aptamer-Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengqun; Wang, Hong; Fu, Fei; Li, Linyao; Li, Jing; Li, Gan; Song, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Song, Erqun

    2017-04-04

    The effective monitoring, identification, and quantification of pathogenic bacteria is essential for addressing serious public health issues. In this study, we present a universal and facile one-step strategy for sensitive and selective detection of pathogenic bacteria using a dual-molecular affinity-based Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) platform based on the recognition of bacterial cell walls by antibiotic and aptamer molecules, respectively. As a proof of concept, Vancomycin (Van) and a nucleic acid aptamer were employed in a model dual-recognition scheme for detecting Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. aureus). Within 30 min, by using Van-functionalized gold nanoclusters and aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles as the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, the FRET signal shows a linear variation with the concentration of Staph. aureus in the range from 20 to 10(8) cfu/mL with a detection limit of 10 cfu/mL. Other nontarget bacteria showed negative results, demonstrating the good specificity of the approach. When employed to assay Staph. aureus in real samples, the dual-recognition FRET strategy showed recoveries from 99.00% to the 109.75% with relative standard derivations (RSDs) less than 4%. This establishes a universal detection platform for sensitive, specific, and simple pathogenic bacteria detection, which could have great impact in the fields of food/public safety monitoring and infectious disease diagnosis.

  5. DNA sequence functionalized with heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassembly for novel energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-15

    This work reports the use of compositionally heterogeneous asymmetric Ag@Au core-satellite nanoassembly functionalized with DNA sequence as unique signaling nanoprobes for the realization of new energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of prostate- specific antigen (PSA). Specifically, the Ag@Au asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies (Ag@Au ACS) were fabricated on a two-dimensional glass substrate by a modified controlled assembly technique, and then functionalized with DNA sequences containing PSA aptamers as signaling nanoprobes. Then, the sandwich complexing between the PSA, its antibodies, and the signaling nanoprobes was performed on a CdS QDs modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The single stranded DNA can server as a facile mediator that place the Ag@Au ACS in proximity of CdS QDs, stimulating the interparticle exciton-plasmon interactions between Ag@Au ACS and CdS QDs and thus quenching the excitonic states in the latter. Since the damping effect is closely related to the target concentration, a novel energy-transfer-based PEC bioanalysis could be achieved for the sensitive and specific PSA assay. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0×10(-11)gmL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)gmL(-1) and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3×10(-13)gmL(-1). This strategy used the Ag@Au ACS-DNA signaling nanoprobes and overcame the deficiency of short operating distance of the energy transfer process for feasible PEC immunoassay. More significantly, it provided a way to couple the plasmonic properties of the Ag NPs and Au NPs in a single PEC bioanalytical system. We expected this work could inspire more interests and further investigations on the advanced engineering of the core-satellite or other judiciously designed nanostructures for new PEC bioanalytical uses with novel properties.

  6. Energy-transfer-based wavelength-shifting DNA probes with "clickable" cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Carolin; Rubner, Moritz M; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-05-01

    The insertion of cyanine dye azides as energy donor dyes via postsynthetic "click"-type cycloaddition chemistry with e.g. a new thiazole orange azide combined with thiazole red yields dual emitting DNA probes with good fluorescence readout properties.

  7. On the construction of low-energy cislunar and translunar transfers based on the libration points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Wei, Yan; Xu, Shijie

    2013-11-01

    There exist cislunar and translunar libration points near the Moon, which are referred to as the LL 1 and LL 2 points, respectively. They can generate the different types of low-energy trajectories transferring from Earth to Moon. The time-dependent analytic model including the gravitational forces from the Sun, Earth, and Moon is employed to investigate the energy-minimal and practical transfer trajectories. However, different from the circular restricted three-body problem, the equivalent gravitational equilibria are defined according to the geometry of the instantaneous Hill boundary due to the gravitational perturbation from the Sun. The relationship between the altitudes of periapsis and eccentricities is achieved from the Poincaré mapping for all the captured lunar trajectories, which presents the statistical feature of the fuel cost and captured orbital elements rather than generating a specified Moon-captured segment. The minimum energy required by the captured trajectory on a lunar circular orbit is deduced in the spatial bi-circular model. The idea is presented that the asymptotical behaviors of invariant manifolds approaching to/traveling from the libration points or halo orbits are destroyed by the solar perturbation. In fact, the energy-minimal cislunar transfer trajectory is acquired by transiting the LL 1 point, while the energy-minimal translunar transfer trajectory is obtained by transiting the LL 2 point. Finally, the transfer opportunities for the practical trajectories that have escaped from the Earth and have been captured by the Moon are yielded by the transiting halo orbits near the LL 1 and LL 2 points, which can be used to generate the whole of the trajectories.

  8. Exciton energy transfer-based quantum dot fluorescence sensing array: "chemical noses" for discrimination of different nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Li, Gui; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Li, Li; Liu, Wei; Shi, Xing; Guo, Yali

    2015-01-20

    A novel exciton energy transfer-based fluorescence sensing array for the discrimination of different nucleobases was developed through target nucleobase-triggered self-assembly of quantum dots (QDs). Four QD nanoprobes with different ligand receptors, including mercaptoethylamine, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, 2-dimethyl-aminethanethiol, and thioglycolic acid, were created to detect and identify nucleobase targets. These QDs served as both selective recognition scaffolds and signal transduction elements for a biomolecule target. The extent of particle assembly, induced by the analyte-triggered self-assembly of QDs, led to an exciton energy transfer effect between interparticles that gave a readily detectable fluorescence quenching and distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are characteristic for each nucleobase and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminate analysis. Furthermore, a fingerprint-based barcode was established to conveniently discriminate the nucleobases. This pattern sensing was successfully used to identify nucleobase samples at unknown concentrations and five rare bases. In this "chemical noses" strategy, the robust characteristics of QD nanoprobes, coupled with the diversity of surface functionality that can be readily obtained using nanoparticles, provides a simple and label-free biosensing approach that shows great promise for biomedical applications.

  9. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    PubMed

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  10. Energy transfer based emission analysis of (Tb³⁺, Sm³⁺): lithium zinc phosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C Parthasaradhi; Naresh, V; Ramaraghavulu, R; Rudramadevi, B H; Reddy, K T Ramakrishna; Buddhudu, S

    2015-06-05

    The present paper reports on the results pertaining to photoluminescence properties of Tb(3+), Sm(3+) and energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Sm(3+) ions in lithium zinc phosphate (LZP) glass matrix prepared by melt quenching method. Besides photoluminescence studies thermal stability for the LZP glass is also evaluated from TG-DTA measurement. Tb(3+) doped glasses have exhibited a prominent green emission at 547 nm assigned to (5)D4→(7)F5 transitions on exciting at λ(exci)=377 nm. The quenching phenomenon in Tb(3+) emission on varying its concentration has been discussed from cross-relaxations. Sm(3+) incorporated glasses have shown strong orange emission at 603 nm assigned to (4)G5/2→(6)H7/2 transition upon exciting with λ(exci)=404 nm. The possibility of energy transfer process taking place between these two ions is understood from the significant spectral overlap of Sm(3+) absorption and Tb(3+) emission. Migration of excitation energy from Tb(3+) ions to Sm(3+) ions at λ(exci)=375 nm is evaluated from the emission spectra of (0.5 mol.% Tb(3+)+(0.5-2.0 mol.%) Sm(3+)) co-doped glasses. The emission intensity of Sm(3+) has enhanced while Tb(3+) emission intensity decreased with an increase in Sm(3+) concentration suggesting the occurrence of energy transfer through cross-relaxations from Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2). The mechanism behind energy transfer process has been further explained from energy level diagram, decay profiles and confirmed by calculating energy transfer parameters (energy transfer efficiency (η) and energy transfer probability (P)) of co-doped glasses. The dipole-dipole interaction is found to be more responsible for energy transfer Tb(3+) ((5)D4) to Sm(3+) ((4)G5/2) ions in LZP glass matrix.

  11. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  12. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    PubMed

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement.

  13. Thermal effects on isoscalar giant resonance energies in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.; Dai, G.; Jin, G.

    1995-07-01

    The thermal effects on the energies of the isoscalar giant multipole resonances of hot nuclei are discussed and an approximate formula for the energy as a function of temperature is derived via a hydrodynamic theory. The energy difference between the isoscalar giant multipole resonance of a hot nucleus and its ground-state resonance depends on the competition between the volume expansion and the increase of the average kinetic energy per nucleon of hot nuclei, which lower and raise the resonance energy, respectively, and nearly counteract each other in magnitude. The variaiton of the isoscalar giant resonance energy with temperature is very small.

  14. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K.; Meng, Fanke; Senty, Tess R.; Bristow, Alan D.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-09-01

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), energy non-radiatively transfers from a blue-shifted emitter to a red-shifted absorber by dipole-dipole coupling. This study shows that plasmonics enables the opposite transfer direction, transferring the plasmonic energy towards the short-wavelength direction to induce charge separation in a semiconductor. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET) differs from FRET because of the lack of a Stoke's shift, non-local absorption effects and a strong dependence on the plasmon's dephasing rate and dipole moment. PIRET non-radiatively transfers energy through an insulating spacer layer, which prevents interfacial charge recombination losses and dephasing of the plasmon from hot-electron transfer. The distance dependence of dipole-dipole coupling is mapped out for a range of detuning across the plasmon resonance. PIRET can efficiently harvest visible and near-infrared sunlight with energy below the semiconductor band edge to help overcome the constraints of band-edge energetics for single semiconductors in photoelectrochemical cells, photocatalysts and photovoltaics.

  15. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Li, F; Skinner, J L

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H2O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Förster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  16. Fermi energy instability in resonant tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claro, Francisco; Inkoferer, Jutta; Obermeir, Gustav

    2001-03-01

    In resonant tunneling two different instabilities may arise induced by the electron-electron interaction, depending on whether the conduction channel is at the emitter Fermi energy, or at the bottom of the emitter Fermi sea. The latter leads to a well understood multistable regime in the device characteristics. The former was found in the past for the case when a magnetic field is present in the direction of the current flow*. We shall show that the external field is not required, and that actually the instability can take place in the presence of zero, one and two dimensional quantum wells. Supported in part by FONDECYT 1990425 and Catedra Presidencial en Ciencias *P.Orellana, E.Anda and F.Claro, Phys.Rev.Lett. 79, 1118 (1997)

  17. Split-loop resonator array for microwave energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shen-Yun; Xu, Peng; Geyi, Wen; Ma, Zhewang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional split-loop resonator composed of a bended wire, a metallic ground slab, and a coaxial line loaded with a lumped matching resistor to mimic the input impedance of a rectifier. An ensemble of such resonators can function as an efficient energy harvester. The energy capture mechanism is explained by an equivalent circuit model. A 20 × 20 resonator array is fabricated to resonate around 2.45 GHz. The simulated and measured results indicate that the proposed resonator array has nearly unity energy conversion efficiency at the resonant frequency and is quite promising as an energy harvester in the microwave wireless power transmission system.

  18. Electrically small resonators for energy harvesting in the infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShareef, Mohammed R.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2013-12-01

    A novel structure based on electrically small resonators is proposed for harvesting the infrared energy and yielding more than 80% harvesting efficiency. The dispersion effect of the dielectric and conductor materials of the resonators is taken into account by applying the Drude model. A new scheme to channel the infrared waves from an array of split ring resonators is proposed, whereby a wide-bandwidth collector is utilized by employing this new channeling concept.

  19. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  20. Real-time target-specific detection of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for white spot syndrome virus using fluorescence energy transfer-based probes.

    PubMed

    Chou, Pin-Hsing; Lin, Yu-Chan; Teng, Ping-Hua; Chen, Chu-Liang; Lee, Pei-Yu

    2011-04-01

    Aiming to establish a target amplicon-specific detection system for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), the fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe technology was applied to develop the FRET LAMP platform. This report describes the development of the first FRET LAMP assay targeting white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of penaeid shrimp. A successful accelerated WSSV LAMP was assembled first in a conventional oven and confirmed by gel electrophoresis and dot-blot hybridization. Subsequently, two additional FRET probes designed to target one loop region within WSSV LAMP amplicons were added to the same LAMP reaction. The reactions were carried out in a LightCycler (Roche) and significant FRET signals were detected in real time. Optimization of the reaction using plasmid DNA shortened the time for the detection of 10(2) copies of the target DNA to less than 70min. Cross reactivity was absent with WSSV-free or infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus-infected Penaeus vannamei samples. The performance of this system was comparable with that of a nested PCR assay from 21 WSSV-infected shrimp. Specifically detecting target amplicons and requiring no post-amplification manipulation, the novel FRET LAMP assay should allow indisputable detection of pathogens with minimized risks of amplicon contamination.

  1. Wave energy driven resonant sea water pump

    SciTech Connect

    Czitrom, S.P.R.

    1996-12-31

    A wave driven sea-water pump which operates by resonance is described. Oscillations in the resonant and exhaust ducts perform similar to two mass-spring systems coupled by a third spring acting for the compression chamber. Performance of the pump is optimized by means of a variable volume air compression chamber (patents pending) which tunes the system to the incoming wave frequency. Wave tank experiments with an instrumented, 1:20 scale model of the pump are described. Performance was studied under various wave and tuning conditions and compared to a numerical model which was found to describe the system accurately. Successful sea trials at an energetic coastline provide evidence of the system`s viability under demanding conditions.

  2. Energy Harvesting with Coupled Magnetorestrictive Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Plexiglas® is a registered trademark of Rohm & Haas . Released by K. S. Simonsen, Head Advanced Concepts and Applied Research...value of effective mass m or beam inductance Lm in Figure 6 was determined. Using this value of effective mass as an approximation, the damping...1) (2) where, m = mass of the resonator [kg] = Lm in Table 1, b = damping parameter [N*s/m] = Rm in

  3. Hydraulic pressure energy harvester enhanced by Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skow, Ellen; Koontz, Zachary; Cunefare, Kenneth; Erturk, Alper

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic pressure energy harvesters (HPEH) are devices that convert the dynamic pressure within hydraulic systems into usable electrical power through axially loaded piezoelectric stacks excited off-resonance by the fluid. Within hydraulic systems, the dominant frequency is typically a harmonic of the pump operating frequency. The pressure fluctuations coupled with the piezoelectric stack can be amplified by creating a housing design that includes a Helmholtz resonator tuned to the dominant frequency of the fluid excitation. A Helmholtz resonator is an acoustic device that consists of a cavity coupled to a fluid medium via a neck, or in this case a port connection to the fluid flow, that acts as an amplifier when within the bandwidth of its resonance. The implementation of a piezoelectric stack within the HPEH allows for a Helmholtz resonator to be included within the fluidic environment despite the significantly higher than air static pressures typical of fluid hydraulic systems (on the order of one to tens of MPa). The resistive losses within the system, such as from energy harvesting and viscous losses, can also be used to increase the bandwidth of the resonance; thus increasing the utility of the device. This paper investigates the design, modeling, and performance of hydraulic pressure energy harvesters utilizing a Helmholtz resonator design.

  4. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  5. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Ivanov, Ivan B.; Kasilov, Sergei V.

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  6. Resonant vibrational excitation of CO by low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.; Vicic, M. D.

    2006-06-15

    Electron impact vibrational excitation of the CO molecule, via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance, in the 0-4 eV energy region has been investigated. The energy dependence of the resonant excitation of the first ten vibrational levels, v=1 to v=10, has been measured by use of a crossed-beams double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Obtained relative differential cross sections are normalized to the absolute values. Integral cross sections are determined by using our recent results on scattered electrons angular distributions, which demonstrate clear p-partial wave character of this resonance. Substructures appear in the {sup 2}{pi} resonant excitation of the CO molecule which have not been previously observed.

  7. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  8. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  9. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation-energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, E. K.; Gómez-Bombarelli, R.; Lovett, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how the effectiveness of natural photosynthetic energy-harvesting systems arises from the interplay between quantum coherence and environmental noise represents a significant challenge for quantum theory. Recently it has begun to be appreciated that discrete molecular vibrational modes may play an important role in the dynamics of such systems. Here we present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrations may be able to contribute to the efficiency and directionality of energy transfer. Excited vibrational states create resonant pathways through the system, supporting fast and efficient energy transport. Vibrational damping together with the natural downhill arrangement of molecular energy levels gives intrinsic directionality to the energy flow. Analytical and numerical results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the efficiency and directionality of energy transport that can be directly related to the existence of resonances between vibrational and excitonic levels.

  10. Electromagnetic energy within single-resonance chiral metamaterial spheres.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Tiago J; Pinheiro, Felipe A; Martinez, Alexandre S

    2013-06-01

    We derive an exact expression for the time-averaged electromagnetic (EM) energy inside a chiral dispersive sphere irradiated by a plane wave. The dispersion relations correspond to a chiral metamaterial consisting of uncoupled single-resonance helical resonators. Using a field decomposition scheme and a general expression for the EM energy density in bianisotropic media, we calculate the Lorenz-Mie solution for the internal fields in a medium that is simultaneously magnetic and chiral. We also obtain an explicit analytical relation between the internal EM energy and the absorption cross section. This result is applied to demonstrate that strong chirality leads to an off-resonance field enhancement within weakly absorbing spheres.

  11. Opportunities for shear energy scaling in bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Jose, Sumy; Hueting, Raymond J E

    2014-10-01

    An important energy loss contribution in bulk acoustic wave resonators is formed by so-called shear waves, which are transversal waves that propagate vertically through the devices with a horizontal motion. In this work, we report for the first time scaling of the shear-confined spots, i.e., spots containing a high concentration of shear wave displacement, controlled by the frame region width at the edge of the resonator. We also demonstrate a novel methodology to arrive at an optimum frame region width for spurious mode suppression and shear wave confinement. This methodology makes use of dispersion curves obtained from finite-element method (FEM) eigenfrequency simulations for arriving at an optimum frame region width. The frame region optimization is demonstrated for solidly mounted resonators employing several shear wave optimized reflector stacks. Finally, the FEM simulation results are compared with measurements for resonators with Ta2O5/ SiO2 stacks showing suppression of the spurious modes.

  12. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    PubMed

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices.

  13. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1996-01-01

    When the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, the particles trapped in a wave are found to form phase space holes or clumps that enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause increased saturation levels of instabilities and even allow the free energy associated with instability to be tapped in a system in which background dissipation suppresses linear instability.

  14. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-10-01

    It is shown that as the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, that the particles trapped in the wave will form phase space holes or clumps that can enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause much larger saturation levels of instabilities, and even allow the free energy associated with instability, to be tapped in a system that is linearly stable due to background dissipation.

  15. Particle-size Dependent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer from Upconversion Nanoparticles to Organic Dyes.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Verena; Würth, Christian; Kraft, Marco; Buchner, Markus; Resch-Genger, Ute; Baeumner, Antje J; Hirsch, Thomas

    2017-03-22

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are attractive candidates for energy transfer-based analytical applications. In contrast to classical donor-acceptor pairs, these particles contain many emitting lanthanide ions together with numerous acceptor dye molecules at different distances to each other, strongly depending on the particle diameter. UCNPs with precisely controlled sizes between 10 and 43 nm were prepared and functionalized with rose bengal and sulforhodamine B by a ligand exchange procedure. Time-resolved studies of the upconversion luminescence of the UCNP donor revealed a considerable shortening of the donor lifetime as a clear hint for Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). FRET was most pronounced for 21 nm-sized UCNPs, yielding a FRET efficiency of 60%. At larger surface-to-volume ratios the FRET efficiency decreased by an increasing competition of non-radiative surface deactivation. Such dye-UCNP architectures can also provide an elegant way to shift the UCNP emission color, since the fluorescence intensity of the organic dyes excited by FRET was comparable to that of the upconversion emission of smaller particles.

  16. Giant resonances in {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn: Isotopic dependence of monopole resonance energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Tokimoto, Y.; Clark, H.L.; John, B.

    2004-07-01

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeVresonance energies was found to be consistent with relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with K{sub NM}{approx}220-240 MeV.

  17. Paths to Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, B. R.

    2014-02-01

    Theodor Förster (1910-1974) developed a phenomenological theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer which proved to be transformative in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. This paper explores the experimental and the theoretical antecedents of Förster's theory of resonance energy transfer (FRET). Early studies of sensitized fluorescence, fluorescence depolarization, and photosynthesis demonstrated the phenomena of long-range energy transfer. At the same time physicists developed theoretical models which contained common physical mechanisms and parameters: oscillating dipoles as models for the atoms or molecules, dipole-dipole coupling for the interaction, and a distance R0 that is optimal for resonance energy transfer. Early theories predicted R0 that was too large as compared to experiments. Finally, in 1946 Förster developed a classical theory and in 1948 he developed a quantum mechanical theory; both theories predicted an inverse sixth power dependence of the rate of energy transfer and a R0 that agreed with experiments. This paper attempts to determine why Förster succeeded when the other theoreticians failed to develop the correct theory. The putative roles of interdisciplinary education and collaborative research are discussed. Furthermore, I explore the role of science journals and their specific audiences in the popularization of FRET to a broad interdisciplinary community.

  18. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, Oscar J. G.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two‐level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer‐lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  19. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  20. Design of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP indicators: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Russwurm, Michael; Mullershausen, Florian; Friebe, Andreas; Jäger, Ronald; Russwurm, Corina; Koesling, Doris

    2007-10-01

    The intracellular signalling molecule cGMP regulates a variety of physiological processes, and so the ability to monitor cGMP dynamics in living cells is highly desirable. Here, we report a systematic approach to create FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based cGMP indicators from two known types of cGMP-binding domains which are found in cGMP-dependent protein kinase and phosphodiesterase 5, cNMP-BD [cyclic nucleotide monophosphate-binding domain and GAF [cGMP-specific and -stimulated phosphodiesterases, Anabaena adenylate cyclases and Escherichia coli FhlA] respectively. Interestingly, only cGMP-binding domains arranged in tandem configuration as in their parent proteins were cGMP-responsive. However, the GAF-derived sensors were unable to be used to study cGMP dynamics because of slow response kinetics to cGMP. Out of 24 cGMP-responsive constructs derived from cNMP-BDs, three were selected to cover a range of cGMP affinities with an EC50 between 500 nM and 6 microM. These indicators possess excellent specifity for cGMP, fast binding kinetics and twice the dynamic range of existing cGMP sensors. The in vivo performance of these new indicators is demonstrated in living cells and validated by comparison with cGMP dynamics as measured by radioimmunoassays.

  1. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  2. Calibration of a resonance energy transfer imaging system.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, M; Hensel, N F; Hartzman, R J

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative technique for the nondestructive visualization of nanometer scale intermolecular separations in a living system is described. A calibration procedure for the acquisition and analysis of resonance energy transfer (RET) image data is outlined. The factors limiting RET imaging of biological samples are discussed. Measurements required for the calibration include: (a) the spectral sensitivity of the image intensifier (or camera); (b) the transmission spectra of the emission filters; and (c) the quantum distribution functions of the energy transfer pair measured in situ. Resonance energy transfer imaging is demonstrated for two DNA specific dyes. The Förster critical distance for energy transfer between Hoechst 33342 (HO) and acridine orange (AO) is 4.5 +/- 0.7 nm. This distance is slightly greater than the distance of a single turn of the DNA helix (3.5 nm or approximately 10 base pairs), and is well below the optical diffraction limit. Timed sequences of intracellular energy transfer reveal nuclear structure, strikingly similar to that observed with confocal and electron microscopy, and may show the spatial distribution of eu- and hetero- chromatin in the interphase nuclei. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:1581499

  3. Ag nanoclusters could efficiently quench the photoresponse of CdS quantum dots for novel energy transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yue; Liang, Yan-Yu; He, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-11-15

    Herein the influence of ultrasmall Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) against CdS quantum dots (QDs) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) nanosystem was exploited for the first time, based on which a novel PEC bioanalysis was successfully developed via the efficient quenching effect of Ag NCs against the CdS QDs. In a model system, DNA assay was achieved by using molecular beacon (MB) probes anchored on a CdS QDs modified electrode, and the MB probes contain two segments that can hybridize with both target DNA sequence and the label of DNA encapsulated Ag NCs. After the MB probe was unfolded by the target DNA sequence, the labels of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag NCs would be brought in close proximity to the CdS QDs electrode surface, and efficient photocurrent quenching of QDs could be resulted from an energy transfer process that originated from NCs. Thus, by monitoring the attenuation in the photocurrent signal, an elegant and sensitive PEC DNA bioanalysis could be accomplished. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0pM to 10nM and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3pM. This work presents a feasible signaling principle that could act as a common basis for general PEC bioanalysis development.

  4. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N* resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c2 in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000)++ are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  5. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-22

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N{sup *} resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c{sup 2} in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000){sup ++} are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  6. Resonance Energy Transfer in Upconversion Nanoplatforms for Selective Biodetection.

    PubMed

    Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Yang, Dongpeng; Li, Fuyou

    2017-01-17

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) describes the process that energy is transferred from an excited donor to an acceptor molecule, leading to a reduction in the fluorescence emission intensity of the donor and an increase in that of the acceptor. By this technique, measurements with the good sensitivity can be made about distance within 1 to 10 nm under physiological conditions. For this reason, the RET technique has been widely used in polymer science, biochemistry, and structural biology. Recently, a number of RET systems incorporated with nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and upconversion nanoparticles, have been developed. These nanocrystals retain their optical superiority and can act as either a donor or a quencher, thereby enhancing the performance of RET systems and providing more opportunities in excitation wavelength selection. Notably, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their inherent advantages of large anti-Stoke shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, and absence of autofluorescence under low energy near-infrared (NIR) light excitation. These nanoparticles are promising for the biodetection of various types of analytes. Undoubtedly, the developments of those applications usually rely on resonance energy transfer, which could be regarded as a flexible technology to mediate energy transfer from upconversion phosphor to acceptor for the design of luminescent functional nanoplatforms. Currently, researchers have developed many RET-based upconversion nanosystems (RET-UCNP) that respond to specific changes in the biological environments. Specifically, small organic molecules, biological molecules, metal-organic complexes, or inorganic nanoparticles were carefully selected and bound to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles for the preparation of RET-UCNP nanosystems. Benefiting from the advantage and versatility offered by this technology, the research of RET

  7. Investing relational energy: the hallmark of resonant leadership.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta

    2004-11-01

    Recent research has shown that hospital restructuring that included staff layoff has adversely affected the role, health and well-being of nurses who remained employed. Further research found that nurses working in environments that reflected resonant (emotionally intelligent) leadership reported the least negative effects to their healt and well-being following hospital restructuring. What remained unclear was the mechanism by which this mitigation occurred. The purpose of this paper is to explore additional findings from this leadership research and discuss one explanation unique to the academic literature for the mitigation variable--the investment of relational energy by resonant nursing leadership to build relationships with nurses and manage emotion in the workplace.

  8. Effect of internal resistance of a Helmholtz resonator on acoustic energy reduction in enclosures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ganghua; Li, Deyu; Cheng, Li

    2008-12-01

    The effect of internal resistance of a Helmholtz resonator on acoustic energy reduction in an enclosure and the multimodal coupling-based Helmholtz resonator design are investigated. Using the analytical solution of a resonator-enclosure interaction model, an energy reduction index is defined in a frequency band to optimize the resonator resistance. The dual process of energy dissipation and radiation of the resonator is quantified. Optimal resistance of the resonator and its physical effect on the resonator-enclosure interaction are numerically evaluated and categorized in terms of frequency bandwidths. Predictions on the resonator performance are confirmed by experiments. Comparisons with existing models based on different optimization criteria are also performed. It is shown that the proposed model serves as an effective design tool to determine the internal resistance of the resonator in order to achieve sound reduction in the frequency band enclosing acoustic resonances.

  9. Detecting Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer with Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Han, Rui; Fang, Ning

    2013-12-30

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal probes for studying intracellular environments and energy transfer mechanisms due to their plasmonic properties. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) relies on a plasmonic nanoparticle to donate energy to a nearby resonant acceptor molecule, a process which can be observed due to the plasmonic quenching of the donor nanoparticle. In this study, a gold nanosphere was used as the plasmonic donor, while the metalloprotein cytochrome c was used as the acceptor molecule. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy allows for simultaneous monitoring of complex environments and noble metal nanoparticles in real time. Using DIC and specially designed microfluidic channels, we were able to monitor PRET at the single gold particle level and observe the reversibility of PRET upon the introduction of phosphate-buffered saline to the channel. In an additional experiment, single gold particles were internalized by HeLa cells and were subsequently observed undergoing PRET as the cell hosts underwent morphological changes brought about by ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  10. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  11. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  12. Resonance energy transfer study of peptide-lipid complexes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G; Saito, H; Molotkovsky, J; Tanaka, M; Egashira, M; Nakano, M; Handa, T

    2001-09-18

    Resonance energy transfer involving tryptophan as a donor and anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC), 3-methoxybenzanthrone (MBA) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) as acceptors has been examined to obtain information on the structure of peptide-lipid systems consisting of 18A or Ac-18A-NH(2) peptides and large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The lower and upper limits for the tryptophan distance from the bilayer midplane have been assessed in terms of the models of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems, taking into account orientational effects. Evidence for the existence of preferential orientations of Ac-18A-NH(2) with respect to the lipid-water interface has been obtained.

  13. Non-resonant energy harvesting via an adaptive bistable potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Narrow bandwidth and easy detuning, inefficiency in broadband and non-stationary excitations, and difficulties in matching a linear harvester’s resonance frequency to low-frequency excitations at small scales, have convinced researchers to investigate nonlinear, and in particular bistable, energy harvesters in recent years. However, bistable harvesters suffer from co-existing low and high energy orbits, and sensitivity to initial conditions, and have recently been proven inefficient when subjected to many real-world random and non-stationary excitations. Here, we propose a novel non-resonant buy-low-sell-high strategy that can significantly improve the harvester’s effectiveness at low frequencies in a much more robust fashion. This strategy could be realized by a passive adaptive bistable system. Simulation results confirm the high effectiveness of the adaptive bistable system following a buy-low-sell-high logic when subjected to harmonic and random non-stationary walking excitations compared to its conventional bistable and linear counterparts.

  14. Resonance energy transfer study of lysozyme-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Ioffe, Valeriya M; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-05-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between the tryptophan residues of lysozyme as donors and anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (AV-PG) as acceptors has been examined to gain insight into molecular level details of the interactions of lysozyme with the lipid bilayers composed of PC with 10, 20, or 40 mol% PG. Energy transfer efficiency determined from the enhanced acceptor fluorescence was found to increase with content of the acidic lipid and surface coverage. The results of RET experiments performed with lipid vesicles containing 40 mol% PG were quantitatively analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems taking into account the distance dependence of orientation factor. Evidence for an interfacial location of the two predominant lysozyme fluorophores, Trp62 and Trp108, was obtained. The RET enhancement observed while employing AV-PG instead of AV-PC as an energy acceptor was interpreted as arising from the ability of lysozyme to bring about local demixing of the neutral and charged lipids in PC/PG model membranes.

  15. Experimental investigation of energy localization in line-defect resonator based on silicon locally resonant phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanli; Feng, Duan; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, energy localization in line-defect resonator based on locally resonant phononic crystal (PnC) is experimentally studied. The defected resonator is realized by creating line defects on a two-dimension (2-D) silicon PnC. The silicon resonator was fabricated by micro machining process and tested by a combination of the fluid coupling method and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Acoustic waves with frequency range from 7.19 MHz to 7.50 MHz are trapped in the cavity, and the corresponding resonant modes are observed in-situ. The measured quality (Q) factor of the resonator, which is 427 at its resonant frequency of 7.3 MHz, is smaller than the simulated ones (666 and 5135). The experimental results agree well with the simulation results that frequencies of the trapped acoustic waves of are mostly in the range of the phononic bandgaps. The locally resonant based PnC resonator in paper with 17 dB magnitude amplification, which is normalized with respect to the transmission of a freestanding silicon slab in the same frequency range, has great potential in energy harvesting or sound concentration.

  16. Resonance energies, lifetimes and complex energy potential curves from standard wave-packet calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2012-05-01

    We show here for a simple model system that the wavepacket dynamics in the interaction region can be described by a superposition of the non-Hermitian exponential divergent eigenfunctions of the physical Hamiltonian. We demonstrate how it is possible to obtain the complex eigenvalues and also the corresponding resonance eigenfunctions from the propagation of the wavepacket within the framework of the standard formalism of quantum mechanics. The general results demonstrated here for a simple model can lead to two different types of computational applications: (i) for systems where one can obtain the resonance energies and lifetimes as well as their corresponding eigenfunctions it is possible to study the evolution of the physical properties solely based on the initially populated resonance states without the need to propagate the wavepacket; (ii) for molecular systems where it is quite difficult to solve the non-Hermitian time-independent Schrödinger equation and obtain molecular resonance energies and functions. For this type of problem, the methods presented here enable one to evaluate the topology of complex potential energy surfaces from the wavepacket propagation and facilitate the study of the nuclear dynamics of ionizing molecular systems.

  17. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-Qin; Zhang, Mao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of the hadronic resonances K*0(892), ϕ(1020), Σ*(1385), and Ξ*(1530) in central AA collisions at , 200, and 2760 GeV is systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization is described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The p T spectra of K*0(892) calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low p T ≲ 1.5 GeV, and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects, the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on ϕ(1020) production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low p T on the basis of overall agreement with the data. We also predict the p T spectra of Σ*(1385) and Ξ*(1530), to be tested by the future experimental data. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575100, 11305076, 11505104)

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between bovine serum albumin and fluoresceinamine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhijun; Liu, Yushuang; Zhang, Ping; Guo, Jun; Ma, Yuxing; Yun, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhong, Ruibo; Zhang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Physical binding-mediated organic dye direct-labelling of proteins could be a promising technology for bio-nanomedical applications. Upon binding, it was found that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred between donor bovine serum albumin (BSA; an amphiphilic protein) and acceptor fluoresceinamine (FA; a hydrophobic fluorophore), which could explain fluorescence quenching found for BSA. FRET efficiency and the distance between FA and BSA tryptophan residues were determined to 17% and 2.29 nm, respectively. Using a spectroscopic superimposition method, the saturated number of FAs that bound to BSA was determined as eight to give a complex formula of FA8-BSA. Finally, molecular docking between BSA and FA was conducted, and conformational change that occurred in BSA upon binding to FA molecules was also studied by three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  20. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  1. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  2. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  3. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Nanoparticles and Nanowires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro L.; Govorov, Alexander O.

    2008-03-01

    We develop a theoretical model to describe Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and nanowires (NWs). We obtain an analytical equation in the dipole limit and a numerical solution for the general case. We find that, for FRET between NPs and NW, the transfer time is proportional to 1/d̂5, where d is the distance between NP and NW. The calculated transfer time between CdTe NPs and NWs is 16.9 ns. This number agrees well with the experimental value, 16 ns [1]. We also found good agreement with the experimental data [1] for other NP-NW distances. For a NW material, we explore a semiconductor (CdTe) and metals (Au and Ag) [2]. In a NP-NW bio-conjugate, excitons flow from NPs to a NW and then become collected in a NW. When voltage is applied across a NW, this system is expected to demonstrate enhanced photo-current and photo-voltage responses. The enhancement effect comes from energy channeling from NPs to a NW due to FRET. This system can be used in optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems. [1] J. Lee, A. O. Govorov, and N. A. Kotov, Nano Letters 5, 2063-2069 (2005). [2] J. Lee, P. Hernandez, J. Lee, A. O. Govorov, and N. A. Kotov, Nature Materials, 6, 291 -- 295 (2007)..

  5. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  6. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer activation sensor for Arf6.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian; McLean, Mark A; Davis, Kathryn; Casanova, James E; Sligar, Steven G; Schwartz, Martin A

    2008-03-15

    The involvement of the small GTPase Arf6 in Rac activation, cell migration, and cancer invasiveness suggests that it is activated in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Small GTPase activation has been imaged in cells using probes in which the GTPase and a fragment of a downstream effector protein are fused to fluorescent reporter proteins that constitute a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor/acceptor pair. Unlike other Ras family GTPases, the N terminus of Arf6 is critical for membrane targeting and, thus, cannot be modified by fusion to a fluorescent protein. We found that the previously described C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) derivative also shows diminished membrane targeting. Therefore, we inserted a fluorescent protein into an inert loop within the Arf6 sequence. This fusion showed normal membrane targeting, nucleotide-dependent interaction with the downstream effector GGA3, and normal regulation by a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Using the recently developed CyPET/YPET fluorescent proteins as a FRET pair, we found that Arf6-CyPET underwent efficient energy transfer when bound to YPET-GGA3 effector domain in intact cells. The addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to fibroblasts triggered a rapid and transient increase in FRET, indicative of Arf6 activation. These reagents should be useful for investigations of Arf6 activation and function.

  7. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Merlin Conformational Changes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Chaiken, Mary F.; Mani, Timmy; Gomes, Michelle M.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal disorder caused by biallelic inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. The NF2 gene encodes a 70-kDa protein, merlin, which is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. ERM proteins are believed to be regulated by a transition between a closed conformation, formed by binding of their N-terminal FERM domain and C-terminal tail domain (CTD), and an open conformation, in which the two domains do not interact. Previous work suggests that the tumor suppressor function of merlin is similarly regulated and that only the closed form is active. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control its conformation is crucial. We have developed a series of probes that measures merlin conformation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, both as purified protein and in live cells. Using these tools, we find that merlin exists predominately as a monomer in a stable, closed conformation that is mediated by the central α-helical domain. The contribution from the FERM-CTD interaction to the closed conformation appears to be less important. Upon phosphorylation or interaction with an effector protein, merlin undergoes a subtle conformational change, suggesting a novel mechanism that modulates the interaction between the FERM domain and the CTD. PMID:19884346

  8. Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-07-01

    More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO{sub 2} fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

  9. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Studies of DNA Polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Towle-Weicksel, Jamie B.; Dalal, Shibani; Sohl, Christal D.; Doublié, Sylvie; Anderson, Karen S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    During DNA repair, DNA polymerase β (Pol β) is a highly dynamic enzyme that is able to select the correct nucleotide opposite a templating base from a pool of four different deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). To gain insight into nucleotide selection, we use a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based system to monitor movement of the Pol β fingers domain during catalysis in the presence of either correct or incorrect dNTPs. By labeling the fingers domain with ((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and the DNA substrate with Dabcyl, we are able to observe rapid fingers closing in the presence of correct dNTPs as the IAEDANS comes into contact with a Dabcyl-labeled, one-base gapped DNA. Our findings show that not only do the fingers close after binding to the correct dNTP, but that there is a second conformational change associated with a non-covalent step not previously reported for Pol β. Further analyses suggest that this conformational change corresponds to the binding of the catalytic metal into the polymerase active site. FRET studies with incorrect dNTP result in no changes in fluorescence, indicating that the fingers do not close in the presence of incorrect dNTP. Together, our results show that nucleotide selection initially occurs in an open fingers conformation and that the catalytic pathways of correct and incorrect dNTPs differ from each other. Overall, this study provides new insight into the mechanism of substrate choice by a polymerase that plays a critical role in maintaining genome stability. PMID:24764311

  10. Low-energy neutron flux measurement using a resonance absorption filter surrounding a lithium glass scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Hamidi, S.

    2007-06-01

    The resonance absorption filter technique has been used to determine the thermal/epithermal neutron flux. The main idea in this technique is to use an element with a high and essentially singular resonance in the neutron absorption cross section as a filter surrounding a miniature-type lithium glass scintillator. The count with and without the filter surrounding the detector gives the number of resonance-energy neutrons. Some preliminary results and a comparison with the MCNP code are shown.

  11. Extended Fluorescent Resonant Energy Transfer in DNA Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Taeseok

    This study investigates the use of surfactants and metal cations for the enhancement of long range fluorescent resonant energy transfer (FRET) and the antenna effect in DNA structures with multiple fluorescent dyes. Double-stranded (ds) DNA structures were formed by hybridization of 21mer DNA oligonucleotides with different arrangements of three fluorescent TAMRA donor dyes with two different complementary 21mer oligonucleotides with one fluorescent TexasRed acceptor dye. In such DNA structures, hydrophobic interactions between the fluorescent dyes in close proximity produces dimerization which along with other quenching mechanisms leads to significant reduction of fluorescent emission properties. Addition of the surfactants Triton X-100, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) along with sodium cations (Na+) and divalent magnesium cations (Mg 2+) were tested for their ability to reduce quenching of the fluorescent dyes and improve overall fluorescent emission, the long range FRET and the antenna effect properties. When the neutral (uncharged) surfactant Triton X-100 was added to the FRET ds-DNA hybrid structures with three TAMRA donors and one TexasRed acceptor, dye dimerization and emission quenching remained unaffected. However, for the positively charged CTAB surfactant at concentrations of 100 uM or higher, the neutralization of the negatively charged ds-DNA backbone by the cationic surfactant micelles was found to reduce TAMRA dye dimerization and emission quenching and improve TexasRed quantum yield, resulting in much higher FRET efficiencies and an enhanced antenna effect. This improvement is likely due to the CTAB molecules covering or sheathing the fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes which breaks up the dimerized dye complexes and prevents further quenching from interactions with water molecules and guanine bases in the DNA structure. While the negatively charged SDS surfactant alone was not able to reduce dimerization and

  12. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  13. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  14. Estimation of neutron energy for first resonance from absorption cross section for thermal neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Donald

    1951-01-01

    Examination of published data for some 52 isotopes indicates that the neutron energy for which the first resonance occurs is related to the magnitude of the thermal absorption cross section. The empirical relation obtained is in qualitative agreement with the results of a simplified version of the resonance theory of the nucleus of Breit-Wigner.

  15. Energy conversion within infrared plasmonic absorption metamaterials for multi-band resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqian; Su, Lei; Xu, Xiaolun; Zhang, Chenglin; Wang, Binbin

    2015-05-01

    The energy conversion within the cross-shaped plasmonic absorber metamaterials (PAM) was investigated theoretically and numerically in the infrared range based on the Poynting's theorem of electromagnetic energy. From the microscopic details, the heat generation owing to the electric current accounts for the majority of the energy conversion, while the magnetic resonance plays a negligible role. The PAMs possess three distinct resonant peaks standing independently, which are attributed to the polarization sensitive excitation of plasmonic resonance. Field redistribution and enhancement associated with multiplex resonant electromagnetic wave passing through the PAM medium provided insight into the energy conversion processes inside the nanostructure. The research results will assist the design of novel plasmon enhanced infrared detectors with multiple-band detection.

  16. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  17. Resonance saturation in the odd-intrinsic parity sector of low-energy QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Karol; Novotný, Jiří

    2011-07-01

    Using the large NC approximation we have constructed the most general chiral resonance Lagrangian in the odd-intrinsic parity sector that can generate low-energy chiral constants up to O(p6). Integrating out the resonance fields these O(p6) constants are expressed in terms of resonance couplings and masses. The role of η' is discussed and its contribution is explicitly factorized. Using the resonance basis we have also calculated two QCD Green functions of currents, ⟨VVP⟩ and ⟨VAS⟩, and found, imposing high-energy constraints, additional relations for resonance couplings. We have studied several phenomenological implications based on these correlators which provided, for example, a prediction for the π0-pole contribution to the muon g-2 factor: aμπ0=65.8(1.2)×10-11.

  18. Energy harvesting by dynamic unstability and internal resonance for piezoelectric beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chunbo; Qin, Weiyang Deng, Wangzheng

    2015-08-31

    We investigated the energy harvesting of a vertical beam with tip mass under vertical excitations. We applied dynamic unstability and internal resonance to improve the efficiency of harvesting. The experiments of harmonic excitation were carried out. Results show that for the beam there exist internal resonances in the dynamically unstable and the buckling bistable cases. The dynamic unstability is a determinant for strong internal resonance or mode coupling, which can be used to create a large output from piezoelectric patches. Then, the experiments of stochastic excitation were carried out. Results prove that the internal resonance or mode coupling can transfer the excitation energy to the low order modes, mainly the first and the second one. This can bring about a large output voltage. For a stochastic excitation, it is proved that there is an optimal weight of tip mass for realizing internal resonance and producing large outputs.

  19. Cryogenic resonant microwave compressors with energy extraction through "warm" interference switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoilenko, G. M.; Shlapakovski, A. S.; Yushkov, Yu. G.

    2016-01-01

    A method of switching cryogenic resonant microwave compressors from the energy accumulation mode to the energy release mode is proposed and analyzed. The switching process is based on the resonant transfer of the microwave energy from a cryogenic storage cavity to a room temperature commutation cavity. The transfer can be realized using a cascade interference microwave switch weakly coupled to the storage cavity and consisting of two H-plane waveguide tees connected in series. The tees are made of a normally conducting material, located outside the cryostat, and contain commuting units in shorted side arms. The length of the cascade input arm (from the storage cavity to the first tee) is non-resonant, while the space between the storage cavity and the second tee is resonant. The weak coupling of the storage cavity to the cascade and the non-resonant length of its input arm allow one to minimize losses during the energy accumulation phase. When the commuting unit in the first tee is ignited, the tee opens, and the non-resonant volume of the cascade input arm is transformed into the volume of the resonant commutation cavity. The microwave energy is then transferred in a resonant way from the storage cavity to the commutation cavity, and when the transfer is complete, the commuting unit in the second tee is ignited to extract the energy into a load. It is shown analytically that, at a certain value of the coupling (the cryogenic storage cavity to the normally conducting cascade of tees) and length of the cascade input arm, the power gain in the storage cavity can be kept high. It is also shown that the energy accumulated in the storage cavity can be effectively transferred to the commutation cavity and from the commutation cavity to the load.

  20. Energy transfer: Resonance is the key for coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Daniel B.

    2017-02-01

    The process of electronic energy transfer between molecules has long fascinated chemists. Femtosecond spectroscopy measurements of a series of molecular dimers now reveal signals that arise from non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling, suggesting a new mechanism to enhance energy transfer.

  1. Resonance treatment using pin-based pointwise energy slowing-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Changho; Lee, Deokjung

    2017-02-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method using a pointwise energy solution has been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the equivalence theory. The equivalence theory uses a crude resonance scattering source approximation, and assumes a spatially constant scattering source distribution inside a fuel pellet. These two assumptions cause a significant error, in that they overestimate the multi-group effective cross sections, especially for 238U. The new resonance self-shielding method solves pointwise energy slowing-down equations with a sub-divided fuel rod. The method adopts a shadowing effect correction factor and fictitious moderator material to model a realistic pointwise energy solution. The slowing-down solution is used to generate the multi-group cross section. With various light water reactor problems, it was demonstrated that the new resonance self-shielding method significantly improved accuracy in the reactor parameter calculation with no compromise in computation time, compared to the equivalence theory.

  2. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  3. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-10-20

    POLIDENT (POint LIbraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  4. Multicomponent long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction system: Bright solitons, energy-sharing collisions, and resonant solitons.

    PubMed

    Sakkaravarthi, K; Kanna, T; Vijayajayanthi, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2014-11-01

    We consider a general multicomponent (2+1)-dimensional long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction (LSRI) system with arbitrary nonlinearity coefficients, which describes the nonlinear resonance interaction of multiple short waves with a long wave in two spatial dimensions. The general multicomponent LSRI system is shown to be integrable by performing the Painlevé analysis. Then we construct the exact bright multisoliton solutions by applying the Hirota's bilinearization method and study the propagation and collision dynamics of bright solitons in detail. Particularly, we investigate the head-on and overtaking collisions of bright solitons and explore two types of energy-sharing collisions as well as standard elastic collision. We have also corroborated the obtained analytical one-soliton solution by direct numerical simulation. Also, we discuss the formation and dynamics of resonant solitons. Interestingly, we demonstrate the formation of resonant solitons admitting breather-like (localized periodic pulse train) structure and also large amplitude localized structures akin to rogue waves coexisting with solitons. For completeness, we have also obtained dark one- and two-soliton solutions and studied their dynamics briefly.

  5. Resonance Energy of an Arene Hydrocarbon from Heat of Combustion Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, Vladimir L

    2015-12-08

    A simple experimental method for determination of the resonance energy by measuring the energies of combustion for two isomeric compounds, aromatic 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethylbenzene and nonaromatic trans,trans,cis-1,5,9-cyclododecatriene is proposed. Both compounds not only have the same molecular formula, but also contain the same number of sp(2) and sp(3) carbon atoms. After converting the obtained values into the gas phase heats of combustion and subtracting one value from another, the resulting mean resonance energy of 184 kJ/mol was obtained. The proposed method can be offered as an experiment for an undergraduate physical chemistry lab curriculum.

  6. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  7. Frequency chirping for resonance-enhanced electron energy during laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2006-04-01

    The model given by Singh-Tripathi [Phys. Plasmas 11, 743 (2004)] for laser electron acceleration in a magnetic wiggler is revisited by including the effect of laser frequency chirping. Laser frequency chirp helps to maintain the resonance condition longer, which increases the electron energy gain. A significant enhancement in electron energy gain during laser acceleration is observed.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium resonance energy transfer and probing globular protein flexibility of myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey A; Link, Justin J; Zang, Chen; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-03-22

    Protein structural plasticity is critical to many biological activities and accurate determination of its temporal and spatial fluctuations is challenging and difficult. Here, we report our extensive characterization of global flexibility of a globular heme protein of myoglobin using resonance energy transfer as a molecular ruler. With site-directed mutagenesis, we use a tryptophan scan to examine local structural fluctuations from B to H helices utilizing 10 tryptophan-heme energy transfer pairs with femtosecond resolution. We observed ultrafast resonance energy transfer dynamics by following a nearly single exponential behavior in 10-100 ps, strongly indicating that the globular structure of myoglobin is relatively rigid, with no observable static or slow dynamic conformational heterogeneity. The observation is against our molecular dynamics simulations, which show large local fluctuations and give multiple exponential energy transfer behaviors, suggesting too flexible of the global structure and thus raising a serious issue of the force fields used in simulations. Finally, these ultrafast energy transfer dynamics all occur on the similar time scales of local environmental relaxations (solvation), leading to nonexponential processes caused by energy relaxations, not structural fluctuations. Our analyses of such processes reveal an intrinsic compressed- and/or stretched-exponential behaviors and elucidate the nature of inherent nonequilibrium of ultrafast resonance energy transfer in proteins. This new concept of compressed nonequilibrium transfer dynamics should be applied to all protein studies by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  9. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  10. Nonradiative resonance energy transfer between semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Samosvat, D. M. Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-07-15

    A microscopic analysis of the mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in a system of two semiconductor QDs caused by Coulomb interaction of donor and acceptor electrons is performed. The energy transfer rate is calculated for QDs based on III–V compounds using the Kane model. Conditions are analyzed under which energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor is possible. The mixing in of the p states of the valence band to the s states of the conduction band is found to give rise to additional contributions to the matrix element of energy transfer. It is shown that these additional contributions play a considerable role in the energy transfer process at distances between QDs close to contact distances or much greater. The influence of the exchange interaction on the energy transfer mechanism is analyzed, and it is shown that this interaction should be taken into account for a quantitative description of the energy transfer when QDs are separated by a distance close to the contact distance.

  11. Energy loss by resonance line photons in an absorbing medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mean path length of photons undergoing repeated scatterings in media of large optical thickness is calculated from accurate numerical solutions of the transfer equation including the effect of frequency redistribution characteristic of combined Doppler and natural broadening. Energy loss by continuous absorption processes, such as ionization or dust absorption, is discussed, and asymptotic scaling laws for the energy loss, the mean path length, and the mean number of scatterings are inferred from the numerical data.

  12. Enhanced acoustoelectric coupling in acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Aichao; Bai, Xiaoling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, enhanced acoustoelectric transduction in an acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators has been reported. The harvester uses a pair of cavities mechanically coupled with a compliant perforated plate to enhance the acoustic coupling between the cavity and the plate. The experimental results show that the volume optimization of the second cavity can significantly increase the generated electric voltage up to 400% and raise the output power to 16 times as large as that of a harvester using a single Helmholtz resonator at resonant frequencies primarily related to the plate.

  13. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s(2) at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  14. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P

    2014-11-15

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  15. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-03-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks.

  16. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks. PMID:24594876

  17. Bearing fault identification by higher order energy operator fusion: A non-resonance based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghidi, H.; Liang, M.

    2016-10-01

    We report a non-resonance based approach to bearing fault detection. This is achieved by a higher order energy operator fusion (HOEO_F) method. In this method, multiple higher order energy operators are fused to form a single simple transform to process the bearing signal obscured by noise and vibration interferences. The fusion is guided by entropy minimization. Unlike the popular high frequency resonance technique, this method does not require the information of resonance excited by the bearing fault. The effects of the HOEO_F method on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) are illustrated in this paper. The performance of the proposed method in handling noise and interferences has been examined using both simulated and experimental data. The results indicate that the HOEO_F method outperforms both the envelope method and the original energy operator method.

  18. Effectiveness Testing of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for an Automobile Wheel Using Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunshun; Zheng, Rencheng; Shimono, Keisuke; Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-01-01

    The collection of clean power from ambient vibrations is considered a promising method for energy harvesting. For the case of wheel rotation, the present study investigates the effectiveness of a piezoelectric energy harvester, with the application of stochastic resonance to optimize the efficiency of energy harvesting. It is hypothesized that when the wheel rotates at variable speeds, the energy harvester is subjected to on-road noise as ambient excitations and a tangentially acting gravity force as a periodic modulation force, which can stimulate stochastic resonance. The energy harvester was miniaturized with a bistable cantilever structure, and the on-road noise was measured for the implementation of a vibrator in an experimental setting. A validation experiment revealed that the harvesting system was optimized to capture power that was approximately 12 times that captured under only on-road noise excitation and 50 times that captured under only the periodic gravity force. Moreover, the investigation of up-sweep excitations with increasing rotational frequency confirmed that stochastic resonance is effective in optimizing the performance of the energy harvester, with a certain bandwidth of vehicle speeds. An actual-vehicle experiment validates that the prototype harvester using stochastic resonance is capable of improving power generation performance for practical tire application. PMID:27763522

  19. Effectiveness Testing of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for an Automobile Wheel Using Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunshun; Zheng, Rencheng; Shimono, Keisuke; Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-10-17

    The collection of clean power from ambient vibrations is considered a promising method for energy harvesting. For the case of wheel rotation, the present study investigates the effectiveness of a piezoelectric energy harvester, with the application of stochastic resonance to optimize the efficiency of energy harvesting. It is hypothesized that when the wheel rotates at variable speeds, the energy harvester is subjected to on-road noise as ambient excitations and a tangentially acting gravity force as a periodic modulation force, which can stimulate stochastic resonance. The energy harvester was miniaturized with a bistable cantilever structure, and the on-road noise was measured for the implementation of a vibrator in an experimental setting. A validation experiment revealed that the harvesting system was optimized to capture power that was approximately 12 times that captured under only on-road noise excitation and 50 times that captured under only the periodic gravity force. Moreover, the investigation of up-sweep excitations with increasing rotational frequency confirmed that stochastic resonance is effective in optimizing the performance of the energy harvester, with a certain bandwidth of vehicle speeds. An actual-vehicle experiment validates that the prototype harvester using stochastic resonance is capable of improving power generation performance for practical tire application.

  20. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Eric T; Hardin, Brian E; McGehee, Michael D

    2010-02-15

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies.

  1. Brightening Gold Nanoparticles: New Sensing Approach Based on Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F− ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25959016

  2. Mesoscopic order and the dimensionality of long-range resonance energy transfer in supramolecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Clément; Makereel, François; Herz, Laura M.; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    We present time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on two series of oligo-p-phenylenevinylene materials that self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with thermotropic reversibility in dodecane. One set of derivatives form chiral helical stacks, while the second set form less organized "frustrated" stacks. Here we study the effects of supramolecular organization on the resonance energy transfer rates. We measure these rates in nanoassemblies formed with mixed blends of oligomers and compare them with the rates predicted by Förster theory. Our results and analysis show that control of supramolecular order in the nanometer length scale has a dominant effect on the efficiency and dimensionality of resonance energy transfer.

  3. Angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on a split-ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Cube, F.; Niegemann, J.; Irsen, S.; Bell, D. C.; Linden, S.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the plasmonic near field of a lithographically defined split-ring resonator with angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. By tilting the sample, different electric field components of the plasmonic modes can be probed with the electron beam. The electron energy loss spectra recorded under oblique incidence can feature plasmonic resonances that are not observable under normal incidence. Our experimental findings are supported by full numerical calculations based on the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method.

  4. Detection of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor with a Novel Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Pair Using a Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Tobias; Schroeter, Eva; Lorenz, Birgit; Stieger, Knut

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe a two-component BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer)-based method to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) molecules in unknown samples as the basis for subsequent in vivo use. A luminescent VEGF binding molecule, which binds in the receptor binding motif of VEGF, is used as the energy donor, transferred to a fluorophore-coupled VEGF binding molecule (acceptor), which binds to the neuropilin binding motif of VEGF, thus enabling energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor molecule. This leads to the emission of light at a longer wavelength and thus the generation of an increased BRET signal only when VEGF is bound to both the donor and acceptor molecules. We further describe a novel BRET pair that uses the Renilla reniformis mutant luciferase RLuc8 and the chemically engineered fluorophore PerCP-Cy5.5®, which exhibits superior peak separation of approximately 300 nm. The implantation of capsules consisting of the two BRET components in solution, permeable for VEGF for its in vivo detection, would provide a new and improved method for monitoring VEGF-induced pathologies and thus an adjustment of therapy to patient needs. PMID:28098756

  5. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  6. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  7. Resonance transition energies and oscillator strengths in lutetium and lawrencium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Fischer, C Froese

    2002-05-06

    The transition energies and oscillator strengths for nd (2)D(3/2)-(n+1)p (2)P(o)(1/2,3/2) transitions in Lu ( n = 5, Z = 71) and Lr ( n = 6, Z = 103) were calculated with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The present study confirmed that the ground state of atomic Lr is [Rn]5f(14)7s(2)7p (2)P(o)(1/2). The calculation for Lr required wave function expansions of more than 330 000 configuration states. In Lu, the transition energies, with Breit and QED corrections included, agree with experiment to within 126 cm(-1). In lighter elements, core correlation is usually neglected but was found to be of extreme importance for these heavy elements, affecting the oscillator strengths by a factor of 3 and 2 in Lu and Lr, respectively.

  8. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  9. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  10. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-15

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm{sup 3}, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  11. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-01

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm3, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  12. Energy-loss of He ions in carbon allotropes studied by elastic resonance in backscattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo; Rauhala, Eero

    2015-10-01

    Backscattering spectra for 4He ions incident on carbon allotropes have been measured in the energy range from 4.30 to 4.95 MeV in steps of 50-100 keV at scattering angles of 106° and 170°. We used three carbon allotropes: graphite, diamond and amorphous carbon. For all these allotropes, we can observe the sharp (4He, 12C) elastic nuclear resonance at the He ion energy of 4.265 MeV in the backscattering spectra. By varying the incident He energy, we have systematically analyzed the profiles of the resonance peaks to study the energy-loss processes: stopping cross-sections and energy-loss straggling around the interesting region of the stopping maximum at about 500 keV. We focus on the resonance profiles and investigate an allotropic effect concerning the energy-loss. Furthermore, an energy bunching effect on the straggling is presented and the mechanism is discussed.

  13. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-09

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  14. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  15. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  16. Color-Tunable Resonant Photoluminescence and Cavity-Mediated Multistep Energy Transfer Cascade.

    PubMed

    Okada, Daichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Lorke, Axel; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-07-26

    Color-tunable resonant photoluminescence (PL) was attained from polystyrene microspheres doped with a single polymorphic fluorescent dye, boron-dipyrrin (BODIPY) 1. The color of the resonant PL depends on the assembling morphology of 1 in the microspheres, which can be selectively controlled from green to red by the initial concentration of 1 in the preparation process of the microspheres. Studies on intersphere PL propagation with multicoupled microspheres, prepared by micromanipulation technique, revealed that multistep photon transfer takes place through the microspheres, accompanying energy transfer cascade with stepwise PL color change. The intersphere energy transfer cascade is direction selective, where energy donor-to-acceptor down conversion direction is only allowed. Such cavity-mediated long-distance and multistep energy transfer will be advantageous for polymer photonics device application.

  17. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  18. Investigation of the hole resonant energies in GaAs-AlGaAs double-barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkal, N.; Zitouni, K.; Kadri, A.

    1994-12-01

    A rigorous calculation of the resonant energies corresponding to valence sub-band hold transmission maxima is presented for GaAs/AlGaAs double-barrier heterostructures, employing the k.p method, the envelope-function approximation, and transfer matrix techniques. Incident waves associated with both the two light-hole and two heavy-hole bands are treated explicitly.

  19. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  2. Exploiting the principle parametric resonance of an electric oscillator for vibratory energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, N. B.; Daqaq, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    Vibratory energy harvesters typically exploit ordinary direct resonances to mechanically amplify environmental inputs before channeling a portion of their energy into an electric load using an electromechanical transduction mechanism. Nonetheless, parametric resonance which has also been recently exploited, but to a lesser extent, holds a key advantage over direct excitations in that, when the level of input excitation exceeds a certain threshold, the amplitude of growth associated with parametric pumping is not limited by the total linear damping present in the system. While all of the previous research studies using parametric resonances for energy harvesting focused on utilizing it as a means of mechanical amplification, this letter demonstrates that vibratory excitations can also be used effectively to induce parametric resonances in the harvesting circuit itself, thereby providing a direct and simple means of electric amplification. A vibratory energy harvester exploiting this phenomenon is proposed in this letter and is shown to produce a maximum of 18 mW root-mean-square power per 1 g of input acceleration.

  3. Measurement of radiative capture resonance energies with an extended gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, D. A.; Ruiz, C.; Fallis, J.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davids, B.; Hager, U.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D. F.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.

    2012-10-01

    The DRAGON facility for the study of radiative capture reactions has an extended gas target, surrounded by an array of BGO detectors. The distribution of detected gamma rays amongst the segmented array permits an estimate of the reaction position and consequently of the resonance energy. We report a study of the technique, using the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al reaction. Energy determination to better than 0.5% has been demonstrated.

  4. A BODIPY-luminol chemiluminescent resonance energy-transfer (CRET) cassette for imaging of cellular superoxide.

    PubMed

    Bag, S; Tseng, J-C; Rochford, J

    2015-02-14

    Spectroscopic and in cellulo studies are here reported on the very first BODIPY-luminol chemiluminescent resonance energy-transfer (CRET) cassette where the luminol CL agent is covalently linked to the BODIPY energy-transfer acceptor in a molecular dyad. The efficiency of intramolecular CRET investigated for the BODIPY-luminol dyad was found to be 64% resulting in a dual emissive response. Successful in cellulo biochemiluminescence via CRET was achieved in PMA activated splenocytes.

  5. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  6. Structure of cytochrome c complexes with phospholipids as revealed by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-08-20

    Resonance energy transfer between a series of lipid-bound fluorescent probes as donors and the heme group of cytochrome c as acceptor has been used to obtain structural information on the protein complexes with model membranes, composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin. Analysis of experimental data in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems provides further evidence for preferential cytochrome c orientation with respect to the lipid bilayer and penetration of the protein into the membrane interior.

  7. Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Daniel; Cankut, Ahmet J; Ali, Noorshida Mohd; Stephenson, Andrew; Spall, Steven J P; Parker, Simon C; Weinstein, Julia A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-05-07

    A series of blue-luminescent Ir(III) complexes with a pendant binding site for lanthanide(III) ions has been synthesized and used to prepare Ir(III)/Ln(III) dyads (Ln = Eu, Tb, Gd). Photophysical studies were used to establish mechanisms of Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer. In the Ir/Gd dyads, where direct Ir→Gd energy-transfer is not possible, significant quenching of Ir-based luminescence nonetheless occurred; this can be ascribed to photoinduced electron-transfer from the photo-excited Ir unit (*Ir, (3)MLCT/(3)LC excited state) to the pendant pyrazolyl-pyridine site which becomes a good electron-acceptor when coordinated to an electropositive Gd(III) centre. This electron transfer quenches the Ir-based luminescence, leading to formation of a charge-separated {Ir(4+)}˙-(pyrazolyl-pyridine)˙(-) state, which is short-lived possibly due to fast back electron-transfer (<20 ns). In the Ir/Tb and Ir/Eu dyads this electron-transfer pathway is again operative and leads to sensitisation of Eu-based and Tb-based emission using the energy liberated from the back electron-transfer process. In addition direct Dexter-type Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer occurs on a similar timescale, meaning that there are two parallel mechanisms by which excitation energy can be transferred from *Ir to the Eu/Tb centre. Time-resolved luminescence measurements on the sensitised Eu-based emission showed both fast and slow rise-time components, associated with the PET-based and Dexter-based energy-transfer mechanisms respectively. In the Ir/Tb dyads, the Ir→Tb energy-transfer is only just thermodynamically favourable, leading to rapid Tb→Ir thermally-activated back energy-transfer and non-radiative deactivation to an extent that depends on the precise energy gap between the *Ir and Tb-based (5)D4 states. Thus, the sensitised Tb(iii)-based emission is weak and unusually short-lived due to back energy transfer, but nonetheless represents rare examples of Tb(III) sensitisation by

  8. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  9. Harvesting wind energy to detect weak signals using mechanical stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Barbara J.; Rix, Jillian G.; Ross, Samuel J.; Yu, Yue; Lindner, John F.; Mathewson, Nathan; Wainwright, Elliot R.; Wilson, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Wind is free and ubiquitous and can be harnessed in multiple ways. We demonstrate mechanical stochastic resonance in a tabletop experiment in which wind energy is harvested to amplify weak periodic signals detected via the movement of an inverted pendulum. Unlike earlier mechanical stochastic resonance experiments, where noise was added via electrically driven vibrations, our broad-spectrum noise source is a single flapping flag. The regime of the experiment is readily accessible, with wind speeds ˜20 m/s and signal frequencies ˜1 Hz. We readily obtain signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 10 dB.

  10. Harvesting wind energy to detect weak signals using mechanical stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Breen, Barbara J; Rix, Jillian G; Ross, Samuel J; Yu, Yue; Lindner, John F; Mathewson, Nathan; Wainwright, Elliot R; Wilson, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Wind is free and ubiquitous and can be harnessed in multiple ways. We demonstrate mechanical stochastic resonance in a tabletop experiment in which wind energy is harvested to amplify weak periodic signals detected via the movement of an inverted pendulum. Unlike earlier mechanical stochastic resonance experiments, where noise was added via electrically driven vibrations, our broad-spectrum noise source is a single flapping flag. The regime of the experiment is readily accessible, with wind speeds ∼20 m/s and signal frequencies ∼1 Hz. We readily obtain signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 10 dB.

  11. High-energy localized eigenstates of an electronic resonator in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalipaev, V. V.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Popov, M. M.

    2008-02-01

    We present a semiclassical analysis of the high-energy eigenstates of an electron inside a closed resonator. An asymptotic method of the construction of the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions, localized in the small neighborhood of a periodic orbit, is developed in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field and arbitrary scalar potential. The isolated periodic orbit is confined between two interfaces which could be planar, concave or even convex. Such a system represents a quantum electronic resonator, an analog of the well-known high-frequency optical or acoustic resonator with eigenmodes called 'bouncing ball vibrations'. The first step in the asymptotic analysis involves constructing a solitary localized asymptotic solution to the Schrödinger equation (electronic Gaussian beam—wavepackage). Then, the stability of a closed continuous family of periodic trajectories confined between two reflecting surfaces of the resonator boundary was studied. The asymptotics of the eigenfunctions were constructed as a superposition of two electronic Gaussian beams propagating in opposite directions between two reflecting points of the periodic orbits. The asymptotics of the energy spectrum are obtained by the generalized Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition derived as a requirement for the eigenfunction asymptotics to be periodic. For one class of periodic orbits, localized eigenstates were computed numerically by the finite element method using FEMLAB and proved to be in a very good agreement with those computed semiclassically.

  12. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y.

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  13. Broadband vibration energy harvesting by application of stochastic resonance from rotational environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Kaizuka, T.; Su, D.; Nakano, K.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    A model for energy harvesting from a rotating automotive tyre is suggested in which the principle of stochastic resonance is advantageously exploited. A bistable response characteristic is obtained by recourse a small harvester comprising a magnetically repellant configuration in which an instrumented cantilever beam can flip between two physical response states when suitably excited by the rotation of a car wheel into which it is fitted. The rotation of the wheel creates a periodic modulation which enables stochastic resonance to take place and as a consequence of this for energy to be harvested from road noise transmitted through the tyre. An optimised mathematical model of the system is presented based on a series of experimental tests and it is shown that a ten-fold increase in harvested energy over a comparable monostable case is feasible. The suggested application for this harvester is to provide electrical power for a tyre pressure monitoring system.

  14. Classification of vibrational resonances in the energy spectrum of the formaldehyde molecule and Katz's branch points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. D.; Duchko, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory of high orders and the algebraic Padé-Hermite approximants are used to determine the singular points of a vibrational energy function of the formaldehyde molecule dependent on a complex perturbation parameter as on the argument. It is shown that the Fermi, Darling-Dennison, and other higher-order vibrational resonances are related to Katz's points—common branch points on the complex plane of the energy of two vibrational states. Analysis of Katz's points that connect different vibrational states allows one to reveal essential resonance perturbations, to introduce an additional classification for them, and to determine the polyad structure of an energy spectrum.

  15. Resonance Energy of an Arene Hydrocarbon from Heat of Combustion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnichenko, Vladimir L.

    2015-01-01

    A simple experimental method for determination of the resonance energy by measuring the energies of combustion for two isomeric compounds, aromatic 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethylbenzene and nonaromatic trans,trans,cis-1,5,9-cyclododecatriene is proposed. Both compounds not only have the same molecular formula, but also contain the same number of sp2 and sp3 carbon atoms. After converting the obtained values into the gas phase heats of combustion and subtracting one value from another, the resulting mean resonance energy of 184 kJ/mol was obtained. The proposed method can be offered as an experiment for an undergraduate physical chemistry lab curriculum. PMID:26997668

  16. Resonant energy transfer between Eu luminescent sites and their local geometry in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, Dolf; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Tanaka, Kazuteru; Lee, Dong-gun; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2015-10-12

    Eu-doped GaN is a solid state material with promising features for quantum manipulation. In this study, we investigate the population dynamics of Eu in ions in this system by resonant excitation. From differences in the emission related to transitions between the {sup 5}D{sub 0} and {sup 7}F{sub 2} manifold in the Eu ions, we can distinguish different luminescence sites and observe that a resonant energy transfer takes place between two of these sites which are in proximity of each other. The time constants related to this energy transfer are on the order of 100 μs. By using different substrates, the energy transfer efficiency could be strongly altered, and it is demonstrated that the coupling between ions has an out-of-plane character. Based on these results, a microscopic model of this combined center is presented.

  17. Particle-hole optical model and strength functions for high-energy giant resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Urin, M. H.

    2010-08-15

    A formulation of the particle-hole optical model is proposed for describing the contribution of the fragmentation effect to the formation of strength functions for high-energy giant resonances. The model is based on the Bethe-Goldstone equation for the energy-averaged particle-hole Green's function. In this equation, the particle-hole interaction that is induced by a virtual excitation of multiquasiparticle configurations and in which, upon averaging over energy, an imaginary part is contained is taken into account. An analogy with the single-quasiparticle optical model is discussed.

  18. Analysis of resonance energy transfer in model membranes: role of orientational effects.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Gorbenko, Galina P

    2002-10-16

    The model of resonance energy transfer (RET) in membrane systems containing donors randomly distributed over two parallel planes separated by fixed distance and acceptors confined to a single plane is presented. Factors determining energy transfer rate are considered with special attention being given to the contribution from orientational heterogeneity of the donor emission and acceptor absorption transition dipoles. Analysis of simulated data suggests that RET in membranes, as compared to intramolecular energy transfer, is substantially less sensitive to the degree of reorientational freedom of chromophores due to averaging over multiple donor-acceptor pairs. The uncertainties in the distance estimation resulting from the unknown mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor are analyzed.

  19. Energy transfer based photoluminescence spectra of co-doped (Dy3+ + Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO glasses for orange emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, L.; Naveen Kumar, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper brings out the results concerning the preparation and optical properties of Sm3+ and Dy3+ each ion separately in different concentrations (0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) and also together doped (x mol.% Dy3+ + 1.5 mol.% Sm3+): Li2O-LiF-B2O3-ZnO (where x = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol.%) glasses by a melt quenching method. Structural and thermal properties have been extensively studied for those glasses by XRD and TG/DTA. The compositional analysis has been carried out from FTIR spectral profile. Optical absorption spectral studies were also carried out. Sm3+: LBZ glasses have displayed an intense orange emission at 603 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2) with an excitation wavelength at 403 nm and Dy3+: LBZ glasses have shown two emissions located at 485 nm (4F9/2 → 6H15/2; blue) and 574 nm (4F9/2 → 6H13/2; yellow) with an excitation wavelength at 385 nm. Remarkably, it has been identified that the significant increase in the reddish orange emission of Sm3+ ions and diminished yellow emission pertaining to Dy3+ ions in the co-doped LBZ glass system under the excitation of 385 nm which relates to Dy3+ ions. This could be due energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+. The non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Sm3+ is explained in terms of their emission spectra, donor lifetime, energy level diagram and energy transfer characteristic factors. These significantly enhanced orange emission exhibited glasses could be suggested as potential optical glasses for orange luminescence photonic devices.

  20. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  1. Anomalies in the theory of viscous energy losses due to shear in rotational MEMS resonators.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Klody, Kelly Anne; Jenkins, Mark W.; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, the effect of viscous wave motion on a micro rotational resonator is discussed. This work shows the inadequacy of developing theory to represent energy losses due to shear motion in air. Existing theory predicts Newtonian losses with little slip at the interface. Nevertheless, experiments showed less effect due to Newtonian losses and elevated levels of slip for small gaps. Values of damping were much less than expected. Novel closed form solutions for the response of components are presented. The stiffness of the resonator is derived using Castigliano's theorem, and viscous fluid motion above and below the resonator is derived using a wave approach. Analytical results are compared with experimental results to determine the utility of existing theory. It was found that existing macro and molecular theory is inadequate to describes measured responses.

  2. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  3. Continuous energy, multi-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculations for problem dependent resonance treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng

    In the past twenty 20 years considerable progress has been made in developing new methods for solving the multi-dimensional transport problem. However the effort devoted to the resonance self-shielding calculation has lagged, and much less progress has been made in enhancing resonance-shielding techniques for generating problem-dependent multi-group cross sections (XS) for the multi-dimensional transport calculations. In several applications, the error introduced by self-shielding methods exceeds that due to uncertainties in the basic nuclear data, and often they can be the limiting factor on the accuracy of the final results. This work is to improve the accuracy of the resonance self-shielding calculation by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. A new method has been developed, it can calculate the continuous-energy neutron fluxes for the whole two-dimensional domain, which can be utilized as weighting function to process the self-shielded multi-group cross sections for reactor analysis and criticality calculations, and during this process, the two-dimensional heterogeneous effect in the resonance self-shielding calculation can be fully included. A new code, GEMINEWTRN (Group and Energy-Pointwise Methodology Implemented in NEWT for Resonance Neutronics) has been developed in the developing version of SCALE [1], it combines the energy pointwise (PW) capability of the CENTRM [2] with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport capability of lattice physics code NEWT [14]. Considering the large number of energy points in the resonance region (typically more than 30,000), the computational burden and memory requirement for GEMINEWTRN is tremendously large, some efforts have been performed to improve the computational efficiency, parallel computation has been implemented into GEMINEWTRN, which can save the computation and memory requirement a lot; some energy points reducing

  4. A resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester for intelligent wireless sensor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jing Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Liu, Xin; Chen, Hengjia; Yang, Jin

    2015-05-07

    Vibration energy harvesting is now receiving more interest as a means for powering intelligent wireless sensor systems. In this paper, a resonant electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH) employing double cantilever to convert low-frequency vibration energy into electrical energy is presented. The VEH is made up of two cantilever beams, a coil, and magnetic circuits. The electric output performances of the proposed electromagnetic VEH have been investigated. With the enhancement of turns number N, the optimum peak power of electromagnetic VEH increases sharply and the resonance frequency deceases gradually. When the vibration acceleration is 0.5 g, we obtain the optimum output voltage and power of 9.04 V and 50.8 mW at frequency of 14.9 Hz, respectively. In a word, the prototype device was successfully developed and the experimental results exhibit a great enhancement in the output power and bandwidth compared with other traditional electromagnetic VEHs. Remarkably, the proposed resonant electromagnetic VEH have great potential for applying in intelligent wireless sensor systems.

  5. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  6. Simulation of Electrostatic Actuation in Interdigitated Comb Drive MEMS Resonator for Energy Harvester Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathya, S.; Pavithra, M.; Muruganand, S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an actuation mechanism based on the interdigitated comb drive MEMS resonator. The important role of that device is to establish MEMS resonators for the second order systems. Comb drive model is one of the basic model which uses the principle of electrostatic and force can be generated for the capacitive sensors. This work is done by overlapping movable and fixed comb fingers which produces an energy. The specific range of the polyimide material properties of young's modulus of 3.1GPa and density of 1300 Kg/m3. Results are shown in the structural domain performance of a lateral motion which corresponds to the applying voltage between the interdigitated comb fingers. It has laterally driven about 40pm with driving voltage. Also the resonance frequency 24Hz and 15Hz with high quality factors are depending on the spring length 260pm and 360pm and structure thickness of 2μm and 5 μm. Here Finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the various physics scenario and it is designed as two dimensional structure multiphysics domain. The prototype of comb drive MEMS resonator has been suitable for energy harvesting system applications.

  7. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation.

  8. Resonance interaction energy between two accelerated identical atoms in a coaccelerated frame and the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the resonance interaction energy between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, interacting with the scalar field or the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, in the reference frame coaccelerating with the atoms. We assume that one atom is excited and the other is in the ground state and that they are prepared in their correlated symmetric or antisymmetric state. Using perturbation theory, we separate, at the second order in the atom-field coupling, the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and a radiation reaction field to the energy shift of the interacting system. We show that only the radiation reaction term contributes to the resonance interaction between the two atoms, while Unruh thermal fluctuations, related to the vacuum fluctuations contribution, do not affect the resonance interatomic interaction. We also show that the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated atoms, recently investigated in the comoving (locally inertial) frame, can be recovered in the coaccelerated frame, without the additional assumption of the Fulling-Davies-Unruh temperature for the quantum fields (as necessary for the Lamb shift, for example). This indicates, in the case considered, the equivalence between the coaccelerated frame and the locally inertial frame.

  9. Direct measurement of low-energy 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, R.; Cavanna, F.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Ciani, G. F.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Piatti, D.; Prati, P.; Straniero, O.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Background: The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction is the most uncertain process in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. At temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars and classical novae, its uncertainty is mainly due to a large number of predicted but hitherto unobserved resonances at low energy. Purpose: A new direct study of low-energy 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na resonances has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Method: The proton capture on 22Ne was investigated in direct kinematics, delivering an intense proton beam to a 22Ne gas target. γ rays were detected with two high-purity germanium detectors enclosed in a copper and lead shield suppressing environmental radioactivity. Results: Three resonances at 156.2 keV [ω γ =(1.48 ±0.10 ) ×10-7 eV], 189.5 keV [ω γ =(1.87 ±0.06 ) ×10-6 eV] and 259.7 keV [ω γ =(6.89 ±0.16 ) ×10-6 eV] proton beam energy, respectively, have been observed for the first time. For the levels at Ex=8943.5 , 8975.3, and 9042.4 keV excitation energy corresponding to the new resonances, the γ -decay branching ratios have been precisely measured. Three additional, tentative resonances at 71, 105, and 215 keV proton beam energy, respectively, were not observed here. For the strengths of these resonances, experimental upper limits have been derived that are significantly more stringent than the upper limits reported in the literature. Conclusions: Based on the present experimental data and also previous literature data, an updated thermonuclear reaction rate is provided in tabular and parametric form. The new reaction rate is significantly higher than previous evaluations at temperatures of 0.08-0.3 GK.

  10. An energetic measure of aromaticity and antiaromaticity based on the Pauling-Wheland resonance energies.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2006-02-20

    Various criteria based on geometric, energetic, magnetic, and electronic properties are employed to delineate aromatic and antiaromatic systems. The recently proposed block-localized wave function (BLW) method evaluates the original Pauling-Wheland adiabatic resonance energy (ARE), defined as the energy difference between the real conjugated system and the corresponding virtual most stable resonance structure. The BLW-derived ARE of benzene is 57.5 kcal mol(-1) with the 6-311+G** basis set. Kistiakowsky's historical experimental evaluation of the stabilization energy of benzene (36 kcal mol(-1)), based on heats of hydrogenation, seriously underestimates this quantity due to the neglect of the partially counterbalancing hyperconjugative stabilization of cyclohexene, employed as the reference olefin (three times) in Kistiakowsky's evaluation. Based instead on the bond-separation-energy reaction involving ethene, which has no hyperconjugation, as well as methane and ethane, the experimental resonance energy of benzene is found to be 65.0 kcal mol(-1). We derived the "extra cyclic resonance energy" (ECRE) to characterize and measure the extra stabilization (aromaticity) of conjugated rings. ECRE is the difference between the AREs of a fully cyclically conjugated compound and an appropriate model with corresponding, but interrupted (acyclic) conjugation. Based on 1,3,5-hexatriene, which also has three double bonds, the ECRE of benzene is 36.7 kcal mol(-1), whereas based on 1,3,5,7-octatetraene, which has three diene conjugations, the ECRE of benzene is 25.7 kcal mol(-1). Computations on a series of aromatic, nonaromatic, and antiaromatic five-membered rings validate the BLW-computed resonance energies (ARE). ECRE data on the five-membered rings (derived from comparisons with acyclic models) correlate well with nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and other quantitative aromaticity criteria. The ARE of cyclobutadiene is almost the same as butadiene but is 10.5 kcal

  11. Conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shinya; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-03-03

    We study the conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage. Heat leakage current from a hot electrode to a cold electrode is taken into account in the analysis of the harvester operation. Modeling of electrical output indicates that a maximum heat leakage current is not negligible because it is larger than that of the heat current harvested into electrical power. A reduction of heat leakage is required in this energy harvester in order to obtain efficient heat-to-electrical conversion. Multiple energy levels of a quantum dot can increase the output power of the harvester. Heavily doped colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are a possible candidate for a quantum-dot monolayer in the energy harvester to reduce heat leakage, scaling down device size, and increasing electrical output via multiple discrete energy levels.

  12. Conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shinya; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    We study the conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage. Heat leakage current from a hot electrode to a cold electrode is taken into account in the analysis of the harvester operation. Modeling of electrical output indicates that a maximum heat leakage current is not negligible because it is larger than that of the heat current harvested into electrical power. A reduction of heat leakage is required in this energy harvester in order to obtain efficient heat-to-electrical conversion. Multiple energy levels of a quantum dot can increase the output power of the harvester. Heavily doped colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are a possible candidate for a quantum-dot monolayer in the energy harvester to reduce heat leakage, scaling down device size, and increasing electrical output via multiple discrete energy levels.

  13. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie; Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  14. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez Moyet, Richard; Rossetti, George A.; Stace, Joseph; Amin, Ahmed; Finkel, Peter

    2015-10-26

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]{sub C}-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequency up-conversion.

  15. A resonance mechanism of efficient energy transfer mediated by Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Miklaszewski, Wiesław

    2012-04-01

    The Wigner-Weisskopf-type model developed by Alicki and Giraldi [J. Phys. B 44, 154020 (2011)], 10.1088/0953-4075/44/15/154020 is applied to the biological process of energy transfer from a large peripheral light harvesting antenna to the reaction center. This process is mediated by the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex with a remarkably high efficiency. The proposed model provides a simple resonance mechanism of this phenomenon employing exciton coherent motion and is described by analytical formulas. A coupling to the vibrational environment is a necessary component of this mechanism as well as a fine-tuning of the FMO complex Hamiltonian. The role of the relatively strong coupling to the energy sink in achieving the resonance condition and the absence of heating of the vibrational environment are emphasized.

  16. Electronic Couplings for Resonance Energy Transfer from CCSD Calculations: From Isolated to Solvated Systems.

    PubMed

    Caricato, Marco; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Scalmani, Giovanni

    2015-11-10

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of electronic couplings provide great insights for the study of resonance energy transfer (RET). However, most of these calculations rely on approximate QM methods due to the computational limitations imposed by the size of typical donor-acceptor systems. In this work, we present a novel implementation that allows computing electronic couplings at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of theory. Solvent effects are also taken into account through the polarizable continuum model (PCM). As a test case, we use a dimer of indole, a common model system for tryptophan, which is routinely used as an intrinsic fluorophore in Förster resonance energy transfer studies. We consider two bright π → π* states, one of which has charge transfer character. Lastly, the results are compared with those obtained by applying TD-DFT in combination with one of the most popular density functionals, B3LYP.

  17. Vibration energy harvester with low resonant frequency based on flexible coil and liquid spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, L.; Tang, Y.; Shkel, A.; Kim, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports an electromagnetic vibration-energy harvester with low resonant frequency based on liquid spring composed of ferrofluid. Cylinder magnet array formed by four disc NdFeB magnets is suspended by ferrofluid in a laser-machined acrylic tube which is wrapped by flexible planar coil fabricated with microfabrication process. The magnet array and coil are aligned automatically by the ferrofluid. Restoring force when the magnet array is deviated from the balance position is proportional to the deviated distance, which makes the ferrofluid work as a liquid spring obeying Hook's law. Experimental results show that the electromagnetic energy harvester occupying 1.8 cc and weighing 5 g has a resonant frequency of 16 Hz and generates an induced electromotive force of Vrms = 2.58 mV (delivering 79 nW power into matched load of 21 Ω) from 3 g acceleration at 16 Hz.

  18. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  19. Density functional resonance theory: complex density functions, convergence, orbital energies, and functionals.

    PubMed

    Whitenack, Daniel L; Wasserman, Adam

    2012-04-28

    Aspects of density functional resonance theory (DFRT) [D. L. Whitenack and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 163002 (2011)], a recently developed complex-scaled version of ground-state density functional theory (DFT), are studied in detail. The asymptotic behavior of the complex density function is related to the complex resonance energy and system's threshold energy, and the function's local oscillatory behavior is connected with preferential directions of electron decay. Practical considerations for implementation of the theory are addressed including sensitivity to the complex-scaling parameter, θ. In Kohn-Sham DFRT, it is shown that almost all θ-dependence in the calculated energies and lifetimes can be extinguished via use of a proper basis set or fine grid. The highest occupied Kohn-Sham orbital energy and lifetime are related to physical affinity and width, and the threshold energy of the Kohn-Sham system is shown to be equal to the threshold energy of the interacting system shifted by a well-defined functional. Finally, various complex-scaling conditions are derived which relate the functionals of ground-state DFT to those of DFRT via proper scaling factors and a non-Hermitian coupling-constant system.

  20. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  1. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins as powerful toolkits for in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A. L.; Savitsky, A. P.

    2011-02-01

    To expand the field of research in biological systems development of extra-sensitive analytical methods is highly desirable. In this review, the latest advances in technologies relying on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins (FP's) to visualize numerous molecular processes in living cells are discussed. Variety of FP's as well as of novel experimental techniques allows one to choose the most appropriate tools to attack concrete problems.

  3. Measuring IL-1β Processing by Bioluminescence Sensors I: Using a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Compan, Vincent; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β processing is one of the hallmarks of inflammasome activation and drives the initiation of the inflammatory response. For decades, Western blot or ELISA have been extensively used to study this inflammatory event. Here, we describe the use of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor to monitor IL-1β processing in real time and in living macrophages either using a plate reader or a microscope.

  4. Energy Extraction from the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Elias, Juan Gallardo and Peter Goldstein N00014-80-C-0308 S. PF OR -ING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS I . PROGRAM ELEMt.T PROJECT, TASK * ,’ niwxrsity...Elias, Juan Gallardo , Peter Goldstein Quantum Institue, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 ABSTRACT We present preliminary...QUANTUM INSTITUTE FREE ELECTRON LASER PROJECT Energy Extraction fran the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode Luis Elias, Juan

  5. Photon-assisted resonant tunneling through variably spaced superlattice energy filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Borenstain, S. I.; Jonsson, B.; Andersson, I.; Westin, J.

    1991-01-01

    The observation of photon-assisted resonant tunneling in a multiple quantum well structure composed of doped quantum wells separated by variably space superlattice energy filters is reported. Electrons confined in the quantum wells are excited to the second quantized state by intersubband absorption of incident infrared radiation and are subsequently emitted through the filters under appropriate bias conditions. This is manifested by a distinct peak, with an associated negative differential photoconductance, in the photocurrent versus bias voltage characteristic at low temperatures.

  6. Molding resonant energy transfer by colloidal crystal: Dexter transfer and electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Urbina, Luis; Kolaric, Branko; Libaers, Wim; Clays, Koen

    2010-05-01

    Building photonic crystals by combination of colloidal ordering and metal sputtering we were able to construct a system sensitive to an electrical field. In corresponding crystals we embedded the Dexter pair (Ir(ppy3) and BAlq) and investigated the influence of the band gap on the resonant energy transfer when the system is excited by light and by an electric field respectively. Our investigations extend applications of photonic crystals into the field of electroluminescence and LED technologies.

  7. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A. Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  8. Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Based Synthetic Sensor Platform for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jongchan; Hong, Jason; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2017-04-03

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a technique that analyzes protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The unique feature of BRET delineates that the resonance energy is generated by the resonance energy donor, Renilla luciferase by the oxidative decarboxylation of coelenterazine substrate. BRET is superior to FRET where issues such as autofluorescence, photobleaching, and light scattering can occur. Recently, BRET has been applied to design synthetic biosensors for monitoring autophagy in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report the methods for constructing a biosensor of human HsLC3a as a probe for autophagy biogenesis and the optimization of the intramolecular BRET assay that allows for high-throughput screening of chemical modulators of autophagy. User-friendly working interface with the BRET-based synthetic sensor of HsLC3a makes drug discovery easy and amenable for high-throughput. The BRET protocol described here could be easily applicable to generate other biosensors for monitoring PPIs by measurement of intermolecular BRET. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. The Harris magnetic field: A laboratory realization of the topology based on energy resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Bowles, J. H.; Amatucci, W. E.; Holland, D. L.; Chen, J.

    2004-06-01

    An often-used approximation to the magnetotail field and the reconnection layer magnetic fields is the modified Harris field which consists of a neutral sheet magnetic field profile Bx(z)? along with a superimposed normal field Bz?. We have designed a configuration of current-carrying conductors and Helmholtz coil fields aimed at producing the topological characteristics of this field. In addition to mapping the geometry of the field we have appealed to another criterion of validity of this simulation, the energy resonance phenomenon. Energy resonance is an essential feature of nonlinear particle dynamics in magnetotail-like magnetic fields. The phenomenon is characterized by periodic peaks and valleys occurring in scattered particle distribution functions when plotted versus energy. The "neutral sheet" of the simulated field is not actually plasma current which self-consistently is responsible for the magnetic field, but rather the field is produced by planar arrays of current carrying wires. For this reason certain self-consistency requirements on particle orbits in such fields do not arise. Particle injection into the field region, which is formed by 4 conducting wire grids and an external constant field, is accomplished with a programmable electron gun with energies in the range 200 eV to 10 keV. The basic physics of the resonance phenomenon which occurs if the average radius of curvature of the field and the Larmor radius of injected particles are comparable, is scalable from the experiment to the magnetotail environment and has no dimensional dependence. The identification of the resonance effect itself arose from analysis of possible particle phase space orbits in Harris-type fields. A result of this analysis was that the orbits are divided into clearly separate classes from which the resonance phenomenon follows. The creation of the field in the laboratory model includes realistic design considerations related to the method of producing the field. The

  10. Resonance energy transfer in conjugates of semiconductor nanocrystals and organic dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    I analyze the efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in luminescent donor-acceptor complexes based on conjugates of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and nanorods and the luminescent dyes. Semiconductor nanocrystals serve either as FRET donors or acceptors. Experimentally observed reduced FRET efficiency in complexes of nanorods and dye molecules as compared to quantum dots are found to be attributable to a distance-limited energy transfer rate in case of point-like dye dipoles and extended nanorod dipole.

  11. Piezoelectric Wind-Energy-Harvesting Device with Reed and Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jun; Kong, Fanrang; He, Liangguo; Guan, Qingchun; Feng, Zhihua

    2010-05-01

    A wind-energy-harvesting device utilizing the principle of a harmonica was created. A reed in a resonant cavity vibrated efficiently with the blowing wind, and a piezoelectric element stuck on the reed generated electricity. The dimensions of the wind inlet were approximately 30×20 mm2. The device was investigated with a wind speed ranging from 2.8 to 10 m/s. An output power of 0.5-4.5 mW was obtained with a matching load of 0.46 MΩ. The energy conversion efficiency of the device could reach up to 2.4%.

  12. Method and apparatus for transferring and injecting rf energy from a generator to a resonant load

    DOEpatents

    Hoffert, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Improved apparatus and method are provided for the coherent amplification and injection of radio-frequency (rf) energy into a load cavity using a plurality of amplifier tubes. A plurality of strip line cavities (30, 32, 34, 36, 40, 42, 44) are laterally joined to define a continuous closed cavity (48), with an amplifier tube (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64) mounted within each resonant strip cavity. Rf energy is injected into the continuous cavity (48) from a single input (70) for coherent coupling to all of the amplifier tubes for amplification and injection into the load cavity (76).

  13. Plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer: A real-time electrodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wendu; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Schatz, George C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a new real-time electrodynamics approach for determining the rate of resonance energy transfer (RET) between two molecules in the presence of plasmonic or other nanostructures (inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media). In this approach to plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer (PC-RET), we develop a classical electrodynamics expression for the energy transfer matrix element which is evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to solve Maxwell's equations for the electric field generated by the molecular donor and evaluated at the position of the molecular acceptor. We demonstrate that this approach yields RET rates in homogeneous media that are in precise agreement with analytical theory based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the presence of gold nanoparticles, our theory shows that the long-range decay of the RET rates can be significantly modified by plasmon excitation, with rates increased by as much as a factor of 106 leading to energy transfer rates over hundreds of nm that are comparable to that over tens of nm in the absence of the nanoparticles. These promising results suggest important future applications of the PC-RET in areas involving light harvesting or sensing, where energy transfer processes involving inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media are commonplace.

  14. Plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer: A real-time electrodynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wendu; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Schatz, George C

    2017-02-14

    This paper presents a new real-time electrodynamics approach for determining the rate of resonance energy transfer (RET) between two molecules in the presence of plasmonic or other nanostructures (inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media). In this approach to plasmon-coupled resonance energy transfer (PC-RET), we develop a classical electrodynamics expression for the energy transfer matrix element which is evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to solve Maxwell's equations for the electric field generated by the molecular donor and evaluated at the position of the molecular acceptor. We demonstrate that this approach yields RET rates in homogeneous media that are in precise agreement with analytical theory based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the presence of gold nanoparticles, our theory shows that the long-range decay of the RET rates can be significantly modified by plasmon excitation, with rates increased by as much as a factor of 10(6) leading to energy transfer rates over hundreds of nm that are comparable to that over tens of nm in the absence of the nanoparticles. These promising results suggest important future applications of the PC-RET in areas involving light harvesting or sensing, where energy transfer processes involving inhomogeneous absorbing and dispersive media are commonplace.

  15. Two-dimensional resonance frequency tuning approach for vibration-based energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lin; Prasad, M. G.; Fisher, Frank T.

    2016-06-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting seeks to convert ambient vibrations to electrical energy and is of interest for, among other applications, powering the individual nodes of wireless sensor networks. Generally it is desired to match the resonant frequencies of the device to the ambient vibration source to optimize the energy harvested. This paper presents a two-dimensionally (2D) tunable vibration-based energy harvesting device via the application of magnetic forces in two-dimensional space. These forces are accounted for in the model separately, with the transverse force contributing to the transverse stiffness of the system while the axial force contributes to a change in axial stiffness of the beam. Simulation results from a COMSOL magnetostatic 3D model agree well with the analytical model and are confirmed with a separate experimental study. Furthermore, analysis of the three possible magnetization orientations between the fixed and tuning magnets shows that the transverse parallel magnetization orientation is the most effective with regards to the proposed 2D tuning approach. In all cases the transverse stiffness term is in general significantly larger than the axial stiffness contribution, suggesting that from a tuning perspective it may be possible to use these stiffness contributions for coarse and fine frequency tuning, respectively. This 2D resonant frequency tuning approach extends earlier 1D approaches and may be particularly useful in applications where space constraints impact the available design space of the energy harvester.

  16. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  17. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J.; Fell, Christopher J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of Förster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells. PMID:23235328

  18. Quantum dots as resonance energy transfer acceptors for monitoring biological interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc; Ziessel, Raymond F.; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2006-04-01

    Due to their extraordinary photophysical properties CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (quantum dots) are excellent luminescence dyes for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) systems. By using a supramolecular lanthanide complex with central terbium cation as energy donor, we show that commercially available biocompatible biotinilated quantum dots are excellent energy acceptors in a time-resolved FRET fluoroimmunoassay (FRET-FIA) using streptavidin-biotin binding as biological recognition process. The efficient energy transfer is demonstrated by quantum dot emission sensitization and a thousandfold increase of the nanocrystal luminescence decay time. A Foerster Radius of 90 Å and a picomolar detection limit were achieved in quantum dot borate buffer. Regarding biological applications the influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and sodium azide (a frequently used preservative) to the luminescence behaviour of our FRET-system is reported.

  19. A deterministic and statistical energy analysis of tyre cavity resonance noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Tyre cavity resonance was studied using a combination of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis where its deterministic part was implemented using the impedance compact mobility matrix method and its statistical part was done by the statistical energy analysis method. While the impedance compact mobility matrix method can offer a deterministic solution to the cavity pressure response and the compliant wall vibration velocity response in the low frequency range, the statistical energy analysis method can offer a statistical solution of the responses in the high frequency range. In the mid frequency range, a combination of the statistical energy analysis and deterministic analysis methods can identify system coupling characteristics. Both methods have been compared to those from commercial softwares in order to validate the results. The combined analysis result has been verified by the measurement result from a tyre-cavity physical model. The analysis method developed in this study can be applied to other similar toroidal shape structural-acoustic systems.

  20. ϕ meson self-energy in nuclear matter from ϕ N resonant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, D.; Hiller Blin, A. N.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The ϕ -meson properties in cold nuclear matter are investigated by implementing resonant ϕ N interactions as described in effective approaches including the unitarization of scattering amplitudes. Several N*-like states are dynamically generated in these models around 2 GeV, in the vicinity of the ϕ N threshold. We find that both these states and the non-resonant part of the amplitude contribute sizably to the ϕ collisional self-energy at finite nuclear density. These contributions are of a similar strength as the widely studied medium effects from the K ¯K cloud. Depending on model details (position of the resonances and strength of the coupling to ϕ N ) we report a ϕ broadening up to about 40-50 MeV, to be added to the ϕ →K ¯K in-medium decay width, and an attractive optical potential at threshold up to about 35 MeV at normal matter density. The ϕ spectral function develops a double peak structure as a consequence of the mixing of resonance-hole modes with the ϕ quasiparticle peak. The former results point in the direction of making up for missing absorption as reported in ϕ nuclear production experiments.

  1. Hunting for dark matter coannihilation by mixing dijet resonances and missing transverse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Malte; El Hedri, Sonia; Kaminska, Anna; Liu, Jia; de Vries, Maikel; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Felix; Zurita, José

    2016-09-01

    Simplified models of the dark matter (co)annihilation mechanism predict striking new collider signatures untested by current searches. These models, which were codified in the coannihilation codex, provide the basis for a dark matter (DM) discovery program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) driven by the measured DM relic density. In this work, we study an exemplary model featuring s-channel DM coannihilation through a scalar diquark mediator as a representative case study of scenarios with strongly interacting coannihilation partners. We discuss the full phenomenology of the model, ranging from low energy flavor constraints, vacuum stability requirements, and precision Higgs effects to direct detection and indirect detection prospects. Moreover, motivated by the relic density calculation, we find significant portions of parameter space are compatible with current collider constraints and can be probed by future searches, including a proposed analysis for the novel signature of a dijet resonance accompanied by missing transverse energy (MET). Our results show that the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb-1 luminosity should be sensitive to mediators as heavy as 1 TeV and dark matter in the 400-500 GeV range. The combination of searches for single and paired dijet peaks, non-resonant jets + MET excesses, and our novel resonant dijet + MET signature have strong coverage of the motivated relic density region, reflecting the tight connections between particles determining the dark matter abundance and their experimental signatures at the LHC.

  2. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  3. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Griep, Mark H.; Winder, Eric M.; Lueking, Donald R.; Garrett, Gregory A.; Karna, Shashi P.; Friedrich, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies. PMID:22737583

  5. Hybrid detection of target sequence DNA based on phosphorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yanming; Lv, Jinzhi; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-03-07

    The severe background fluorescence and scattering light of real biological samples or environmental samples largely reduce the sensitivity and accuracy of fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors based on fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). To solve this problem, we designed a novel target sequence DNA biosensor based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). This sensor relied on Mn-doped ZnS (Mn-ZnS) room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) QDs/poly-(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) nanocomposite (QDs(+)) as the energy donor and the single-strand DNA-ROX as the energy receptor. Thereby, an RTP biosensor was built and used to quantitatively detect target sequence DNA. This biosensor had a detection limit of 0.16nM and a linear range of 0.5-20nM for target sequence DNA. The dependence on RTP of QDs effectively avoided the interference from background fluorescence and scattering light in biological samples. Moreover, this sensor did not need sample pretreatment. Thus, this sensor compared with FRET is more feasible for quantitative detection of target sequence DNA in biological samples. Interestingly, the QDs(+) nanocomposite prolonged the phosphorescence lifetime of Mn-ZnS QDs by 2.6 times to 4.94ms, which was 5-6 magnitude-order larger than that of fluorescent QDs. Thus, this sensor largely improves the optical properties of QDs and permits chemical reactions at a long enough time scale.

  6. Non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for car-key applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Hehn, T.; Thewes, M.; Kuehne, I.; Frey, A.; Scholl, G.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for application in a remote car-key, to extend the lifetime of the battery or even to realize a fully energy autonomous, maintenance-free car-key product. Characteristic for a car-key are low frequency and large amplitude motions during normal daily operation. The basic idea of this non-resonant generator is to use a round flat permanent magnet moving freely in a round flat cavity, which is packaged on both sides by printed circuit boards embedded with multi-layer copper coils. The primary goal of this structure is to easily integrate the energy harvester with the existing electrical circuit module into available commercial car-key designs. The whole size of the energy harvester is comparable to a CR2032 coin battery. To find out the best power-efficient and optimal design, several magnets with different dimensions and magnetizations, and various layouts of copper coils were analysed and built up for prototype testing. Experimental results show that with an axially magnetized NdFeB magnet and copper coils of design variant B a maximum open circuit voltage of 1.1V can be observed.

  7. Temporal Homogenization of Linear ODEs, with Applications to Parametric Super-Resonance and Energy Harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Molei; Owhadi, Houman

    2016-04-01

    We consider the temporal homogenization of linear ODEs of the form {dot{x}=Ax+ɛ P(t)x+f(t)}, where P( t) is periodic and {ɛ} is small. Using a 2-scale expansion approach, we obtain the long-time approximation {x(t)≈ exp(At) ( Ω(t)+int_0^t exp(-A τ) f(τ) dτ )}, where {Ω} solves the cell problem {dot{Ω}=ɛ B Ω + ɛ F(t)} with an effective matrix B and an explicitly-known F( t). We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the accuracy of the approximation (over a O(ɛ^{-1})} time-scale), and show how B can be computed (at a cost independent of {ɛ}). As a direct application, we investigate the possibility of using RLC circuits to harvest the energy contained in small scale oscillations of ambient electromagnetic fields (such as Schumann resonances). Although a RLC circuit parametrically coupled to the field may achieve such energy extraction via parametric resonance, its resistance R needs to be smaller than a threshold κ proportional to the fluctuations of the field, thereby limiting practical applications. We show that if n RLC circuits are appropriately coupled via mutual capacitances or inductances, then energy extraction can be achieved when the resistance of each circuit is smaller than nκ. Hence, if the resistance of each circuit has a non-zero fixed value, energy extraction can be made possible through the coupling of a sufficiently large number n of circuits ({n≈ 1000} for the first mode of Schumann resonances and contemporary values of capacitances, inductances and resistances). The theory is also applied to the control of the oscillation amplitude of a (damped) oscillator.

  8. Resonance energies of the allyl cation and allyl anion: contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of propene.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Josiah B; Karty, Joel M

    2004-02-06

    Density functional theory was employed to calculate the acidities and hydride abstraction enthalpies of propene (3) and propane (4), along with their vinylogues (5 and 6, respectively). The same reaction enthalpies were calculated for the propene vinylogues in which the terminal vinyl group was rotated perpendicular to the rest of the conjugated system (7). The contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of each vinylogue of 5 (n = 1-3) was computed and extrapolated to n = 0 (the parent propene system). The resonance energies of the allyl cation and anion were determined to be about 20-22 and 17-18 kcal/mol, respectively. Comparisons are made to resonance energies calculated using other methodologies.

  9. Synthesis and Resonance Energy Transfer in Conjugates of Luminescent Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots and Chlorin e6 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosyuk, A. A.; Artemyev, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    We synthesized a new type of conjugates of highly luminescent water soluble CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots covalently bound to Chlorin e6 dye molecules. We observed a resonance energy transfer from quantum dots emitting at 660 nm to Chlorine e6 molecules in our conjugates which can be utilized for phototherapy. Contrary to that quantum dots emitting at 588 nm show non-resonance quenching of excitonic luminescence without the energy transfer to dye molecules.

  10. Semiclassical wave packet treatment of scattering resonances: application to the delta zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions.

    PubMed

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-09-28

    For the first time Feshbach-type resonances important in recombination reactions are characterized using the semiclassical wave packet method. This approximation allows us to determine the energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of the resonances and also to observe a very interesting correlation between them. Most important is that this approach permits description of a quantum delta-zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions and reproduces the anomalous rates of ozone formation.

  11. Laser interaction based on resonance saturation (LIBORS): an alternative to inverse bremsstrahlung for coupling laser energy into a plasma.

    PubMed

    Measures, R M; Drewell, N; Cardinal, P

    1979-06-01

    Resonance saturation represents an efficient and rapid method of coupling laser energy into a gaseous medium. In the case of a plasma superelastic collision quenching of the laser maintained resonance state population effectively converts the laser beam energy into translational energy of the free electrons. Subsequently, ionization of the laser pumped species rapidly ensues as a result of both the elevated electron temperature and the effective reduction of the ionization energy for those atoms maintained in the resonance state by the laser radiation. This method of coupling laser energy into a plasma has several advantages over inverse bremsstrahlung and could therefore be applicable to several areas of current interest including plasma channel formation for transportation of electron and ion beams, x-ray laser development, laser fusion, negative ion beam production, and the conversion of laser energy to electricity.

  12. Observation of resonant energy transfer between identical-frequency laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Afeyan, B. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Estabrook, K. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; Wharton, K. B.

    1998-12-09

    Enhanced transmission of a low intensity laser beam is observed when crossed with an identical-frequency beam in a plasma with a flow velocity near the ion sound speed. The time history of the enhancement and the dependence on the flow velocity strongly suggest that this is due to energy transfer between the beams via a resonant ion wave with zero frequency in the laboratory frame. The maximum energy transfer has been observed when the beams cross in a region with Mach 1 flow. The addition of frequency modulation on the crossing beams is seen to reduce the energy transfer by a factor of two. Implications for indirect-drive fusion schemes are discussed.

  13. Lowering of Boson-Fermion System Energy with a Gapped Cooper Resonant-Pair Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, T. A.; de Llano, M.

    Applying two-time Green-function techniques to the Friedberg-T.D. Lee phenomenological Hamiltonian of a many-fermion system, it is shown that positive-energy resonant bosonic pairs associated with four-fermion excitations above the Fermi sea are energetically lower in a ground-state that is a mixture of two coexisting and dynamically interacting many-particle subsystems: a) unpaired fermions and b) composite bosons. It is argued that an interaction between free fermions and bosons excited above the Fermi sea in the mixture, namely, the continuous processes of pair-formation from, and disintegration into, two unpaired electrons, results in a substantially lowering the total system energy. The positive-energy composite bosons begin to appear incoherently below a depairing temperature T* as their coupling- and temperature-dependent number density gradually increases from zero. This leads quite naturally to the pseudogap phenomenon observed in high-Tc cuprates.

  14. Lowering of Boson-Fermion System Energy with a Gapped Cooper Resonant-Pair Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, T. A.; de Llano, M.

    2007-09-01

    Applying two-time Green-function techniques to the Friedberg-T.D. Lee phenomenological Hamiltonian of a many-fermion system, it is shown that positive-energy resonant bosonic pairs associated with four-fermion excitations above the Fermi sea are energetically lower in a ground-state that is a mixture of two coexisting and dynamically interacting many-particle subsystems: a) unpaired fermions and b) composite bosons. It is argued that an interaction between free fermions and bosons excited above the Fermi sea in the mixture, namely, the continuous processes of pair-formation from, and disintegration into, two unpaired electrons, results in a substantially lowering the total system energy. The positive-energy composite bosons begin to appear incoherently below a de-pairing temperature T* as their coupling- and temperature-dependent number density gradually increases from zero. This leads quite naturally to the pseudogap phenomenon observed in high-Tc cuprates

  15. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent. PMID:28338043

  16. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter (90)Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300-500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  17. Nanoscale energy-route selector consisting of multiple photo-switchable fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer structures on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ryo; Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We report on a nanoscale energy-route selector consisting of multiple fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structures switched by external signaling with multiple wavelengths of light. In each FRET structure, a specific activator molecule is incorporated to a FRET pair of a donor and an acceptor to control the activation of the acceptor. Owing to this configuration, the FRET structures are switched independently, and an energy route is selected. Two photo-switchable FRET structures, one consists of Alexa Fluor 568 (donor), Cy5 (acceptor), and Alexa Fluor 405 (activator), and the other consists of Alexa Fluor 568 (donor), Cy5.5 (acceptor), and Cy3 (activator), were constructed using DNA strands modified with fluorescence molecules. Switching rates for the individual FRET structures were measured as 64 and 49 %, respectively. An energy-route selector was then assembled with the FRET structures which share a single donor. Experimental results demonstrate that the energy route can be changed repeatedly by activation control using three wavelengths of light.

  18. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-03-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  19. Measurement of the OXYGEN-17(PROTON, Alpha Particle) Nitrogen -14 Cross Section at Stellar Energies (proton Energies, Resonant Reaction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Jeffery Curtis

    The isotopic abundance ratio 16O/17O has been shown to be a good probe of mass flow and mixing in stars. This ratio is sensitive to the depth of convective mixing which occurs on the giant branch and to the amount of nonconvective mixing occurring on the main sequence. The interpretation of recent observations of this ratio in red giants is limited by a large uncertainty in the value of the 17O(p, alpha)14N reaction rate. This reaction rate is dominated at stellar energies by a resonance at E_{rm x} = 5673 keV in the compound nucleus 18 F, whose strength was previously uncertain. We have carried out a measurement of the ^ {17}O(p,alpha)^{14 }N cross section at proton energies of 75 keV and 65 keV. Thick, high-purity rm Ta_2O _5 targets enriched to 77% ^ {17}O were used in conjunction with beam currents of 0.45 mA and large-solid-angle detectors. The background for the experiment was measured using targets of natural isotopic composition. The resonance peak was observed in the data collected at 75 keV, and we determined the proton width of the 5673 keV state to be 22 +/- 4 neV. This implies a rate for the 17O(p,alpha)^ {14}N reaction that is ten times greater than the typical rates used previously in stellar models.

  20. Nuclear Poincaré cycle synchronizes with the incident de Broglie wave to predict regularity in neutron resonance energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Makio

    2016-06-01

    In observed neutron resonances, long believed to be a form of quantum chaos, regular family structures are found in the s-wave resonances of many even-even nuclei in the tens keV to MeV region [M.Ohkubo, Phys. Rev. C 87, 014608(2013)]. Resonance reactions take place when the incident de Broglie wave synchronizes with the Poincaré cycle of the compound nucleus, which is composed of several normal modes with periods that are time quantized by inverse Fermi energy. Based on the breathing model of the compound nucleus, neutron resonance energies in family structures are written by simple arithmetic expressions using Sn and small integers. Family structures in observed resonances of 40Ca+n and 37Cl+n are described as simple cases. A model for time quantization is discussed.

  1. Determination of lipid asymmetry in human red cells by resonance energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.; Schroit, A.J.

    1987-08-11

    This report describes the application of a resonance energy transfer assay to determine the transbilayer distribution of /sup 125/I-labelled 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD)-labelled lipid analogues. The validity of this technique was established by determining the relationship between the distance of separation of lissamine rhodamine B labeled phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rho-PE) acceptor lipid and NBD-labeled donor lipid and energy transfer efficiency. By determination of the distance between probes at 50% transfer efficiency (R/sub 0/), the distance between fluorophores distributed symmetrically (outer leaflet label) and asymmetrically in artificially generated vesicles was determined. Calculation of the average distance between probes revealed a 14-A difference between NBD-lipid and N-Rho-PE localized in the same leaflet and in opposing leaflets, respectively. Application of this technique to the study of the transbilayer distribution of NBD-lipid in human red blood cells (RBC) showed that exogenously supplied NBD-phosphatidylserine (NBD-PS) was selectively transported to the inner leaflet, whereas NBD-phosphatidylcholine remained in outer leaflet. In contrast, pretreatment of the RBC with diamide (a SH cross-linking reagent) blocked the transport of NBD-PS. The absence or presence of NBD-PS in the outer leaflet was independently verified by employing back-exchange, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid derivatization, and decarboxylation with PS decarboxylase experiments. These control experiments yielded results which confirmed the lipid distributions determined by the resonance energy transfer assay.

  2. DNA Base Pair Resolution Measurements Using Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency in Lanthanide Doped Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Delplanque, Aleksandra; Wawrzynczyk, Dominika; Jaworski, Pawel; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Buckle, Malcolm; Nyk, Marcin; Nogues, Claude; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio) probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+) act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm) NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA) by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5’ amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5’ fluorophore (Cy5) modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+) and the acceptor (Cy5) with sensitivity at a nanometre scale. PMID:25748446

  3. Electromagnetic production of mesons and nucleon resonances at GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Pichowsky, M.; Sato, T.

    1995-08-01

    A coupled-channels model for investigating the electromagnetic excitation of nucleon resonances (N*) at energies accessible to CEBAF, was developed. Motivated by the existing QCD-based hadron models, we assume that the basic resonant interaction mechanisms of the model Hamiltonian are the absorption and emission of photons and mesons by a bare quark core. The matrix elements of nonresonant interactions are deduced from low-order Feynman diagrams of an effective Lagrangian with chiral symmetry. The standard projection operator technique was applied to obtain a set of unitary scattering equations for describing {pi}N and {gamma}N reactions up to the GeV energy region. By assuming that the nonresonant two-pion continuum can be approximated as a fictitious {sigma}N state, the scattering equations can then be cast into a set of coupled-channels equations involving only two-particle {gamma}N, {pi}N, {eta}N, {rho}N, {pi}{Delta}, {omega}N and {sigma}N channels, which can be solved by well-developed numerical methods. The bare coupling constants and the range parameters of the hadronic form factors are adjusted to reproduce {pi}N scattering phase shifts up to 2-GeV incident pion energy. We then explore the dependence of the {gamma}N {yields} {pi}N and N(e,e{prime}{pi}) observables on the {gamma}N {yields} N* excitation strengths predicted by various QCD-based models of hadrons.

  4. Performance Improvement of Polymer Solar Cells by Surface-Energy-Induced Dual Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mengnan; Shen, Ping; Liu, Yan; Chen, Boyuan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping; Shen, Liang

    2016-03-09

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) is effectively applied on polymer solar cells (PSCs) to improve power conversion efficiency (PCE). However, universality of the reported results mainly focused on utilizing single type of MNPs to enhance light absorption only in specific narrow wavelength range. Herein, a surface-energy-induced dual MNP plasmon resonance by thermally evaporating method was presented to achieve the absorption enhancement in wider range. The differences of surface energy between silver (Ag), gold (Au), and tungsten trioxide (WO3) compared by contact angle images enable Ag and Au prefer to respectively aggregate into isolated islands rather than films at the initial stage of the evaporation process, which was clearly demonstrated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement. The sum of plasmon-enhanced wavelength range induced by both Ag NPs (350-450 nm) and Au NPs (450-600 nm) almost cover the whole absorption spectra of active layers, which compatibly contribute a significant efficiency improvement from 4.57 ± 0.16 to 6.55 ± 0.12% compared to the one without MNPs. Besides, steady state photoluminescence (PL) measurements provide strong evidence that the SPR induced by the Ag-Au NPs increase the intensity of light absorption. Finally, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) reveals that doping Au and Ag causes upper shift of both the work function and valence band of WO3, which is directly related to hole collection ability. We believe the surface-energy-induced dual plasmon resonance enhancement by simple thermally evaporating technique might pave the way toward higher-efficiency PSCs.

  5. Short-and long-range order effects on resonance energy transfer in crystals and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberan-Santos, M. N.; Bodunov, E. N.

    2004-09-01

    Resonance energy transfer by the Förster-Dexter mechanism in a cubic crystal and in a rigid homogeneous medium is studied. The homogeneous medium is modeled using a hard-sphere fluid (HSF) radial distribution function. This distribution is more realistic than the commonly used uniform distribution with excluded volume (UDEV) function. For the dipole-dipole mechanism, both models yield essentially the same donor luminescence decay, except for small critical radii. For the exchange mechanism, however, the two models differ significantly. In particular, to fit a given experimental decay, the UDEV model requires both a larger effective Bohr radius and a larger rate constant at collisional distance than the HSF model.

  6. Short-range order effect on resonance energy transfer in rigid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodunov, E. N.; Berberan-Santos, M. N.

    2004-05-01

    Resonance energy transfer by the Förster-Dexter mechanism in a rigid homogeneous medium is modeled using a hard-sphere fluid (HSF) radial distribution function. This distribution is more realistic than the commonly used uniform distribution with excluded volume (UDEV) function. For the dipole-dipole mechanism, both models yield essentially the same donor luminescence decay, except for small critical radii. For the exchange mechanism, however, the two models differ significantly. The HSF model displays a stronger "two-exponential" behavior. Also, to fit a given experimental decay, the UDEV model requires both a larger effective Bohr radius and a larger rate constant at collisional distance than the HSF model.

  7. Imaging cytosolic translocation of Mycobacteria with two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yassel; Zhang, Qi; Rahaman, Arifur; Ouellet, Hugues; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun; Li, Chunqiang

    2014-01-01

    Transition from latency to active tuberculosis requires Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to penetrate the phagosomal membrane and translocate to the cytosol of the host macrophage. Quantitative two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is developed to measure cytosolic translocation using Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) as a model organism for Mtb. Macrophages were infected with Mm or non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms) as a control, then loaded with a FRET substrate. Once translocation occurs, mycobacterium-bearing β-lactamase cleaves the substrate, resulting in decrease of FRET signal. Quantification of this FRET signal change revealed that Mm, but not Ms, is capable of translocating to the cytosol. PMID:25426325

  8. Tuning FÖRESTER Resonance Energy Transfer (fret) in Dna-Fluorophore Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollum, Marvin; Hernandez, Carlos E. Crespo

    2012-06-01

    According to Förester's equations, the efficiency (EFRET) of resonance energy transfer between fluorophores is governed by three factors: separation distance, relative orientation of transition dipole moments, and the spectral overlap integral. We've designed an ideal architecture for controlling each of these parameters by covalently linking FRET fluorophore pairs into complementary DNA helices. Steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopies are used to determine EFRET in a range of environments, while time-resolved techniques are used to reveal any decreases in FRET due to competing electronic relaxation pathways.

  9. Resonance Energy Transfer Relates the Gas-Phase Structure and Pharmacological Activity of Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-11

    Enkephalins are efficient pain-relief drugs that bind to transmembrane opioid receptors. One key structural parameter that governs the pharmacological activity of these opioid peptides and is typically determined from condensed-phase structures is the distance between the aromatic rings of their Tyr and Phe residues. We use resonance energy transfer, detected by a combination of cold ion spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to estimate the Tyr-Phe spacing for enkephalins in the gas phase. In contrast to the condensed-phase structures, these distances appear to differ substantially in enkephalins with different pharmacological efficiencies, suggesting that gas-phase structures might be a better pharmacophoric metric for ligand peptides.

  10. Methods and kits for nucleic acid analysis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Kwok, Pui-Yan; Chen, Xiangning

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a target nucleotide or sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid is disclosed. The method is comprised of forming an oligonucleotide labeled with two fluorophores on the nucleic acid target site. The doubly labeled oligonucleotide is formed by addition of a singly labeled dideoxynucleoside triphosphate to a singly labeled polynucleotide or by ligation of two singly labeled polynucleotides. Detection of fluorescence resonance energy transfer upon denaturation indicates the presence of the target. Kits are also provided. The method is particularly applicable to genotyping.

  11. Sensing metabolites using donor-acceptor nanodistributions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, O. J.; Birch, D. J. S.; McCartney, L. J.; Pickup, J. C.

    2001-04-01

    Before fluorescence sensing techniques can be applied to media as delicate and complicated as human tissue, an adequate interpretation of the measured observables is required, i.e., an inverse problem needs to be solved. Recently we have solved the inverse problem relating to the kinetics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), which clears the way for the determination of the donor-acceptor distribution function in FRET assays. In this letter this approach to monitoring metabolic processes is highlighted and the application to glucose sensing demonstrated.

  12. Level set segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on local Gaussian distribution fitting energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yunjie; Pan, Xiaohua; Hong, Xunning; Xia, Deshen

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a variational level set approach in a multi-phase formulation to segmentation of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images with intensity inhomogeneity. In our model, the local image intensities are characterized by Gaussian distributions with different means and variances. We define a local Gaussian distribution fitting energy with level set functions and local means and variances as variables. The means and variances of local intensities are considered as spatially varying functions. Therefore, our method is able to deal with intensity inhomogeneity without inhomogeneity correction. Our method has been applied to 3T and 7T MR images with promising results.

  13. The parametric resonance features for theory of energy transfer in dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, V. P.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of energy transfer between degrees of freedom of dusty plasma system can be described by equations similar to Mathieu equation with account of stochastic forces. Such equation is studied by analytical approach. The solutions for higher order of accuracy are obtained. The method for numerical solution and resonance zone detection is proposed. The solution for the extended Mathieu equation is obtained for wide range of parameter values. The results of numerical solution are compared with analytical solutions of different order and known analytical results for Mathieu equation.

  14. Direct determination of resonance energy transfer in photolyase: structural alignment for the functional state.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuang; Guo, Lijun; Ai, Yuejie; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Luo, Yi; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-11-13

    Photoantenna is essential to energy transduction in photoinduced biological machinery. A photoenzyme, photolyase, has a light-harvesting pigment of methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) that transfers its excitation energy to the catalytic flavin cofactor FADH¯ to enhance DNA-repair efficiency. Here we report our systematic characterization and direct determination of the ultrafast dynamics of resonance energy transfer from excited MTHF to three flavin redox states in E. coli photolyase by capturing the intermediates formed through the energy transfer and thus excluding the electron-transfer quenching pathway. We observed 170 ps for excitation energy transferring to the fully reduced hydroquinone FADH¯, 20 ps to the fully oxidized FAD, and 18 ps to the neutral semiquinone FADH(•), and the corresponding orientation factors (κ(2)) were determined to be 2.84, 1.53 and 1.26, respectively, perfectly matching with our calculated theoretical values. Thus, under physiological conditions and over the course of evolution, photolyase has adopted the optimized orientation of its photopigment to efficiently convert solar energy for repair of damaged DNA.

  15. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne(p, γ )23Na Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanna, Francesca; Depalo, Rosanna

    The neon-sodium (NeNa) cycle drives the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al, through a series of proton capture reactions that start from 20Ne, to end with sodium synthesis. This cycle is active in red giant stars (RGB), asymptotic giant branch stars (AGB), in novae as well as in type Ia supernovae. In order to reproduce the observed elemental abundances, the cross sections of the reactions involved in the nucleosynthesis process should be accurately known. The 22Ne(p, γ )23Na reaction rate was very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. For proton energies below 400 keV, in the literature there were only upper limits for the resonance strengths. A new direct study of the 22Ne(p, γ )23Na reaction has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) in Gran Sasso using a windowless gas target and two high-purity germanium detectors. Several resonances have been observed for the first time in a direct experiment.

  16. The physical origin of large covalent-ionic resonance energies in some two-electron bonds.

    PubMed

    Hiberty, Philippe C; Ramozzi, Romain; Song, Lingchun; Wu, Wei; Shaik, Sason

    2007-01-01

    This study uses valence bond (VB) theory to analyze in detail the previously established finding that alongside the two classical bond families of covalent and ionic bonds, which describe the electron-pair bond, there exists a distinct class of charge-shift bonds (CS-bonds) in which the fluctuation of the electron pair density plays a dominant role. Such bonds are characterized by weak binding, or even a repulsive, covalent component, and by a large covalent-ionic resonance energy RE(cs) that is responsible for the major part, or even for the totality, of the bonding energy. In the present work, the nature of CS-bonding and its fundamental mechanisms are analyzed in detail by means of a VB study of some typical homonuclear bonds (H-H, H3C-CH3, H2N-NH2, HO-OH, F-F, and Cl-Cl), ranging from classical-covalent to fully charge-shift bonds. It is shown that CS-bonding is characterized by a covalent dissociation curve with a shallow minimum situated at long interatomic distances, or even a fully repulsive covalent curve. As the atoms that are involved in the bond are taken from left to right or from bottom to top of the periodic table, the weakening effect of the adjacent bonds or lone pairs increases, while at the same time the reduced resonance integral, that couples the covalent and ionic forms, increases. As a consequence, the weakening of the covalent interaction is gradually compensated by a strengthening of CS-bonding. The large RE(cs) quantity of CS-bonds is shown to be an outcome of the mechanism necessary to establish equilibrium and optimum bonding during bond formation. It is shown that the shrinkage of the orbitals in the covalent structure lowers the potential energy, V, but excessively raises the kinetic energy, T, thereby tipping the virial ratio off-balance. Subsequent addition of the ionic structures lowers T while having a lesser effect on V, thus restoring the requisite virial ratio (T/-V = 1/2). Generalizing to typically classical covalent bonds

  17. Energy harvesting using parametric resonant system due to time-varying damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapolan, Matteo; Tehrani, Maryam Ghandchi; Bonisoli, Elvio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of energy harvesting is considered using an electromechanical oscillator. The energy harvester is modelled as a spring-mass-damper, in which the dissipated energy in the damper can be stored rather than wasted. Previous research provided the optimum damping parameter, to harvest maximum amount of energy, taking into account the stroke limit of the device. However, the amount of the maximum harvested energy is limited to a single frequency in which the device is tuned. Active and semi-active strategies have been suggested, which increases the performance of the harvester. Recently, nonlinear damping in the form of cubic damping has been proposed to extend the dynamic range of the harvester. In this paper, a periodic time-varying damper is introduced, which results in a parametrically excited system. When the frequency of the periodic time-varying damper is twice the excitation frequency, the system internal energy increases proportionally to the energy already stored in the system. Thus, for certain parametric damping values, the system can become unstable. This phenomenon can be exploited for energy harvesting. The transition curves, which separate the stable and unstable dynamics are derived, both analytically using harmonic balance method, and numerically using time simulations. The design of the harvester is such that its response is close to the transition curves of the Floquet diagram, leading to stable but resonant system. The performance of the parametric harvester is compared with the non-parametric one. It is demonstrated that performances and the frequency bandwidth in which the energy can be harvested can be both increased using time-varying damping.

  18. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  19. Correlation of Resonance Charge Exchange Cross-Section Data in the Low-Energy Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1962-01-01

    During the course of a literature survey concerning resonance charge exchange, an unusual degree of agreement was noted between an extrapolation of the data reported by Kushnir, Palyukh, and Sena and the data reported by Ziegler. The data of Kushnir et al. are for ion-atom relative energies from 10 to 1000 ev, while the data of Ziegler are for a relative energy of about 1 ev. Extrapolation of the data of Kushnir et al. was made in accordance with Holstein's theory, 3 which is a combination of time-dependent perturbation methods and classical orbit theory. The results of this theory may be discussed in terms of a critical impact parameter b(sub c).

  20. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kenny F; Dennis, Allison M

    2015-06-05

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting.

  1. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-05-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  2. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Kenny F.; Dennis, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting. PMID:26057041

  3. Resonance energy transfer study of hemoglobin and cytochrome c complexes with lipids.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1998-11-02

    The complexes of hemoglobin and cytochrome c with liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and its mixtures with cardiolipin and cholesterol have been studied by monitoring resonance energy transfer between fluorescent probe 3-methoxybenzanthrone as donor and heme groups of the proteins as acceptors. By analyzing experimental data within the framework of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems, the limits of the range of possible heme positions with respect to lipid bilayer have been assessed. The distance of heme group of hemoglobin from the membrane center was found to increase in the presence of cardiolipin or cholesterol. The results obtained for cytochrome c complexes with cardiolipin-containing model membranes suggest the existence of preferential protein orientation relative to the lipid bilayer, and provide evidence for the protein penetration in the membrane interior.

  4. Location of novel benzanthrone dyes in model membranes as revealed by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhytniakivska, Olga; Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kirilova, Elena; Kalnina, Inta; Kirilov, Georgiy; Molotkovsky, Julian; Tulkki, Jukka; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2014-05-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) as a donor and newly synthesized benzanthrones (referred to here as A8, A6, AM12, AM15 and AM18) as acceptors has been examined to gain insight into molecular level details of the interactions between benzanthrone dyes and model lipid membranes composed of zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine and its mixtures with anionic lipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). FRET data were quantitatively analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems taking into account the distance dependence of orientation factor. Evidence for A8 location in phospholipid headgroup region has been obtained. Inclusion of CL and PG into PC bilayer has been found to induce substantial relocation of A6, AM12, AM15 and AM18 from hydrophobic membrane core to lipid-water interface.

  5. Cytochrome c location in phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin model membranes: resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galina P; Domanov, Yegor A

    2003-03-25

    Resonance energy transfer between lipid-bound fluorescent probe 3-methoxybenzanthrone as a donor and heme group of cytochrome c as an acceptor has been examined to ascertain the protein disposition relative to the surface of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (10, 50 and 80 mol%). The model of energy transfer in membrane systems has been extended to the case of donors distributed between the two-bilayer leaflets and acceptors located at the outer monolayer taking into account the donor and acceptor orientational behavior. Assuming specific protein orientation relative to the membrane surface and varying lateral distance of the donor-acceptor closest approach in the range from 0 to 3.5 nm the limits for possible heme distances from the bilayer midplane have been found to be 0.8-3 nm (10 mol% CL), 0-2.6 nm (50 mol% CL), and 1.4-3.3 nm (80 mol% CL).

  6. Resonance energy transfer study of hemoglobin complexes with model phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-10-04

    By examining the resonance energy transfer between fluorescent probes, embedded in the lipid bilayer (4-(dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpiridine, 4-(dimethylaminostyryl)-1-dodecylpiridine, N,N'-bishexamethylenrhodamine, rhodamine 6G) as donors, and the heme group of hemoglobin as acceptor, the structure of the protein complexes with the model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin was characterized. Quantitative interpretation of the experimental data was performed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems, using a set of parameters including the distance of closest approach between donor and acceptor, the vertical separation of donor planes, the acceptor distance from the donor plane and the orientation factor. The limits for the heme distance from the lipid bilayer center and the depth of the protein penetration in the membrane interior were estimated. The results obtained suggest that the depth of hemoglobin insertion into liposomal membranes decreases upon increasing CL content in the lipid bilayer.

  7. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-García, A; García, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the Γ point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  8. Preliminary investigation into the design of thermally responsive Forster resonance energy transfer colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Monte Scott

    While nuclear imaging techniques (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and Positron Emission Tomography) have proven effective for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the human body, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging offers additional benefits. Fluorescent imaging provides high resolution with real-time response, persistent lifetime (hours to days), cell targeting, and transdermal penetration with minimal physical encumbrance. Malignant cells can be targeted by absorbance of exogenous fluorescent nanoprobe contrast agents. Imaging is improved by fluorescent enhancement, especially by energy transfer between attached dyes. Also for use against cancer are heat-active treatments, such as hyperthermal, photothermal, and chemothermal therapies. Helpful to these treatments is the thermal response from nanoprobes, within human cells, which provide real-time feedback. The present study investigates the design and feasibility of a nanoprobe molecular device, absorbable into malignant human cells, which provides real-time tracking and thermal response, as indicated by enhanced fluorescence by energy transfer. A poly(propargyl acrylate) colloidal suspension was synthesized. The particles were modified with a triblock copolymer, previously shown to be thermally responsive, and an end-attached fluorescent dye. A second dye was modeled for attachment in subsequent work. When two fluorescent dyes are brought within sufficiently close proximity, and excitation light is supplied, energy can be transferred between dyes to give enhanced fluorescence with a large Stokes shift (increase in wavelength between excitation and emission). The dye pair was modeled for overlap of emission and absorbance wavelengths, and energy transfer was demonstrated with 23% efficiency and a 209 nm Stokes shift. The quantum yield of the donor dye was determined at 70%, and the distance for 50% energy transfer was calculated at 2.9 nm, consistent with reports for similar compounds. When

  9. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  10. Fluorescent material concentration dependency: Förster resonance energy transfer in quasi-solid state DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Jo, Hyun-Jun; Thogiti, Suresh; Yang, Weon Ki; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is critical for wide spectral absorption, an increased dye loading, and photocurrent generation of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). This process consists of organic fluorescent materials (as an energy donor), and an organic dye (as an energy acceptor on TiO2 surfaces) with quasi-solid electrolyte. The judicious choice of the energy donor and acceptor facilitates a strong spectral overlap between the emission and absorption regions of the fluorescent materials and dye. This FRET process enhances the light-harvesting characteristics of quasi-solid state DSSCs. In this study, DSSCs containing different concentrations (0, 1, and 1.5 wt%) of a fluorescent material (FM) as the energy donor are investigated using FRET. The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs containing FMs in a quasi-solid electrolyte increased by 33% over a pristine cell. The optimized cell fabricated with the quasi-solid state DSSC containing 1.0 wt% FM shows a maximum efficiency of 3.38%, with a short-circuit current density (J SC ) of 4.32 mA/cm-2, and an open-circuit voltage (V OC ) of 0.68 V under illumination of simulated solar light (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm-2). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis.

  12. Proteolytic activity monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer through quantum-dot-peptide conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Clapp, Aaron R.; Brunel, Florence M.; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Tetsuo Uyeda, H.; Chang, Eddie L.; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-07-01

    Proteases are enzymes that catalyse the breaking of specific peptide bonds in proteins and polypeptides. They are heavily involved in many normal biological processes as well as in diseases, including cancer, stroke and infection. In fact, proteolytic activity is sometimes used as a marker for some cancer types. Here we present luminescent quantum dot (QD) bioconjugates designed to detect proteolytic activity by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. To achieve this, we developed a modular peptide structure which allowed us to attach dye-labelled substrates for the proteases caspase-1, thrombin, collagenase and chymotrypsin to the QD surface. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency within these nanoassemblies is easily controlled, and proteolytic assays were carried out under both excess enzyme and excess substrate conditions. These assays provide quantitative data including enzymatic velocity, Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters, and mechanisms of enzymatic inhibition. We also screened a number of inhibitory compounds against the QD-thrombin conjugate. This technology is not limited to sensing proteases, but may be amenable to monitoring other enzymatic modifications.

  13. Detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in coffee using chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun-Jung; Mun, Hyoyoung; Kim, Su-Ji; Shim, Won-Bo; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-03-01

    We report a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in roasted coffee beans. The aptamer sequences used in this study are 5'-DNAzyme-Linker-OTA aptamer-3'-dabcyl. Dabcyl at the end of the OTA aptamer region plays as a quencher in CRET aptasensor. When hemin and OTA are added, the dabcyl-labeled OTA aptamer approaches to the G-quadruplex-hemin complex by formation of the G-quadruplex-OTA complex. The G-quadruplex-hemin complexes possess horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-like activity, and therefore, the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (HRPzyme) catalyzes peroxidation in the presence of luminol and H2O2. Resonance energy transfer between luminol (donor) and dabcyl (acceptor) enables quenching of chemiluminescence signals. The signal decreases with increasing the concentration of OTA within the range of 0.1-100ngmL(-1) (limit of detection 0.22ngmL(-1)), and the level of recovery of the respective 1ngmL(-1) and 10ngmL(-1) spiked coffee samples was 71.5% and 93.3%. These results demonstrated the potential of the proposed method for OTA analysis in diverse foods.

  14. Gold nanoparticles-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer for ultrasensitive detection of melamine.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianxiu; Wang, Yadi; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A turn-on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer method was fabricated for the determination of melamine by using bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein chemiluminescence reaction as a donor and dispersed gold nanoparticles as an acceptor. The chemiluminescence signal of bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein reaction decreased significantly in the presence of dispersed gold nanoparticles because the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles perfectly overlapped with the chemiluminescence spectrum. Melamine could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, leading to a dramatic red-shift of the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles. The absorption band of the aggregated gold nanoparticles does not overlap with the chemiluminescence spectrum of the reaction. In such a case, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer could not happen and the chemiluminescence signal was restored. The procedure allowed the measurement of 3.2×10(-12)-3.2×10(-7) mol/L melamine with a limit of detection of 3×10(-13) mol/L. The method was applied to the determination of melamine in spiked milk samples; with recoveries within the range 94.1-104.2%.

  15. The inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between quantum dots for glucose assay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Li-Pei; Chen, Mei-Ling; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2012-02-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two quantum dots of different sizes causes fluorescence quenching. Hereby a binding site pre-blocking approach is proposed to avoid this effect. Pre-binding of glucose on the donor occupies the binding sites and thus blocks resonance energy transfer between the two quantum dots, protecting the fluorescence from being quenched. A glucose assay is developed based on this approach. The glucose content is correlated with the fluorescence difference in the absence and in the presence of glucose. In practice, Green QDs-Con A conjugates are used as donors and Red QDs-NH(2)-glu conjugates as acceptors to form FRET system. The inhibition of fluorescence quenching is then measured in the presence of glucose. A linear calibration graph is achieved within 0.1-2.0 mmolL(-1), along with a detection limit of 0.03 mmolL(-1) and a RSD of 2.1% (1.0 mmolL(-1)). 91-105% of glucose in serum and urine samples is recovered. It is worth mentioning that the present glucose assay approach also generates a fluorescence chromatic difference imaging, and the color display clearly identifies the glucose contents by visual detection with a distinguishing ability of ca. 0.5 mmolL(-1). The present approach can potentially be used for the clinical determination of glucose in biological samples which can be further developed into a glucose sensor.

  16. Design and development of high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer efficiency hybrid-imaging constructs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kovalski, Letícia; Broyles, David; Hunt, Eric A; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the design and construction of an imaging construct with high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) efficiency that is composed of multiple quantum dots (QDs; λem = 655 nm) self-assembled onto a bioluminescent protein, Renilla luciferase (Rluc). This is facilitated by the streptavidin-biotin interaction, allowing the facile formation of a hybrid-imaging construct (HIC) comprising up to six QDs (acceptor) grafted onto a light-emitting Rluc (donor) core. The resulting assembly of multiple acceptors surrounding a donor permits this construct to exhibit high resonance energy transfer efficiency (∼64.8%). The HIC was characterized using fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application of our construct, a generation-5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) nanocarrier was loaded with our HIC for in vitro and in vivo imaging. We envision that this design of multiple acceptors and bioluminescent donor will lead to the development of new BRET-based systems useful in sensing, imaging, and other bioanalytical applications.

  17. Energy operator demodulating of optimal resonance components for the compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dingcheng; Yu, Dejie; Zhang, Wenyi

    2015-11-01

    Compound faults diagnosis is a challenge for rotating machinery fault diagnosis. The vibration signals measured from gearboxes are usually complex, non-stationary, and nonlinear. When compound faults occur in a gearbox, weak fault characteristic signals are always submerged by the strong ones. Therefore, it is difficult to detect a weak fault by using the demodulating analysis of vibration signals of gearboxes directly. The key to compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes is to separate different fault characteristic signals from the collected vibration signals. Aiming at that problem, a new method for the compound faults diagnosis of gearboxes is proposed based on the energy operator demodulating of optimal resonance components. In this method, the genetic algorithm is first used to obtain the optimal decomposition parameters. Then the compound faults vibration signals of a gearbox are subject to resonance-based signal sparse decomposition (RSSD) to separate the fault characteristic signals of the gear and the bearing by using the optimal decomposition parameters. Finally, the separated fault characteristic signals are analyzed by energy operator demodulating, and each one’s instantaneous amplitude can be calculated. According to the spectra of instantaneous amplitudes of fault characteristic signals, the faults of the gear and the bearing can be diagnosed, respectively. The performance of the proposed method is validated by using the simulation data and the experiment vibration signals from a gearbox with compound faults.

  18. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  19. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  20. Investigations and system design for simultaneous energy and data transmission through inductively coupled resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Lloret Fuentes, E.; Buchholz, M.

    2015-11-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) with simultaneous data transmission through coupled magnetic resonators is investigated in this paper. The development of this system is dedicated to serve as a basis for applications in the field of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), for example tracking vital parameters remotely, charge and control sensors and so on. Due to these different scenarios we consider, it is important to have a system which is reliable under the circumstance of changing positioning of the receiving device. State of the art radio systems would be able to handle this. Nevertheless, energy harvesting from far field sources is not sufficient to power the devices additionally on mid-range distances. For this reason, coupled magnetic resonant circuits are proposed as a promising alternative, although suffering from more complex positioning dependency. Based on measurements on a simple prototype system, an equivalent circuit description is used to model the transmission system dependent on different transmission distances and impedance matching conditions. Additionally, the simulation model is used to extract system parameters such as coupling coefficients, coil resistance and self-capacitance, which cannot be calculated in a simple and reliable way. Furthermore, a mathematical channel model based on the schematic model has been built in MATLAB©. It is used to point out the problems occurring in a transmission system with variable transmission distance, especially the change of the passband's centre frequency and its bandwidth. Existing solutions dealing with this distance dependent behaviour, namely the change of the transmission frequency dependent on distance and the addition of losses to the resonators to increase the bandwidth, are considered as not inventive. First, changing the transmission frequency increases the complexity in the data transmission system and would use a disproportional total bandwidth compared to the actually available bandwidth

  1. Resonance energy transfer between fluorescent BSA protected Au nanoclusters and organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Sangram; Rich, Ryan; Fudala, Rafal; Butler, Susan; Kokate, Rutika; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-12-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to their unique fluorescence properties and lack of toxicity. These metal nanoclusters have utility in a variety of disciplines including catalysis, biosensing, photonics, imaging and molecular electronics. However, they suffer from several disadvantages such as low fluorescence quantum efficiency (typically near 6%) and broad emission spectrum (540 nm to 800 nm). We describe an approach to enhance the apparent brightness of BSA Au clusters by linking them with a high extinction donor organic dye pacific blue (PB). In this conjugate PB acts as a donor to BSA Au clusters and enhances its brightness by resonance energy transfer (RET). We found that the emission of BSA Au clusters can be enhanced by a magnitude of two-fold by resonance energy transfer (RET) from the high extinction donor PB, and BSA Au clusters can act as an acceptor to nanosecond lifetime organic dyes. By pumping the BSA Au clusters using a high extinction donor, one can increase the effective brightness of less bright fluorophores like BSA Au clusters. Moreover, we prepared another conjugate of BSA Au clusters with the near infrared (NIR) dye Dylight 750 (Dy750), where BSA Au clusters act as a donor to Dy750. We observed that BSA Au clusters can function as a donor, showing 46% transfer efficiency to the NIR dye Dy750 with a long lifetime component in the acceptor decay through RET. Such RET-based probes can be used to prevent the problems of a broad emission spectrum associated with the BSA Au clusters. Moreover, transferring energy from BSA Au clusters to Dy750 will result in a RET probe with a narrow emission spectrum and long lifetime component which can be utilized in imaging applications.Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected nanoclusters (Au and Ag) represent a group of nanomaterials that holds great promise in biophysical applications due to

  2. Resonant nature of intrinsic defect energy levels in PbTe revealed by infrared photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Jin, Shuqiang; Ye, Zhenyu; Wu, Huizhen; Qi, Zhen

    2014-07-01

    Step-scan Fourier-transform infrared photoreflectance and modulated photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the optical transitions of the epitaxial PbTe thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF2 (111) substrate in the vicinity of energy gap of lead telluride at 77 K. It is found that the intrinsic defect energy levels in the electronic structure are of resonant nature. The Te-vacancy energy level is located above the conduction band minimum by 29.1 meV. Another defect (VX) energy level situated below valance band maximum by 18.1 meV is also revealed. Whether it is associated with the Pb vacancy is still not clear. It might also be related to the misfit dislocations stemming from the lattice mismatch between PbTe and BaF2 substrate. The experimental results support the theory prediction (N. J. Parada and G. W. Pratt, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 180 (1969), N. J. Parada, Phys. Rev. B 3, 2042 (1971)) and are consistent with the reported Hall experimental results (G. Bauer, H. Burkhard, H. Heinrich, and A. Lopez-Otero, J. Appl. Phys. 47, 1721 (1976)).

  3. Enhanced harvesting of red photons in nanowire solar cells: evidence of resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Karthik; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-04-28

    Modern excitonic solar cells efficiently harvest photons in the 350-650 nm spectral range; however, device efficiencies are typically limited by poor quantum yields for red and near-infrared photons. Using Forster-type resonance energy transfer from zinc phthalocyanine donor molecules to ruthenium polypyridine complex acceptors, we demonstrate a four-fold increase in quantum yields for red photons in dye-sensitized nanowire array solar cells. The dissolved donor and surface anchored acceptor molecules are not tethered to each other, through either a direct chemical bond or a covalent linker layer. The spatial confinement of the electrolyte imposed by the wire-to-wire spacing of the close-packed nanowire array architecture ensures that the distances between a significant fraction of donors and acceptors are within a Förster radius. The critical distance for energy transfer from an isolated donor chromophore to a self-assembled monolayer of acceptors on a plane follows the inverse fourth power instead of the inverse sixth power relation. Consequently, we observe near quantitative energy transfer efficiencies in our devices. Our results represent a new design paradigm in excitonic solar cells and show it is possible to more closely match the spectral response of the device to the AM 1.5 solar spectrum through use of electronic energy transfer.

  4. An ultrasensitive homogeneous aptasensor for kanamycin based on upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, De-en; Liu, Yajie; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-05-15

    We developed an ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) aptasensor for kanamycin detection, using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as the energy donor and graphene as the energy acceptor. Oleic acid modified upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized through a hydrothermal process followed by a ligand exchange with hexanedioic acid. The kanamycin aptamer (5'-NH2-AGATGGGGGTTGAGGCTAAGCCGA-3') was tagged to UCNPs through an EDC-NHS protocol. The π-π stacking interaction between the aptamer and graphene brought UCNPs and graphene in close proximity and hence initiated the FRET process resulting in quenching of UCNPs fluorescence. The addition of kanamycin to the UCNPs-aptamer-graphene complex caused the fluorescence recovery because of the blocking of the energy transfer, which was induced by the conformation change of aptamer into a hairpin structure. A linear calibration was obtained between the fluorescence intensity and the logarithm of kanamycin concentration in the range from 0.01 nM to 3 nM in aqueous buffer solution, with a detection limit of 9 pM. The aptasensor was also applicable in diluted human serum sample with a linear range from 0.03 nM to 3 nM and a detection limit of 18 pM. The aptasensor showed good specificity towards kanamycin without being disturbed by other antibiotics. The ultrahigh sensitivity and pronounced robustness in complicated sample matrix suggested promising prospect of the aptasensor in practical applications.

  5. Nanotubular J-aggregates and quantum dots coupled for efficient resonance excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Kirmse, Holm; Steeg, Egon; Kühn, Sergei; Friede, Sebastian; Kirstein, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2015-02-24

    Resonant coupling between distinct excitons in organic supramolecular assemblies and inorganic semiconductors is supposed to offer an approach to optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on colloidal nanohybrids consisting of self-assembled tubular J-aggregates decorated with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) via electrostatic self-assembly. The role of QDs in the energy transfer process can be switched from a donor to an acceptor by tuning its size and thereby the excitonic transition energy while keeping the chemistry unaltered. QDs are located within a close distance (<4 nm) to the J-aggregate surface, without harming the tubular structures and optical properties of J-aggregates. The close proximity of J-aggregates and QDs allows the strong excitation energy transfer coupling, which is around 92% in the case of energy transfer from the QD donor to the J-aggregate acceptor and approximately 20% in the reverse case. This system provides a model of an organic-inorganic light-harvesting complex using methods of self-assembly in aqueous solution, and it highlights a route toward hierarchical synthesis of structurally well-defined supramolecular objects with advanced functionality.

  6. Effect of Diffusion on Resonance Energy Transfer Rate Distributions: Implications for Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toptygin, Dmitri; Chin, Alexander F; Hilser, Vincent J

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions and many other biopolymers lack the three-dimensional structure that could be determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR, which encourages the application of alternative experimental methods. Time-resolved resonance energy transfer data are often used to measure distances between two fluorophores attached to a flexible biopolymer. This is complicated by the rotational and translational diffusion of the fluorophores and by nonmonoexponential donor decay in the absence of the acceptor. Equation I(DA)(t) = I(D)(t)·F(t) is derived here, which is applicable regardless of whether I(D)(t) is monoexponential. I(D)(t) and I(DA)(t) are the δ-excitation donor emission decays in the absence and in the presence of the acceptor; F(t) contains information about energy transfer, donor-acceptor distance distribution, and diffusion dynamics. It is shown that in the absence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a continuous distribution of exponentials, whereas in the presence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a sum of discrete exponentials. For each case it is shown how F(t) is related to the distance distribution. Experimental data obtained with a flexible tetradecapeptide in aqueous solution clearly demonstrate that F(t) is a sum of discrete exponential terms. A partial differential equation describing resonance energy transfer in the presence of both rotational and translational diffusion of the donor and acceptor tethered to the ends of a semiflexible chain is solved in this work using a combination of analytical and numerical methods; the solution is used to fit time-resolved emission of the donor, which makes it possible to determine the model parameters: contour length, persistence length, and the end-to-end translational diffusion coefficient.

  7. Calculation of resonance effects in low-energy electron-water collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccarreta, Chiara

    Electron collisions with water are very important for the understanding of radiation damage in biological system, atmospheric processes, masers, etc. These collisions can result in the rotational, vibrational and/or electronic excitation of the molecule but they can also induce fragmentation. Specifically, low-energy electrons can produce fragmentation via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and electronic excitation into dissociative states. Experimental work on water break-up has focused on dissociative attachment. More recently measurements of ground state OH production via electron impact have been performed (Harb et al. 2001) showing the different contributions of DEA and dissociative excitation. Few theoretical studies on the resonance curves for DEA of water are available (Haxton et al. 2004a). Among them, one has been carried out taking into account a single dissociative coordinate (Gorfinkiel et al. 2002), the assumption being that dissociation results in the formation of H and OH. The discrepancy between the theoretical results and the experimental measurements of Harb et al. (2001) suggest that full three-dimensional studies are needed. The i-matrix method and the i-matrix polyatomic code (Morgan et al. 1998) is used to treat the electronic part of the process. We have performed fixed-nuclei calculations for 840 geometries of H2O. These were obtained by varying the internal nuclear coordinates of the molecule, using 8 different angles and 14 different OH intemuclear distances. Following Gorfinkiel et al. (2002), we have incorporated nine target states in the close-coupling expansion and calculated cross sections for electronic excitation into the first 4 excited states as a function of geometry. In accordance with previous calculations and experiments (Belie et al. 1981) we found three Feshbach resonances below the ionisation threshold. In C2v symmetry these resonances are labelled 2B, 2A and 2B2. The DEA process is likely to proceed via these

  8. Real-time visualization of caspase-3 activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

    PubMed

    Alasia, Silvia; Cocito, Carolina; Merighi, Adalberto; Lossi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    As apoptosis occurs via a complex signaling cascade that is tightly regulated at multiple cell points, different methods exist to evaluate the activity of the proteins involved in the intracellular apoptotic pathways and the phenotype of apoptotic neurons. Detention of the activity of the enzyme caspase-3, the key executioner caspase in programmed cell death, by laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology is an alternative approach to classical standard techniques, such as Western blotting, activity assays, or histological techniques, and allows working with both fixed and living cells. This technique combined with the organotypic culture approach ex vivo represents a valid tool for the study of the mechanisms of neuronal survival /death and neuroprotection.

  9. Spectral wide-field microscopic fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Qin, Guiqi; Chai, Liuying; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Fangfang; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-08-01

    With its precise, sensitive, and nondestructive features, spectral unmixing-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy has been widely applied to visualize intracellular biological events. In this report, we set up a spectral wide-field microscopic FRET imaging system by integrating a varispec liquid crystal tunable filter into a wide-field microscope for quantitative FRET measurement in living cells. We implemented a representative emission-spectral unmixing-based FRET measurement method on this platform to simultaneously acquire pixel-to-pixel images of both FRET efficiency (E ) and acceptor-to-donor concentration ratio (R C ) in living HepG2 cells expressing fusion proteins in the presence or absence of free donors and acceptors and obtained consistent results with other instruments and methods. This stable and low-cost spectral wide-field microscopic FRET imaging system provides a new toolbox for imaging molecular events with high spatial resolution in living cells.

  10. The influence of DNA shape fluctuations on fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements in nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Lucia; Hoenderdos, Maurice; Prinsen, Peter; Schiessel, Helmut

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements allow one to observe site exposure in nucleosomes, i.e. the transient unwrapping of a part of the wrapped DNA from the histone octamer. In such experiments one can typically distinguish between a closed state and an open state but in principle one might hope to detect several states, each corresponding to a certain number of open binding sites. Here we show that even in an ideal FRET setup it would be hard to detect unwrapping states with intermediate levels of FRET efficiencies. As the unwrapped DNA molecule, modelled here as a wormlike chain, has a finite stiffness, shape fluctuations smear out FRET signals completely from such intermediate states.

  11. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  12. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  13. Tracking polymer diffusion in a wet latex film with fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jeffrey C; Liu, Yuanqin; Winnik, Mitchell A; Demmer, David; Haslett, Tom; Lau, Willie

    2007-08-01

    We describe an instrument to measure the polymer interdiffusion between donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled latex polymers in a partially wet latex film with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). It is possible to temporarily arrest the drying process of a wet latex film by sealing the film in an airtight chamber. In our approach, we measure donor fluorescence decays from 0.5 mm diameter spots at various positions across an arrested latex film with time-correlated single photon counting. We interpret the resulting decays with a Monte Carlo simulation of the FRET process and extract information about the extent of polymer diffusion as a function of position on the film. These results enable us to determine the extent of polymer interdiffusion as a function of distance from the wet-dry edge in the latex film. To highlight this device's ability to capture the rapid early stages of latex interdiffusion, we report results from an acrylate copolymer latex.

  14. Time-resolved Förster-resonance-energy-transfer DNA assay on an active CMOS microarray

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David Eric; Gong, Ping; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    We present an active oligonucleotide microarray platform for time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. In these assays, immobilized probe is labeled with a donor fluorophore and analyte target is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Changes in the fluorescence decay lifetime of the donor are measured to determine the extent of hybridization. In this work, we demonstrate that TR-FRET assays have reduced sensitivity to variances in probe surface density compared with standard fluorescence-based microarray assays. Use of an active array substrate, fabricated in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, provides the additional benefits of reduced system complexity and cost. The array consists of 4096 independent single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) pixel sites and features on-chip time-to-digital conversion. We demonstrate the functionality of our system by measuring a DNA target concentration series using TR-FRET with semiconductor quantum dot donors. PMID:18515059

  15. Upconversion nanoparticle-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Long, Qian; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-06-15

    This paper reports a novel nanosensor for organophosphorus pesticides based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The detection mechanism is based on the facts that AuNPs quench the fluorescence of UCNPs and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATC) into thiocholine. Under the optimized conditions, the logarithm of the pesticides concentration was proportional to the inhibition efficiency. The detection limits of parathion-methyl, monocrotophos and dimethoate reached 0.67, 23, and 67 ng/L, respectively. Meanwhile, the biosensor shows good sensitivity, stability, and could be successfully applied to detection of OPs in real food samples, suggesting the biosensor has potentially extensive application clinic diagnoses assays.

  16. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase—quantum dot bionanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M.; Doane, Tennyson L.; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2014-12-01

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor-acceptor distances (˜5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ˜5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications.

  17. Paper-based upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor for sensitive detection of multiple cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Zhou, Donglei; Yin, Ze; Cui, Shaobo; Xu, Wen; Chen, Baojiu; Song, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    A paper-based upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay device is proposed for sensitive detection of CEA. The device is fabricated on a normal filter paper with simple nano-printing method. Upconversion nanoparticles tagged with specific antibodies are printed to the test zones on the test paper, followed by the introduction of assay antigen. Upconversion fluorescence measurements are directly conducted on the test zones after the antigen-to-antibody reactions. Furthermore, a multi-channel test paper for simultaneous detection of multiple cancer biomarkers was established by the same method and obtained positive results. The device showed high anti-interfere, stability, reproducible and low detection limit (0.89 ng/mL), moreover it is very easy to fabricate and operate, which is a promising prospect for a clinical point-of-care test. PMID:27001460

  18. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  19. Homogeneous assay for biotin based on Aequorea victoria bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Rudenko, Natalia V; Marchenkov, Victor V; Skosyrev, Vitaly S; Arzhanov, Maxim A; Burkhardt, Nils; Zakharov, Mikhail V; Semisotnov, Gennady V; Vinokurov, Leonid M; Alakhov, Yuli B

    2003-02-01

    Here we describe a homogeneous assay for biotin based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between aequorin and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fusions of aequorin with streptavidin (SAV) and EGFP with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) were purified after expression of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli cells. Association of SAV-aequorin and BCCP-EGFP fusions was followed by BRET between aequorin (donor) and EGFP (acceptor), resulting in significantly increasing 510 nm and decreasing 470 nm bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that free biotin inhibited BRET due to its competition with BCCP-EGFP for binding to SAV-aequorin. These properties were exploited to demonstrate competitive homogeneous BRET assay for biotin.

  20. Stopped-flow fluorescence resonance energy transfer for analysis of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tims, Hannah S; Widom, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    Macromolecular assemblies and machines undergo large-scale conformational changes as essential features of their normal function. Modern stopped-flow instrumentation and biotechnology combine to provide a powerful tool for characterizing the rates and natures of these conformational changes. Standard commercially available instruments provide extraordinary sensitivity and speed, allowing analysis of millisecond or longer timescale processes, with concentrations as low as a few nanomolar and volumes of just a few hundred microliters. One can now place specific dyes anywhere desired on a nucleic acid, and often on a protein as well. This ability allows the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments for detailed conformational analyses, even as the system is evolving rapidly over time following the initiation of a reaction. This approach is ideally suited for analysis of intrinsic properties of chromatin and of the machines that control chromatin assembly, disassembly, and function.

  1. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  2. Biosensing with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Coupling between Fluorophores and Nanocarbon Allotropes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shaowei; Cargill, Allison A.; Das, Suprem R.; Medintz, Igor L.; Claussen, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocarbon allotropes (NCAs), including zero-dimensional carbon dots (CDs), one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and two-dimensional graphene, exhibit exceptional material properties, such as unique electrical/thermal conductivity, biocompatibility and high quenching efficiency, that make them well suited for both electrical/electrochemical and optical sensors/biosensors alike. In particular, these material properties have been exploited to significantly enhance the transduction of biorecognition events in fluorescence-based biosensing involving Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET). This review analyzes current advances in sensors and biosensors that utilize graphene, CNTs or CDs as the platform in optical sensors and biosensors. Widely utilized synthesis/fabrication techniques, intrinsic material properties and current research examples of such nanocarbon, FRET-based sensors/biosensors are illustrated. The future outlook and challenges for the research field are also detailed. PMID:26110411

  3. A graphitic carbon nitride based fluorescence resonance energy transfer detection of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zou, Hong Yan; Gao, Ming Xuan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), which occurs between two luminescent chromophores, can greatly improve the selectivity and sensitivity of a fluorescent assay when a ratiometric signaling with the fluorescence enhancement of the acceptor at the expense of the donor is adopted. In this study, a fluorescence ratiometric detection (FRD) of riboflavin (RF) has been made based on FRET, as the strong overlap occurred between the emission spectrum of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and absorption spectrum of RF, in which g-C3N4 acts as the energy donor and RF as the energy acceptor. With increasing concentration of RF, the fluorescence intensity of g-C3N4 emission at 444 nm decreased and the fluorescence peak at 523 nm for RF increased regularly, making the fluorescence intensity ratio of 523 nm to 444 nm linearly dependent on the concentration of RF in the range from 0.4 μM to 10 μM, giving a limit of the detection of 170 nM. This method can be used to quantify RF in complex systems such as milk and drink, showing that the novel FRET-based fluorescence ratiometric detection can enable an attractive assay platform for analytes of interest.

  4. Effect of Zinc oxide nanoparticle on Fluorescence Resonance Energy transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Dey, Dibyendu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Paul, Pabitra Kumar; Das, R.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between two dyes Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G were investigated in solution in the presence and absence of Zinc oxide nanoparticle. Zinc oxide nanostructure is used as the fluorescence enhancing agent for the present study since donor (Fluorescein) fluorescence increase significantly in presence of nanoparticle. Accordingly, the energy transfer efficiency in the presence of nanoparticle increases. The maximum efficiency was 69% for acceptor (Rhodamine 6G) concentration of 0.75 × 10- 5 M. The energy transfer efficiency was found to be pH sensitive and it varies from 4.15% to 90.00% in mixed dye solution for a change in pH from 1.5 to 10.0. With proper calibration it is possible to use the present system under investigation to sense pH which is better with respect to our previous reported results [Spectrochim. Acta Part A. 149 (2015) 143-149] as it can sense a wide range of pH and with better sensitivity.

  5. Study of G-protein-coupled receptor-protein interactions by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Karen M; Eidne, Karin A

    2004-01-01

    Complex networks of protein-protein interactions are key determinants of cellular function, including those regulated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Formation of either stable or transitory complexes are involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding through to signal transduction, desensitization, resensitization and downregulation. Today, 50% of all recently launched drugs are targeted against GPCRs. This particular class of proteins is extremely useful as a drug target because the receptors are partly located outside the cell, simplifying bioavailability and delivery of drugs directed against them. However, being located within the cell membrane causes difficulties for the study of GPCR function and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), a naturally occurring phenomenon, represents a newly emerging, powerful tool with which to investigate and monitor dynamic interactions involving this receptor class. BRET is a noninvasive, highly sensitive technique, performed as a simple homogeneous assay. involving the proximity-dependent transfer of energy from an energy donor to acceptor resulting in the emission of light. This technology has several advantages over alternative approaches as the detection occurs within live cells, in real time, and is not restricted to a particular cellular compartment. The use of such biophysical techniques as BRET, will not only increase our understanding of the nature of GPCR regulation and the protein complexes involved, but could also potentially lead to the development of novel therapeutics that modulate these interactions.

  6. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a binary organic nanoparticle system and its application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Xu, Xinjun; Wang, Jinshan; Li, Lidong

    2015-04-22

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles have a much better photostability than molecule-based probes. Here, we report a simple strategy to detect chemicals and biomolecules by a binary nanoparticle system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO, energy donor) and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV, energy acceptor) are utilized to prepare the binary nanoparticle system through a reprecipitation method. Since the FRET process is strongly distance-dependent, a change in the interparticle distance between the two kinds of nanoparticles after introduction of analytes will alter the FRET efficiency. The response of the binary nanoparticle system to cationic polyelectrolytes was investigated by monitoring the FRET efficiency from PFO to MEH-PPV nanoparticles and the fluorescence color of the nanoparticle solutions. Furthermore, the cationic polyelectrolyte pretreated binary nanoparticle system can be used to detect DNA by desorption of nanoparticles from the polyelectrolyte's chains and the detection concentration can go down to 10(-14) M. Thus, the binary nanoparticle system shows great promise for applications in chemical sensing or biosensing.

  7. Near-resonant rotational energy transfer in HCl–H{sub 2} inelastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Mathieu; Lique, François; Kalugina, Yulia; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

    2014-02-14

    We present a new four-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface for the HCl–H{sub 2} van der Waals system. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. Potential energy surface was obtained from electronic structure calculations using a coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations method. The four atoms were described using the augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta basis set and bond functions were placed at mid-distance between the HCl and H{sub 2} centers of mass for a better description of the van der Waals interaction. The global minimum is characterized by the well depth of 213.38 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the T-shape structure with H{sub 2} molecule on the H side of the HCl molecule. The dissociation energies D{sub 0} are 34.7 cm{sup −1} and 42.3 cm{sup −1} for the complex with para- and ortho-H{sub 2}, respectively. These theoretical results obtained using our new PES are in good agreement with experimental values [D. T. Anderson, M. Schuder, and D. J. Nesbitt, Chem. Phys. 239, 253 (1998)]. Close coupling calculations of the inelastic integral rotational cross sections of HCl in collisions with para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2} were performed at low and intermediate collisional energies. Significant differences exist between para- and ortho-H{sub 2} results. The strongest collision-induced rotational HCl transitions are the transitions with Δj = 1 for collisions with both para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. Rotational relaxation of HCl in collision with para-H{sub 2} in the rotationally excited states j = 2 is dominated by near-resonant energy transfer.

  8. Near-resonant rotational energy transfer in HCl-H2 inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Mathieu; Kalugina, Yulia; Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Lique, François

    2014-02-01

    We present a new four-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface for the HCl-H2 van der Waals system. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. Potential energy surface was obtained from electronic structure calculations using a coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations method. The four atoms were described using the augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta basis set and bond functions were placed at mid-distance between the HCl and H2 centers of mass for a better description of the van der Waals interaction. The global minimum is characterized by the well depth of 213.38 cm-1 corresponding to the T-shape structure with H2 molecule on the H side of the HCl molecule. The dissociation energies D0 are 34.7 cm-1 and 42.3 cm-1 for the complex with para- and ortho-H2, respectively. These theoretical results obtained using our new PES are in good agreement with experimental values [D. T. Anderson, M. Schuder, and D. J. Nesbitt, Chem. Phys. 239, 253 (1998)]. Close coupling calculations of the inelastic integral rotational cross sections of HCl in collisions with para-H2 and ortho-H2 were performed at low and intermediate collisional energies. Significant differences exist between para- and ortho-H2 results. The strongest collision-induced rotational HCl transitions are the transitions with Δj = 1 for collisions with both para-H2 and ortho-H2. Rotational relaxation of HCl in collision with para-H2 in the rotationally excited states j = 2 is dominated by near-resonant energy transfer.

  9. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Jin; Wu, Kai-jie; Chen, Yu-le; Wang, Xin-yang; Chang, Luke S; He, Da-lin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detect bladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively. The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair. Methods: Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed, which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family. Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637, 253J and T24, as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined. Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope. For assays using dual FRET MBs, the excitation wavelength was 488 nm, and the emission detection wavelengths were 520±20 nm and 560±20 nm, respectively. Results: The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals. In contrast, no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs. Conclusion: The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer. PMID:22019956

  10. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  11. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  12. Beyond the Förster formulation for resonance energy transfer: the role of dark states.

    PubMed

    Sissa, C; Manna, A K; Terenziani, F; Painelli, A; Pati, S K

    2011-07-28

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) is investigated in pairs of charge-transfer (CT) chromophores. CT chromophores are an interesting class of π conjugated chromophores decorated with one or more electron-donor and acceptor groups in polar (D-π-A), quadrupolar (D-π-A-π-D or A-π-D-π-A) or octupolar (D(-π-A)(3) or A(-π-D)(3)) structures. Essential-state models accurately describe low-energy linear and nonlinear spectra of CT-chromophores and proved very useful to describe spectroscopic effects of electrostatic interchromophore interactions in multichromophoric assemblies. Here we apply the same approach to describe RET between CT-chromophores. The results are quantitatively validated by an extensive comparison with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, confirming that essential-state models offer a simple and reliable approach for the calculation of electrostatic interchromophore interactions. This is an important result since it sets the basis for more refined treatments of RET: essential-state models are in fact easily extended to account for molecular vibrations in truly non-adiabatic approaches and to account for inhomogeneous broadening effects due to polar solvation. Optically forbidden (dark) states of quadrupolar and octupolar chromophores offer an interesting opportunity to verify the reliability of the dipolar approximation. In striking contrast with the dipolar approximation that strictly forbids RET towards or from dark states, our results demonstrate that dark states can take an active role in RET with interaction energies that, depending on the relative orientation of the chromophores, can be even larger than those relevant to allowed states. Essential-state models, whose predictions are quantitatively confirmed by TDDFT results, allow us to relate RET interaction energies towards allowed and dark states to the supramolecular symmetry of the RET-pair, offering reliable design strategies to optimize RET-interactions.

  13. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  14. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  15. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  16. Ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, G S; Murchie, A I; Walter, F; Clegg, R M; Lilley, D M

    1997-01-01

    The ion-induced folding transitions of the hammerhead ribozyme have been analysed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The hammerhead ribozyme may be regarded as a special example of a three-way RNA junction, the global structure of which has been studied by comparing the distances (as energy transfer efficiencies) between the ends of pairs of labelled arms for the three possible end-to-end vectors as a function of magnesium ion concentration. The data support two sequential ion-dependent transitions, which can be interpreted in the light of the crystal structures of the hammerhead ribozyme. The first transition corresponds to the formation of a coaxial stacking between helices II and III; the data can be fully explained by a model in which the transition is induced by a single magnesium ion which binds with an apparent association constant of 8000-10 000 M-1. The second structural transition corresponds to the formation of the catalytic domain of the ribozyme, induced by a single magnesium ion with an apparent association constant of approximately 1100 M-1. The hammerhead ribozyme provides a well-defined example of ion-dependent folding in RNA. PMID:9405376

  17. Resonance interactions in acyclic systems. 1. Energies and charge distributions in allyl anions and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, K.B.; Breneman, C.M.; LePage, T.J. )

    1990-01-03

    The energies of dissociation of propane to 1-propyl cation and anion and of propene to allyl cation and anion may be satisfactorily reproduced via ab initio calculations at the MP4/6-311++G**//6-31G* level. The reaction of 1-propyl cation with propene to give the unconjugated allyl cation was found to be endothermic, whereas the corresponding reaction of the anion was exothermic. The rotational barrier for allyl cation was 36 kcal/mol, whereas that for the anion was 19 kcal/mol. These data were analyzed in terms of electron delocalization and the electrostatic energies of the ions, and it was concluded that whereas the cation had significant resonance stabilization, the anion had little stabilization. A series of allyl type anions were examined making use of 6-311++G** wave functions calculated at the 6-31G* geometries. Correction for electron correlation at the MP3 level led to calculated proton affinities which agreed well with the experimental values. Electronegative atoms at the central position had little affect on the proton affinities, but when they were at the terminal positions, there was a large change. The changes in electron population among the amions were studied via numerical integration of the charge densities within boundaries which may be assigned to the atoms in the ions. The more stable anions are characterized by a -+- charge distribution for the three atoms in the allylic system, leading to internal coulombic stabilization.

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions using Aequorea victoria bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, Leonid M.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Y.; Rudenko, Natalia V.; Marchenkov, Victor V.; Skosyrev, Vitaly S.; Arzhanov, Maxim A.; Zakharov, Mikhail V.; Burkhardt, Nils; Semisotnov, Gennady V.; Alakhov, Yuli B.

    2003-07-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a naturally occurring phenomenon taking place in some marine coelenterates. Emission of light in these organisms involves the energy transfer between chromophores of donor luciferase and acceptor fluorescent protein. Due to the strict dependence of BRET efficiency on the inter-chromophore distance, the phenomenon has been applied to study protein-protein interactions by fusing interacting partners with either donor or acceptor proteins. Here we describe a BRET-based homogeneous protein-protein interaction assay exploiting novel donor-acceptor pair formed by photoproteins of jellyfish Aequorea victoria bioluminescent system, aequorin and green fluorescent protein enhanced variant (EGFP). Two known interacting proteins, streptavidin (SAV) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) were fused, respectively, with aequorin and EGFP. The fusions were purified after expression of the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli cells. Association of SAV-Aequorin and BCCP-EGFP was followed by BRET between aequorin (donor) and EGFP (acceptor) resulting in significantly increasing 510 nm and decreasing 470 nm bioluminescence intensity. It was shown that free biotin inhibited BRET due to its competition with BCCP-EGFP for binding to SAV-Aequorin. These properties were exploited to demonstrate competitive homogeneous BRET assay for biotin.

  19. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer and living cell imaging of novel pyridyltriphenylamine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duojun; Qian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A novel pyridyltriphenylamine-rhodamine dye PTRh and a pyridyltriphenylamine derivative PTO were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS-MALDI-TOF. PTRh performed typical fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal from pyridyltriphenylamine to rhodamine along with notable color change from green to rose when interacting with Hg2+ in EtOH/H2O. And PTRh as a ratiometric probe for Hg2+ based on FRET could achieve a very low detection limit of 32 nM and energy transfer efficiency of 83.7% in aqueous organic system. On the other hand, spectra properties of PTO in its aggregates, THF/H2O mixed solution and silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) dispersed in water were investigated. And the results indicated PTO exhibited bright green fluorescence in solid state, and PTO was successfully encapsulated in silica matrix (30-40 nm), emitting bright blue fluorescence with 11.7% quantum yield. Additionally, living cell imaging experiments demonstrated that PTRh could effectively response to intracellular Hg2+ and PTO-doped Si-NPs were well uptaken by MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It could be concluded that the chromophores are promising materials used as biosensors.

  20. {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51(5) b and 20.0(19) b, respectively, by irradiating aliquots of {sup 57}Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  1. Electric and magnetic properties computed for valence bond structures: is there a link between pauling resonance energy and ring current?

    PubMed

    Havenith, Remco W A

    2006-04-28

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties have been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their individual Kekulé resonance structures. The results show that there is no direct relationship between the Pauling resonance energy and the properties; the response properties are weighted averages of the properties of the individual structures. According to the aromaticity criteria based on molecular properties, one-structure benzene would be aromatic; thus, concerning molecular properties, spin-coupled bonds do not behave like localized bonds in Lewis structures, with which they are usually associated.

  2. Energy transfer of surface wind-induced currents to the deep ocean via resonance with the Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2017-03-01

    There are two main comparable sources of energy to the deep ocean-winds and tides. However, the identity of the most efficient mechanism that transfers wind energy to the deep ocean is still debated. Here we study, using oceanic general circulation model simulations and analytic derivations, the way that the wind directly supplies energy down to the bottom of the ocean when it is stochastic and temporally correlated or when it is periodic with a frequency that matches the Coriolis frequency. Basically, under these, commonly observed, conditions, one of the wind components resonates with the Coriolis frequency. Using reanalysis surface wind data and our simple model, we show that about one-third of the kinetic energy that is associated with wind-induced currents resides in the abyssal ocean, highlighting the importance of the resonance of the wind with the Coriolis force.

  3. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and Conformational Stability of Proteins: An Advanced Biophysical Module for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Katheryn M.; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2008-01-01

    Protein folding is an exploding area of research in biophysics and physical chemistry. Here, we describe the integration of several techniques, including absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, to probe important topics in protein folding. Cytochrome c is used as a model…

  4. Homogeneous competitive hybridization assay based on two-photon excitation fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingzhi; Dong, Xiaohu; Lian, Wenlong; Peng, Xiaoniu; Liu, Zhihong; He, Zhike; Wang, Ququan

    2010-02-15

    Recently, we have successfully developed a two-photon excitation fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TPE-FRET)-based homogeneous immunoassay using two-photon excitable small organic molecule as the energy donor. In the present work, the newly emerging TPE-FRET technique was extended to the determination of oligonucleotide. A new TPE molecule with favorable two-photon action cross section was synthesized [2-(2,5-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)acetic acid, abbreviated as TP-COOH], with the tagged reactive carboxyl group allowing facile conjugation with streptavidin (SA). Employing the TP-COOH molecule as energy donor and black hole quencher 1 (BHQ-1) as acceptor, a TPE-FRET-based homogeneous competitive hybridization model was constructed via a biotin-streptavidin bridge. Through the hybridization between a biotinylated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and a BHQ-1-linked ssDNA, and the subsequent capture of the as-formed hybrid by TP-COOH labeled SA, the donor fluorescence was quenched due to the FRET between TP-COOH and BHQ-1. Upon the competition between a target ssDNA and the quencher-linked ssDNA toward the biotinylated oligonucleotide, the donor fluorescence was recovered in a target-dependent manner. Good linearity was obtained with the target oligonucleotide ranging from 0.08 to 1.52 microM. The method was applied to spiked serum and urine samples with satisfying recoveries obtained. The results of this work verified the applicability of TPE-FRET technique in hybridization assay and confirmed the advantages of TPE-FRET in complicated matrix.

  5. Development of homogeneous binding assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and Alexa Fluor fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Beechem, Joseph M

    2006-10-01

    We studied the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots emitting at 565, 605, and 655 nm as energy donors and Alexa Fluor fluorophores with absorbance maxima at 594, 633, 647, and 680 nm as energy acceptors. As a first step, we prepared covalent conjugates between all three types of quantum dots and each of the Alexa Fluor fluorophores that could act as an energy acceptor. All of these conjugates displayed efficient resonance energy transfer. Then we prepared covalent conjugates of these quantum dots with biotin, fluorescein, and cortisol and established that the binding of these conjugates to suitable Alexa Fluor-labeled antibodies and streptavidin (in the case of biotin) can be efficiently detected by measuring the resonance energy transfer in homogeneous solutions. Finally, based on these observations, competitive binding assays for these three small analytes were developed. The performance of these assays as a function of the degree of labeling of the quantum dots was evaluated. It was found that decreasing the degree of loading of the quantum dots leads to decreases of the limits of detection. The results show the great potential of this FRET system for the development of new homogeneous binding assays.

  6. Twenty-Eight Orders of Parametric Resonance in a Microelectromechanical Device for Multi-band Vibration Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contends to be the first to report the experimental observation of up to 28 orders of parametric resonance, which has thus far only been envisioned in the theoretical realm. While theory has long predicted the onset of n orders of parametric resonance, previously reported experimental observations have been limited up to about the first 5 orders. This is due to the rapid narrowing nature of the frequency bandwidth of the higher instability intervals, making practical accessibility increasingly more difficult. Here, the authors have experimentally confirmed up to 28 orders of parametric resonance in a micromachined membrane resonator when electrically undamped. While the implication of this finding spans across the vibration dynamics and transducer application spectrum, the particular significance of this work is to broaden the accumulative operational frequency bandwidth of vibration energy harvesting for enabling self-powered microsystems. Up to 5 orders were recorded when driven at 1.0 g of acceleration across a matched load of 70 kΩ. With a natural frequency of 980 Hz, the fundamental mode direct resonance had a −3 dB bandwidth of 55 Hz, in contrast to the 314 Hz for the first order parametric resonance; furthermore, the half power bands of all 5 orders accumulated to 478 Hz. PMID:27445205

  7. Highly adaptable and sensitive protease assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zauner, Thomas; Berger-Hoffmann, Renate; Müller, Katrin; Hoffmann, Ralf; Zuchner, Thole

    2011-10-01

    Proteases are widely used in analytical sciences and play a central role in several widespread diseases. Thus, there is an immense need for highly adaptable and sensitive assays for the detection and monitoring of various proteolytic enzymes. We established a simple protease fluorescence resonance energy transfer (pro-FRET) assay for the determination of protease activities, which could in principle be adapted for the detection of all proteases. As proof of principle, we demonstrated the potential of our method using trypsin and enteropeptidase in complex biological mixtures. Briefly, the assay is based on the cleavage of a FRET peptide substrate, which results in a dramatic increase of the donor fluorescence. The assay was highly sensitive and fast for both proteases. The detection limits for trypsin and enteropeptidase in Escherichia coli lysate were 100 and 10 amol, respectively. The improved sensitivity for enteropeptidase was due to the application of an enzyme cascade, which leads to signal amplification. The pro-FRET assay is highly specific as even high concentrations of other proteases did not result in significant background signals. In conclusion, this sensitive and simple assay can be performed in complex biological mixtures and can be easily adapted to act as a versatile tool for the sensitive detection of proteases.

  8. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.; Milas, Peker

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  9. Association of a novel preribosomal complex in Trypanosoma brucei determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Ciganda, Martin; Williams, Noreen

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that the trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37 form a unique preribosomal complex with ribosomal protein L5 and 5S rRNA in the nucleoplasm. We hypothesize that this novel trimolecular complex is necessary for stabilizing 5S rRNA in Trypanosoma brucei and is essential for the survival of the parasite. In vitro quantitative analysis of the association between the proteins L5 and P34 is fundamental to our understanding of this novel complex and thus our ability to exploit its unique characteristics. Here we used in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to analyze the association between L5 and P34. First, we demonstrated that FRET can be used to confirm the association between L5 and P34. We then determined that the binding constant for L5 and P34 is 0.60 ± 0.03 μM, which is in the range of protein-protein binding constants for RNA binding proteins. In addition, we used FRET to identify the critical regions of L5 and P34 involved in the protein-protein association. We found that the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motif (RRM) of P34 and the L18 domain of L5 are important for the association of the two proteins with each other. These results provide us with the framework for the discovery of ways to disrupt this essential complex.

  10. Thrombin detection in murine plasma using engineered fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptadimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Brut, Marie; Mazères, Serge; Estève, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    Biodetection strategies, in which two sides of one target protein are targeted simultaneously, have been shown to increase specificity, selectivity, and affinity, and it has been suggested that they constitute excellent candidates for protein sensing in complex media. In this study we propose a method to engineer the sequence of a DNA construct dedicated to reversible thrombin detection. This construct, called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) aptadimer, is assembled with two aptamers, which target different epitopes of thrombin, interconnected with a DNA linker that contains a FRET couple and a reversible double helix stem. In the absence of target, the stem is stable maintaining a FRET couple in close proximity, and fluorescence is unquenched upon thrombin addition due to the dehybridization of the stem. We define design rules for the conception of FRET aptadimers, and develop a software to optimize their functionality. One engineered FRET aptadimer sequence is subsequently characterized experimentally by temperature scanning fluorimetry, demonstrating the relevance of our technology for thrombin sensing in bulk and diluted murine plasma.

  11. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  12. Toward a hybridization assay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and quantum dots immobilized in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Anthony J.; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W. Russ; Chen, Lu; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2010-06-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely adopted as integrated components of bioassays and biosensors. In particular, solid phase nucleic acid hybridization assays have been demonstrated to have several advantages and permit the detection of up to four DNA targets simultaneously using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This work explores the potential for miniaturization of a solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using QDs and FRET on a microfluidics platform. A method was developed for the immobilization of Streptavidin coated QDs and the preparation of QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates within microfluidic channels using electrokinetic delivery. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the selective detection of target DNA using FRET-sensitized emission from a Cy3 acceptor paired with a green emitting QD donor. The microfluidic platform offered the advantages of smaller sample volumes, nearly undetectable non-specific adsorption, and hybridization within minutes. This work is an important first step toward the development of biochips that enable the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid targets.

  13. Gold nanoparticles-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer for competitive immunoassay of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Lu, Xin; Tian, Jianniao

    2012-12-21

    A novel platform for competitive immunoassay of biomolecules was designed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The antigen was first labeled with FITC, and the FITC labeled antigen was then reacted with AuNPs functionalized with a relative antibody to obtain the nanometer-sized sensor. The FRET between FITC and AuNPs led to the fluorescent quenching of FITC. Upon the recognition of the target antigen, the FICT labeled antigen was released from the AuNPs surface because of competitive immunoreaction, the distance between the FITC and AuNPs increased, and the interaction between FITC and AuNPs became weaker, which significantly hindered the FRET and, thus, increased the fluorescence of FITC. The change in fluorescence intensity produced a novel method for detection of the target. By using immunoglobulin M (IgM) as a model analyte, the competitive immunoassay had a limit of detection of 42 pM. The present method was applied for the determination of IgM in human serum with satisfactory results. The proposed method exhibits several advantages such as high quenching efficiency and sensitivity, and good specificity toward target versus other analogues. Moreover, this strategy could be conveniently extended for the detection of other biomolecules by using the corresponding antigens and respective antibodies.

  14. Carbon quantum dots as fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for organophosphate pesticides determination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoli; Song, Yang; Yan, Xu; Zhu, Chengzhou; Ma, Yongqiang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-03-07

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) obtained from natural organics attract significant attention due to the abundance of carbon sources, varieties of heteroatom doping (such as N, S, P) and good biocompatibility of precursor. In this study, tunable fluorescence emission CQDs originated from chlorophyll were synthesized and characterized. The fluorescence emission can be effectively quenched by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Thiocholine, which was produced from acetylthiocholine (ATC) by the hydrolysis of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), could cause the aggregation of Au NPs and the corresponding recovery of FRET-quenched fluorescence emission. The catalytic activity of BChE could be irreversibly inhibited by organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), thus, the recovery effect was reduced. By evaluating the fluorescence emission intensity of CQDs, a FRET-based sensing platform for OPs determination was established. Paraoxon was studied as an example of OPs. The sensing platform displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the paraoxon concentrations in the range of 0.05-50μgL(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05μgL(-1). Real sample study in tap and river water revealed that this sensing platform was repeatable and accurate. The results indicate that the OP sensor is promising for applications in food safety and environmental monitoring.

  15. Analyzing the influence of contact-induced quenching processes on Förster resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Ralf; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2007-07-01

    Experiments based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are widely used to obtain information on conformational dynamics of biomolecular systems. To reliably measure FRET, accurate knowledge of photophysical properties of the used fluorophores is indispensable. In high FRET constructs donor (D) and acceptor (A) fluorophores can approach each other close enough that electronic interactions might occur. When separated by distances on the order of van der Waals radii, photophysical properties can be changed reversibly, opening new non-radiative relaxation pathways, or irreversibly, chemically altering the fluorophores. Even transient contacts can thus compromise accurate FRET measurements. To study FRET and competing D-A contact-induced processes we labeled the amino acid cystein (Cys) with two fluorophores. A donor (D; TMR or Cy3B) was attached to the thiol group and an acceptor (A; Atto647N) to the amino group of Cys. Absorption spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were used to characterize the different A-Cys-D complexes at the ensemble level. In addition, we performed single-molecule FRET experiments using alternating-laser excitation to study the heterogeneity of the FRET-systems. We identified competing quenching processes severely changing D and A quantum yields upon fluorophore contact. The results are applicable for quantitative analysis of FRET in dynamic molecular systems that allow transient contact between D and A fluorophores.

  16. Resonant structure of low-energy H{sub 3}{sup +} dissociative recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Altevogt, Simon; Berg, Max H.; Bing, Dennis; Grieser, Manfred; Hoffmann, Jens; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Mendes, Mario B.; Novotny, Oldrich; Novotny, Steffen; Buhr, Henrik; Kreckel, Holger; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Greene, Chris H.; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Repnow, Roland; Sorg, Tobias; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas

    2011-03-15

    High-resolution dissociative recombination rate coefficients of rotationally cool and hot H{sub 3}{sup +} in the vibrational ground state have been measured with a 22-pole trap setup and a Penning ion source, respectively, at the ion storage-ring TSR. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to explore the dependence of the rate coefficient on ion temperature and to study the contributions of different symmetries to probe the rich predicted resonance spectrum. The kinetic energy release was investigated by fragment imaging to derive internal temperatures of the stored parent ions under differing experimental conditions. A systematic experimental assessment of heating effects is performed which, together with a survey of other recent storage-ring data, suggests that the present rotationally cool rate-coefficient measurement was performed at 380{sub -130}{sup +50} K and that this is the lowest rotational temperature so far realized in storage-ring rate-coefficient measurements on H{sub 3}{sup +}. This partially supports the theoretical suggestion that temperatures higher than assumed in earlier experiments are the main cause for the large gap between the experimental and the theoretical rate coefficients. For the rotationally hot rate-coefficient measurement a temperature of below 3250 K is derived. From these higher-temperature results it is found that increasing the rotational ion temperature in the calculations cannot fully close the gap between the theoretical and the experimental rate coefficients.

  17. The role of Forster resonance energy transfer in luminescent solar concentrator efficiency and color tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Benjamin L.

    Forster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) is demonstrated in a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) material containing two air-stable, high quantum yield laser dyes in a PMMA matrix. The concentration regime surrounding the Forster critical distance is determined for the system. Two-dye LSC films employing FRET are shown to increase the absorption of air mass 1.5 solar irradiance without affecting the self absorption properties of the film. The impact of nonradiative transfer efficiency on LSC performance is experimentally demonstrated and evidence is presented suggesting higher concentration two-dye films are have reduced waveguide transport losses under excitation of the shorter wavelength dye when compared to less concentrated films of the same optical density. The impact of FRET efficiency and thus LSC film fluorescence spectra on LSC color determination is investigated and shown to be minimal. LSC color determination is shown to be accurate through the use of standard subtractive color schemes that consider only film absorption, and wide color tunability is shown to be achievable through the use of a subtractive color model, with as few as three appropriately absorbing dyes.

  18. Interaction between fluorescein isothiocyanate and carbon dots: Inner filter effect and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huabing; Xu, Chaoyong; Bai, Yanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Dongmei; Liang, Jiangong; Liu, Lingzhi; Han, Heyou

    2017-01-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used for the preparation of multifunctional probes by conjugation with organic fluorescent dyes. However, the effect of organic fluorescent dyes on CDs still remains poorly understood. Herein, the effect of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) on CDs was explored by spectroscopic techniques at pH5.1, 7.0 and 9.0. The fluorescent intensity of CDs was found to be quenched gradually after mixing directly with different concentrations of FITC, but the fluorescent lifetime of CDs remained unchanged. According to the results of UV-vis absorption spectra and fluorescent lifetime measurements, a pH-dependent inner filter effect (IFE) between CDs and FITC was proposed. However, the fluorescent lifetime of CDs deceased after their conjugation with FITC, implying the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CDs and FITC. This study has revealed two different effects of FITC on CDs with varying pH values and provided useful theoretical guidelines for further research on the interaction between other nanoparticles and fluorophores.

  19. Interaction between fluorescein isothiocyanate and carbon dots: Inner filter effect and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huabing; Xu, Chaoyong; Bai, Yanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Dongmei; Liang, Jiangong; Liu, Lingzhi; Han, Heyou

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used for the preparation of multifunctional probes by conjugation with organic fluorescent dyes. However, the effect of organic fluorescent dyes on CDs still remains poorly understood. Herein, the effect of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) on CDs was explored by spectroscopic techniques at pH 5.1, 7.0 and 9.0. The fluorescent intensity of CDs was found to be quenched gradually after mixing directly with different concentrations of FITC, but the fluorescent lifetime of CDs remained unchanged. According to the results of UV-vis absorption spectra and fluorescent lifetime measurements, a pH-dependent inner filter effect (IFE) between CDs and FITC was proposed. However, the fluorescent lifetime of CDs deceased after their conjugation with FITC, implying the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CDs and FITC. This study has revealed two different effects of FITC on CDs with varying pH values and provided useful theoretical guidelines for further research on the interaction between other nanoparticles and fluorophores.

  20. Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer: Coupling between Chromophore Molecules and Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Xie, Tao; Qian, Ruo-Can; Long, Yi-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from a single metallic nanoparticle to the molecules adsorbed on its surface has attracted more and more attentions in recent years. Here, a molecular beacon (MB)-regulated PRET coupling system composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and chromophore molecules has been designed to study the influence of PRET effect on the scattering spectra of GNPs. In this system, the chromophore molecules are tagged to the 5'-end of MB, which can form a hairpin structure and modified on the surface of GNPs by its thiol-labeled 3'-end. Therefore, the distance between GNPs and chromophore molecules can be adjusted through the open and close of the MB loop. From the peak shift, the PRET interactions of different GNPs-chromophore molecules coupling pairs have been calculated by discrete dipole approximation and the fitting results match well with the experimental data. Therefore, the proposed system has been successfully applied for the analysis of PRET situation between various metallic nanoparticles and chromophore molecules, and provides a useful tool for the potential application in screening the PRET-based nanoplasmonic sensors.

  1. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  2. Nanostructured biosensor for detecting glucose in tear by applying fluorescence resonance energy transfer quenching mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longyi; Tse, Wai Hei; Chen, Yi; McDonald, Matthew W; Melling, James; Zhang, Jin

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, a nanostructured biosensor is developed to detect glucose in tear by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenching mechanism. The designed FRET pair, including the donor, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), and the acceptor, dextran-binding malachite green (MG-dextran), was conjugated to concanavalin A (Con A), an enzyme with specific affinity to glucose. In the presence of glucose, the quenched emission of QDs through the FRET mechanism is restored by displacing the dextran from Con A. To have a dual-modulation sensor for convenient and accurate detection, the nanostructured FRET sensors were assembled onto a patterned ZnO nanorod array deposited on the synthetic silicone hydrogel. Consequently, the concentration of glucose detected by the patterned sensor can be converted to fluorescence spectra with high signal-to-noise ratio and calibrated image pixel value. The photoluminescence intensity of the patterned FRET sensor increases linearly with increasing concentration of glucose from 0.03mmol/L to 3mmol/L, which covers the range of tear glucose levels for both diabetics and healthy subjects. Meanwhile, the calibrated values of pixel intensities of the fluorescence images captured by a handhold fluorescence microscope increases with increasing glucose. Four male Sprague-Dawley rats with different blood glucose concentrations were utilized to demonstrate the quick response of the patterned FRET sensor to 2µL of tear samples.

  3. Toward automated denoising of single molecular Förster resonance energy transfer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hao-Chih; Lin, Bo-Lin; Chang, Wei-Hau; Tu, I.-Ping

    2012-01-01

    A wide-field two-channel fluorescence microscope is a powerful tool as it allows for the study of conformation dynamics of hundreds to thousands of immobilized single molecules by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals. To date, the data reduction from a movie to a final set containing meaningful single-molecule FRET (smFRET) traces involves human inspection and intervention at several critical steps, greatly hampering the efficiency at the post-imaging stage. To facilitate the data reduction from smFRET movies to smFRET traces and to address the noise-limited issues, we developed a statistical denoising system toward fully automated processing. This data reduction system has embedded several novel approaches. First, as to background subtraction, high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) method is employed to extract spatial and temporal features. Second, to register and map the two color channels, the spots representing bleeding through the donor channel to the acceptor channel are used. Finally, correlation analysis and likelihood ratio statistic for the change point detection (CPD) are developed to study the two channels simultaneously, resolve FRET states, and report the dwelling time of each state. The performance of our method has been checked using both simulation and real data.

  4. Experimental Validation of a Theory for a Variable Resonant Frequency Wave Energy Converter (VRFWEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minok; Virey, Louis; Chen, Zhongfei; Mäkiharju, Simo

    2016-11-01

    A point absorber wave energy converter designed to adapt to changes in wave frequency and be highly resilient to harsh conditions, was tested in a wave tank for wave periods from 0.8 s to 2.5 s. The VRFWEC consists of a closed cylindrical floater containing an internal mass moving vertically and connected to the floater through a spring system. The internal mass and equivalent spring constant are adjustable and enable to match the resonance frequency of the device to the exciting wave frequency, hence optimizing the performance. In a full scale device, a Permanent Magnet Linear Generator will convert the relative motion between the internal mass and the floater into electricity. For a PMLG as described in Yeung et al. (OMAE2012), the electromagnetic force proved to cause dominantly linear damping. Thus, for the present preliminary study it was possible to replace the generator with a linear damper. While the full scale device with 2.2 m diameter is expected to generate O(50 kW), the prototype could generate O(1 W). For the initial experiments the prototype was restricted to heave motion and data compared to predictions from a newly developed theoretical model (Chen, 2016).

  5. Photoswitchable semiconductor nanocrystals with self-regulating photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián A.; Gillanders, Florencia; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules and nanoparticles constitute superior biosensors for a wide range of industrial, research and biomedical applications. Rendered reversible by spontaneous or deterministic means, such probes facilitate many of the techniques in fluorescence microscopy that surpass the optical resolution dictated by diffraction. Here we have devised a family of photoswitchable quantum dots (psQDs) in which the semiconductor core functions as a fluorescence donor in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and multiple photochromic diheteroarylethene groups function as acceptors upon activation by ultraviolet light. The QDs were coated with a polymer bearing photochromic groups attached via linkers of different length. Despite the resulting nominal differences in donor-acceptor separation and anticipated FRET efficiencies, the maximum quenching of all psQD preparations was 38±2%. This result was attributable to the large ultraviolet absorption cross-section of the QDs, leading to preferential cycloreversion of photochromic groups situated closer to the nanoparticle surface and/or with a more favourable orientation.

  6. Nanoluciferase signal brightness using furimazine substrates opens bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to widefield microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiho; Grailhe, Regis

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, BRET) techniques are powerful tools for studying protein-protein interactions in cellular assays. In contrast to fluorescent proteins, chemiluminescent proteins do not require excitation light, known to trigger autofluorescence, phototoxicity, and photobleaching. Regrettably, low signal intensity of luciferase systems restricts their usage as they require specialized microscopes equipped with ultra low-light imaging cameras. In this study, we report that bioluminescence quantification in living cells using a standard widefield automated microscope dedicated to screening and high content analysis is possible with the newer luciferase systems, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With such equipment, we showed that robust intramolecular BRET can be measured using a combination of Nluc and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Using the human Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) dimer model, we next validated that intermolecular BRET could be quantified at a single cell level. The enhanced signal brightness of Nluc enabling BRET imaging to widefield microscopy shows strong potential to open up single cell protein-protein interactions studies to a wider audience. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Upconversion Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Detecting DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seockjune; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Im, Su-Gyeong; Lee, Min-Ki; Lee, Chang-Hun; Son, Sang Jun; Oh, Heung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of a crucial CpG island is the main mechanism for the inactivation of CDKN2A in the early stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, the detection of DNA methylation with high sensitivity and specificity is important, and various detection methods have been developed. Recently, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been found to display a high signal-to-noise ratio and no photobleaching, making them useful for diagnostic applications. In this pilot study, we applied UCNPs to the detection of CDKN2A methylation and evaluated the feasibility of this system for use in molecular diagnostics. DNA PCR was performed using biotinylated primers, and the PCR amplicon was then intercalated with SYTOX Orange dye, followed by incubation with streptavidin-conjugated UCNPs. Fluorescence detection of the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of the UCNPs (MS-UC-FRET) was then performed, and the results were compared to those from real-time PCR (RQ-PCR) and pyrosequencing. Detection by MS-UC-FRET was more sensitive than that by either RQ-PCR or pyrosequencing. Our results confirmed the success of our MS-UC-FRET system for detecting DNA methylation and demonstrated the potential application of this system in molecular diagnostics. PMID:27517925

  8. Förster resonance energy transfer as a tool to study photoreceptor biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovan, Stephanie C.; Howell, Scott; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-11-01

    Vision is initiated in photoreceptor cells of the retina by a set of biochemical events called phototransduction. These events occur via coordinated dynamic processes that include changes in secondary messenger concentrations, conformational changes and post-translational modifications of signaling proteins, and protein-protein interactions between signaling partners. A complete description of the orchestration of these dynamic processes is still unavailable. Described in this work is the first step in the development of tools combining fluorescent protein technology, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and transgenic animals that have the potential to reveal important molecular insights about the dynamic processes occurring in photoreceptor cells. We characterize the fluorescent proteins SCFP3A and SYFP2 for use as a donor-acceptor pair in FRET assays, which will facilitate the visualization of dynamic processes in living cells. We also demonstrate the targeted expression of these fluorescent proteins to the rod photoreceptor cells of Xenopus laevis, and describe a general method for detecting FRET in these cells. The general approaches described here can address numerous types of questions related to phototransduction and photoreceptor biology by providing a platform to visualize dynamic processes in molecular detail within a native context.

  9. Photoswitchable semiconductor nanocrystals with self-regulating photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Sebastián A; Gillanders, Florencia; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A; Jovin, Thomas M

    2015-01-16

    Photoswitchable molecules and nanoparticles constitute superior biosensors for a wide range of industrial, research and biomedical applications. Rendered reversible by spontaneous or deterministic means, such probes facilitate many of the techniques in fluorescence microscopy that surpass the optical resolution dictated by diffraction. Here we have devised a family of photoswitchable quantum dots (psQDs) in which the semiconductor core functions as a fluorescence donor in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and multiple photochromic diheteroarylethene groups function as acceptors upon activation by ultraviolet light. The QDs were coated with a polymer bearing photochromic groups attached via linkers of different length. Despite the resulting nominal differences in donor-acceptor separation and anticipated FRET efficiencies, the maximum quenching of all psQD preparations was 38±2%. This result was attributable to the large ultraviolet absorption cross-section of the QDs, leading to preferential cycloreversion of photochromic groups situated closer to the nanoparticle surface and/or with a more favourable orientation.

  10. Oligomeric state of human erythrocyte band 3 measured by fluorescence resonance energy homotransfer.

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, S M; Piston, D W; Beth, A H

    1998-01-01

    The oligomeric state of the erythrocyte anion exchange protein, band 3, has been assayed by resonance energy homotransfer. Homotransfer between oligomeric subunits, labeled with eosin-5-maleimide at Lys430 in the transmembrane domain, has been demonstrated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and is readily observed by its depolarization of the eosin fluorescence. Polarized fluorescence measurements of HPLC-purified band 3 oligomers indicate that eosin homotransfer increases progressively with increasing species size. This shows that homotransfer also occurs between labeled band 3 dimers as well as within the dimers, making fluorescence anisotropy measurements sensitive to band 3 self-association. Treatment of ghost membranes with either Zn2+ or melittin, agents that cluster band 3, significantly decreases the anisotropy as a result of the increased homotransfer within the band 3 clusters. By comparison with the anisotropy of species of known oligomeric state, the anisotropy of erythrocyte ghost membranes at 37 degrees C is consistent with dimeric and/or tetrameric band 3, and does not require postulation of a fraction of large clusters. Proteolytic removal of the cytoplasmic domain of band 3, which significantly increases the rotational mobility of the transmembrane domain, does not affect its oligomeric state, as reported by eosin homotransfer. These results support a model in which interaction with the membrane skeleton restricts the mobility of band 3 without significantly altering its self-association state. PMID:9675213

  11. Nicking enzyme-assisted biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Wenkai; Duan, Yingfen; Li, Zhongjie; Deng, Le

    2014-05-15

    Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) outbreaks continue to occur, and have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvC I is widely used for the detection of biomolecules and displays activity for specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In this study, we developed a biosensor to detect S. enteritidis based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using nicking enzyme and carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because of the quenching effect of black hole quencher 1 (BHQ 1), the CNPs do not fluoresce in the reaction system. When the target bacteria are added, the nicking enzyme recognizes and cleaves the dsDNA fabricated by the interaction between probe and target. As a result, the CNPs dissociate from BHQ 1 and emit strong fluorescence. Using the nicking enzyme, the fluorescence signals of the biosensor are greatly amplified. The biosensor exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of S. enteritidis ranging from 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in water and from 1.5 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in milk. The present results indicate that our FRET-based detection system can be widely employed for the effective detection of pathogens.

  12. Predicting signatures of anisotropic resonance energy transfer in dye-functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gil, Gabriel; Corni, Stefano; Delgado, Alain; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-11-13

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) is an inherently anisotropic process. Even the simplest, well-known Förster theory, based on the transition dipole-dipole coupling, implicitly incorporates the anisotropic character of RET. In this theoretical work, we study possible signatures of the fundamental anisotropic character of RET in hybrid nanomaterials composed of a semiconductor nanoparticle (NP) decorated with molecular dyes. In particular, by means of a realistic kinetic model, we show that the analysis of the dye photoluminescence difference for orthogonal input polarizations reveals the anisotropic character of the dye-NP RET which arises from the intrinsic anisotropy of the NP lattice. In a prototypical core/shell wurtzite CdSe/ZnS NP functionalized with cyanine dyes (Cy3B), this difference is predicted to be as large as 75% and it is strongly dependent in amplitude and sign on the dye-NP distance. We account for all the possible RET processes within the system, together with competing decay pathways in the separate segments. In addition, we show that the anisotropic signature of RET is persistent up to a large number of dyes per NP.

  13. Highly sensitive turn-on fluorescence detection of thrombomodulin based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Liyan; Zhu, Jiaming; Wang, Wen; Jin, Lehe; Fu, Yanjiao; Duan, Bohui; Tan, Liang

    2017-02-01

    As an integral glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial cells, thrombomodulin (TM) has very high affinity for thrombin. TM has been regarded to be a marker of endothelial damage since it can be released during endothelial cell injury. In this work, a highly sensitive fluorescence method for the quantitative detection of TM was developed. TM antibody (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were bound on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to construct BSA-AuNPs-Ab nanocomposites and they were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The fluorescence of acridine orange (AO) was quenched by the prepared gold nanocomposites based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the presence of TM, the fluorescence was turned on due to the effective separation of AO from the surface of gold nanocomposites. Under optimum conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the TM concentration from 0.1 pg mL- 1 to 5 ng mL- 1 with a low detection limit of 12 fg mL- 1. The release of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) by the injured HUVEC-C cells in the presence of H2O2 was investigated using the proposed method. The released sTM content in the growth medium was found to be increased with the enhancement of contact time of the cells with H2O2.

  14. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tallet, Estelle; Fernandez, Isabelle; Zhang, Chi; Salsac, Marion; Gregor, Nathalie; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Pin, Jean Philippe; Trinquet, Eric; Goffin, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (PRLR) is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL) that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L) was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L) or PRLR blockade (antagonist) involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue native electrophoresis, BRET1), we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements. PMID:22649370

  15. Re-evaluation of biotin-streptavidin conjugation in Förster resonance energy transfer applications

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Bahar; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Bingbing; Yuan, Baohong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Bioaffinity conjugation between streptavidin (SA) and biotin has been widely used to link donors and acceptors for investigating the distance-dependent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). When studying a commonly used FRET system of (QD-SA)-(biotin-DNA-dye) [donor: quantum dot (QD); acceptor: small organic fluorescent dye; and linker: deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) molecule via SA-biotin conjugation], however, a contradictory finding was recently reported in the literature. It was found that the FRET lost its dependence on the number of DNA base pairs when using a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution. We found that the conflicted results were caused by the ionic strength of the adopted buffer solutions. Our results suggest that the dependent FRET on the number of DNA bases is favorable in a low-ionic-strength buffer, whereas in relatively high-ionic-strength buffers, the FRET loses the DNA length dependence. We propose that the independence is mainly caused by the conformational change of DNA molecules from a stretched to a coiled mode when the cations in the high-ionic-strength buffer neutralize the negatively charged backbone of DNA molecules, thereby bringing the acceptors close to the donors. PMID:25162908

  16. Versatility of homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays for biologics drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Christine J; Matthews, Carl; Neal, Frances; Colley, Caroline; Gardener, Matthew J; Vaughan, Tristan

    2015-04-01

    Identification of potential lead antibodies in the drug discovery process requires the use of assays that not only measure binding of the antibody to the target molecule but assess a wide range of other characteristics. These include affinity ranking, measurement of their ability to inhibit relevant protein-protein interactions, assessment of their selectivity for the target protein, and determination of their species cross-reactivity profiles to support in vivo studies. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer is a technology that offers the flexibility for development of such assays, through the availability of donor and acceptor fluorophore-conjugated reagents for detection of multiple tags or fusion proteins. The time-resolved component of the technology reduces potential assay interference, allowing screening of a range of different crude sample types derived from the bacterial or mammalian cell expression systems often used for antibody discovery projects. Here we describe the successful application of this technology across multiple projects targeting soluble proteins and demonstrate how it has provided key information for the isolation of potential therapeutic antibodies with the desired activity profile.

  17. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  18. Passive suppression of helicopter ground resonance using nonlinear energy sinks attached on the helicopter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeot, B.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the passive control of a rotor instability named helicopter Ground Resonance (GR). The passive device consists of a set of essential cubic nonlinear absorbers named Nonlinear Energy Sinks (NES) each of them positioned on a blade. A dynamic model reproducing helicopter GR instability is presented and transformed to a time-invariant nonlinear system using a multi-blade coordinate transformation based on Fourier transform mapping the dynamic state variables into a non-rotating reference frame. Combining complexification, slow/fast partition of the dynamics and averaging procedure, a reduced model is obtained which allowed us to use the so-called geometric singular perturbation analysis to characterize the steady state response regimes. As in the case of a NES attached to the fuselage, it is shown that under suitable conditions, GR instability can be completely suppressed, partially suppressed through periodic response or strongly modulated response. Relevant analytical results are compared, for validation purposes, to direct integration of the reference and reduced models.

  19. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  20. Modulation of quantum dot photoemission based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer to a photochromic dye acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Clapp, Aaron R.; Trammel, Scott A.; Mattoussi, Hedi M.

    2004-12-01

    We demonstrate the use of a photochromic dye to achieve fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) modulation between a QD donor and the dye acceptor brought in close proximity in a selfassembled QD-protein-dye conjugate. The E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP) appended on its C-terminal with an oligohistidine attachment domain, immobilized onto CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs was labeled with a sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide activated photochromic BIPS molecule (1',3-dihydro-1'-(2-carboxyethyl)-3,3-dimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]). Two different dye-to-MBP-protein ratios of 1:1 and 5:1 were used. The ability of MBP-BIPS to modulate QD photoluminescence was tested by switching BIPS from the colorless spiropyran (SP) to the colored merocyanine (MC) using irradiation with white light (>500 nm) or with UV light (~365 nm), respectively. QDs surrounded by ~20 MBP-BIPS with a dye to protein ratio of 1 showed ~25% loss in their photoemission with consecutive repeated switches, while QDs surrounded by ~20 MBP-BIPS with BIPS to MBP ratio of 5 produced a substantially more pronounced rate of FRET where the QD emission was quenched by ~60%. This result suggests the possibility of using QD-protein conjugates to assemble reversible FRET nanoassemblies where the QD emission can be controlled by changing the properties of the acceptors dyes bound to the protein.

  1. Förster resonance energy transfer evidence for lysozyme oligomerization in lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Sarkar, Pabak; Luchowski, Rafal; Akopova, Irina; Patsenker, Leonid D; Klochko, Oleksii; Tatarets, Anatoliy L; Kudriavtseva, Yuliia O; Terpetschnig, Ewald A; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2010-12-23

    Intermolecular time-resolved and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been applied to detect quantitatively the aggregation of polycationic protein lysozyme (Lz) in the presence of lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixture with 5, 10, 20, or 40 mol % of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (PG5, PG10, PG20, or PG40, respectively). Upon binding to PC, PG5, or PG10 model membranes, Lz was found to retain its native monomeric conformation, while increasing content of anionic lipid up to 20 or 40 mol % resulted in the formation of Lz aggregates. The structural parameters of protein self-association (the degree of oligomerization, the distance between the monomers in protein assembly, and the fraction of donors present in oligomers) have been derived. The crucial role of the factors such as lateral density of the adsorbed protein and electrostatic and hydrophobic Lz-lipid interactions in controlling the protein self-association behavior has been proposed.

  2. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Evidence for Lysozyme Oligomerization in Lipid Environment

    PubMed Central

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Sarkar, Pabak; Luchowski, Rafal; Akopova, Irina; Patsenker, Leonid D.; Klochko, Oleksii; Tatarets, Anatoliy L.; Kudriavtseva, Yuliia O.; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2012-01-01

    Intermolecular time-resolved and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been applied to detect quantitatively the aggregation of polycationic protein lysozyme (Lz) in the presence of lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixture with 5, 10, 20, or 40 mol % of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (PG5, PG10, PG20, or PG40, respectively). Upon binding to PC, PG5, or PG10 model membranes, Lz was found to retain its native monomeric conformation, while increasing content of anionic lipid up to 20 or 40 mol % resulted in the formation of Lz aggregates. The structural parameters of protein self-association (the degree of oligomerization, the distance between the monomers in protein assembly, and the fraction of donors present in oligomers) have been derived. The crucial role of the factors such as lateral density of the adsorbed protein and electrostatic and hydrophobic Lz–lipid interactions in controlling the protein self-association behavior has been proposed. PMID:21126034

  3. Resonant-Like Enhancement of the High-Energy Plateau in ATD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, Katarzyna; Fabrikant, Ilya I.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2006-05-01

    We calculate the intensity variation of above-threshold detachment (ATD) rates for H^- and F^- in the high-energy plateau region, by solving the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation within the Sturmian-Floquet approach [1]. We find pronounced enhancement of the ATD spectra as the laser-field intensity induces ATD channel closings. We confirm previous results on negative ions with an active s-electron [2], and extend them to the case of p-symmetry of the initial state. Depending on the symmetry of the initial state, we show that the enhancement is most pronounced for even- or odd-channel closures. Similar resonant-like enhancements have been observed experimentally in above-threshold ionization spectra for rare gases [3], calculations for which are in progress. [1] R. M. Potvliege, Comp. Phys. Comm. 114, 42 (1998); [2] B. Borca et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 193001 (2002); [3] See, e.g., F. Grasbon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 173003 (2003).

  4. Förster resonance energy transfer as a probe of membrane protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guipeun; López-Peña, Ignacio; Oklejas, Vanessa; Gary, Cyril S; Cao, Weihan; Kim, Judy E

    2012-02-01

    The folding reaction of a β-barrel membrane protein, outer membrane protein A (OmpA), is probed with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. Four mutants of OmpA were generated in which the donor fluorophore, tryptophan, and acceptor molecule, a naphthalene derivative, are placed in various locations on the protein to report the evolution of distances across the bilayer and across the protein pore during a folding event. Analysis of the FRET efficiencies reveals three timescales for tertiary structure changes associated with insertion and folding into a synthetic bilayer. A narrow pore forms during the initial stage of insertion, followed by bilayer traversal. Finally, a long-time component is attributed to equilibration and relaxation, and may involve global changes such as pore expansion and strand extension. These results augment the existing models that describe concerted insertion and folding events, and highlight the ability of FRET to provide insight into the complex mechanisms of membrane protein folding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  5. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  6. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  7. Quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer by monitoring sensitized emission in living plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sara M.; Galliardt, Helena; Schneider, Jessica; Barisas, B. George; Seidel, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) describes excitation energy exchange between two adjacent molecules typically in distances ranging from 2 to 10 nm. The process depends on dipole-dipole coupling of the molecules and its probability of occurrence cannot be proven directly. Mostly, fluorescence is employed for quantification as it represents a concurring process of relaxation of the excited singlet state S1 so that the probability of fluorescence decreases as the probability of FRET increases. This reflects closer proximity of the molecules or an orientation of donor and acceptor transition dipoles that facilitates FRET. Monitoring sensitized emission by 3-Filter-FRET allows for fast image acquisition and is suitable for quantifying FRET in dynamic systems such as living cells. In recent years, several calibration protocols were established to overcome to previous difficulties in measuring FRET-efficiencies. Thus, we can now obtain by 3-filter FRET FRET-efficiencies that are comparable to results from sophisticated fluorescence lifetime measurements. With the discovery of fluorescent proteins and their improvement toward spectral variants and usability in plant cells, the tool box for in vivo FRET-analyses in plant cells was provided and FRET became applicable for the in vivo detection of protein-protein interactions and for monitoring conformational dynamics. The latter opened the door toward a multitude of FRET-sensors such as the widely applied Ca2+-sensor Cameleon. Recently, FRET-couples of two fluorescent proteins were supplemented by additional fluorescent proteins toward FRET-cascades in order to monitor more complex arrangements. Novel FRET-couples involving switchable fluorescent proteins promise to increase the utility of FRET through combination with photoactivation-based super-resolution microscopy. PMID:24194740

  8. English to Sanskrit Machine Translation Using Transfer Based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ganesh R.; Godse, Sachin P.

    2010-11-01

    Translation is one of the needs of global society for communicating thoughts and ideas of one country with other country. Translation is the process of interpretation of text meaning and subsequent production of equivalent text, also called as communicating same meaning (message) in another language. In this paper we gave detail information on how to convert source language text in to target language text using Transfer Based Approach for machine translation. Here we implemented English to Sanskrit machine translator using transfer based approach. English is global language used for business and communication but large amount of population in India is not using and understand the English. Sanskrit is ancient language of India most of the languages in India are derived from Sanskrit. Sanskrit can be act as an intermediate language for multilingual translation.

  9. High-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator for enhanced acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-05-01

    A high-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator (Cr-PCR) coupled with an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR) is proposed to improve acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting. Owing to the strongly directional wave-scattering effect of the cross-plate corners, strong confinement of acoustic waves emerges. Consequently, the proposed Cr-PCR structure exhibits ∼353.5 times higher Q value and ∼6.1 times greater maximum pressure amplification than the phononic crystal resonator (Cy-PCR) (consisting of cylindrical scatterers) of the same size. Furthermore, the harvester using the proposed Cr-PCR and the EMHR has ∼22 times greater maximum output-power volume density than the previous harvester using Cy-PCR and EMHR structures.

  10. Statistical analysis of the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance of the High Energy Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Duan, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    In a diffraction-limited storage ring, half integer resonances can have strong effects on the beam dynamics, associated with the large detuning terms from the strong focusing and strong sextupoles as required for an ultralow emittance. In this study, the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance (MA) was statistically analyzed based on one design of the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS). It was found that the probability of MA reduction due to crossing of half integer resonances is closely correlated with the level of beta beats at the nominal tunes, but independent of the error sources. The analysis indicated that for the presented HEPS lattice design, the rms amplitude of beta beats should be kept below 1.5% horizontally and 2.5% vertically to reach a small MA reduction probability of about 1%.

  11. Temperature- and energy-dependent phase shifts of resonant multiple-beam X-ray diffraction in germanium crystals.

    PubMed

    Liao, Po-Yu; Liu, Wen-Chung; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Chiu, Yi-Hua; Kung, Ying-Yu; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports temperature- and energy-dependent phase shifts of resonant multiple-beam X-ray diffraction in germanium crystals, involving forbidden (002) and weak (222) reflections. Phase determination based on multiple-beam diffraction is employed to estimate phase shifts from (002)-based {(002)(375)(373̅)} four-beam cases and (222)-based { (222)(5̅33̅)} three-beam cases in the vicinity of the Ge K edge for temperatures from 20 K up to 300 K. The forbidden/weak reflections enhance the sensitivity of measuring phases at resonance. At room temperature, the resonance triplet phases reach a maximum of 8° for the four-beam cases and -19° for the three-beam cases. It is found that the peak intensities and triplet phases obtained from the (002) four-beam diffraction are related to thermal motion induced anisotropy and anomalous dispersion, while the (222) three-beam diffraction depends on the aspherical covalent electron distribution and anomalous dispersion. However, the electron-phonon interaction usually affects the forbidden reflections with increasing temperatures and seems to have less effect on the resonance triplet phase shifts measured from the (002) four-beam diffraction. The resonance triplet phase shifts of the (222) three-beam diffraction versus temperature are also small.

  12. Application of bias voltage to tune the resonant frequency of membrane-based electroactive polymer energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lin; Grissom, Michael; Fisher, Frank T.

    2016-05-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting has been widely investigated to as a means to generate low levels of electrical energy for applications such as wireless sensor networks. However, for optimal performance it is necessary to ensure that resonant frequencies of the device match the ambient vibration frequencies for maximum energy harvested. Here a novel resonant frequency tuning approach is proposed by applying a bias voltage to a pre-stretched electroactive polymer (EAP) membrane, such that the resulting changes in membrane tension can tune the device to match the environmental vibration source. First, a material model which accounts for the change in properties due to the pre-stretch of a VHB 4910 EAP membrane is presented. The effect of the bias voltage on the EAP membrane, which induces an electrostatic pressure and corresponding reduction in membrane thickness, are then determined. The FEM results from ANSYS agree well with an analytical hyperelastic model of the activation response of the EAP membrane. Lastly, through a mass-loaded circular membrane vibration model, the effective resonant frequency of the energy harvester can be determined as a function of changes in membrane tension due to the applied bias voltage. In the case of an EAP membrane, pre-stretch contributes to the pre-stretch stiffness of the system while the applied bias voltage contributes to a change in bias voltage stiffness of the membrane. Preliminary experiments verified the resonant frequencies corresponding to the bias voltages predicted from the appropriate models. The proposed bias voltage tuning approach for the EAP membrane may provide a novel tuning strategy to enable energy harvesting from various ambient vibration sources in various application environments.

  13. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor between upconverting nanoparticles and palladium nanoparticles for ultrasensitive CEA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Shi, Liang; Sun, De-En; Li, Peiwu; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-12-15

    An ultrasensitive biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was constructed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between upconverting nanoparticles (UCPs) and palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). PdNPs was synthesized by the addition of a solution of Na2PdCl4 into a mixture of N2H4·H2O as the reducing agent and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as the stabilizer. The CEA aptamer (5'-NH2-ATACCAGCTTATTCAATT-3') was conjugated to hexanedioic acid (HDA) modified UCPs (HDA-UCPs) through an EDC-NHS coupling protocol. The coordination interaction between nitrogen functional groups of the CEA aptamer and PdNPs brought UCPs and PdNPs in close proximity, which resulted in the fluorescence quenching of UCPs to an extent of 85%. And the non-specific fluorescence quenching caused by PdNPs towards HDA-UCPs was negligible. After the introduction of CEA into the UCPs-CEA aptamer-PdNPs fluorescence quenching system, the CEA aptamer preferentially combined with CEA accompanied by the conformational change which weakened the coordination interaction between the CEA aptamer and PdNPs. So fluorescence recovery of UCPs was observed and a linear relationship between the fluorescence recovery of UCPs and the concentration of CEA was obtained in the range from 2pg/mL to 100pg/mL in the aqueous buffer with the detection limit of 0.8pg/mL. The ultrasensitive detection of CEA was also realized in diluted human serum with a linear range from 4pg/mL to 100pg/mL and a detection limit of 1.7pg/mL. This biosensor makes the most of the high quenching ability of PdNPs towards UCPs with negligible non-specific fluorescence quenching and has broad application prospects in biochemistry.

  14. Real-time detection of cellular death receptor-4 activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Gandhok, Harmeet; Zeng, Ling Ge; Waqas, Sidra; Jiang, Xuejun; Wang, Sihong

    2013-05-01

    Targeted therapy involving the activation of death receptors DR4 and/or DR5 by its ligand, TRAIL, can selectively induce apoptosis in certain tumor cells. In order to profile the dynamic activation or trimerization of TRAIL-DR4 in live cells in real-time, the development of an apoptosis reporter cell line is essential. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology via a FRET pair, cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescence protein (YFP), was used in this study. DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP were stably expressed in human lung cancer PC9 cells. Flow cytometer sorting and limited dilution coupled with fluorescence microscopy were used to select a monoclonal reporter cell line with high and compatible expression levels of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP. FRET experiments were conducted and FRET efficiencies were monitored according to the Siegel's YFP photobleaching FRET protocol. Upon TRAIL induction a significant increase in FRET efficiencies from 5% to 9% demonstrated the ability of the DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cell line in monitoring the dynamic activation of TRAIL pathways. 3D reconstructed confocal images of DR4-CFP/YFP reporter cells exhibited a colocalized expression of DR4-CFP and DR4-YFP mainly on cell membranes. FRET results obtained during this study complements the use of epi-fluorescence microscopy for FRET analysis. The real-time FRET analysis allows the dynamic profiling of the activation of TRAIL pathways by using the time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Therefore, DR4-CFP/YFP PC9 reporter cells along with FRET technology can be used as a tool for anti-cancer drug screening to identify compounds that are capable of activating TRAIL pathways.

  15. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer using luciferase-immobilized quantum dots for self-illuminated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Yu, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Yan-Fu; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an innovative method for cancer treatment that involves the administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to visible light. An appreciable amount of a particular light source is a key to activate photosensitizers in PDT. However, the external excitation light source is a problem for clinical application because of the limitation of tissue-penetrating properties. Additionally, the wavelength of laser emission should match the absorption wavelength of each photosensitizer for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species and cell killing. In this study, Renilla luciferase-immobilized quantum dots-655 (QD-RLuc8) was used for bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-mediated PDT to resolve these problems. The bioluminescent QD-RLuc8 conjugate exhibits self-illumination at 655 nm after coelenterazine addition, which can activate the photosensitizer, Foscan(®)-loaded micelles for PDT. Our results show that BRET-mediated PDT by QD-RLuc8 plus coelenterazine (20 μg/mL) successfully generated reactive oxygen species (40.8%), killed ~ 50% A549 cells at 2 μg/mL equivalent Foscan(®)in vitro and significantly delayed tumor growth in vivo due to cell apoptosis under TUNEL analysis without obvious weight loss. Based on immunohistochemical observations, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-negative area of tumor sections after BRET-mediated PDT was obviously increased compared to the PDT-untreated groups without an external light source. We conclude that this nanotechnology-based PDT possesses several clinical benefits, such as overcoming light penetration issues and treating deeper lesions that are intractable by PDT alone.

  16. Simple Estimation of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Orientation Factor Distribution in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Loura, Luís M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its acute sensitivity to distance in the nanometer scale, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has found a large variety of applications in many fields of chemistry, physics, and biology. One important issue regarding the correct usage of FRET is its dependence on the donor-acceptor relative orientation, expressed as the orientation factor κ2. Different donor/acceptor conformations can lead to κ2 values in the 0 ≤ κ2 ≤ 4 range. Because the characteristic distance for FRET, R0, is proportional to (κ2)1/6, uncertainties in the orientation factor are reflected in the quality of information that can be retrieved from a FRET experiment. In most cases, the average value of κ2 corresponding to the dynamic isotropic limit (<κ2> = 2/3) is used for computation of R0 and hence donor-acceptor distances and acceptor concentrations. However, this can lead to significant error in unfavorable cases. This issue is more critical in membrane systems, because of their intrinsically anisotropic nature and their reduced fluidity in comparison to most common solvents. Here, a simple numerical simulation method for estimation of the probability density function of κ2 for membrane-embedded donor and acceptor fluorophores in the dynamic regime is presented. In the simplest form, the proposed procedure uses as input the most probable orientations of the donor and acceptor transition dipoles, obtained by experimental (including linear dichroism) or theoretical (such as molecular dynamics simulation) techniques. Optionally, information about the widths of the donor and/or acceptor angular distributions may be incorporated. The methodology is illustrated for special limiting cases and common membrane FRET pairs. PMID:23203123

  17. Combining MFD and PIE for accurate single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Sikor, Martin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Mokranjac, Dejana; Seidel, Claus A M; Lamb, Don C

    2012-03-01

    Single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer (spFRET) experiments using single-molecule burst analysis on a confocal microscope are an ideal tool to measure inter- and intramolecular distances and dynamics on the nanoscale. Different techniques have been developed to maximize the amount of information available in spFRET burst analysis experiments. Multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) is used to monitor a variety of fluorescence parameters simultaneously and pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) employs direct excitation of the acceptor to probe its presence and photoactivity. To calculate accurate FRET efficiencies from spFRET experiments with MFD or PIE, several calibration measurements are usually required. Herein, we demonstrate that by combining MFD with PIE information regarding all calibration factors as well as an accurate determination of spFRET histograms can be performed in a single measurement. In addition, the quality of overlap of the different detection volumes as well as the detection of acceptor photophysics can be investigated with MFD-PIE. Bursts containing acceptor photobleaching can be identified and excluded from further investigation while bursts that contain FRET dynamics are unaffected by this analysis. We have employed MFD-PIE to accurately analyze the effects of nucleotides and substrate on the interdomain separation in DnaK, the major bacterial heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). The interdomain distance increases from 47 Å in the ATP-bound state to 84 Å in the ADP-bound state and slightly contracts to 77 Å when a substrate is bound. This is in contrast to what was observed for the mitochondrial member of the Hsp70s, Ssc1, supporting the notion of evolutionary specialization of Hsp70s for different cellular functions in different organisms and cell organelles.

  18. Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer: A Tool for Probing Molecular Cell-Biomaterial Interactions in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel D.; Mooney, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The current paradigm in designing biomaterials is to optimize material chemical and physical parameters based on correlations between these parameters and downstream biological responses, whether in vitro or in vivo. Extensive developments in molecular design of biomaterials have facilitated identification of several biophysical and biochemical variables (e.g. adhesion peptide density, substrate elastic modulus) as being critical to cell response. However, these empirical observations do not indicate whether different parameters elicit cell responses by modulating redundant variables of the cell-material interface (e.g. number of cell-material bonds, cell-matrix mechanics). Recently, a molecular fluorescence technique, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) has been applied to quantitatively analyze parameters of the cell-material interface for both two and three-dimensional adhesion substrates. Tools based on FRET have been utilized to quantify several parameters of the cell-material interface relevant to cell response, including molecular changes in matrix proteins induced by interactions both with surfaces and cells, the number of bonds between integrins and their adhesion ligands, and changes in the crosslink density of hydrogel synthetic extracellular matrix analogs. As such techniques allow both dynamic and 3D analyses they will be useful to quantitatively relate downstream cellular responses (e.g. gene expression) to the composition of this interface. Such understanding will allow bioengineers to fully exploit the potential of biomaterials engineered on the molecular scale, by optimizing material chemical and physical properties to a measurable set of interfacial parameters known to elicit a predictable response in a specific cell population. This will facilitate the rational design of complex, multi-functional biomaterials used as model systems for studying diseases or for clinical applications. PMID:17270268

  19. Fluid-fluid membrane microheterogeneity: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed Central

    Loura, L M; Fedorov, A; Prieto, M

    2001-01-01

    Large unilamellar vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixtures were studied using fluorescence techniques (steady-state fluorescence intensity and anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)). Three compositions (cholesterol mole fraction 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25) and two temperatures (30 and 40 degrees C) inside the coexistence range of liquid-ordered (l(o)) and liquid-disordered (l(d)) phases were investigated. Two common membrane probes, N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (NBD-DMPE) and N-(lissamine(TM)-rhodamine B)-dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Rh-DMPE), which form a FRET pair, were used. The l(o)/l(d) partition coefficients of the probes were determined by individual photophysical measurements and global analysis of time-resolved FRET decays. Although the acceptor, Rh-DMPE, prefers the l(d) phase, the opposite is observed for the donor, NBD-DMPE. Accordingly, FRET efficiency decreases as a consequence of phase separation. Comparing the independent measurements of partition coefficient, it was possible to detect very small domains (<20 nm) of l(o) in the cholesterol-poor end of the phase coexistence range. In contrast, domains of l(d) in the cholesterol-rich end of the coexistence range have comparatively large size. These observations are probably related to different processes of phase separation, nucleation being preferred in formation of l(o) phase from initially pure l(d), and domain growth being faster in formation of l(d) phase from initially pure l(o). PMID:11159445

  20. Cytochrome c-Lipid Interactions: New Insights from Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Kinnunen, Paavo K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) from anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or cardiolipin (AV-CL) to cytochrome c (cyt c) heme moiety was employed to assess the molecular-level details of protein interactions with lipid bilayers composed of PC with 2.5 (CL2.5), 5 (CL5), 10 (CL10), or 20 (CL20) mol % CL under conditions of varying ionic strength and lipid/protein molar ratio. Monte Carlo analysis of multiple data sets revealed a subtle interplay between 1), exchange of the neutral and acidic lipid in the protein-lipid interaction zone; 2), CL transition into the extended conformation; and 3), formation of the hexagonal phase. The switch between these states was found to be controlled by CL content and salt concentration. At ionic strengths ≥40 mM, lipid bilayers with CL fraction not exceeding 5 mol % exhibited the tendency to transform from lamellar to hexagonal phase upon cyt c adsorption, whereas at higher contents of CL, transition into the extended conformation seems to become thermodynamically favorable. At lower ionic strengths, deviations from homogeneous lipid distributions were observed only for model membranes containing 2.5 mol % CL, suggesting the existence of a certain surface potential critical for assembly of lipid lateral domains in protein-lipid systems that may subsequently undergo morphological transformations depending on ambient conditions. These characteristics of cyt c-CL interaction are of great interest, not only from the viewpoint of regulating cyt c electron transfer and apoptotic propensities, but also to elucidate the general mechanisms by which membrane functional activities can be modulated by protein-lipid interactions. PMID:20858419

  1. Cytochrome c-lipid interactions: new insights from resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2010-09-22

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) from anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or cardiolipin (AV-CL) to cytochrome c (cyt c) heme moiety was employed to assess the molecular-level details of protein interactions with lipid bilayers composed of PC with 2.5 (CL2.5), 5 (CL5), 10 (CL10), or 20 (CL20) mol % CL under conditions of varying ionic strength and lipid/protein molar ratio. Monte Carlo analysis of multiple data sets revealed a subtle interplay between 1), exchange of the neutral and acidic lipid in the protein-lipid interaction zone; 2), CL transition into the extended conformation; and 3), formation of the hexagonal phase. The switch between these states was found to be controlled by CL content and salt concentration. At ionic strengths ≥ 40 mM, lipid bilayers with CL fraction not exceeding 5 mol % exhibited the tendency to transform from lamellar to hexagonal phase upon cyt c adsorption, whereas at higher contents of CL, transition into the extended conformation seems to become thermodynamically favorable. At lower ionic strengths, deviations from homogeneous lipid distributions were observed only for model membranes containing 2.5 mol % CL, suggesting the existence of a certain surface potential critical for assembly of lipid lateral domains in protein-lipid systems that may subsequently undergo morphological transformations depending on ambient conditions. These characteristics of cyt c-CL interaction are of great interest, not only from the viewpoint of regulating cyt c electron transfer and apoptotic propensities, but also to elucidate the general mechanisms by which membrane functional activities can be modulated by protein-lipid interactions.

  2. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-12-02

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave.

  3. Low-energy electron scattering by N2 molecules physisorbed on Ag: Study of the resonant vibrational excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1995-02-01

    Molecules adsorbed on a metal surface can be excited by low-energy electron impact. Resonant processes in which an intermediate negative ion is formed during the collision are very efficient. The resonant vibrational excitation of N2 molecules physisorbed on Ag by low-energy electrons is studied theoretically with the coupled-angular-mode method. The influence of the neighboring surface on the excitation process (including the excitation of overtones) is analyzed. The results are compared with the experimental results of Demuth, Schmeisser, and Avouris. It is found that in a scattering experiment, most of the vibrational excitation concerns electrons that are inelastically scattered into the metal and are thus not observed experimentally.

  4. Classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes resonance effects in electronic-vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Ali, Dominic P.; Miller, William H.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, a classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes is applied to E → V energy transfer in a collinear system, A + BC (v = 1) → A* + BC (v = 0), resembling Br-H2. Finally, the model, which treats electronic as well as translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, describes the resonance features in this process reasonably well.

  5. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  6. A Finite Element Model Of Self-Resonating Bimorph Microcantilever For Fast Temperature Cycling In A Pyroelectric Energy Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, Salwa; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Bannuru, Thirumalesh; Rajic, Slobodan; Islam, Syed K; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2011-01-01

    A self resonating bimorph cantilever structure for fast temperature cycling in a pyroelectric energy harvester has been modeled using a finite element method. The effect of constituting material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure has been investigated. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature play a key role in dominating the cycling frequency and efficiency of energy recycling. An optimal solution for the most efficient energy scavenging process has been sought by studying the performance trend with different variable parameters such as thermal contact conductance, heat source temperature, device aspect ratio and constituent materials of varying thermal conductivity and expansion coefficients.

  7. Fully self-consistent study of charge-exchange resonances and the impact on the symmetry energy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Cao, Li-Gang; Colò, G.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-10-01

    We have examined within a fully self-consistent theoretical framework the energy difference between the anti-analog giant dipole resonance (AGDR) and the isobaric analog state (IAS), EAGDR-EIAS , as an indicator of the neutron skin and of the density behavior of the symmetry energy. We have improved two specific points in our HF+RPA calculations: (1) the exchange term of the two-body Coulomb interaction is treated exactly without Slater approximation; and (2) the two-parameters spin-orbit interaction is treated in a consistent way within the energy density functional theory. The estimated values for the neutron skin in 208Pb and the slope parameter of symmetry energy are compared with previous analysis available in the literature.

  8. Method for resolution of closely situated resonance peaks for the yield of negative ions based on the energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazunov, V.A.; Khvostenko, V.I.; Fal'ko, V.S.; Chanbarisov, V.Sh.

    1982-04-20

    A method was proposed for isolating and resolving on the basis of the energy the closely situated resonance peaks for the yield of negative ions when the mass spectrometry method is used to study the capture of electrons by molecules. In essence, the method for isolating and resolving on the basis of the energy the closely situated resonance peaks of the EYC (effective yield curves) of negative ions consists in obtaining and subsequently comparing the total current of the particles (ions plus neutrals) with a definite m/z ratio and the current of the neutral particles that are formed during ejection of the electrons. The EYC of the (M - H)/sup -/ ions from 2-propylthiophene, where two peaks with maxima at 5.1 and 8.7 +/- 0.1 eV were observed. The accuracy, with which the position of the maximum of the isolated resonance peak can be indicated, depends on tau/sub a/ as a function of the energy of the electrons. For many molecular ions and fragment ions, tau/sub a/ decreases with increase in the energy in the resonance region, while an analysis of the experimental data indicates that the observed decrease in tau/sub a/ with increase in the energy is usually less than 0.0001 sec per 1 eV. With such a change in the lifetime the shift in the maximum of the EYC of the neutral component of the stream of particles toward higher electron energies relative to the maximum of the ion current corresponds to approx. 0.2 eV. Taking this into account and a systematic error of 0.1 eV in the nonlinearity of the energy scale of the electrons, and also the accuracy of determining the position of the maximum of the EYC (0.1 eV), it can be said that the closely situated states of negative ions can be isolated with a accuracy of +/- 0.2 eV.

  9. New evaluation of the{sup 232}Th resonance parameters in the energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    Neutron resonance parameters of {sup 232}Th were obtained from a Reich-Moore SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Linear Accelerator (ORELA) by Olsen et al. in 1981 and of high-resolution neutron capture measurements performed recently at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA (Belgium)) by Schillebeeckx et al. and at n-TOF (CERN (Switzerland)) by Aerts et al. The ORELA data were analyzed previously by Olsen using the Breit-Wigner multilevel code SIOB, and their results were used for the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. In our new analysis of the Olsen neutron transmissions using the modern computer code SAMMY, better accuracy is obtained for the resonance parameters by including recent experimental neutron capture data in the experimental data base. The experimental data base and the method of analysis are described in the report. Neutron transmissions and capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared to the experimental values. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters. The new evaluation produces a decrease in the capture resonance integral, and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks. (authors)

  10. Exciton Recombination, Energy-, and Charge Transfer in Single- and Multilayer Quantum-Dot Films on Silver Plasmonic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Taeho; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jinwoo; Li, Xiang-Shu; Moon, Eui-Seong; Baik, Chan-Wook; Il Kim, Sun; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee; Park, Gyeong-Su; Shin, Jai-Kwang; Hwang, Sungwoo; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2016-05-01

    We examine exciton recombination, energy-, and charge transfer in multilayer CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) on silver plasmonic resonators using photoluminescence (PL) and excitation spectroscopy along with kinetic modeling and simulations. The exciton dynamics including all the processes are strongly affected by the separation distance between QDs and silver resonators, excitation wavelength, and QD film thickness. For a direct contact or very small distance, interfacial charge transfer and tunneling dominate over intrinsic radiative recombination and exciton energy transfer to surface plasmons (SPs), resulting in PL suppression. With increasing distance, however, tunneling diminishes dramatically, while long-range exciton-SP coupling takes place much faster (>6.5 ns) than intrinsic recombination (~200 ns) causing considerable PL enhancement. The exciton-SP coupling strength shows a strong dependence on excitation wavelengths, suggesting the state-specific dynamics of excitons and the down-conversion of surface plasmons involved. The overlayers as well as the bottom monolayer of QD multilayers exhibit significant PL enhancement mainly through long-range exciton-SP coupling. The overall emission behaviors from single- and multilayer QD films on silver resonators are described quantitatively by a photophysical kinetic model and simulations. The present experimental and simulation results provide important and useful design rules for QD-based light harvesting applications using the exciton-surface plasmon coupling.

  11. Exciton Recombination, Energy-, and Charge Transfer in Single- and Multilayer Quantum-Dot Films on Silver Plasmonic Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Taeho; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jinwoo; Li, Xiang-Shu; Moon, Eui-Seong; Baik, Chan-Wook; Il Kim, Sun; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee; Park, Gyeong-Su; Shin, Jai-Kwang; Hwang, Sungwoo; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    We examine exciton recombination, energy-, and charge transfer in multilayer CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) on silver plasmonic resonators using photoluminescence (PL) and excitation spectroscopy along with kinetic modeling and simulations. The exciton dynamics including all the processes are strongly affected by the separation distance between QDs and silver resonators, excitation wavelength, and QD film thickness. For a direct contact or very small distance, interfacial charge transfer and tunneling dominate over intrinsic radiative recombination and exciton energy transfer to surface plasmons (SPs), resulting in PL suppression. With increasing distance, however, tunneling diminishes dramatically, while long-range exciton-SP coupling takes place much faster (>6.5 ns) than intrinsic recombination (~200 ns) causing considerable PL enhancement. The exciton-SP coupling strength shows a strong dependence on excitation wavelengths, suggesting the state-specific dynamics of excitons and the down-conversion of surface plasmons involved. The overlayers as well as the bottom monolayer of QD multilayers exhibit significant PL enhancement mainly through long-range exciton-SP coupling. The overall emission behaviors from single- and multilayer QD films on silver resonators are described quantitatively by a photophysical kinetic model and simulations. The present experimental and simulation results provide important and useful design rules for QD-based light harvesting applications using the exciton-surface plasmon coupling. PMID:27184469

  12. Reexamination of the Energy Levels of 15F by 14O + 1H ElasticResonance Scattering with BEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.Q.; Powell, J.; Lee, D.W.; Leitner, D.; McMahan, M.A.; Moltz, D.M.; O'Neil, J.P.; Perajarvi, K.; Phair, L.; Ramsey, C.A.; Xu,X.J.; Cerny, Joseph

    2005-05-30

    The energy levels of 15F have been measured by the p(14O,p)14O reaction. The 120 MeV 14O radioactive ion beam was produced by the BEARS coupled cyclotron system at an intensity averaging 1x104 particles/second on target. Energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction. The two lowest resonances in 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. The fit to the ground state had Jp = 1/2+ at 1.23+-0.05 MeV (width 0.5-0.84 MeV), and the first excited state was Jp=5/2+ at 2.81+-0.02 MeV (width 0.30+-0.06 MeV), both relative to the mass-energy of the proton and 14O. The 15F ground state energy supports the disappearance of the Z=8 proton magic number for odd Z, Tz=-3/2 nuclei.

  13. The inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between multicolor quantum dots for rapid and sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Beibei; Wang, Qi; Ma, Meihu; Cai, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we constructed the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system between two multi-color quantum dots (QDs) of two sizes for rapid and sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus. In this system, green-emitting QDs conjugated with rabbit anti-S. aureus antibodies were used as energy donors while orange-emitting QDs conjugated with goat-anti-rabbit IgG were used as energy acceptors to form FRET system. Pre-binding of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on the donor occupied the binding sites and thus blocked resonance energy transfer between two colors QDs, leading to the quenching fluorescence of the acceptor. The fluorescence of acceptor has a linear calibration graph with the concentrations of S. aureus from 52 to 2.6 × 105 CFU mL-1. The low detection limit was 10 CFU/mL. It was worth mentioning that the detection method of S. aureus had been applied to the analysis of apple juice and milk samples, which could potentially be developed into a sensor in the further study.

  14. Depolarization after resonance energy transfer (DARET): a sensitive fluorescence-based assay for botulinum neurotoxin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Marcella A; Williams, Dudley; Okawa, Yumiko; Holguin, Bret; James, Nicholas G; Ross, Justin A; Roger Aoki, K; Jameson, David M; Steward, Lance E

    2011-06-01

    The DARET (depolarization after resonance energy transfer) assay is a coupled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-fluorescence polarization assay for botulinum neurotoxin type A or E (BoNT/A or BoNT/E) proteolytic activity that relies on a fully recombinant substrate. The substrate consists of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) flanking SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa) residues 134-206. In this assay, the substrate is excited with polarized light at 387 nm, which primarily excites the BFP, whereas emission from the GFP is monitored at 509 nm. Energy transfer from the BFP to the GFP in the intact substrate results in a substantial depolarization of the GFP emission. The energy transfer is eliminated when the fluorescent domains separate on cleavage by the endopeptidase, and emission from the directly excited GFP product fragment is then highly polarized, resulting in an overall increase in polarization. This increase in polarization can be monitored to assay the proteolytic activity of BoNT/A and BoNT/E in real time. It allows determination of the turnover rate of the substrate and the kinetic constants (V(max) and k(cat)) based on the concentration of cleaved substrate determined directly from the measurements using the additivity properties of polarization. The assay is amenable to high-throughput applications.

  15. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing.

    PubMed

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs.

  16. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing

    PubMed Central

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C.; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs. PMID:27032688

  17. All organic host-guest crystals based on a dumb-bell-shaped conjugated host for light harvesting through resonant energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Reingard; Berger, Ricarda; Manca, Marianna; Hulliger, Jürg; Weber, Edwin; Loi, Maria A; Botta, Chiara

    2012-01-16

    Together we glow: Fully organic host-guest crystals with two dyes inserted in their parallel nanochannels display broad emission in the visible range thanks to resonant energy transfer. The conjugated host crystal provides light harvesting in the UV region.

  18. Thermal energy transfer by plasmon-resonant composite nanoparticles at pulse laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-04-01

    Heating of composite plasmon-resonant nanoparticles (spherical gold nanoshells) under pulse laser illumination is considered. The numerical solution of the time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for spatial inhomogeneities of absorbed laser radiation is performed. Important features of temperature kinetics and thermal flux inside nanoparticles are analyzed. Possible applications of the observed effects in nanotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  19. New generation polyphase resonant converter-modulators for the Korean atomic energy research institute

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Gribble, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present operational data and performance parameters of the newest generation polyphase resonant high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) as developed and delivered to the KAERI 100 MeV ''PEFP'' accelerator [1]. The KAERI design realizes improvements from the SNS and SLAC designs [2]. To improve the IGBT switching performance at 20 kHz for the KAERI system, the HVCM utilizes the typical zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) at turn on and as well as artificial zero-current-switching (ZCS) at turn-off. The new technique of artificial ZCS technique should result in a 6 fold reduction of IGBT switching losses (3). This improves the HCVM conversion efficiency to better than 95% at full average power, which is 500 kW for the KAERI two klystron 105 kV, 50 A application. The artificial ZCS is accomplished by placing a resonant RLC circuit across the input busswork to the resonant boost transformer. This secondary resonant circuit provides a damped ''kick-back'' to assist in IGBT commutation. As the transformer input busswork is extremely low inductance (< 10 nH), the single RLC network acts like it is across each of the four IGBT collector-emitter terminals of the H-bridge switching network. We will review these topological improvements and the overall system as delivered to the KAERI accelerator and provide details of the operational results.

  20. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  1. Multiple low-energy excitation states in FeNi disks observed by broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Y.; Zhou, C.; Sun, L.; Chui, S. T.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetization excitation in micron sized FeNi disks with different diameters is studied by broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurement. Except the main FMR peak, additional adsorption peaks with lower energies are observed. Both micromagnetic simulation and quantum spin wave calculation confirm that the low-energy excitation states are attributed to backward volume magnetostatic (BVM) spin waves. The size dependence of the low-energy states is systematically studied in 50-nm-thick Py disks with diameters larger than 500 nm, and the linewidth of the first BVM state is found to be obviously smaller than that of the FMR absorption peak. Through a quantitative comparison with experimental results, the quantum spin wave calculation is proven to be a reliable method to get the susceptibility and is much faster than the classical micromagnetic simulations.

  2. Investigation of the cerebral energy status in patients with glutaric aciduria type I by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Möller, H E; Koch, H G; Weglage, J; Freudenberg, F; Ullrich, K

    2003-04-01

    In vivo phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to investigate markers of the cerebral energy status in two patients with glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I). Besides an increased concentration of phosphomonoesters in one patient, no other significant alterations from controls were found. This might indicate increased resynthesis of dendritic processes secondary to preceding metabolic crises. In contrast to previous cell-culture studies, no cerebral depletion of phosphocreatine (PCr) was observed. In conclusion, a severe global and permanent depletion of cerebral energy supplies must be ruled out. The benefit of a permanent creatine substitution to stabilize mitochondrial energy metabolism seems thus questionable. However, as MRS was performed during stable clinical conditions, the possibility of a PCr decrease during acute metabolic crises cannot be assessed.

  3. Higher lying resonances in low-energy electron scattering with carbon monoxide*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dora, Amar; Tennyson, Jonathan; Chakrabarti, Kalyan

    2016-10-01

    R-matrix calculations on electron collisions with CO are reported whose aim is to identify any higher-lying resonances above the well-reported and lowest 2Π resonance at about 1.6 eV. Extensive tests with respect to basis sets, target models and scattering models are performed. The final results are reported for the larger cc-pVTZ basis set using a 50 state close-coupling (CC) calculation. The Breit-Wigner eigenphase sum and the time-delay methods are used to detect and fit any resonances. Both these methods find a very narrow 2Σ+ symmetry Feshbach-type resonance very close to the target excitation threshold of the b 3Σ+ state which lies at 12.9 eV in the calculations. This resonance is seen in the CC calculation using cc-pVTZ basis set while a CC calculation using the cc-pVDZ basis set does not produce this feature. The electronic structure of CO- is analysed in the asymptotic region; 45 molecular states are found to correlate with states dissociating to an anion and an atom. Electronic structure calculations are used to study the behaviour of these states at large internuclear separation. Quantitative results for the total, elastic and electronic excitation cross sections are also presented. The significance of these results for models of the observed dissociative electron attachment of CO in the 10 eV region is discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limão-Vieira, Gustavo García, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrović.

  4. Effects of excluded volume and correlated molecular orientations on Förster resonance energy transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mino

    2014-04-14

    Förster theory for the survival probability of excited chromophores is generalized to include the effects of excluded volume and orientation correlation in the molecular distribution. An analytical expression for survival probability was derived and written in terms of a few simple elementary functions. Because of the excluded volume, the survival probability exhibits exponential decay at early times and stretched exponential decay at later times. Experimental schemes to determine the size of the molecular excluded volume are suggested. With the present generalization of theory, we analyzed vibrational resonance energy transfer kinetics in neat water. Excluded volume effects prove to be important and slow down the kinetics at early times. The majority of intermolecular resonance energy transfer was found to occur with exponential kinetics, as opposed to the stretched exponential behavior predicted by Förster theory. Quantum yields of intra-molecular vibrational relaxation, intra-, and intermolecular energy transfer were calculated to be 0.413, 0.167, and 0.420, respectively.

  5. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  6. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Measurement of Turbulent Kinetic Energy for the Estimation of Irreversible Pressure Loss in Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Hope, Michael D.; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The authors sought to measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the ascending aorta of patients with aortic stenosis and to assess its relationship to irreversible pressure loss. BACKGROUND Irreversible pressure loss caused by energy dissipation in post-stenotic flow is an important determinant of the hemodynamic significance of aortic stenosis. The simplified Bernoulli equation used to estimate pressure gradients often misclassifies the ventricular overload caused by aortic stenosis. The current gold standard for estimation of irreversible pressure loss is catheterization, but this method is rarely used due to its invasiveness. Post-stenotic pressure loss is largely caused by dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy into heat. Recent developments in magnetic resonance flow imaging permit noninvasive estimation of TKE. METHODS The study was approved by the local ethics review board and all subjects gave written informed consent. Three-dimensional cine magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to measure TKE in 18 subjects (4 normal volunteers, 14 patients with aortic stenosis with and without dilation). For each subject, the peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was compared with a pressure loss index. The pressure loss index was based on a previously validated theory relating pressure loss to measures obtainable by echocardiography. RESULTS The total TKE did not appear to be related to global flow patterns visualized based on magnetic resonance–measured velocity fields. The TKE was significantly higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in normal volunteers (p < 0.001). The peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was strongly correlated to index pressure loss (R2 = 0.91). CONCLUSIONS Peak total TKE in the ascending aorta correlated strongly with irreversible pressure loss estimated by a well-established method. Direct measurement of TKE by magnetic resonance flow imaging may, with further validation, be used to estimate irreversible pressure loss

  8. (239)Pu neutron resonance parameters revisited and covariance matrix in the neutron energy range from thermal to 2.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range up to 2.5 keV neutron energy and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the analysis code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The experimental data were renormalized, aligned on a common energy scale, and corrected for residual background. Average neutron transmission and cross sections calculated with the new resonance parameters were compared to the corresponding experimental data and to ENDF/B-VI.

  9. DNA-quantum dot sensing platform with combined Förster resonance energy transfer and photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huijie; Wang, Lixiang; Wong, Ka-wai; Du, Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    A special DNA sensing platform based on a network of hybrid DNA-quantum dot system was designed and fabricated. Upon attachment of hybridized complementary DNA sequences, the molecular switch system can exhibit both photoinduced Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and photovoltaic (PV) effects simultaneously, but will give much weakened or no effect for the capture of hybridized products from "mismatched" DNA sequences. This dual sensing scheme based on combined FRET and PV effects can safeguard the accuracy of sensing, as FRET and PV can be singly induced even in the case of mismatch.

  10. Probing Nucleic Acid Interactions and Pre-mRNA Splicing by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is a powerful technique routinely used to monitor interactions between biomolecules. Here, we focus on the techniques that are used for investigating the structure and interactions of nucleic acids (NAs). We present a brief overview of the most commonly used FRET microscopy techniques, their advantages and drawbacks. We list experimental approaches recently used for either in vitro or in vivo studies. Next, we summarize how FRET contributed to the understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and spliceosome assembly. PMID:23203103

  11. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  12. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  13. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomason, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO/sub 2/ lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 700/sup 0/K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ..delta..J up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 ..-->.. 101) and hot-band (011 ..-->.. 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu/sub 3/-transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments.

  14. A theoretical study of the coupling between a vortex-induced vibration cylindrical resonator and an electromagnetic energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu-Xu, J.; Barrero-Gil, A.; Velazquez, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the coupling between a vortex-induced vibration (VIV) cylindrical resonator and its associated linear electromagnetic generator. The two-equation mathematical model is based on a dual-mass formulation in which the dominant masses are the stator and translator masses of the generator. The fluid-structure interaction implemented in the model equations follows the so-called ‘advanced forcing model’ whose closure relies on experimental data. The rationale to carry out the study is the fact that in these types of configurations there is a two-way interaction between the moving parts in such a way that their motions influence each other simultaneously, thereby affecting the energy actually harvested. It is believed that instead of mainly resorting to complementary numerical simulations, a theoretical model can shed some light on the nature of the interaction and, at the same time, provide scaling laws that can be used for practical design and optimization purposes. It has been found that the proposed configuration has a maximum hydrodynamic to mechanical to electrical conversion efficiency (based on the VIV resonator oscillation amplitude) of 8%. For a cylindrical resonator 10 cm long with a 2 cm diameter, this translates into an output power of 20 to 160 mW for water stream velocities in the range from 0.5 to 1 m s-1.

  15. Direct measurement of several resonance strengths and energies in 34S(α , γ) 38 Ar within the T = 2 . 2 GK Gamow window with DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, D.; O'Malley, P.; Akers, C.; Chen, A. A.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Erikson, L. E.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Greife, U.; Hager, Ulrike; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Laird, A. M.; Mahl, A.; Ruiz, C.

    2015-10-01

    Radiative α capture on 34S can impact nucleosynthesis in several astrophysical environments, including oxygen burning, explosive oxygen burning (Type II supernovae), and Type Ia supernovae. However, there exist discrepancies in the literature for the resonance strengths of two strong resonances within the Gamow window for oxygen burning temperatures (E0 +/- Δ / 2 = 3183 +/- 897 keV at T = 2 . 2 GK). Previous measurements suffered from systematic uncertainties inherent in the experimental technique. Furthermore, there are several states in 38Ar in the energy range of interest for which no 34S + α resonance strength/energy measurements have been performed. This measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF in BC, Canada. DRAGON's experimental technique allows direct measurement of quantities such as stopping power and resonance energy, alleviating the need for external inputs and reducing uncertainty. This talk will discuss DRAGON's experimental technique, analysis methods and results.

  16. An investigation into the simultaneous use of a resonator as an energy harvester and a vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Tang, B.; Melo, G. Pechoto; Lopes, V.

    2014-02-01

    A mass-spring-damper system is at the core of both a vibration absorber and a harvester of energy from ambient vibrations. If such a device is attached to a structure that has a high impedance, then it will have very little effect on the vibrations of the structure, but it can be used to convert mechanical vibrations into electrical energy (act as an energy harvester). However, if the same device is attached to a structure that has a relatively low impedance, then the device may attenuate the vibrations as it may act as both a vibration absorber and an energy harvester simultaneously. In this paper such a device is discussed. Two situations are considered; the first is when the structure is excited with broadband random excitation and the second is when the structure is excited by a single frequency. The optimum parameters of the device for both energy harvesting and vibration attenuation are discussed for these two cases. For random excitation it is found that if the device is optimized for vibration suppression, then this is also adequate for maximizing the energy absorbed (harvested), and thus a single device can effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time. For single frequency excitation this is found not to be the case. To maximize the energy harvested, the natural frequency of the system (host structure and absorber) has to coincide with the forcing frequency, but to minimize vibration of the host structure, the natural frequency of the absorber has to coincide with the forcing frequency. In this case, therefore, a single resonator cannot effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time.

  17. Using off-resonance laser modulation for beam-energy-spread cooling in generation of short-wavelength radiation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao

    2013-08-23

    To improve temporal coherence in electron beam based light sources, various techniques employ frequency up conversion of external seed sources via electron beam density modulation; however, the energy spread of the beam may hinder the harmonic generation efficiency. In this Letter, a method is described for cooling the electron beam energy spread by off-resonance seed laser modulation, through the use of a transversely dispersed electron beam and a modulator undulator with an appropriate transverse field gradient. With this novel mechanism, it is shown that the frequency up-conversion efficiency can be significantly enhanced. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for seeded soft x-ray free-electron laser and storage ring based coherent harmonic generation in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region.

  18. Plasmon-mediated radiative energy transfer across a silver nanowire array via resonant transmission and subwavelength imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Li, Min; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Peng, Xiao-Niu; Su, Xiong-Rui; Zhang, Zong-Suo; Li, Jian-Bo; Kim, Nam-Chol; Yu, Xue-Feng; Zhou, Li; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2010-09-28

    Efficient plasmon-mediated excitation energy transfer between the CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) across the silver nanowire array up to 560 nm in length is observed. The subwavelength imaging and spectral response of the silver nanowire arrays with near-field point-source excitations are revealed by theoretical simulations. Our studies demonstrate three advantages of the nanosystem: efficient exciton-plasmon conversion at the input side of the array through near-field strong coupling, directional waveguidance and resonant transmission via half-wave plasmon modes of the nanowire array, and subwavelength imaging at the output side of the array. These advantages allow a long-range radiative excitation energy transfer with a high efficiency and a good directionality.

  19. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  20. Increase in the energy efficiency of a pulsed-periodic relativistic backward wave oscillator with a modulating resonant reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tot'meninov, E. M.; Vykhodtsev, P. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Klimov, A. I.; Rostov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    An efficient microwave oscillator (320 MW and 7.9 GHz) that generates microwave pulses with a duration of 90 ns is developed using optimization of an electron-wave system and decompression of the longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum induction of 0.62 T in the region of an explosive-emission cathode and a lower field (0.36 T) with respect to cyclotron resonance in the slow-wave structure. In a packet (up to 10 ns) repetitively-pulsed (100 Hz) regime, the maximum conversion efficiency of the electron-beam power to microwave radiation is 27%. The mean energy of the radiation pulse (23 J) is about 18% of the pulse energy of high-voltage oscillator.

  1. Graphene and graphene-like two-denominational materials based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Lyu, Jing; Shi, Jingyu; Yang, Mo

    2017-03-15

    In the past decades, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied in many biological applications to reveal the biological information at the nanoscale. Recently, graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials started to be used in FRET assays as donors or acceptors including graphene oxide (GO), graphene quantum dot (GQD), graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C3N4) and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2, MnO2, and WS2). Due to the remarkable properties such as large surface to volume ratio, tunable energy band, photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility, these 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays have shown great potential in various biological applications. This review summarizes the recent development of graphene and graphene-like 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays in applications of biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery monitoring.

  2. Energy gap, penetration depth, and surface resistance of MgB2 thin films determined by microwave resonator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, B. B.; Klein, N.; Kang, W. N.; Kim, Hyeong-Jin; Choi, Eun-Mi; Lee, Sung-Ik; Dahm, T.; Maki, K.

    2002-09-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the microwave surface impedance Zs=Rs+iωμ0λ of two c-axis oriented MgB2 films employing dielectric resonator techniques. The temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration depth λ determined by a sapphire dielectric resonator at 17.9 GHz can be well fitted from 5 K close to Tc by the standard BCS integral expression assuming the reduced energy gap Δ(0)/kTc to be as low as 1.13 and 1.03 for the two samples. For the penetration depth at zero temperatures, values of 102 and 107 nm were determined from the fit. Our results clearly indicate the s-wave character of the order parameter. A similar fit of the penetration depth data was obtained with an anisotropic s-wave BCS model. Within this model we had to assume a prolate order parameter, having a large gap value in the c-axis direction and a small gap within the ab plane. This is in contrast to recent fits of the anisotropic s-wave model to upper critical-field data, where an oblate order parameter had to be used, and raises interesting questions about the nature of the superconducting state in MgB2. A rutile dielectric resonator was employed to obtain the temperature dependence of Rs with high accuracy. Below about Tc/2, Rs(T)-Rs(5 K) exhibits an exponential temperature dependence with a reduced energy gap consistent with that determined from the penetration depth data. The Rs value at 4.2 K was found to be as low as 19 μΩ at 7.2 GHz, which is comparable with a high-temperature superconducting copper oxide thin film.

  3. Reevaluation of 58Ni and 60Ni Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2009-01-01

    The previous 58Ni and 60Ni set of resonance parameters (ENDF/B-VII-0, JEFF-3, etc.) was based on the SAMMY analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutron transmission, scattering cross section and capture cross section measurements by C. M. Perey et al. The present results were obtained by adding to the SAMMY experimental data base the capture cross sections measured recently at the Oak Ridge Linear Electron Accelerator by Guber et al. and the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator very high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed by Brusegan et al. A complete resonance parameter covariance matrix (RPCM) was obtained from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database. The data sets were made consistent, when needed, by adjusting the neutron energy scales, the normalization coefficients, and the background corrections. The RPCM allows the calculation of the cross section uncertainties due mainly to statistical errors in the experimental data. The systematic uncertainties of the experimental data, estimated from the preliminary analyses of the experimental database, were taken into account in the cross section covariance matrix (CSCM) for total, scattering, and capture cross sections. The diagonal elements of the CSCM were obtained by quadratic combination of the different components of the uncertainties. Because of a lack of experimental information, the energy correlations were not obtained, and a value of 0.5 was arbitrarily taken for all the CSCM nondiagonal elements.

  4. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    PubMed

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02-0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe.

  5. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02–0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe. PMID:27143876

  6. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies by a microwave field in a mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2007-06-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the acceleration of electrons by a 2.45-GHz microwave field in an adiabatic mirror trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions, the electric and wave vectors of the wave being orthogonal to the trap axis. At a microwave electric field of {>=}10 V/cm and air pressures of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} Torr (the experiments were also performed with helium and argon), a self-sustained discharge was initiated in which a fraction of plasma electrons were accelerated to energies of 0.3-0.5 MeV. After the onset of instability, the acceleration terminated; the plasma decayed; and the accelerated electrons escaped toward the chamber wall, causing the generation of X-ray emission. Estimates show that electrons can be accelerated to the above energies only in the regime of self-phased interaction with the microwave field, provided that the electrons with a relativistically increased mass penetrate into the region with a higher magnetic field. It is shown that the negative-mass instability also can contribute to electron acceleration. The dynamic friction of the fast electrons by neutral particles in the drift space between the resonance zones does not suppress electron acceleration, so the electrons pass into a runaway regime. Since the air molecules excited by relativistic runaway electrons radiate primarily in the red spectral region, this experiment can be considered as a model of high-altitude atmospheric discharges, known as 'red sprites.'.

  8. Computer program for determining fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency from flow cytometric data on a cell-by-cell basis.

    PubMed

    Szentesi, Gergely; Horváth, Gábor; Bori, Imre; Vámosi, György; Szöllosi, János; Gáspár, Rezso; Damjanovich, Sándor; Jenei, Attila; Mátyus, László

    2004-09-01

    The determination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with flow cytometry (FCET) is one of the most efficient tools to study the proximity relationships of cell membrane components in cell populations on a cell-by-cell basis. Because of the high amount of data and the relatively tedious calculations, this procedure should be assisted by powerful data processing software. The currently available programs are not able to fulfill this requirement. We developed a Windows-based program to calculate fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency values from list mode flow cytometry standard (FCS) files. This program displays the measured data in standard plots by generating one- and two-parameter histograms on linear or logarithmic scales. A graphical gating tool allows the user to select the desired cell population according to any combination of the parameter values. The program performs several statistical calculations, including mean, S.D., percent of the gated data. We have implemented two types of data sheet for FRET calculations to aid and guide the user during the analysis: one with population-mean-based autofluorescence correction and the other with spectrum-based cell-by-cell autofluorescence correction. In this paper, we describe the gating algorithms, the file opening procedure and the rules of gating. The structure of the program and a short description of the graphical user-interface (GUI) are also presented in this article.

  9. Probing the Ion Binding Site in a DNA Holliday Junction Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    PubMed Central

    Litke, Jacob L.; Li, Yan; Nocka, Laura M.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2016-01-01

    Holliday Junctions are critical DNA intermediates central to double strand break repair and homologous recombination. The junctions can adopt two general forms: open and stacked-X, which are induced by protein or ion binding. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy, metal ion luminescence and thermodynamic measurements are used to elucidate the ion binding site and the mechanism of junction conformational change. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements of end-labeled junctions monitored junction conformation and ion binding affinity, and reported higher affinities for multi-valent ions. Thermodynamic measurements provided evidence for two classes of binding sites. The higher affinity ion-binding interaction is an enthalpy driven process with an apparent stoichiometry of 2.1 ± 0.2. As revealed by Eu3+ luminescence, this binding class is homogeneous, and results in slight dehydration of the ion with one direct coordination site to the junction. Luminescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirmed the presence of two ions and indicated they are 6–7 Å apart. These findings are in good agreement with previous molecular dynamics simulations, which identified two symmetrical regions of high ion density in the center of stacked junctions. These results support a model in which site-specific binding of two ions in close proximity is required for folding of DNA Holliday junctions into the stacked-X conformation. PMID:26978349

  10. Real-time, continuous detection of maltose using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) on a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Gel, Murat; Zhu, Yonggang; Dacres, Helen; Anderson, Alisha; Trowell, Stephen C

    2014-12-15

    We have previously shown that a genetically encoded bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor, comprising maltose binding protein (MBP) flanked by a green fluorescent protein (GFP(2)) at the N-terminus and a variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc2) at the C-terminus, has superior sensitivity and limits of detection for maltose, compared with an equivalent fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor. Here, we demonstrate that the same MBP biosensor can be combined with a microfluidic system for detection of maltose in water or beer. Using the BRET-based biosensor, maltose in water was detected on a microfluidic chip, either following a pre-incubation step or in real-time with similar sensitivity and dynamic range to those obtained using a commercial 96-well plate luminometer. The half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 2.4×10(-7)M and 1.3×10(-7) M for maltose detected in pre-incubated and real-time reactions, respectively. To demonstrate real-time detection of maltose in a complex medium, we used it to estimate maltose concentration in a commercial beer sample in a real-time, continuous flow format. Our system demonstrates a promising approach to in-line monitoring for applications such as food and beverage processing.

  11. A framework to analyze the stochastic harmonics and resonance of wind energy grid interconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Youngho; Lee, Choongman; Hur, Kyeon; ...

    2016-08-31

    This study addresses a modeling and analysis methodology for investigating the stochastic harmonics and resonance concerns of wind power plants (WPPs). Wideband harmonics from modern wind turbines are observed to be stochastic, associated with real power production, and they may adversely interact with the grid impedance and cause unexpected harmonic resonance if not comprehensively addressed in the planning and commissioning of the WPPs. These issues should become more critical as wind penetration levels increase. We thus propose a planning study framework comprising the following functional steps: First, the best-fitted probability density functions (PDFs) of the harmonic components of interest inmore » the frequency domain are determined. In operations planning, maximum likelihood estimations followed by a chi-square test are used once field measurements or manufacturers' data are available. Second, harmonic currents from the WPP are represented by randomly-generating harmonic components based on their PDFs (frequency spectrum) and then synthesized for time-domain simulations via inverse Fourier transform. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive assessment by including the impacts of feeder configurations, harmonic filters, and the variability of parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed study approach for a 100-MW offshore WPP consisting of 20 units of 5-MW full-converter turbines, a realistic benchmark system adapted from a WPP under development in Korea, and discuss lessons learned through this research.« less

  12. A framework to analyze the stochastic harmonics and resonance of wind energy grid interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Youngho; Lee, Choongman; Hur, Kyeon; Kang, Yong Cheol; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Sang -Ho; Choy, Young -Do; Yoon, Gi -Gab

    2016-08-31

    This study addresses a modeling and analysis methodology for investigating the stochastic harmonics and resonance concerns of wind power plants (WPPs). Wideband harmonics from modern wind turbines are observed to be stochastic, associated with real power production, and they may adversely interact with the grid impedance and cause unexpected harmonic resonance if not comprehensively addressed in the planning and commissioning of the WPPs. These issues should become more critical as wind penetration levels increase. We thus propose a planning study framework comprising the following functional steps: First, the best-fitted probability density functions (PDFs) of the harmonic components of interest in the frequency domain are determined. In operations planning, maximum likelihood estimations followed by a chi-square test are used once field measurements or manufacturers' data are available. Second, harmonic currents from the WPP are represented by randomly-generating harmonic components based on their PDFs (frequency spectrum) and then synthesized for time-domain simulations via inverse Fourier transform. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive assessment by including the impacts of feeder configurations, harmonic filters, and the variability of parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed study approach for a 100-MW offshore WPP consisting of 20 units of 5-MW full-converter turbines, a realistic benchmark system adapted from a WPP under development in Korea, and discuss lessons learned through this research.

  13. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10/sup -3/ eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in /sup 240/Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in /sup 180/Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed.

  14. Pygmy resonance and low-energy enhancement in the γ-ray strength functions of Pd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, T. K.; Nyhus, H. T.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Larsen, A. C.; Renstrøm, T.; Ruud, I. E.; Siem, S.; Toft, H. K.; Tveten, G. M.; Wilson, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Background: An unexpected enhancement in the γ-ray strength function, as compared to the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance (GDR), has been observed for Sc, Ti, V, Fe, and Mo isotopes for Eγ<4 MeV. This enhancement was not observed in subsequent analyses on Sn isotopes, but a pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) centered at Eγ≈8 MeV was however detected. The γ-ray strength functions measured for Cd isotopes exhibit both features over the range of isotopes, with the low-energy enhancement decreasing and PDR strength increasing as a function of neutron number. This suggests a transitional region for the onset of low-energy enhancement, and also that the PDR strength depends on the number of neutrons. Purpose: The γ-ray strength functions of Pd105-108 have been measured in order to further explore the proposed transitional region. Method: Experimental data were obtained at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory by using the charged particle reactions (He3,He3'γ) and (He3,αγ) on Pd106,108 target foils. Particle-γ coincidence measurements provided information on initial excitation energies and the corresponding γ-ray spectra, which were used to extract the level densities and γ-ray strength functions according to the Oslo method. Results: The γ-ray strength functions indicate a sudden increase in magnitude for Eγ>4 MeV, which is interpreted as a PDR centered at Eγ≈8 MeV. An enhanced γ-ray strength at low energies is also observed for Pd105, which is the lightest isotope measured in this work. Conclusions: A PDR is clearly identified in the γ-ray strength functions of Pd105-108, and a low-energy enhancement is observed for Pd105. Further, the results correspond and agree very well with the observations from the Cd isotopes, and support the suggested transitional region for the onset of low-energy enhancement with decreasing mass number. The neutron number dependency of the PDR strength is also evident.

  15. Vibrational Levels and Resonances on a New Potential Energy Surface for the Ground Electronic State of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengue, Steve Alexandre; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic ratios for ozone observed in laboratory and atmospheric measurements, known as the ozone isotopic anomaly,[1,2] have been an open question in physical and atmospheric chemistry for the past 30 years. The biggest limitation in achieving agreement between theory and experiment has been the availability of a satisfactory[3-5] ground state potential energy surface (PES). The presence of a spurious reef feature in the asymptotic region of most PESs has been associated with large discrepancies between calculated and observed rates of formation especially at low temperature. We recently proposed a new global potential energy surface for ozone[6,7] possessing 4 features that make it suitable for kinetics and dynamics studies: excellent equilibrium parameters, good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, accurate dissociation energy and a transition region with accurate topography (without the reef artifact). This PES has been used recently to simulate the temperature dependent exchange reaction (16O+16O2) with a quantum statistical model[6,7], and, for the first time, a negative temperature dependence which agrees with experiments was obtained, indicating the good quality of this global surface. A quantum description of the ozone exchange and recombination reaction requires knowledge of the resonances but also the rovibrational levels just below the dissociation. We present results of global 3-well vibrational-state calculations up to the dissociation threshold and (J = 0) resonances up to 1000 wn beyond. The calculations were done using a large DVR basis ( 24 million functions) with a symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm as well as MCTDH. Results indicate the presence of localized bound states at energies close to the dissociation threshold beyond which some long-lived resonances follow, contrasted with a few delocalized bound states with density at large values of the stretching coordinates. References: 1- K. Mauersberger et al., Adv. At. Mol. Opt

  16. Distribution of type I Fc epsilon-receptors on the surface of mast cells probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M; Pecht, I

    1993-01-01

    The aggregation state of type I Fc epsilon-receptors (Fc epsilon RI) on the surface of single living mast cells was investigated by resonance fluorescence energy transfer. Derivatization of Fc epsilon RI specific ligands, i.e., immunoglobulin E or Fab fragments of a Fc epsilon RI specific monoclonal antibody, with donor and acceptor fluorophores provided a means for measuring receptor clustering through energy transfer between the receptor probes. The efficiency of energy transfer between the ligands carrying distinct fluorophores was determined on single cells in a microscope by analyzing the photobleaching kinetics of the donor fluorophore in the presence and absence of receptor ligands labeled with acceptor fluorophores. To rationalize the energy transfer data, we developed a theoretical model describing the dependence of the energy transfer efficiency on the geometry of the fluorescently labeled macromolecular ligands and their aggregation state on the cell surface. To this end, the transfer process was numerically calculated first for one pair and then for an ensemble of Fc epsilon RI bound ligands on the cell surface. The model stipulates that the aggregation state of the Fc epsilon RI is governed by an attractive lipid-protein mediated interaction potential. The corresponding pair-distribution function characterizes the spatial distribution of the ensemble. Using this approach, the energy transfer efficiency of the ensemble was calculated for different degrees of receptor aggregation. Comparison of the theoretical modeling results with the experimental energy transfer data clearly suggests that the Fc epsilon RI are monovalent, randomly distributed plasma membrane proteins. The method provides a novel approach for determining the aggregation state of cell surface components. PMID:8431535

  17. Energy and polarization dependence of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Kao, C.C.; Haemaelaeinen, K.

    1998-12-31

    The authors report the energy and polarization dependence of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. An energy loss feature at {approximately}6 eV is observed in the vicinity of the Cu K-edge. Numerical calculations based on the Anderson impurity model identify this as a charge transfer excitation to the anti-bonding state. The incident polarization is shown to select the intermediate states participating in the resonance process. Resonances are observed at 8,990 eV and 9,000 eV with the incident polarization perpendicular and parallel to the CuO planes, respectively. In contrast to the single-site model calculations, no resonances are observed associated with the {und 1s}3d{sup 10} {und L} intermediate states, suggesting non-local effects play a role.

  18. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  19. Location of the epidermal growth factor binding site on the EGF receptor. A resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Carraway, K L; Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-09-18

    As a first step toward developing a structural map of key sites on the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, we have used resonance energy transfer to measure the distance of closest approach between the receptor-bound growth factor molecule and lipid molecules at the surface of the plasma membrane. EGF, specifically labeled at its amino terminus with fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate, was used as an energy donor in these experiments, while either octadecylrhodamine B or octadecylrhodamine 101, inserted into plasma membranes isolated from human epidermoid carcinoma (A431) cells, served as the energy acceptors. The energy transfer measurements indicate that the amino terminus of the bound growth factor is about 67 A away from the plasma membrane. On the basis of the dimensions of the EGF molecule, this suggests that EGF binds to a site on its receptor that is a considerable distance (52-82 A) from the surface of these cells. Identical results were obtained under conditions where the receptor functions as an active tyrosine kinase, suggesting that the relative juxtaposition of the EGF binding domain to the membrane surface does not change with receptor autophosphorylation or with the activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

  20. Energy contribution of octanoate to intact rat brain metabolism measured by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Douglas; Haller, Ronald G; Walton, Marlei E

    2003-07-02

    Glucose is the dominant oxidative fuel for brain, but studies have indicated that fatty acids are used by brain as well. We postulated that fatty acid oxidation in brain could contribute significantly to overall energy usage and account for non-glucose-derived energy production. [2,4,6,8-13C4]octanoate oxidation in intact rats was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that oxidation of 13C-octanoate in brain is avid and contributes approximately 20% to total brain oxidative energy production. Labeling patterns of glutamate and glutamine were distinct, and analysis of these metabolites indicated compartmentalized oxidation of octanoate in brain. Examination of liver and blood spectra revealed that label from 13C-octanoate was incorporated into glucose and ketones, which enabled calculation of its overall energy contribution to brain metabolism: glucose (predominantly unlabeled) and 13C-labeled octanoate can account for the entire oxidative metabolism of brain. Additionally, flux through anaplerotic pathways relative to tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (Y) was calculated to be 0.08 +/- 0.039 in brain, indicating that anaplerotic flux is significant and should be considered when assessing brain metabolism. Y was associated with the glutamine synthesis compartment, consistent with the view that anaplerotic flux occurs primarily in astrocytes.

  1. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  2. Electron Energy Structure and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Binuclear Niobium Molecules in Li-Nb Phosphate Glass Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington-Peet, Sabrina

    2005-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of Nb4+ ions in lithium-niobium phosphate glass insulators with different composition of oxide components have been studied. The EPR data reveal formation of triplet Nb binuclear complex in Li-Nb glass dielectric. Equilibrium atomic geometries of a model molecule (OH)3-Nb-O-Nb-(OH)3 embedded into Li-Nb phosphate glass are determined by molecular dynamics. The total energy and electron energy structure of the system have been studied by first principles generalized gradient approximation (GGA) method within density functional theory (DFT). Molecular geometry in substantially distorted as a result of external potential of the glass. Total energy analysis of the (OH)3-Nb-O-Nb-(OH)3 molecule embedded into Li-Nb phosphate glass indicates appearance of two non-equivalent atomic geometries with the oxygen atom in --Nb-O-Nb- fragment shifted from its undisturbed symmetrical position. Predicted modifications of electron energy structure of the system are discussed in comparison with measured EPR data.

  3. Lateral diffusion coefficients in membranes measured by resonance energy transfer and a new algorithm for diffusion in two dimensions.

    PubMed Central

    Kuśba, Jósef; Li, Li; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Johnson, Michael; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    We describe measurements of lateral diffusion in membranes using resonance energy transfer. The donor was a rhenium (Re) metal-ligand complex lipid, which displays a donor decay time near 3 micros. The long donor lifetime resulted in an ability to measure lateral diffusion coefficient below 10(-8) cm(2)/s. The donor decay data were analyzed using a new numerical algorithm for calculation of resonance energy transfer for donors and acceptors randomly distributed in two dimensions. An analytical solution to the diffusion equation in two dimensions is not known, so the equation was solved by the relaxation method in Laplace space. This algorithm allows the donor decay in the absence of energy transfer to be multiexponential. The simulations show that mutual lateral diffusion coefficients of the donor and acceptor on the order of 10(-8) cm(2)/s are readily recovered from the frequency-domain data with donor decay times on the microsecond timescale. Importantly, the lateral diffusion coefficients and acceptor concentrations can be recovered independently despite correlation between these parameters. This algorithm was tested and verified using the donor decays of a long lifetime rhenium lipid donor and a Texas red-lipid acceptor. Lateral diffusion coefficients ranged from 4.4 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DMPG) at 10 degrees C to 1.7 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) at 35 degrees C. These results demonstrated the possibility of direct measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients using microsecond decay time luminophores. PMID:11867452

  4. Simple Model for Gold Nano Particles Concentration Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, N. M.; Ha, C. V.; Nga, D. T.; Lan, N. T.; Nhung, T. H.; Viet, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gold nano particles (GNPs) concentration dependence of the energy transfer occurs between the fluorophores and GNPs is investigated. In the case of theses pairs, GNPs can enhance or quench the fluorescence of fluorophores depending upon the relative magnitudes of two energy transfer mechanisms: i) the plasmonic field enhancement at the fluorophores emission frequencies (plasmon coupled fluorescence enhancement) and ii) the localized plasmon coupled Forster energy transfer from fluorescent particles to gold particles, which quenches the fluorescence. The competition of these mechanisms is depending on the spectral overlap of fluorophores and GNPs, their relative concentration, excitation wavelength. Simple two branches surface plasmon polariton model for GNPs concentration dependence of the energy transfer is proposed. The experimental data and theoretical results confirm our findings.

  5. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  6. Nonlinear oscillation of nanoelectro-mechanical resonators using energy balance method: considering the size effect and the van der Waals force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalambaz, Mohammad; Ghalambaz, Mehdi; Edalatifar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The energy balance method is utilized to analyze the oscillation of a nonlinear nanoelectro-mechanical system resonator. The resonator comprises an electrode, which is embedded between two substrates. Two types of clamped-clamped and cantilever nano-resonators are studied. The effects of the van der Waals attractions, Casimir force, the small size, the fringing field, the mid-plane stretching, and the axial load are taken into account. The governing partial differential equation of the resonator is reduced using the Galerkin method. The energy method is applied to obtain an analytical solution without considering any linearization or small parameter. The results of the present study are compared with the results available in the literature. In addition, the results of the present analytical solution are compared with the Runge-Kutta numerical results. An excellent agreement between the present analytical solution, numerical solution, and the results available in the literature was found. The influences of the van der Waals force, Casimir force, size effect, and fringing field effect on the oscillation frequency of resonators are studied. The results indicate that the presence of the intermolecular forces (van der Waals), Casimir force, and fringing field effect decreases the oscillation frequency of the resonator. In contrast, the presence of the size effect increases the oscillation frequency of the resonator.

  7. Polymer-Polymer Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Significantly Boosts the Power Conversion Efficiency of Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; Bharti, Vishal; Kumar, Mahesh; Chand, Suresh; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-06-24

    Optically resonant donor polymers can exploit a wider range of the solar spectrum effectively without a complicated tandem design in an organic solar cell. Ultrafast Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in a polymer-polymer system that significantly improves the power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells from 6.8% to 8.9% is demonstrated, thus paving the way to achieving 15% efficient solar cells.

  8. High accuracy 235U(n,f) data in the resonance energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Stephan, C.; Tarrío, D.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gonçalves, I. F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kaeppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez, T.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Pancin, S., J.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Weiss, C.; Wiesher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2016-03-01

    The 235U neutron-induced cross section is widely used as reference cross section for measuring other fission cross sections, but in the resonance region it is not considered as an IAEA standard because of the scarce experimental data covering the full region. In this work, we deal with a new analysis of the experimental data obtained with a detection setup based on parallel plate ionization chambers (PPACs) at the CERN n_TOF facility in the range from 1 eV to 10 keV. The relative cross section has been normalised to the IAEA value in the region between 7.8 and 11 eV, which is claimed as well-known. Comparison with the ENDF/B-VII evaluation and the IAEA reference file from 100 eV to 10 keV are provided.

  9. Communication: Energy-dependent resonance broadening in symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions from an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2014-10-07

    The electronic structure of organic-inorganic interfaces often features resonances originating from discrete molecular orbitals coupled to continuum lead states. An example is molecular junction, individual molecules bridging electrodes, where the shape and peak energy of such resonances dictate junction conductance, thermopower, I-V characteristics, and related transport properties. In molecular junctions where off-resonance coherent tunneling dominates transport, resonance peaks in the transmission function are often assumed to be Lorentzian functions with an energy-independent broadening parameter Γ. Here we define a new energy-dependent resonance broadening function, Γ(E), based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices, which can describe resonances of a more complex, non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively. We compute this quantity via an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach based on density functional theory (DFT) for both symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions, and show that our definition of Γ(E), when combined with Breit-Wigner formula, reproduces the transmission calculated from DFT-NEGF. Through a series of examples, we illustrate how this approach can shed new light on experiments and understanding of junction transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals.

  10. Communication: Energy-dependent resonance broadening in symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions from an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2014-10-01

    The electronic structure of organic-inorganic interfaces often features resonances originating from discrete molecular orbitals coupled to continuum lead states. An example is molecular junction, individual molecules bridging electrodes, where the shape and peak energy of such resonances dictate junction conductance, thermopower, I-V characteristics, and related transport properties. In molecular junctions where off-resonance coherent tunneling dominates transport, resonance peaks in the transmission function are often assumed to be Lorentzian functions with an energy-independent broadening parameter Γ. Here we define a new energy-dependent resonance broadening function, Γ(E), based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices, which can describe resonances of a more complex, non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively. We compute this quantity via an ab initio non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach based on density functional theory (DFT) for both symmetric and asymmetric molecular junctions, and show that our definition of Γ(E), when combined with Breit-Wigner formula, reproduces the transmission calculated from DFT-NEGF. Through a series of examples, we illustrate how this approach can shed new light on experiments and understanding of junction transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals.

  11. Determination of effective resonance energy for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction by the cadmium ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the effective resonance energy, Ebarr -value for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction was measured using cadmium ratio method. A dual monitor (197Au-98Mo), which has convenient resonance properties, was employed for characterization of the irradiation sites. Then analytical grade iridium oxide samples diluted with CaCO3 to lower neutron self-shielding effect stacked in small cylindrical Teflon boxes were irradiated once with a 1 mm thick Cd cylindrical box placed in a thermalized neutron field of an 241Am-Be neutron source then without it. The activities produced in samples during 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction were measured using a p-type HPGe detector γ-ray spectrometer with a 44.8% relative efficiency. The correction factors for thermal, epithermal neutron self-shielding (Gth, Gepi), true coincidence summing (Fcoi) and gamma-ray self-absorption (Fs) effects were determined with appropriate approaches and programs. Thus, the experimental Ebarr -value was determined to be 2.65 ± 0.61 eV for 193Ir target nuclide. The recent data for Q0 and FCd values for Ebarr determination were based on k0-NAA online database. The present experimental Ebarr value was calculated and compared with more recent values for Q0 and FCd for 193Ir. Additionally, the Ebarr -values was theoretically calculated from the up-to-date resonance data obtained from ENDF/B VII library using two different approaches. Since there is no experimentally determined Ebarr -value for the 193Ir isotope, the results are compared with the calculated ones given in the literature.

  12. The energy scaling in a side-pumped ultra-low-magnification unstable resonator by employing a compact master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Su, K. W.

    2016-10-01

    The energy scaling for a diode-side-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in an ultra-low-magnification unstable convex-concave resonator is investigated. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate the fact that the energy scaling is restricted by the increasing of side-pumping sources inside the resonator because of the significant pump-to-mode size mismatching. It is verified that employing the master oscillation power amplifier can effectively enlarge the output pulse energy and improve the beam quality. Up to 60-mJ pulse energy with 17-MW peak power is obtained at a pump energy of 520 mJ. A 1573-nm eye-safe laser emission with pulse energy up to 25 mJ is further attended via the extracavity optical parametric oscillator.

  13. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  14. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  15. Modulation of Plasmon-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer to Gold Nanoparticles by Protein Survivin Channeled-Shell Gating.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Chalupa, Agata

    2015-10-15

    The resonance energy transfer (RET) from excited fluorescent probe molecules to plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be gated by modulating the width of channels (gates) in submonolayer protein shells surrounding AuNPs. We have explored the gated-RET (gRET) processes using an antiapoptotic protein survivin (Sur) as the gating material, citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP@Cit), and fluorescein isothiocyanate as the fluorescent probe. Despite the electrostatic repulsive forces between these components, a strong modulation of RET efficiency by Sur down to 240 pM (S/N = 3) is possible. Using piezometric measurements, we have confirmed the Sur adsorbability on Cit-coated Au surfaces with monolayer coverage: γSur = 5.4 pmol/cm(2) and Langmuirian adsorption constant KL,Sur = 1.09 × 10(9) M(-1). The AuNP@Cit/Sur stability has been corroborated using resonance elastic light scattering. The quantum mechanical calculations indicate that multiple hydrogen bonding between Cit ligands and -NH3(+), =NH2(+), and -NH2 groups of lysines and arginines of Sur have likely facilitated Sur bonding to nanoparticles. A theoretical model of gated-RET has been developed, enabling predictions of the system behavior. In contrast to the positive slope of the Stern-Volmer quenching dependence (F0/F) = f(QA), a negative slope has been obtained for gRET relationship (F0/F) = f(cP), attributed to the dequenching.

  16. Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy of quantum well resonances in Fe films on the Cu-covered W(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Altman, M S

    2013-07-01

    Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy has been used to investigate the quantum size effect (QSE) in electron reflectivity from Fe films grown on a pseudomorphic Cu layer on a W(110) surface. Intensity oscillations caused by the QSE as functions of Fe film thickness and incident electron energy identify quantum well resonance conditions in the film. Evaluation of these intensity oscillations using the phase accumulation model provides information on the unoccupied spin polarized band structure in the Fe film above the vacuum level. We also find evidence that the presence of the non-magnetic Cu layer shifts spin polarized quantum well resonances in the Fe layer uniformly downward in energy by 1.1eV compared to Fe/W(110) films without an interface Cu layer, suggesting that the Cu layer gives a small degree of control over the quantum well resonances.

  17. Fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes revealed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomschik, Miroslav; Zheng, Haocheng; van Holde, Ken; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Leuba, Sanford H.

    2005-03-01

    The nucleosome core particle, the basic repeated structure in chromatin fibers, consists of an octamer of eight core histone molecules, organized as dimers (H2A/H2B) and tetramers [(H3/H4)2] around which DNA wraps tightly in almost two left-handed turns. The nucleosome has to undergo certain conformational changes to allow processes that need access to the DNA template to occur. By single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrate fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes between two states: fully folded (closed), with the DNA wrapped around the histone core, or open, with the DNA significantly unraveled from the histone octamer. The brief excursions into an extended open state may create windows of opportunity for protein factors involved in DNA transactions to bind to or translocate along the DNA. conformational transitions | evanescent field fluorescence microscope | nucleosome dynamics | nucleosome opening

  18. Homeotropic alignment and Förster resonance energy transfer: The way to a brighter luminescent solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Taylor, Alaric; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2014-11-07

    We investigate homeotropically aligned fluorophores and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for luminescent solar concentrators using Monte-Carlo ray tracing. The homeotropic alignment strongly improves the trapping efficiency, while FRET circumvents the low absorption at homeotropic alignment by separating the absorption and emission processes. We predict that this design doped with two organic dye molecules can yield a 82.9% optical efficiency improvement compared to a single, arbitrarily oriented dye molecule. We also show that quantum dots are prime candidates for absorption/donor fluorophores due to their wide absorption band. The potentially strong re-absorption and low quantum yield of quantum dots is not a hindrance for this design.

  19. [Determination of Trace Boron Based on Gold Nanorod Plasmonic Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Energy Transfer to the Coordinate].

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling-ling; Li, Ting-sheng; Luo, Yang-he; Wen, Gui-qing; Liang, Ai-hui; Jiang, Zhi-liang

    2015-05-01

    B is a necessary trace element for human and animals, but the excess intake of B caused poison. Thus, it is very important to determination of B in foods and water. The target of this study is development of a new, sensitive and selective resonance Rayleigh scattering energy transfer (RRS-ET) for the determination of B. The combination of energy transfer with resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) has developed a new technology called RRS-ET, which can realize selective and sensitive detection of boric acid. The gold nanorods in diameter of 12 nm and length of 37 nm were prepared by the seed growth procedure. In pH 5. 6 NH4 Ac-HAc buffer solution and in the presence of azomethine-H (AMH), the gold nanorod particles exhibited a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 404 nm. In the presence of boric acid, it reacts with AMH to form AMH-boric acid (AMH-B) complexes. When the complexe as a receptor close to the gold nanorod as a donor, the resonance Rayleigh scattering energy transfer (RRS-ET) take placed that resulted in the Rayleigh scattering signal quenching. With the increase of the concentration of boric acid, the formed complexes increased, the scattering light energy of gold nanorod transfer to the complexes increased, resulting in the Rayleigh scattering intensity linearly reduced at 404 nrn. The decreased RRS intensity responds linearly to the concentration of boron over 10~750 ng . mL-1 B, with a regress equation of ΔI404 nm =3. 53c+24 and a detection of 5 ng mL-1 B. The influence of coexistence substances on the RRS-ET determination of 2. 3 X 10(-7) mol . L-1 B was considered in details. Results showed that this new RRS-ET method is of high selectivity, that is, 4 X 10(-4) mol . L-1 Mn2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Bi+, Na+, Al3+, glucose, Hg2+, IO3-, F-, SO(2-)3, SiO3-, NO3-, CIO4-, H2O2, mannitol, glycerol, and ethylene glycol, 4X 10(-5) mol . L-1 L-tyrosine, and 2 X 10(-4) mol . L-1 L-glutamic acid do not interfere with the determination. Based on this, a new

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  1. Investigation of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Competition of Fluorescent Dyes on DNA Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent labeling is widely used to investigate the structural stability and changes to DNA nano- and microstructures. Despite this, the conventional method for observing DNA structures has several limitations in terms of cost-efficiency. This paper introduces a DNA spherical particle stained with DNA intercalating dyes (SYBR Green and SYTOX Orange) as tracers and reports the interaction between multiple dyes. The interference between the dyes was analyzed in terms of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and competition. The changes in the fluorescence intensity by FRET were uniform, regardless of the sequence. The competition effect could occur when several dyes were added simultaneously. These properties are expected to help in the design of multicolor tracers in bioimaging and environmental applications. PMID:25856674

  2. Scaling output energy in a diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched laser with a flat-flat resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. Y.; Huang, Y. J.; Liang, H. C.; Chen, Y. F.; Su, K. W.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial and temporal behaviors in a diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched laser with a flat-flat resonator are systematically explored as a function of the cavity length. A Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG miniature laser is experimentally used to show that the scale-up of the pulse energy without the higher-order transverse modes can be practically realized by optimizing the cavity length as a function of the pump size. A theoretical analysis is performed to confirm the experimental results. The extracavity second harmonic generation is experimentally conducted to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser design. PACS number(s): 42.60.Gd Q-switching; 42.55.Xi Diode-pumped lasers; 42.55.-f Lasers; 42.65.Sf Dynamics of nonlinear optical systems; optical instabilities, optical chaos and complexity, and optical spatiotemporal dynamics.

  3. Generalized Master Equation with Non-Markovian Multichromophoric Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Modular Exciton Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Hoyer, Stephan; Fleming, Graham; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    A generalized master equation (GME) governing quantum evolution of modular exciton density (MED) is derived for large scale light harvesting systems composed of weakly interacting modules of multiple chromophores. The GME-MED offers a practical framework to incorporate real time coherent quantum dynamics calculations of small length scales into dynamics over large length scales, and also provides a non-Markovian generalization and rigorous derivation of the Pauli master equation employing multichromophoric Förster resonance energy transfer rates. A test of the GME-MED for four sites of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex demonstrates how coherent dynamics of excitonic populations over coupled chromophores can be accurately described by transitions between subgroups (modules) of delocalized excitons. Application of the GME-MED to the exciton dynamics between a pair of light harvesting complexes in purple bacteria demonstrates its promise as a computationally efficient tool to investigate large scale exciton dynamics in complex environments.

  4. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  5. Subdomain-specific collapse of denatured staphylococcal nuclease revealed by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengcheng; Meng, Xianglan; Qu, Peng; Zhao, Xin Sheng; Wang, Chih-chen

    2009-09-03

    By using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET), the equilibrium denaturation of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) induced by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) has been investigated. We have characterized the collapse of the denatured chain and its relation to structure formation. Two mutants, K28C/H124C and K28C/K97C, were constructed and labeled for monitoring the behaviors of the global molecule and the beta subdomain, respectively. For both the labeled mutants, only native and non-native conformations were observed, and the non-native conformations expanded with increasing GdmCl concentrations. The non-native chains of the two derivatives exhibited different changes of persistence length at higher GdmCl concentrations, suggesting a subdomain-specific collapse of the denatured state of SNase. This local chain specific collapse is likely to play a role in modulating the formation of early intermediate during protein folding.

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer microscopy and spectroscopy for localizing protein-protein interactions in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuansheng; Rombola, Christina; Jyothikumar, Vinod; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental theory of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was established in the 1940's. Its great power was only realized in the past 20 years after different techniques were developed and applied to biological experiments. This success was made possible by the availability of suitable fluorescent probes, advanced optics, detectors, microscopy instrumentation and analytical tools. Combined with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy, FRET imaging allows scientists to study a variety of phenomena that produce changes in molecular proximity, thereby leading to many significant findings in the life sciences. In this review, we outline various FRET imaging techniques and their strengths and limitations; we also provide a biological model to demonstrate how to investigate protein-protein interactions in living cells using both intensity- and fluorescence lifetime-based FRET microscopy methods. PMID:23813736

  7. Micro-RNA detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer of DNA-carbon quantum dots probes.

    PubMed

    Khakbaz, Faeze; Mahani, Mohamad

    2017-04-15

    Carbon quantum dots have been proposed as an effective platform for miRNA detection. Carbon dots were synthesized by citric acid. The synthesized dots were characterized by dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and FT-IR spectrophotometry. The fluorescence quantum yield of the synthesized dots was determined using quinine sulfate as the standard. The FAM-labeled single stranded DNA, as sensing element, was adsorbed on dots by π-π interaction. The quenching of the dots fluorescence due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used for mir 9-1 detection. In the presence of the complementary miRNA, the FRET did not take place and the fluorescence was recovered.

  8. Resonant vortex-core reversal in magnetic nano-spheres as robust mechanism of efficient energy absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min-Kwan

    2016-08-01

    We report on novel vortex-core reversal dynamics in nano-spheres of single-vortex spin configuration as revealed by micromagnetic simulations combined with analytical derivations. When the frequency of an AC magnetic field is tuned to the frequency of the vortex-core precession around the direction of a given static field, oscillatory vortex-core reversals occur, and additionally, the frequency is found to change with both the strength of the applied AC field and the particle size. Such resonant vortex-core reversals in nano-spheres may provide a new and efficient means of energy absorption by, and emission from, magnetic nanoparticles, which system can be effectively implemented in bio-applications such as magnetic hyperthermia.

  9. Resonant vortex-core reversal in magnetic nano-spheres as robust mechanism of efficient energy absorption and emission

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We report on novel vortex-core reversal dynamics in nano-spheres of single-vortex spin configuration as revealed by micromagnetic simulations combined with analytical derivations. When the frequency of an AC magnetic field is tuned to the frequency of the vortex-core precession around the direction of a given static field, oscillatory vortex-core reversals occur, and additionally, the frequency is found to change with both the strength of the applied AC field and the particle size. Such resonant vortex-core reversals in nano-spheres may provide a new and efficient means of energy absorption by, and emission from, magnetic nanoparticles, which system can be effectively implemented in bio-applications such as magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:27531408

  10. Cytochrome c induces lipid demixing in weakly charged phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol model membranes as evidenced by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Trusova, Valeriya M; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2009-06-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (AV-PG) as donors and the heme groups of cytochrome c (cyt c) as acceptors was examined in PC/PG model membranes containing 10, 20 or 40 mol% PG with an emphasis on evaluating lipid demixing caused by this protein. The differences between AV-PC and AV-PG RET profiles observed at PG content 10 mol% were attributed to cyt c ability to produce segregation of acidic lipids into lateral domains. The radius of lipid domains recovered using Monte-Carlo simulation approach was found not to exceed 4 nm pointing to the local character of cyt c-induced lipid demixing. Increase of the membrane PG content to 20 or 40 mol% resulted in domain dissipation as evidenced by the absence of any RET enhancement while recruiting AV-PG instead of AV-PC.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer as a versatile tool in the development of homogeneous cellular kinase assays.

    PubMed

    Saville, Lisa; Spais, Chrysanthe; Mason, Jennifer L; Albom, Mark S; Murthy, Seetha; Meyer, Sheryl L; Ator, Mark A; Angeles, Thelma S; Husten, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Homogeneous cellular assays can streamline product detection in the drug discovery process. One commercially available assay employing time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) that detects phosphorylated products was used to evaluate inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL in a cell line expressing an AXL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. This TR-FRET assay was modified to evaluate the phosphorylation state of the AXL family member MER in a cell line expressing MER with a V5 tag by adding a fluorescein-labeled anti-V5 antibody. This homogeneous cellular assay was further modified to evaluate the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cell lines that expressed an untagged kinase by the inclusion of a commercially available anti-FAK antibody conjugated with an acceptor dye. The methods described here can be further adapted for TR-FRET detection of other cellular kinase activities.

  12. Fishbones in Joint European Torus plasmas with high ion-cyclotron-resonance-heated fast ions energy content

    SciTech Connect

    Nabais, F.; Borba, D.; Mantsinen, M.; Nave, M.F.F.; Sharapov, S.E.; Joint

    2005-10-01

    In Joint European Torus (JET) [P. J. Lomas, Plasma Phys. Controled Fusion 31, 1481 (1989)], discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating only, low-density plasmas and high fast ions energy contents provided a scenario where fishbones behavior has been observed to be related with sawtooth activity: Crashes of monster sawteeth abruptly changed the type of observed fishbones from low-frequency fishbones [B. Coppi and F. Porcelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2272 (1986)] to high-frequency fishbones [L. Chen, R. White, and M. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1122 (1984)]. During periods between crashes, the type of observed fishbones gradually changed in the opposite way. Two new fishbones regimes have been observed in intermediate stages: Fishbones bursts covering both high and low frequencies and low amplitude bursts of both types occurring simultaneously. Both sawtooth and fishbones behavior have been explained using a variational formalism.

  13. A New Polymer Nanoprobe Based on Chemiluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer for Ultrasensitive Imaging of Intrinsic Superoxide Anion in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Liu, Lu; Xiao, Haibin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lulin; Tang, Bo

    2016-03-09

    Despite significant developments in optical imaging of superoxide anion (O2(•-)) as the preliminary reactive oxygen species, novel visualizing strategies that offer ultrahigh sensitivity are still imperative. This is mainly because intrinsic concentrations of O2(•-) are extremely low in living systems. Herein, we present the rational design and construction of a new polymer nanoprobe PCLA-O2(•-) for detecting O2(•-) based on chemiluminescence (CL) resonance energy transfer without an external excitation source. Structurally, PCLA-O2(•-) contains two moieties linked covalently, namely imidazopyrazinone that is capable of CL triggered by O2(•-) as the energy donor and conjugated polymers with light-amplifying property as the energy acceptor. Experiment results demonstrate that PCLA-O2(•-) exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity at the picomole level, dramatically prolonged luminescence time, specificity, and excellent biocompatibility. Without exogenous stimulation, this probe for the first time in situ visualizes O2(•-) level differences between normal and tumor tissues of mice. These exceptional features ensure that PCLA-O2(•-) as a self-luminescing probe is an alternative in vivo imaging approach for ultralow level O2(•-).

  14. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library and its application in cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Kang, Nam-Young; Yu, Xiaotong; Sahu, Srikanta; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report a new strategy for constructing a dye library with large Stokes shifts. By coupling a dark donor with BODIPY acceptors of tunable high quantum yield, a novel dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library, named BNM, has been synthesized. Upon excitation of the dark donor (BDN) at 490 nm, the absorbed energy is transferred to the acceptor (BDM) with high efficiency, which was tunable in a broad range from 557 nm to 716 nm, with a high quantum yield of up to 0.8. It is noteworthy to mention that the majority of the non-radiative energy loss of the donor was converted into the acceptor's fluorescence output with a minimum leak of donor emission. Fluorescence imaging tested in live cells showed that the BNM compounds are cell-permeable and can also be employed for live-cell imaging. This is a new library which can be excited through a dark donor allowing for strong fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, the BNM library is well suited for high-throughput screening or multiplex experiments in biological applications by using a single laser excitation source.

  15. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  16. Parametric resonance energy exchange and induction phenomenon in a one-dimensional nonlinear oscillator chain

    PubMed

    Yoshimura

    2000-11-01

    We study analytically the induction phenomenon in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam beta oscillator chain under initial conditions consisting of single mode excitation. Our study is based on the analytical computation of the largest characteristic exponent of an approximate version of the variational equation. The main results can be summarized as follows: (1) the energy density epsilon scaling of the induction time T is given by T approximately epsilon(-1), and T becomes smaller for higher-frequency mode excitation; (2) there is a threshold energy density epsilon(c) such that the induction time diverges when epsiloninfinity; (3) the threshold epsilon(c) vanishes as epsilon(c) approximately N-2 in the limit N-->infinity; (4) the threshold epsilon(c) does not depend on the mode number k that is excited in the initial condition; (5) the two modes k+/-m have the largest exponential growth rate, and m increases with increasing epsilon as m/N=sqrt[3betaepsilon]/pi. The above analytical results are thoroughly verified in numerical experiments. Moreover, we discuss the energy exchange process after the induction period in some energy density regimes, based on the numerical results.

  17. Noninvasive quantification of fluid mechanical energy losses in the total cavopulmonary connection with magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Venkatachari, Anand K; Halliburton, Sandra S; Setser, Randolph M; White, Richard D; Chatzimavroudis, George P

    2007-01-01

    A major determinant of the success of surgical vascular modifications, such as the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC), is the energetic efficiency that is assessed by calculating the mechanical energy loss of blood flow through the new connection. Currently, however, to determine the energy loss, invasive pressure measurements are necessary. Therefore, this study evaluated the feasibility of the viscous dissipation (VD) method, which has the potential to provide the energy loss without the need for invasive pressure measurements. Two experimental phantoms, a U-shaped tube and a glass TCPC, were scanned in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner and the images were used to construct computational models of both geometries. MR phase velocity mapping (PVM) acquisitions of all three spatial components of the fluid velocity were made in both phantoms and the VD was calculated. VD results from MR PVM experiments were compared with VD results from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations on the image-based computational models. The results showed an overall agreement between MR PVM and CFD. There was a similar ascending tendency in the VD values as the image spatial resolution increased. The most accurate computations of the energy loss were achieved for a CFD grid density that was too high for MR to achieve under current MR system capabilities (in-plane pixel size of less than 0.4 mm). Nevertheless, the agreement between the MR PVM and the CFD VD results under the same resolution settings suggests that the VD method implemented with a clinical imaging modality such as MR has good potential to quantify the energy loss in vascular geometries such as the TCPC.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  19. The function of the milk-clotting enzymes bovine and camel chymosin studied by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Langholm; Jacobsen, Jonas; Moss, Marcia L; Rasmussen, Fred; Qvist, Karsten Bruun; Larsen, Sine; van den Brink, Johannes M

    2015-05-01

    Enzymatic coagulation of bovine milk can be divided in 2 steps: an enzymatic step, in which the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein bovine κ-casein is cleaved, and an aggregation step. The aspartic peptidases bovine and camel chymosin (EC 3.4.23.4) are typically used to catalyze the enzymatic step. The most commonly used method to study chymosin activity is the relative milk-clotting activity test that measures the end point of the enzymatic and aggregation step. This method showed that camel chymosin has a 2-fold higher milk-clotting activity toward bovine milk than bovine chymosin. To enable a study of the enzymatic step independent of the aggregation step, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay has been developed using a peptide substrate derived from the 98-108 sequence of bovine κ-casein. This assay and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were employed to determine the enzymatic activity of camel and bovine chymosin under milk clotting-like conditions (pH 6.65, ionic strength 80 mM). The results obtained show that the catalytic efficiency of camel chymosin is 3-fold higher than bovine chymosin. The substrate affinity and catalytic activity of bovine and camel chymosin increase at lower pH (6.00 and 5.50). The glycosylation of bovine and camel chymosin did not affect binding of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate, but doubly glycosylated camel chymosin seems to have slightly higher catalytic efficiency. In the characterization of the enzymes, the developed assay is easier and faster to use than the traditionally used relative milk-clotting activity test method.

  20. Intravital Förster resonance energy transfer imaging reveals osteopontin-mediated polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation by tumor cell emboli.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Yuji; Takakura, Kanako; Sumiyama, Kenta; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) cause paraneoplastic leukemoid reactions and facilitate tumor cell metastasis. However, the interaction of MDSCs with tumor cells in live tissue has not been adequately visualized. To accomplish this task, we developed an intravital imaging protocol to observe metastasized tumor cells in mouse lungs. For visualization of the activation of MDSCs, bone marrow cells derived from transgenic mice expressing a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor for ERK were implanted into host mice. Under a two-photon excitation microscope, numerous polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) were found to infiltrate the lungs of tumor-bearing mice in which 4T1 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the footpads. By Förster resonance energy transfer imaging, we found ERK activation in PMNs around the 4T1 tumor emboli in the lungs. Because antibody array analysis implied the involvement of osteopontin (OPN) in the metastasis of 4T1 cells, we further analyzed the effect of OPN knockdown. The OPN knockdown in 4T1 cells did not affect the cell growth, but markedly suppressed lung metastasis of 4T1 cells and ERK activation in PMNs in the lung. Intravenous injection of recombinant OPN restored the lung metastasis of OPN-deficient 4T1 cells, suggesting that OPN functioned in a paracrine manner. It has been reported that ERK activation of neutrophils causes NETosis and that PMNs promote metastasis of tumor cells by NETosis. In agreement with previous reports, the NETosis inhibitor DNase I inhibited lung metastasis of 4T1 cells. These observations suggest that OPN promotes metastasis of 4T1 cells by activating PMNs and inducing NETosis.

  1. Enhanced Plasmonic Resonance Energy Transfer in Mesoporous Silica-Encased Gold Nanorod for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chou, Pi-Tai; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) have recently drawn considerable interest from those working in in vivo biomolecular sensing and bioimaging. Especially appealing in these applications is the plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of GNRs induced by two-photon excitation at infrared wavelengths, owing to the significant penetration depth of infrared light in tissue. Unfortunately, many studies have also shown that often the intensity of pulsed coherent irradiation of GNRs needed results in irreversible deformation of GNRs, greatly reducing their two-photon luminescence (TPL) emission intensity. In this work we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorods (MS-GNRs) that incorporate photosensitizers (PSs) for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). The PSs, doped into the nano-channels of the mesoporous silica shell, can be efficiently excited via intra-particle plasmonic resonance energy transfer from the encased two-photon excited gold nanorod and further generates cytotoxic singlet oxygen for cancer eradication. In addition, due to the mechanical support provided by encapsulating mesoporous silica matrix against thermal deformation, the two-photon luminescence stability of GNRs was significantly improved; after 100 seconds of 800 nm repetitive laser pulse with the 30 times higher than average power for imaging acquisition, MS-GNR luminescence intensity exhibited ~260% better resistance to deformation than that of the uncoated gold nanorods. These results strongly suggest that MS-GNRs with embedded PSs might provide a promising photodynamic therapy for the treatment of deeply situated cancers via plasmonic resonance energy transfer. PMID:24955141

  2. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L. La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  3. Blinking fluorescence of single donor-acceptor pairs: important role of "dark'' states in resonance energy transfer via singlet levels.

    PubMed

    Osad'ko, I S; Shchukina, A L

    2012-06-01

    The influence of triplet levels on Förster resonance energy transfer via singlet levels in donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs is studied. Four types of D-A pair are considered: (i) two-level donor and two-level acceptor, (ii) three-level donor and two-level acceptor, (iii) two-level donor and three-level acceptor, and (iv) three-level donor and three-level acceptor. If singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are ineffective, the energy transfer efficiency E=I_{A}/(I_{A}+I_{D}), where I_{D} and I_{A} are the average intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence, can be described by the simple theoretical equation E(F)=FT_{D}/(1+FT_{D}). Here F is the rate of energy transfer, and T_{D} is the donor fluorescence lifetime. In accordance with the last equation, 100% of the donor electronic energy can be transferred to an acceptor molecule at FT_{D}≫1. However, if singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are effective, the energy transfer efficiency is described by another theoretical equation, E(F)=F[over ¯](F)T_{D}/[1+F[over ¯](F)T_{D}]. Here F[over ¯](F) is a function of F depending on singlet-triplet transitions in both donor and acceptor molecules. Expressions for the functions F[over ¯](F) are derived. In this case the energy transfer efficiency will be far from 100% even at FT_{D}≫1. The character of the intensity fluctuations of donor and acceptor fluorescence indicates which of the two equations for E(F) should be used to find the value of the rate F. Therefore, random time instants of photon emission in both donor and acceptor fluorescence are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for all four types of D-A pair. Theoretical expressions for start-stop correlators (waiting time distributions) in donor and acceptor fluorescence are derived. The probabilities w_{N}^{D}(t) and w_{N}^{A}(t) of finding N photons of donor and acceptor fluorescence in the time interval t are calculated for various values of the energy

  4. Energy Confinement Recovery in Low Collisionality ITER Shape Plasmas with Applied Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Grierson, B.; Logan, N.; Nazikian, R.

    2016-10-01

    Application of RMPs to low collisionality (ν*e < 0.4) ITER shape plasmas on DIII-D leads to a rapid reduction in stored energy due to density pumpout that is sometimes followed by a gradual recovery in the plasma stored energy. Understanding this confinement recovery is essential to optimize the confinement of RMP plasmas in present and future devices such as ITER. Transport modeling using TRANSP+TGLF indicates that the core a/LTi is stiff in these plasmas while the ion temperature gradient is much less stiff in the pedestal region. The reduction in the edge density during pumpout leads to an increase in the core ion temperature predicted by TGLF based on experimental data. This is correlated to the increase in the normalized ion heat flux. Transport stiffness in the core combined with an increase in the edge a/LTi results in an increase of the plasma stored energy, consistent with experimental observations. For plasmas where the edge density is controlled using deuterium gas puffs, the effect of the RMP on ion thermal confinement is significantly reduced. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Space, energy and anisotropy effects on effective cross sections and diffusion coefficients in the resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Meftah, B.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods used in reactor analysis do not include adequately the effect of anisotropic scattering in the calculation of resonance effective cross sections. Also the assumption that the streaming term ..cap omega...del Phi is conserved when the total, absorption and transfer cross sections are conserved, is bad because the leakage from a heterogeneous cell will not be conserved and is strongly anisotropic. A third major consideration is the coupling between different regions in a multiregion reactor; currently this effect is being completely ignored. To assess the magnitude of these effects, a code based on integral transport formalism with linear anisotropic scattering was developed. Also, a more adequate formulation of the diffusion coefficient in a heterogeneous cell was derived. Two reactors, one fast, ZPR-6/5, and one thermal, TRX-3, were selected for the study. The study showed that, in general, the inclusion of linear scattering anisotropy increases the cell effective capture cross section of U-238. The increase was up to 2% in TRX-3 and 0.5% in ZPR-6/5. The effect on the multiplication factor was -0.003% ..delta..k/k for ZPR-6/5 and -0.05% ..delta..k/k for TRX-3. For the case of the diffusion coefficient, the combined effect of heterogeneity and linear anisotropy gave an increase of up to 29% in the parallel diffusion coefficient of TRX-3 and 5% in the parallel diffusion coefficient of ZPR-6/5. In contrast, the change in the perpendicular diffusion coefficient did not exceed 2% in both systems.

  6. Repulsive magnetic levitation-based ocean wave energy harvester with variable resonance: Modeling, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Masoud; Wang, Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a magnetic levitation characteristic used in a vibration based energy harvester, called repulsive magnetic scavenger (RMS). The RMS is capable of harvesting ocean wave energy with a unique repelling permanent magnet array, which provides a stronger and more uniform magnetic field, compared to its attracting magnetic counterparts. The levitating magnets are stacked together around a threaded rod so that the same pole is facing each other. Two fixed magnets placed with one at each end of the RMS provides a collocated harvesting and braking mechanism in the face of high amplitude vibrations. Magnets in the levitated magnet stack are separated by pole pieces which are made of metals to intensify the magnetic field strength. The effect of the thickness and the use of different materials with different permeability for pole pieces is also studied to obtain an optimal energy harvesting efficiency. Moreover, the procedure to find the restoring force applied to the levitating magnet stack is demonstrated. Then, the Duffing vibration equation of the harvester is solved and the frequency response function is calculated for various force amplitudes and electrical damping so as to investigate the effect of these parameters on the response of the system. Furthermore, the effect of the maximum displacement of the moving magnet stack on the natural frequency of the device is studied. And finally, Faraday's law is employed to estimate the output voltage and power of the system under the specified input excitation force. Experiments show that the output emf voltage of the manufactured prototype reaches up to 42 V for an excitation force with the frequency of 9 Hz and the maximum amplitude of 3.4 g.

  7. Relativistic many-body calculation of low-energy dielectronic resonances in Be-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the relativistic configuration-interaction method coupled with the many-body perturbation theory (CI+MBPT) to describe low-energy dielectronic recombination. We combine the CI+MBPT approach with the complex rotation method (CRM) and compute the dielectronic recombination spectrum for Li-like carbon, which recombines into Be-like carbon. We demonstrate the utility and evaluate the accuracy of this newly developed CI+MBPT+CRM approach by comparing our results with the results of the previous high-precision study of the Ciii system [Mannervik et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 313 (1998)].

  8. Comment on the article "Investigation of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Neeraj Kumar; Pant, Sanjay; Joshi, Hem Chandra

    2017-03-01

    In this comment we, report the missing of relevant literature regarding Forster energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein and rhodamine 6G in a recent paper (Spectrochim. Acta A, 149 (2015) 143-149). In this paper, the authors claim that "a new FRET pair" has been identified, which is absolutely incorrect. In fact, studies on FRET in this dye pair under different conditions have been done earlier. Further, the estimated critical transfer distance may have uncertainty because of donor quantum yield which is not clarified in the paper.

  9. Pressure and kinetic energy transport across the cavity mouth in resonating cavities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter Roger; Abbá, Antonella; Tordella, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Basic properties of the incompressible fluid motion in a rectangular cavity located along one wall of a plane channel are considered. For Mach numbers of the order of 1×10(-3) and using the incompressible formulation, we look for observable properties that can be associated with acoustic emission, which is normally observed in this kind of flow beyond a critical value of Reynolds number. The focus is put on the energy dynamics, in particular on the accumulation of energy in the cavity which takes place in the form of pressure and kinetic energy. By increasing the external forcing, we observe that the pressure flow into the cavity increases very rapidly, then peaks. However, the flow of kinetic energy, which is many orders of magnitude lower than that of the pressure, slowly but continuously grows. This leads to the pressure-kinetic energy flows ratio reaching an asymptotic state around the value 1000 for the channel bulk speed Reynolds number. It is interesting to note that beyond this threshold when the channel flow is highly unsteady-a sort of coarse turbulent flow-a sequence of high and low pressure spots is seen to depart from the downward cavity step in the statistically averaged field. The set of spots forms a steady spatial structure, a sort of damped standing wave stretching along the spanwise direction. The line joining the centers of the spots has an inclination similar to the normal to the fronts of density or pressure waves, which are observed to propagate from the downstream cavity edge in compressible cavity flows (at Mach numbers of 1×10(2) to 1×10(3), larger than those considered here). The wavelength of the standing wave is of the order of 1/8 the cavity depth and observed at the channel bulk Reynolds number, Re~2900. In this condition, the measure of the maximum pressure differences in the cavity field shows values of the order of 1×10(-1) Pa. We interpret the presence of this sort of wave as the fingerprint of the noise emission spots which

  10. Average power and pulse energy scaling of 1.6 μm resonantly-diode-pumped erbium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galecki, Lukasz; Eichhorn, Marc; Zendzian, Waldemar

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed erbium lasers operating in the eye-safe spectral band around 1.6 μm can find numerous defense and civil applications that often require high pulse energy, reasonable pulse repetition frequency (100 Hz), specific wavelength and last not least very good beam quality. Even though resonant pumping shifts a significant part of thermal load from gain medium to pumping diodes, fulfillment of all these requirements is still rather difficult, what can be attributed to spectroscopic limitations of erbium doped crystalline gain media as well as to low spatial brightness of available InP pumping diodes. In the paper we report recent breakthroughs in the field of pulsed erbium lasers. Main difficulties towards multi-ten-mJ output from systems based on the TIR (total- internal-reflection) pump scheme arrangement will be defined and solutions proposed. We also demonstrate for the first time to the best of our knowledge a Q-switched Er3+:YAG laser operating at the repetition rate of 100 Hz with truly diffraction limited beam quality (M2 =1) and pulse energy of up to 24mJ (damage free).

  11. Direct measurement of the kinetics of CBM9 fusion-tag bioprocessing using luminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kavoosi, Mojgan; Creagh, A Louise; Turner, Robin F B; Kilburn, Douglas G; Haynes, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The economics of affinity-tagging technologies, particularly at preparative scales, depends in part on the cost and efficiency of the bioprocessing step used to remove the affinity tag and obtain the final purified product (Lowe et al., J Biochem Biophys Methods. 2001;49:561-574). When CBM9, the family 9 cellulose binding module from Thermotoga maritima, serves as the affinity tag, the overall efficiency of tag removal is a function of the choice of processing enzyme and the local structure of the cleavage site, most notably the linker sequence flanking the bioprocessing recognition site on the tag side. A novel spectroscopic method is reported and used to rapidly and accurately measure CBM9 fusion-tag bioprocessing kinetics and their dependence on the choice of linker sequence. The assay monitors energy transfer between a lanthanide-based donor bound to the CBM9 tag and an acceptor fluorophore presented on the target protein or peptide. Enzyme-catalyzed cleavage of the fusion tag terminates this resonance energy transfer, resulting in a change in fluorescence intensity that can be monitored to quantify substrate concentration over time. The assay is simple, fast and accurate, providing k(cat)/K(M) values that contain standard errors of less than 3%. As a result, both substantial and subtle differences in bioprocessing kinetics can be measured and used to guide bioproduct design.

  12. Förster resonance energy transfer and protein-induced fluorescence enhancement as synergetic multi-scale molecular rulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploetz, Evelyn; Lerner, Eitan; Husada, Florence; Roelfs, Martin; Chung, Sangyoon; Hohlbein, Johannes; Weiss, Shimon; Cordes, Thorben

    2016-09-01

    Advanced microscopy methods allow obtaining information on (dynamic) conformational changes in biomolecules via measuring a single molecular distance in the structure. It is, however, extremely challenging to capture the full depth of a three-dimensional biochemical state, binding-related structural changes or conformational cross-talk in multi-protein complexes using one-dimensional assays. In this paper we address this fundamental problem by extending the standard molecular ruler based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) into a two-dimensional assay via its combination with protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE). We show that donor brightness (via PIFE) and energy transfer efficiency (via FRET) can simultaneously report on e.g., the conformational state of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) following its interaction with unlabelled proteins (BamHI, EcoRV, and T7 DNA polymerase gp5/trx). The PIFE-FRET assay uses established labelling protocols and single molecule fluorescence detection schemes (alternating-laser excitation, ALEX). Besides quantitative studies of PIFE and FRET ruler characteristics, we outline possible applications of ALEX-based PIFE-FRET for single-molecule studies with diffusing and immobilized molecules. Finally, we study transcription initiation and scrunching of E. coli RNA-polymerase with PIFE-FRET and provide direct evidence for the physical presence and vicinity of the polymerase that causes structural changes and scrunching of the transcriptional DNA bubble.

  13. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from sulfonated graphene to riboflavin: a simple way to detect vitamin B2.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Layek, Rama K; Nandi, Arun K

    2013-08-14

    We have prepared sulfonated graphene (SG) by diazonium coupling technique and it has been characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), EDS elemental mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FTIR spectroscopy. The photoluminescence (PL) property of SG at different pH (pH 4, 7, and 9.2) has been investigated and SG shows highest PL-intensity and quantum yield at pH 4 compared to those at higher pH and that of GO at pH 4. Due to the strong overlap between the emission spectrum of SG and absorption spectrum of riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2) at pH 4, it has been tactfully used as donor for the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. However, graphene oxide (GO) does not exhibit any FRET with RF at an identical condition due to its much lower quantum yield. We have demonstrated a selective detection of vitamin B2 in presence of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA), protein (BSA), amino acid (Lysine) and other water-soluble vitamins (Becosules, Zevit capsules) based on the spontaneous FRET from PL-active SG (donor) to RF (acceptor). The calibration curve indicates excellent affirmation to detect vitamin B2 using FRET and it is superior to the ordinary fluorescence method of detecting RF in presence of different biomolecules.

  14. A homogeneous europium cryptate-based assay for the diagnosis of mutations by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Crapez, E.; Bazin, H.; Andre, E.; Noletti, J.; Grenier, J.; Mathis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is considered to be a very useful methodology for the detection and characterization of mutations, particularly for clinical purposes. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorescent donor and a suitable fluorophore as acceptor has been applied in the past to several scientific fields. This technique is well adapted to nucleic acid analysis such as DNA sequencing, DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. We describe here a homogeneous format based on the use of a rare earth cryptate label as donor: tris-bipyridine-Eu3+. The long-lived fluorescence of this label makes it possible to reach a high sensitivity by using a time-resolved detection mode. A non-radiative energy transfer technology, known as time-resolved amplification of cryptate emission (TRACE®) characterized by a temporal and spectral selectivity has been developed. The TRACE® detection of characterized single nucleotide polymorphism using the OLA for allelic discrimination is proposed. We demonstrate the potentialities of this OLA–TRACE® methodology through the analysis of K-ras oncogene point mutations. PMID:11452039

  15. A novel aptasensor for lysozyme based on electrogenerated chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between luminol and silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yong-Ping; Wang, Jiao; Peng, Ying; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-03-22

    In the present work, electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol was investigated in neutral condition at a gold electrode in the presence of silicon quantum dots (SiQDs). The results revealed that SiQDs can not only greatly enhance luminol ECL, but also act as energy acceptor to construct a novel ECL resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) system with luminol. As a result, strong anodic ECL signal was obtained in neutral condition at the bare gold electrode, which is suitable for biosensing application. Lysozyme exhibited apparent inhibiting effect on the ECL-RET system, based on which an ECL aptasensor was fabricated for the sensitive detection of lysozyme. The proposed method showed high sensitivity, good selectivity, and wide linearity for the detection of lysozyme in the range of 5.0×10(-14)-5.0×10(-9)gmL(-1) with a detection limit of 5.8×10(-15)gmL(-1) (3σ). The results suggested that as-proposed luminol/SiQDs ECL biosensor will be promising in the detection enzyme.

  16. Lifetime-based optical sensing of pH using resonance energy transfer in sol-gel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipior, Jeffrey; Bambot, Shabbir B.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    1994-07-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of an optical pH sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements and sol-gel technology. The sensor is based on the phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), from a pH-insensitive donor to a pH-sensitive acceptor. The pH-dependent increase in the bromothymol blue acceptor absorbance results in increased energy transfer, reducing the lifetime of the Texas red hydrazide donor. The lifetimes were measured by the phase and modulation of the emission, relative to the modulated incident light, and were found to be insensitive to the total signal level and fluctuations in light intensity. However, the present sensors are sensitive to salt concentration and/or ionic strength. Importantly, this sol-gel sensor is not fragile, providing stable readings for days and can be repeatedly autoclaved without loss of sensitivity to pH. The use of FRET as the pH transduction mechanism can be reliably extended to longer wavelengths, and allows the future use of laser diode excitation sources.

  17. A simple and sensitive immunoassay for the determination of human chorionic gonadotropin by graphene-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jiuqian; Jing, Tao; Zhou, Tingting; Zhou, Yusun; Wu, Wei; Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we report a strategy of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) using graphene as an efficient long-range energy acceptor. Magnetic nanoparticles were also used in CRET for simple magnetic separation and immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-HCG antibody. In the design of CRET system, the sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed between human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, antigen) and two different antibodies bridged the magnetic nanoparticles and graphene (acceptors), which led to the occurrence of CRET from chemiluminescence light source to graphene. After optimizing the experimental conditions, the quenching of chemiluminescence signal depended linearly on the concentration of HCG in the range of 0.1 mIU mL(-1)-10 mIU mL(-1) and the detection limit was 0.06 mIU mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of HCG levels in saliva and serum samples, and the results were in good agreement with the plate ELISA with colorimetric detection. It could also be developed for detection of other antigen-antibody immune complexes by using the corresponding antigens and respective antibodies.

  18. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer and protein-induced fluorescence enhancement as synergetic multi-scale molecular rulers

    PubMed Central

    Ploetz, Evelyn; Lerner, Eitan; Husada, Florence; Roelfs, Martin; Chung, SangYoon; Hohlbein, Johannes; Weiss, Shimon; Cordes, Thorben

    2016-01-01

    Advanced microscopy methods allow obtaining information on (dynamic) conformational changes in biomolecules via measuring a single molecular distance in the structure. It is, however, extremely challenging to capture the full depth of a three-dimensional biochemical state, binding-related structural changes or conformational cross-talk in multi-protein complexes using one-dimensional assays. In this paper we address this fundamental problem by extending the standard molecular ruler based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) into a two-dimensional assay via its combination with protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE). We show that donor brightness (via PIFE) and energy transfer efficiency (via FRET) can simultaneously report on e.g., the conformational state of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) following its interaction with unlabelled proteins (BamHI, EcoRV, and T7 DNA polymerase gp5/trx). The PIFE-FRET assay uses established labelling protocols and single molecule fluorescence detection schemes (alternating-laser excitation, ALEX). Besides quantitative studies of PIFE and FRET ruler characteristics, we outline possible applications of ALEX-based PIFE-FRET for single-molecule studies with diffusing and immobilized molecules. Finally, we study transcription initiation and scrunching of E. coli RNA-polymerase with PIFE-FRET and provide direct evidence for the physical presence and vicinity of the polymerase that causes structural changes and scrunching of the transcriptional DNA bubble. PMID:27641327

  20. Förster resonance energy transfer between pyrene and bovine serum albumin: Effect of the hydrophobic pockets of cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Arnab; Mukherjee, Puspal; Das, Tarasankar; Ghosh, Prasun; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    The phenomenon of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between pyrene and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein in presence of cyclodextrins (CDs) is explored in the present work. CDs provide hydrophobic environment and thus the aromatic molecules get encapsulated in them depending on the relative size and space. In this work we revealed that along with pyrene monomer, the side chains of amino acids in BSA can get trapped partly in the hydrophobic cavities of CDs if space permits. While being encapsulated by β-CD as pyrene monomer, it can interact with the BSA tryptophan moiety exposed toward the aqueous environment to form a dimer through π-π interaction. This, in turn, affects the energy transfer process by reducing the efficiency. On the other hand, pyrene excimer gets encapsulated in a γ-CD molecule due to availability of enough space. The excimer shows a new band at a higher wavelength. This further reduces FRET efficiency due to scarcity of acceptor for the tryptophan moieties in BSA.

  1. A DNA probe based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer for detection of transgenic 35S promoter DNA.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinzhi; Miao, Yanming; Yang, Jiajia; Qin, Jin; Li, Dongxia; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-05-15

    A QDs-DNA nano-probe was made by combining Mn-doped ZnS room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) quantum dots (QDs) and DNA. Then an RTP sensor for quantitative detection of genetically-modified mark sequence cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (Ca MV 35S) DNA was built on basis of phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). The underlying principles were that a QDs-DNA water-soluble nano-probe was built by connecting single-strand DNA to the surfaces of QDs via a ligand exchange method. This probe had good RTP performance and could well identify Ca MV 35S. Thereby, the simple, rapid and efficient detection of genetically-modified organisms was realized. With the increase of target DNA sequence, the phosphorescent intensity of QDs was gradually reduced due to the energy transfer between QDs and the organic quencher BHQ2. This sensor had a detection limit of 4.03nM and a detection range of 12-300nM. Moreover, this sensor had high selectivity. This sensor could effectively detect the target DNA compared with mismatched and random sequences. Thus, this method is very promising for biological analysis.

  2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from pyrene to perylene labels for nucleic acid hybridization assays under homogeneous solution conditions

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Masayuki; Ohuchi, Shohkichi; Sode, Koji; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Shimadzu, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We characterized the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from pyrene (donor) to perylene (acceptor) for nucleic acid assays under homogeneous solution conditions. We used the hybridization between a target 32mer and its complementary two sequential 16mer deoxyribonucleotides whose neighboring terminals were each respectively labeled with a pyrene and a perylene residue. A transfer efficiency of ~100% was attained upon the hybridization when observing perylene fluorescence at 459 nm with 347-nm excitation of a pyrene absorption peak. The Förster distance between two dye residues was 22.3 Å (the orientation factor of 2/3). We could change the distance between the residues by inserting various numbers of nucleotides into the center of the target, thus creating a gap between the dye residues on a hybrid. Assuming that the number of inserted nucleotides is proportional to the distance between the dye residues, the energy transfer efficiency versus number of inserted nucleotides strictly obeyed the Förster theory. The mean inter-nucleotide distance of the single-stranded portion was estimated to be 2.1 Å. Comparison between the fluorescent properties of a pyrene–perylene pair with those of a widely used fluorescein–rhodamine pair showed that the pyrene–perylene FRET is suitable for hybridization assays. PMID:10734211

  3. A Paper-Based Sandwich Format Hybridization Assay for Unlabeled Nucleic Acid Detection Using Upconversion Nanoparticles as Energy Donors in Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Noor, M. Omair; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioassays based on cellulose paper substrates are gaining increasing popularity for the development of field portable and low-cost diagnostic applications. Herein, we report a paper-based nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET). UCNPs with intense green emission served as donors with Cy3 dye as the acceptor. The avidin functionalized UCNPs were immobilized on cellulose paper and subsequently bioconjugated to biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. Introduction of unlabeled oligonucleotide targets resulted in a formation of probe-target duplexes. A subsequent hybridization of Cy3 labeled reporter with the remaining single stranded portion of target brought the Cy3 dye in close proximity to the UCNPs to trigger a LRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye. The hybridization assays provided a limit of detection (LOD) of 146.0 fmol and exhibited selectivity for one base pair mismatch discrimination. The assay was functional even in undiluted serum samples. This work embodies important progress in developing DNA hybridization assays on paper. Detection of unlabeled targets is achieved using UCNPs as LRET donors, with minimization of background signal from paper substrates owing to the implementation of low energy near-infrared (NIR) excitation. PMID:28347081

  4. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  5. Effect of compartmentalization of donor and acceptor on the ultrafast resonance energy transfer from DAPI to silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Roopali; Chatterjee, Surajit; Kannaujiya, Krishna K.; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence of cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been demonstrated using steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond fluorescence upconversion techniques. The synthesized Ag NCs were characterized using FTIR, mass spectrometry, XPS, HRTEM, DLS, UV-Vis and PL spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals the formation of ultrasmall Ag4 NCs with a small amount of Ag5 NCs. UV-Vis and PL spectra reveal distinct molecular-like optoelectronic behaviour of these ultrasmall Ag NCs. The dihydrolipoic acid-capped Ag NCs strongly quench the fluorescence of DAPI with concomitant increase in its photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 675 nm. This steady-state fluorescence quenching proceeds with a significant shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of DAPI in the presence of Ag NCs, signifying the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from DAPI to Ag NCs. Various energy transfer parameters have been estimated from FRET theory. The present FRET pair shows a characteristic Förster distance of 2.45 nm and can be utilized as a reporter of short-range distances in various FRET based applications. Moreover, this nonradiative FRET is completely suppressed in the presence of both 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA. Our results reveal selective compartmentalization of Ag NCs and DAPI in the presence of 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA, respectively. This selective compartmentalization of donor and acceptor and the subsequent modification of the FRET process may find application in various sensing, photovoltaic, and light harvesting applications.The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence

  6. Nanoparticles based on quantum dots and a luminol derivative: implications for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide by chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Sook; Deepagan, V G; You, Dong Gil; Jeon, Jueun; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jung Young; Lee, Doo Sung; Suh, Yung Doug; Park, Jae Hyung

    2016-03-18

    Overproduction of hydrogen peroxide is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as cancer and arthritis. To image hydrogen peroxide via chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer in the near-infrared wavelength range, we prepared quantum dots functionalized with a luminol derivative.

  7. Effect of compartmentalization of donor and acceptor on the ultrafast resonance energy transfer from DAPI to silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Roopali; Chatterjee, Surajit; Kannaujiya, Krishna K; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence of cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been demonstrated using steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond fluorescence upconversion techniques. The synthesized Ag NCs were characterized using FTIR, mass spectrometry, XPS, HRTEM, DLS, UV-Vis and PL spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals the formation of ultrasmall Ag4 NCs with a small amount of Ag5 NCs. UV-Vis and PL spectra reveal distinct molecular-like optoelectronic behaviour of these ultrasmall Ag NCs. The dihydrolipoic acid-capped Ag NCs strongly quench the fluorescence of DAPI with concomitant increase in its photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 675 nm. This steady-state fluorescence quenching proceeds with a significant shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of DAPI in the presence of Ag NCs, signifying the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from DAPI to Ag NCs. Various energy transfer parameters have been estimated from FRET theory. The present FRET pair shows a characteristic Förster distance of 2.45 nm and can be utilized as a reporter of short-range distances in various FRET based applications. Moreover, this nonradiative FRET is completely suppressed in the presence of both 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA. Our results reveal selective compartmentalization of Ag NCs and DAPI in the presence of 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA, respectively. This selective compartmentalization of donor and acceptor and the subsequent modification of the FRET process may find application in various sensing, photovoltaic, and light harvesting applications.

  8. New measurements of low-energy resonances in the 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. J.; Champagne, A. E.; Downen, L. N.; Dermigny, J. R.; Hunt, S.; Iliadis, C.; Cooper, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction is one of the most uncertain reactions in the NeNa cycle and plays a crucial role in the creation of 23Na, the only stable Na isotope. Uncertainties in the low-energy rates of this and other reactions in the NeNa cycle lead to ambiguities in the nucleosynthesis predicted from models of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. This in turn complicates the interpretation of anomalous Na-O trends in globular cluster evolutionary scenarios. Previous studies of the 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na , 22Ne(3He,d )23Na , and 12C(12C,p )23Na reactions disagree on the strengths, spins, and parities of low-energy resonances in 23Na and the direct-capture 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate contains large uncertainties as well. In this work we present new measurements of resonances at Erc.m.=417 , 178, and 151 keV and of the direct-capture process in the 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction. The resulting total 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na rate is approximately a factor of 20 higher than the rate listed in a recent compilation at temperatures relevant to hot-bottom burning in AGB stars. Although our rate is close to that derived from a recent 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na measurement by Cavanna et al. in 2015, we find that this large rate increase results in only a modest 18% increase in the 23Na abundance predicted from a 5 M⊙ thermally pulsing AGB star model from Ventura and D'Antona (2005). The estimated astrophysical impact of this rate increase is in marked contrast to the factor of ˜3 increase in 23Na abundance predicted by Cavanna et al. and is attributed to the interplay between the 23Na(p ,α )20Ne and 20Ne(p ,γ )21Na reactions, both of which remain fairly uncertain at the relevant temperature range.

  9. Multi-frequency Operation of a MEMS Vibration Energy Harvester by Accessing Five Orders of Parametric Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Yan, J.; Soga, K.; Seshia, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanical amplification effect of parametric resonance has the potential to outperform direct resonance by over an order of magnitude in terms of power output. However, the excitation must first overcome the damping-dependent initiation threshold amplitude prior to accessing this more profitable region. In addition to activating the principal (1st order) parametric resonance at twice the natural frequency ω0, higher orders of parametric resonance may be accessed when the excitation frequency is in the vicinity of 2ω0/n for integer n. Together with the passive design approaches previously developed to reduce the initiation threshold to access the principal parametric resonance, vacuum packaging (< 10 torr) is employed to further reduce the threshold and unveil the higher orders. A vacuum packaged MEMS electrostatic harvester (0.278 mm3) exhibited 4 and 5 parametric resonance peaks at room pressure and vacuum respectively when scanned up to 10 g. At 5.1 ms-2, a peak power output of 20.8 nW and 166 nW is recorded for direct and principal parametric resonance respectively at atmospheric pressure; while a peak power output of 60.9 nW and 324 nW is observed for the respective resonant peaks in vacuum. Additionally, unlike direct resonance, the operational frequency bandwidth of parametric resonance broadens with lower damping.

  10. Spin observables for the isovector spin-dipole giant resonance excited in (p,n) reactions at medium energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. W.

    1996-10-01

    For charge-exchange reactions at medium energies, one of the dominant features of small-angle spectra is the excitation of the ΔT = 1, ΔL = 1, ΔS = 1 isovector "spin-dipole" resonance (SDR). We describe how polarization-transfer measurements can be used to identify the overlapping J^π = 0^-, 1^-, and 2^- components of the SDR. Results for ^16O(p,n) and ^40Ca(p,n) using data (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A577, 79c (1994). (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A599, 211c (1996). for the transverse polarization-transfer coefficient D_NN' are presented and compared with distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) calculations with theory of finite Fermi systems (TFFS) wavefunctions. (F. A. Gareev et al.), Sov. J. Part. Nucl. 19, 373 (1988). Future experiments will utilize complete sets of polarization-transfer data to extract the longitudinal and transverse spin responses,(M. Ichimura and K. Kawahigashi, Phys. Rev. C45), 1822 (1992). which will provide a more definitive separation of the different J^πs in the SDR. footnote Supported by NSF PHY 94-09265

  11. Buffer enhanced bioluminescence resonance energy transfer sensor based on Gaussia luciferase for in vitro detection of protease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyun; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Zhiping; Cui, Zongqiang; Wang, Dianbing; Wei, Hongping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2012-04-29

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) has gained favors in recent years as a detection technology for protease activity due to its extreme reliability, high sensitivity and low intrinsic backgrounds. Because of the sensitivity of the donors, substrates and the acceptors, it is expected that BRET systems are sensitive to buffer environments. However, no systematic study has been reported on how buffer components would affect the BRET ratio, and thus affect the determination of protease activity based on BRET. We present here that several environmental factors, including buffer agents, pH and divalent metal ions, influenced BRET ratio significantly, when humanized Gaussia luciferase (hGluc) was utilized as the donor and enhanced yellow fluorescence protein (EYFP) as the acceptor. Based on these findings, an enhancing solution was optimized to improve the performance of the BRET sensor for analysis of enterokinase activity in vitro, resulting in 10-fold and 7-fold improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit, respectively. We anticipate the system will be applicable for improving performance of other in vitro BRET protease sensors, especially when the optimal conditions for protease activity would severely affect the BRET signal.

  12. Discriminating in vitro cell fusion from cell aggregation by flow cytometry combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Leonor; López-Balderas, Nayali; Larralde, Carlos; Lamoyi, Edmundo

    2006-12-01

    Expression of fusion proteins in the plasma membrane enables cells to bind and fuse with surrounding cells to form syncytia. Cell fusion can have important functional outcomes for the interacting cells, as syncytia formation does in AIDS pathogenesis. Studies on cell fusion would be facilitated by a quantitative method able to discriminate between cellular aggregates and bona fide fused cells in a cell population. Flow cytometry with fluorescence resonance energy transfer is applied here for analyzing fusion of HIV-1 envelope-expressing cells with CD4+ Jurkat cells. Fusion partners were labeled with the vital lipophilic fluorescent probes DiO (green) and DiI (red) and FRET is manifested by an enhancement of the DiI red fluorescence intensity in double fluorescent cells, thus allowing discrimination between fused and aggregated cells. The inhibitory effect of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies and the inhibitory peptide T-20 upon cell fusion were readily quantified by this technique. This method allows the distinction of fused and aggregated cells even when they are at low frequencies.

  13. Investigation of Quenching Mechanism in Thermoreversible Fluorescent Recording Materials of Fluorescence Using Thermochromic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shuzo; Vacha, Martin; Watanabe, Toshiyuki

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrated reversible thermosensitive recording of a fluorescent image (TRF) using a low-molecular-weight mixture consisting of a fluorescent dye, a fluoran dye, a developer, and a reversible matrix. In this material, reversible thermoresponsive disorder-crystal transition triggers a cyclical colorless-color change of a fluoran dye, which induces on-off switching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a fluorescent dye to a fluoran dye. On-off switching of fluorescence is induced by heat-promoted off-on switching of FRET. Modulation of fluorescence is held at room temperature by utilizing thermal hysteresis, and nondestructive readout of the fluorescent image is accomplished in the presence of excitation light. Here, we investigate the on-off switching mechanism of fluorescence in this recording material. We analyzed the theoretical factor of emission quenching in the erasing state by comparing the theoretical overlap integral Ω between fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes on the basis of the FRET theory with experimental emission contrast for various combinations of fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes. It was proved that fluorescence on-off switching occurs mainly by concentration quenching due to the aggregation of fluorescent dyes and FRET from isolated fluorescent dyes to colored fluoran dyes. The key issue to obtain both high-contrast fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield is to control these two factors.

  14. Persistent luminescence nanoprobe for biosensing and lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis via time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Jintong; Ma, Fengjiao; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence technique can reduce the short-lived background luminescence and auto-fluorescence interference from cells and tissues by exerting the delay time between pulsed excitation light and signal acquisition. Here, we prepared persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) to design a universal time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) platform for biosensing, lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis and in situ lifetime quantification of intracellular caspase-3. Three kinds of PLNPs-based nanoprobes are assembled by covalently binding dye-labeled peptides or DNA to carboxyl-functionalized PLNPs for the efficient detection of caspase-3, microRNA and protein. The peptides-functionalized nanoprobe is also employed for fluorescence lifetime imaging to monitor cell apoptosis, which shows a dependence of cellular fluorescence lifetime on caspase-3 activity and thus leads to an in situ quantification method. This work provides a proof-of-concept for PLNPs-based TR-FRET analysis and demonstrates its potential in exploring dynamical information of life process.

  15. Imaging of activated caspase-3 in living cell by fluorescence resonance energy transfer during photosensitization-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Xing, Da; Chen, Qun; Tang, Yonghong

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel and promising cancer treatment that employs a combination of a photosensitizing chemical and visible light, induces apoptosis in cell, and activation of caspase-3 is considered to be the final step in many apoptosis pathways. The changes of caspase-3 activation in cell during TNFα- and photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. FRET probe consisting of fusions of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), Venus and a linker peptide containing the caspase-3 cleavage sequence DEVD was utilized. Therefore, activated caspase-3 cleaved the linker peptide of FRET probe and disrupted the FRET signal. Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (ASTC-a-1) were stably transfected with the plasmid (ECFP-DEVD-Venus) and then were treated by TNF-α and PDT, respectively. Experimental results indicated that caspase-3 activation resulted in cleavage of linker peptide and subsequent disruption of the FRET signal during TNFα- and photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis, and that the activation of caspase-3 induced by photodynamic therapy was faster than that induce by TNF-α. The study supports that using FRET technique and different recombinant substrates as FRET probes could be used to detect the process of PDT-induced apoptosis and provide a new means to investigate apoptotic mechanism of PDT.

  16. Spin-Transfer Measurements for the Pion Deuteron Going to Proton Proton Reaction at Energies Spanning the Delta Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltham, Andrew G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the first spin-transfer experiment performed for the pi{vec d} to{vec p}p reaction. Three spin-transfer parameters were measured: K_sp {LS}{'}; K _sp{SS}{'}; and K_sp{NN}{' }, each at a single angle for a number of energies spanning the Delta resonance of this system. The apparatus employed in this experiment consisted of established systems, including a dynamically polarized deuteron target and a proton polarimeter which utilized the well known proton-carbon analyzing powers. Two arms of detectors were used to minimize the background contribution by preferentially selecting those two-body final states corresponding to the pi dto pp reaction kinematics. We compare our results with the predictions of published partial wave amplitude fits pertaining to existing data on the time-reversed ppto dpi reaction, and demonstrate the inadequacy of these established fits in providing a complete description of this fundamental process. In addition, our data are compared with the predictions of two current theories. The failure of these theories to describe the fundamental features of this reaction clearly demonstrates the need for further theoretical work in this area. The data presented in this thesis are essential for the unique determination of the partial wave amplitudes characterizing the pprightleftharpoons d pi reaction. The accurate experimental determination of these amplitudes will provide an important framework for testing further theoretical developments.

  17. Toward a multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2009-05-15

    Solid-phase assays using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed for the selective detection of nucleic acids. QDs were immobilized on optical fibers and conjugated with probe oligonucleotides. Hybridization with acceptor labeled target oligonucleotides generated FRET-sensitized acceptor fluorescence that was used as the analytical signal. A sandwich assay was also introduced and avoided the need for target labeling. Green and red emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs were used as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 acceptors, respectively. Quantitative measurements were made via spectrofluorimetry or fluorescence microscopy. Detection limits as low as 1 nM were obtained, and the discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with contrast ratios as high as 31:1 was possible. The assays retained their selectivity and at least 50% of their signal when tested in bovine serum and against a large background of noncomplementary genomic DNA. Mixed films of the two colors of QD and two probe oligonucleotide sequences were prepared for multiplexed solid-phase hybridization assays. It was possible to simultaneously detect two target sequences with retention of selectivity, including SNP discrimination. This research provides an important precedent and framework for the future development of QD-based bioassays and biosensors.

  18. Aptasensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer for the analysis of adenosine in urine samples of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Zahra; Khayamian, Taghi; Saraji, Mohammad; Shirani, Marziyeh Poshteh

    2016-05-15

    A new aptasensor was designed for the analysis of adenosine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CdS quantum dot (QDs) as a donor and polypyrrole (Ppy) as an acceptor. The QDs were covalently bonded to anti-adenosine aptamer where its fluorescence was quenched by Ppy. When Ppy was replaced by adenosine, the fluorescence of QDs was restored and its intensity was proportional to the adenosine concentration. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range was found to be 23-146 nM with a detection limit of 9.3 nM. The method was used for analysis of adenosine in urine samples of lung cancer patients and its accuracy was evaluated by comparison of the results of the proposed method with the standard method of HPLC-UV. Furthermore, the interactions of adenosine molecules with the aptamer were investigated using molecular modeling, including molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). The results demonstrated that each G-quadruplex aptamer can capture two adenosine molecules.

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer on single living cells. Application to binding of monovalent haptens to cell-bound immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Kircheis, M; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Dreybrodt, W; Jovin, T M; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the specific binding of 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-haptens to two different monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgE) molecules bound to Fc epsilon-receptors on the cell surface of single, living rat basophilic leukemia cells subclone 2H3 cells. The measurements were performed at 4 degrees, 15 degrees, and 25 degrees C using a recently developed technique that permits the quantitative determination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two fluorophores on single cells in a microscope from the photobleaching kinetics of the donor fluorophore. We introduce here a method for performing binding studies on individual attached cells. At 25 degrees C, the titration studies yielded equilibrium binding constants Kint of 9 x 10(8), 8 x 10(8), and 8 x 10(7) M-1 for the monovalent haptens N-2,4-DNP-epsilon-amino-n-caproic acid, N epsilon-2,4-DNP-L-lysine, and N-2,4-DNP-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid, respectively. Our data indicate that the affinity constants for the first two haptens binding to IgE on adherent cells are 4 to 11 times larger than that of the corresponding values obtained by fluorescence quenching experiments with the same haptens and IgE molecules either in solution or bound to cells in suspension. PMID:1832974

  20. A Perspective on Studying G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling with Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensors in Living Organisms.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Jakobus; Woolard, Jeanette; Rinken, Ago; Hoffmann, Carsten; Hill, Stephen J; Goedhart, Joachim; Bruchas, Michael R; Bouvier, Michel; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W

    2015-09-01

    The last frontier for a complete understanding of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology is to be able to assess GPCR activity, interactions, and signaling in vivo, in real time within biologically intact systems. This includes the ability to detect GPCR activity, trafficking, dimerization, protein-protein interactions, second messenger production, and downstream signaling events with high spatial resolution and fast kinetic readouts. Resonance energy transfer (RET)-based biosensors allow for all of these possibilities in vitro and in cell-based assays, but moving RET into intact animals has proven difficult. Here, we provide perspectives on the optimization of biosensor design, of signal detection in living organisms, and the multidisciplinary development of in vitro and cell-based assays that more appropriately reflect the physiologic situation. In short, further development of RET-based probes, optical microscopy techniques, and mouse genome editing hold great potential over the next decade to bring real-time in vivo GPCR imaging to the forefront of pharmacology.