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Sample records for resonance imaging detected

  1. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  2. Optically Detected Scanned Probe Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Wang, Hailong; Du, Chunhui; Manuilov, Sergei; Adur, Rohan; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance is a powerful tool for studying magnetic properties and dynamics of spin systems. Scanned magnetic probes can induce spatially localized resonance due to the strong magnetic field and gradient near the magnetic tip., Nitrogen vacancy centers (NV) in diamond provide a sensitive means of measuring magnetic fields at the nanoscale. We report preliminary results towards using the high sensitivity of NV detection with a scanned magnetic probe to study local magnetic phenomena. This work is supported by the Center for Emergent Materials at The Ohio State University, a NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (DMR-0820414).

  3. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  4. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  5. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliarik, Marek; Párová, Lucie; Vaisocherová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    2009-05-01

    We report a novel high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for rapid and parallelized detection of protein biomarkers. The biosensor is based on a high-performance SPR imaging sensor with polarization contrast and internal referencing which yields a considerably higher sensitivity and resolution than conventional SPR imaging systems (refractive index resolution 2 × 10-7 RIU). We combined the SPR imaging biosensor with microspotting to create an array of antibodies. DNA-directed protein immobilization was utilized for the spatially resolved attachment of antibodies. Using Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) as model protein biomarker, we demonstrated the potential for simultaneous detection of proteins in up to 100 channels.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    DOEpatents

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  7. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image enhancement for automatic disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To sufficiently improve magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) quality to enable reliable computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). METHODS: A set of image enhancement strategies that included filters (i.e. Gaussian, median, Wiener and Perona-Malik), wavelets (i.e. contourlet, ridgelet and a non-orthogonal noise compensation implementation), graph-cut approaches using lazy-snapping and Phase Unwrapping MAxflow, and binary thresholding using a fixed threshold and dynamic thresholding via histogram analysis were implemented to overcome the adverse characteristics of MRCP images such as acquisition noise, artifacts, partial volume effect and large inter- and intra-patient image intensity variations, all of which pose problems in application development. Subjective evaluation of several popular pre-processing techniques was undertaken to improve the quality of the 2D MRCP images and enhance the detection of the significant biliary structures within them, with the purpose of biliary disease detection. RESULTS: The results varied as expected since each algorithm capitalized on different characteristics of the images. For denoising, the Perona-Malik and contourlet approaches were found to be the most suitable. In terms of extraction of the significant biliary structures and removal of background, the thresholding approaches performed well. The interactive scheme performed the best, especially by using the strengths of the graph-cut algorithm enhanced by user-friendly lazy-snapping for foreground and background marker selection. CONCLUSION: Tests show promising results for some techniques, but not others, as viable image enhancement modules for automatic CAD systems for biliary and liver diseases. PMID:21160667

  8. Ultrasensitive magnetometry and magnetic resonance imaging using cantilever detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined cantilevers make remarkable magnetometers for nanoscale measurements of magnetic materials and for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present various applications of cantilever magnetometry at low temperature using cantilevers capable of attonewton force sensitivity. Small, unexpected magnetic effects can be seen, such as anomalous damping in magnetic field. A key application is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) of both electron and nuclear spins. In recent experiments with MRFM-based NMR imaging, 3D spatial resolution better than 10 nm was achieved for protons in individual virus particles. The achieved volumetric resolution represents an improvement of 100 million compared to the best conventional MRI. The microscope is sensitive enough to detect NMR signals from adsorbed layers of hydrocarbon contamination, hydrogen in multiwall carbon nanotubes and the phosphorus in DNA. Operating with a force noise on the order of 6 aN per root hertz with a magnetic tip that produces a field gradient in excess of 30 gauss per nanometer, the magnetic moment sensitivity is ˜0.2 Bohr magnetons. The corresponding field sensitivity is ˜3 nT per root hertz. To our knowledge, this combination of high field sensitivity and nanometer spatial resolution is unsurpassed by any other form of nanometer-scale magnetometry.

  9. Lesion detection in magnetic resonance brain images by hyperspectral imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Wang, Lin; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hsian Min; Chang, Chein-I.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images can be considered as multispectral images so that MR imaging can be processed by multispectral imaging techniques such as maximum likelihood classification. Unfortunately, most multispectral imaging techniques are not particularly designed for target detection. On the other hand, hyperspectral imaging is primarily developed to address subpixel detection, mixed pixel classification for which multispectral imaging is generally not effective. This paper takes advantages of hyperspectral imaging techniques to develop target detection algorithms to find lesions in MR brain images. Since MR images are collected by only three image sequences, T1, T2 and PD, if a hyperspectral imaging technique is used to process MR images it suffers from the issue of insufficient dimensionality. To address this issue, two approaches to nonlinear dimensionality expansion are proposed, nonlinear correlation expansion and nonlinear band ratio expansion. Once dimensionality is expanded hyperspectral imaging algorithms are readily applied. The hyperspectral detection algorithm to be investigated for lesion detection in MR brain is the well-known subpixel target detection algorithm, called Constrained Energy Minimization (CEM). In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed CEM in lesion detection, synthetic images provided by BrainWeb are used for experiments.

  10. Diseased Region Detection of Longitudinal Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Shan, Liang; Charles, H. Cecil; Wirth, Wolfgang; Niethammer, Marc; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important imaging technique for quantifying the spatial location and magnitude/direction of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Although several analytical methods, such as subregion-based analysis, have been developed to refine and improve quantitative cartilage analyses, they can be suboptimal due to two major issues: the lack of spatial correspondence across subjects and time and the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across subjects. The aim of this paper is to present a statistical method for longitudinal cartilage quantification in OA patients, while addressing these two issues. The 3D knee image data is preprocessed to establish spatial correspondence across subjects and/or time. Then, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) is proposed to deal with the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across both time and OA subjects. To estimate unknown parameters in GHMM, we employ a pseudo-likelihood function and optimize it by using an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model can effectively detect diseased regions in each OA subject and present a localized analysis of longitudinal cartilage thickness within each latent subpopulation. Our GHMM integrates the strengths of two standard statistical methods including the local subregion-based analysis and the ordered value approach. We use simulation studies and the Pfizer longitudinal knee MRI dataset to evaluate the finite sample performance of GHMM in the quantification of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes. Our results indicate that GHMM significantly outperforms several standard analytical methods. PMID:25823031

  11. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  12. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  13. Detectability of early brain meningitis with magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect early brain meningitis was evaluated in a canine model. Contrast dose, timing postinjection, and imaging technique (specifically the use of magnetization transfer) were assessed. Imaging of five canines was performed at 1.5 T 24 hours after injection of Cowans staphylococcus into the cisterna magna. Two control animals also were imaged using the same protocol. Contrast doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.8 mmol/kg gadoteridol were compared. Scans were performed at 2, 13, and 22 minutes after an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg. Thirty minutes after the initial injection of contrast, a supplemental dose of 0.2 mmol/kg was given. Scans were then repeated at 2, 12, and 22 minutes after this dose was administered. A second supplemental contrast injection of 0.5 mmol/kg was given at 70 minutes, and immediate postinjection scans with and without MT were acquired. Results. In the animals receiving a cisternal injection of bacteria, the degree of meningeal enhancement was greatest at 0.8 mmol/kg, intermediate at 0.3 mmol/kg, and least at 0.1 mmol/kg. Scans in control studies did not demonstrate abnormal meningeal enhancement. High-contrast dose, MT, and acquisition of immediate postcontrast scans all resulted in statistically significant improvement. On masked film review, abnormal meningeal enhancement was noted in only 2 of 5 experimental dogs at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg (regardless of the use of MT) compared with all animals at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. In 18 of 37 dogs (paired scans with and without MT), when abnormal enhancement was noted, the use of MT improved the visualization of abnormal meningeal enhancement. In early brain meningitis, high-contrast dose (0.3 mmol/kg), MT, and scanning immediately after injection improve detection of abnormal meningeal enhancement, thus facilitating the diagnosis of meningitis. Of these factors, contrast dose is the most important. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body (1). This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons (2, 3) in a static magnetic field B{sub 0}. An applied radiofrequency pulse causes the protons to precess about B{sub 0} at their Larmor frequency {nu}{sub 0} = ({gamma}/2{pi})B{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the gyromagnetic ratio; {gamma}/2{pi} = 42.58 MHz/tesla. The precessing protons generate an oscillating magnetic field and hence a voltage in a nearby coil that is amplified and recorded. The application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients specifies a unique magnetic field and thus an NMR frequency in each voxel of the subject, so that with appropriate encoding of the signals one can acquire a complete image (4). Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems (5). Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. Commercially available 0.2-T systems based on permanent magnets offer both lower cost and a more open access than their higher-field counterparts, at the expense of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. At the still lower field of 0.03 mT maintained by a conventional, room-temperature solenoid, Connolly and co-workers (6, 7) obtain good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by prepolarizing the protons in a field B{sub p} of 0.3 T. Prepolarization (8) enhances the magnetic moment of an ensemble of protons over that produced by the lower precession field; after the polarizing field is removed, the higher magnetic moment produces a correspondingly larger signal during its precession in B{sub 0}. Using the same method, Stepisnik et al. (9) obtained MR images in the Earth's magnetic field ({approx} 50 {micro}T). Alternatively, one can enhance the signal amplitude

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging detected prostate evasive anterior tumours: Further insights

    PubMed Central

    Edwan, Ghazi Al; Ghai, Sangeet; Margel, David; Kulkarni, Girish; Hamilton, Rob; Toi, Ants; Haidar, Masoom A.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical confusion continues to exist regarding the underestimation of cancers among patients on active surveillance and among men with repeated negative prostate biopsies despite worrisome prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. We have previously described our initial experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based detection of tumours in the anterior prostate gland. In this report, we update and expand our experience with these tumours in terms of multiparametric-MRI findings, staging, and grading. Furthermore, we report early treatment outcomes with these unique cancers. Methods: We reviewed our prostate MRI dataset of 1117 cases from January 2006 until December 2012 and identified 189 patients who fulfilled criteria for prostate evasive anterior tumors (PEATS). Descriptive analyses were performed on multiple covariates. Kaplan-Meier actuarial technique was used to plot the treatment-related outcomes from PEATS tumours. Results: Among the 189 patients who had MRI-detectable anterior tumours, 148 had biopsy proven disease in the anterior zone. Among these tumours, the average PSA was 18.3 ng/mL and most cancers were Gleason 7. In total, 68 patients chose surgical therapy. Among these men, most of their cancers had extra prostatic extension and 46% had positive surgical margins. Interestingly, upgrading of tumours that were biopsy Gleason 6 in the anterior zone was common, with 59% exhibiting upgrading to Gleason 7 or higher. Biochemical-free survival among men who elected surgery was not ideal, with 20% failing by 20 months. Conclusion: PEATS tumours are found late and are disproportionally high grade tumours. Careful consideration to MRI testing should be given to men at risk for PEATS. PMID:26029293

  16. Magnetic resonance microwave absorption imaging: Feasibility of signal detection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bin; Weaver, John B.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) technique was used to detect small displacements induced by localized absorption of pulsed 434 MHz microwave power as a potential method for tumor detection. Methods: Phase contrast subtraction was used to separate the phase change due to motion from thermoelastic expansion from other contributions to phase variation such as the bulk temperature rise of the medium and phase offsets from the MR scanner itself. A simple set of experiments was performed where the motion was constrained to be one dimensional which provided controls on the data acquisition and motion extraction procedures. Specifically, the MR-detected motion signal was isolated by altering the direction of the microwave-induced motion and sampling the response with motion encoding gradients in all three directions when the microwave power was turned on and turned off. Results: Successful signal detection, as evidenced by the recording of a systematic alternating (zigzag) phase pattern, occurred only when the motion encoding was in parallel with either the vertical or horizontal direction of the microwave-induced motion on both 10 and 4 mm spatial scales. Conclusions: These results demonstrate, for the first time, that motion associated with thermoelastic expansion from the absorption of pulsed microwave power can be detected with MR. PMID:19994529

  17. Novel detection schemes of nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging: applications from analytical chemistry to molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Harel, Elad; Schröder, Leif; Xu, Shoujun

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-established analytical technique in chemistry. The ability to precisely control the nuclear spin interactions that give rise to the NMR phenomenon has led to revolutionary advances in fields as diverse as protein structure determination and medical diagnosis. Here, we discuss methods for increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance experiments, moving away from the paradigm of traditional NMR by separating the encoding and detection steps of the experiment. This added flexibility allows for diverse applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip flow imaging and biological sensors to optical detection of magnetic resonance imaging at low magnetic fields. We aim to compare and discuss various approaches for a host of problems in material science, biology, and physics that differ from the high-field methods routinely used in analytical chemistry and medical imaging.

  18. Fast Detection of Seeds and Freeze Damage of Mandarines Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Min; Milczarek, Rebecca; McCarthy, Michael

    Fast detection of seeds and freeze damage in mandarine citrus fruit was performed using magnetic resonance imaging. A 1 T industrial grade permanent magnet was used to acquire the image data. The spatial resolution of the image was 550 μm. A fast spin echo pulse sequence was used to detect freeze damage and seeds. The signal intensity of seeds and freeze damaged regions was weaker than normal tissue. Threshold based image analysis has proven successful in detecting seeds and quantifying freeze damage.

  19. Tumor detection from enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using fuzzy curvelet.

    PubMed

    Jaffar, M Arfan; Ain, Quratul; Choi, Tae Sun

    2012-04-01

    Effective medical image analysis is possible by the use of technique known as segmentation. Segmentation is a very challenging task because there is not any standard segmentation method is available for any medical application. In this article, we have proposed an automatic brain MR image segmentation method. Fast discrete curvelet transform and spatial fuzzy C-mean algorithm is used for noise removal and segmentation of brain MR image. Fuzzy entropy has been used for calculating adaptive and optimal threshold to separate out the image segments. Our proposed system is exclusively based on the information contained by the image itself. No extra information and no human intervention are required in our proposed system. We have tested our proposed system on different T1, T2 and PD brain MR images. PMID:21960292

  20. Is it Possible to Detect Dendrite Currents Using Presently Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques?

    PubMed Central

    Jay, William I.; Wijesinghe, Ranjith S.; Dolasinski, Brain D.; Roth, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    The action currents of a dendrite, peripheral nerve or skeletal muscle create their own magnetic field. Many investigators have attempted to detect neural and dendritic currents directly using magnetic resonance imaging that can cause the phase of the spins to change. Our goal in this paper is to use the calculated magnetic field of a dendrite to estimate the resulting phase shift in the magnetic resonance signal. The field produced by a dense collection of simultaneously active dendrites may be just detectable under the most ideal circumstances, but in almost every realistic case the field cannot be detected using current MRI technology. PMID:22447349

  1. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  2. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer. PMID:27244400

  3. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  4. A Novel Microfluidic Flow Rate Detection Method Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Temperature Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shijie; Wang, Peng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhao, Tianze; Xu, Shanzhi; Guo, Mingjiang; Yu, Xinglong

    2016-01-01

    A novel microfluidic flow rate detection method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) temperature imaging is proposed. The measurement is performed by space-resolved SPR imaging of the flow induced temperature variations. Theoretical simulations and analysis were performed to demonstrate a proof of concept using this approach. Experiments were implemented and results showed that water flow rates within a wide range of tens to hundreds of μL/min could be detected. The flow rate sensor is resistant to disturbances and can be easily integrated into microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. PMID:27347960

  5. Force-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Micron-Scale Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sixta, Aimee; Bogat, Sophia; Wright, Diego; Mozaffari, Shirin; Tennant, Daniel; Paster, Jeremy; Markert, John

    We report our efforts in the development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) for the study of biological materials in liquid media at the micron scale. Our probe contains microfluidic samples sealed in thin-walled (few µm) quartz tubes, with a micro-oscillator sensor nearby in vacuum to maintain its high mechanical resonance quality factor. An initial demonstration utilizes a permalloy magnet on the oscillator tip, which provides a resonant slice of thickness 0.5 µm and an area of diameter 10µm these first measurements aim to demonstrate a single-shot measurement of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in aqueous solutions of Cu2SO4. We also aim to implement a sawtooth 2? cyclic inversion of the nuclear spins, a detection scheme that effectively eliminates common measurement artifacts. At the micron scale, both spin diffusion and physical diffusion in liquids tend to blur images in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); we aim to exploit the local nature of the NMRFM probe to obtain higher resolution dynamical images, with the ultimate goal of imaging within individual biological cells.

  6. Label-free imaging, detection, and mass measurement of single viruses by surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Patel, Urmez; Huang, Xinping; Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2010-01-01

    We report on label-free imaging, detection, and mass/size measurement of single viral particles in solution by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance microscopy. Diffraction of propagating plasmon waves along a metal surface by the viral particles creates images of the individual particles, which allow us to detect the binding of the viral particles to surfaces functionalized with and without antibodies. We show that the intensity of the particle image is related to the mass of the particle, from which we determine the mass and mass distribution of influenza viral particles with a mass detection limit of approximately 1 ag (or 0.2 fg/mm2). This work demonstrates a multiplexed method to measure the masses of individual viral particles and to study the binding activity of the viral particles. PMID:20798340

  7. Magnetic resonance detection: spectroscopy and imaging of lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Harel, Elad

    2009-01-01

    This mini-review is focused on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging to study processes on lab-on-a-chip devices. NMR as an analytical tool is unmatched in its impact across nearly every area of science, from biochemistry and medicine to fundamental chemistry and physics. The controls available to the NMR spectroscopist or imager are vast, allowing for everything from high level structural determination of proteins in solution to detailed contrast imaging of organs in-vivo. Unfortunately, the weak nuclear magnetic moment of the nucleus requires that a very large number of spins be present for an inductively detectable signal, making the use of magnetic resonance as a detection modality for microfluidic devices especially challenging. Here we present recent efforts to combat the inherent sensitivity limitation of magnetic resonance for lab-on-a-chip applications. Principles and examples of different approaches are presented that highlight the flexibility and advantages of this type of detection modality.

  8. Incidental Bladder Cancer Detected on Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate Gland

    PubMed Central

    Sardari, Al; Thomas, John V.; Nix, Jeffrey W.; Pietryga, Jason A.; Sanyal, Rupan; Gordetsky, Jennifer B.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of axial imaging in various fields of medicine has led to an increased frequency of incidental findings, specifically incidental cancer lesions. Hence, as the use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) for prostate cancer detection, staging, and management becomes more widespread, the potential for additional incidental findings in the pelvis increases. Herein, we report the case of a man on active surveillance for low-grade, early-staged prostate cancer who underwent MP-MRI and was incidentally found to have a high-grade bladder cancer lesion. PMID:26783492

  9. Hippocampus shape analysis for temporal lobe epilepsy detection in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohan, Zohreh; Azmi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    There are evidences in the literature that Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) causes some lateralized atrophy and deformation on hippocampus and other substructures of the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to high-contrast soft tissue imaging, is one of the most popular imaging modalities being used in TLE diagnosis and treatment procedures. Using an algorithm to help clinicians for better and more effective shape deformations analysis could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this project our purpose is to design, implement and test a classification algorithm for MRIs based on hippocampal asymmetry detection using shape and size-based features. Our method consisted of two main parts; (1) shape feature extraction, and (2) image classification. We tested 11 different shape and size features and selected four of them that detect the asymmetry in hippocampus significantly in a randomly selected subset of the dataset. Then, we employed a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify the remaining images of the dataset to normal and epileptic images using our selected features. The dataset contains 25 patient images in which 12 cases were used as a training set and the rest 13 cases for testing the performance of classifier. We measured accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 76%, 100%, and 70% for our algorithm. The preliminary results show that using shape and size features for detecting hippocampal asymmetry could be helpful in TLE diagnosis in MRI.

  10. Myocardial border detection by branch-and-bound dynamic programming in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J Y; Fu, J C; Wu, C C; Lin, H M; Chai, J W

    2005-07-01

    Dynamic programming (DP) is a mathematical technique for making optimal decisions on the sequencing of interrelated problems. It has been used widely to detect borders in magnetic resonance images (MRI). MRI is noninvasive and generates clear images; however, it is impractical for manual measurement of the huge number of images generated by dynamic organs such as those of the cardiovascular system. A fast and effective algorithm is essential for on-line implementation of MRI-based computer aided measurement and diagnosis. In this paper, a branch-and-bound dynamic programming technique is applied to detect the endocardial borders of the left ventricular. The proposed branch-and-bound method drastically reduces the computational time required in conventional exhaustive search methods. Statistical tests are conducted to verify the CPU time performance of the branch-and-bound technique in comparison to the conventional exhaustive search method.

  11. Resonant Cavity Imaging: A Means Toward High-Throughput Label-Free Protein Detection.

    PubMed

    Bergstein, David A; Ozkumur, Emre; Wu, Arthur C; Yalçin, Ayça; Colson, Jeremy R; Needham, James W; Irani, Rostem J; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Goldberg, Bennett B; Delisi, Charles; Ruane, Michael F; Unlü, M Selim

    2008-01-01

    The resonant cavity imaging biosensor (RCIB) is an optical technique for detecting molecular binding interactions label free at many locations in parallel that employs an optical resonant cavity for high sensitivity. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a Fabry-Perot cavity constructed from dielectric reflectors (Si/SiO(2)), one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept using a tunable laser, a near-infrared digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity controls the sensitivity with which the presence of bound molecules is detected. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations is recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup has been constructed. A test sample was fabricated with 25, 100-mum wide square features, each with a different density of 1-mum square depressions etched 12 nm into the SiO(2) surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm rms precision. In a second test, avidin, bound selectively to biotin conjugated bovine serum albumin, was detected.

  12. Resonant Cavity Imaging: A Means Toward High-Throughput Label-Free Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bergstein, David A.; Özkumur, Emre; Wu, Arthur C.; Yalçin, Ayça; Colson, Jeremy R.; Needham, James W.; Irani, Rostem J.; Gershoni, Jonathan M.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; DeLisi, Charles; Ruane, Michael F.; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2009-01-01

    The resonant cavity imaging biosensor (RCIB) is an optical technique for detecting molecular binding interactions label free at many locations in parallel that employs an optical resonant cavity for high sensitivity. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a Fabry–Perot cavity constructed from dielectric reflectors (Si/SiO2), one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept using a tunable laser, a near-infrared digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity controls the sensitivity with which the presence of bound molecules is detected. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations is recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup has been constructed. A test sample was fabricated with 25, 100-μm wide square features, each with a different density of 1-μm square depressions etched 12 nm into the SiO2 surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm rms precision. In a second test, avidin, bound selectively to biotin conjugated bovine serum albumin, was detected. PMID:19823593

  13. The role of ultrasonography in the detection of adrenal masses: comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Sasagawa; Suzuki, H; Izumi, T; Kaneko, H; Nakada, T

    2001-01-01

    To compare detection rates of adrenal tumors by ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance image, we studied 61 patients with adrenal tumor, who underwent adrenalectomy. In 45 (73.8%) of the 61 patients. adrenal tumor was detected by ultrasonography. However, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could detect all adrenal tumors. All adrenal tumors measuring more than 3.0 cm in diameter were detected by ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance image. When adrenal tumors were smaller than 3.0 cm. however, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging correctly found adrenal tumors in 30 (65.2%) and 46 (100.0%) of 46 patients and 30 (100.0%) of 30 patients, respectively. These facts suggest that ultrasonography seems to be an effective diagnostic procedure for the prevention of overlooking adrenal tumors larger than 3.0 cm. PMID:11583338

  14. [The Diagnostic Value of Pre-Biopsy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Detecting Prostate Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yoneyama, Shuko; Ishida, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Kondo, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the value of pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting prostate cancer. We analyzed 267 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3-10 ng/ml who underwent systematic prostate needle biopsy. From April 2009 to March 2011, a total of 98 male patients underwent 16-core prostatic biopsies without pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (nonenforcement group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 169 men underwent pre-biopsy MRI [T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] (enforcement group). When MRI findings indicated cancer in the latter group, in addition to the systematic 16-core biopsy one or two targeted biopsies were performed. Patients without suspicious MRI findings underwent only systematic 16-core biopsy. Cancer detection rates in the nonenforcement and enforcement groups were 42.9% (48/92) and 46. 2% (78/169), respectively. The difference did not reach significance (p=0.612). Although the cancer detection rates were 39.4% (41/104) in the MRI-negative group and 56. 9% (37/65) in the MRI-positive group (p=0.039), the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection by MRI were relatively low: 47.4% and 69.2%, respectively. By receiver-operating curve analysis, the area under the curve for cancer detection by MRI was only 0.583. There were two study limitations. First, the patient sample size was small. Second, it is unclear whether an adequate sample of the suspicious lesion was obtained by biopsy. We thus demonstrated that it might be improper to base a diagnosis solely on pre-biopsy MRI (T2WI and DWI) findings in men with serum PSA levels of 3-10 ng/ml.

  15. Automatic detection of larynx cancer from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Trushali; Soraghan, John; Grose, Derek; MacKenzie, Kenneth; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos

    2015-03-01

    Detection of larynx cancer from medical imaging is important for the quantification and for the definition of target volumes in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being increasingly used in RTP due to its high resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast. Manually detecting larynx cancer from sequential MRI is time consuming and subjective. The large diversity of cancer in terms of geometry, non-distinct boundaries combined with the presence of normal anatomical regions close to the cancer regions necessitates the development of automatic and robust algorithms for this task. A new automatic algorithm for the detection of larynx cancer from 2D gadoliniumenhanced T1-weighted (T1+Gd) MRI to assist clinicians in RTP is presented. The algorithm employs edge detection using spatial neighborhood information of pixels and incorporates this information in a fuzzy c-means clustering process to robustly separate different tissues types. Furthermore, it utilizes the information of the expected cancerous location for cancer regions labeling. Comparison of this automatic detection system with manual clinical detection on real T1+Gd axial MRI slices of 2 patients (24 MRI slices) with visible larynx cancer yields an average dice similarity coefficient of 0.78+/-0.04 and average root mean square error of 1.82+/-0.28 mm. Preliminary results show that this fully automatic system can assist clinicians in RTP by obtaining quantifiable and non-subjective repeatable detection results in a particular time-efficient and unbiased fashion.

  16. Potential applications of microtesla magnetic resonance imaging detected using a superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 muT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz 1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissue

  17. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Whittier Ryan

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  18. Investigation of feline brain anatomy for the detection of cortical spreading depression with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; James, M F; Bockhorst, K H; Smith, M I; Bradley, D P; Papadakis, N G; Carpenter, T A; Parsons, A A; Leslie, R A; Hall, L D; Huang, C L

    2001-05-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and peri-infarct depolarisation (PID) are related phenomena that have been associated with the human clinical syndromes of migraine (CSD), head injury and stroke (PID). Nevertheless the existence of CSD in man remains controversial, despite the detection of this phenomenon in the brains of most, if not all, other animal species investigated. This failure to unambiguously detect CSD clinically may be at least partly due to the anatomically complex, gyrencephalic structure of the human brain. This study was designed to establish conditions for the study of CSD in the brain of a gyrencephalic species using the noninvasive technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 3-dimensional (3D) gyrencephalic anatomy of the cat brain was examined to determine the imaging conditions necessary to detect CSD events. Orthogonal transverse, sagittal and horizontal T1-weighted image slices showed that the marginal and suprasylvian gyri were the most appropriate cortical structures to study CSD. This was in view of (1) their simple geometry: (2) their lengthy extent of grey matter orientated rostrocaudally in the cortex: (3) their separation by a sulcus across which CSD spread could be studied and (4) the discontinuity in the grey matter in these regions between the right and left hemispheres dorsal to the corpus callosum. The structure suggested by the T1-weighted images was corroborated by systematic diffusion tensor imaging to map the fractional anisotropy and diffusion trace. Thus a single horizontal image plane could visualise the neighbouring suprasylvian and marginal gyri of both cerebral hemispheres, whereas its complex shape and position ruled out the ectosylvian gyrus for CSD studies. With the horizontal imaging plane, CSD events were reproducibly detected by animating successive diffusion-weighted MR images following local KCl stimulation of the cortical surface. In single image frames, CSD detection and characterisation required

  19. Polymer Microring Resonators for High-Frequency Ultrasound Detection and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ling, Tao; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ashkenazi, Shai; Guo, L Jay

    2008-01-01

    Polymer microring resonators fabricated by nanoimprinting are presented as a means of ultrasound detection. Acoustic waves impinging on a ring-shaped optical resonator cause strain in the ring dimensions, modulating optical output. Basic acoustic and optical characteristics of the microring sensor are presented. Measurements at several frequencies show a high sensitivity and low noise-equivalent pressure. The angular response is determined by sensing the optoacoustic excitation of a 49 μm polyester microsphere and shows wide-angle sensitivity. A 1-D array consisting of 4 microrings is demonstrated using wavelength multiplexing for addressing each element. The high sensitivity, bandwidth, and angular response make it a potentially useful sensor platform for many applications including high-frequency ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging.

  20. Polymer Microring Resonators for High-Frequency Ultrasound Detection and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ling, Tao; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ashkenazi, Shai; Guo, L. Jay

    2009-01-01

    Polymer microring resonators fabricated by nanoimprinting are presented as a means of ultrasound detection. Acoustic waves impinging on a ring-shaped optical resonator cause strain in the ring dimensions, modulating optical output. Basic acoustic and optical characteristics of the microring sensor are presented. Measurements at several frequencies show a high sensitivity and low noise-equivalent pressure. The angular response is determined by sensing the optoacoustic excitation of a 49 μm polyester microsphere and shows wide-angle sensitivity. A 1-D array consisting of 4 microrings is demonstrated using wavelength multiplexing for addressing each element. The high sensitivity, bandwidth, and angular response make it a potentially useful sensor platform for many applications including high-frequency ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging. PMID:20700482

  1. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  2. Detection of necrosis in human tumour xenografts by proton magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, I.; Kaalhus, O.; Lyng, H.; Rofstad, E. K.

    1995-01-01

    Tumours with necrotic regions have an inadequate blood supply and are expected to differ from well-vascularised tumours in response to treatment. The purpose of the present work was to investigate whether proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might be used to detect necrotic regions in tumours. MR images and histological sections from individual tumours of three different amelanotic human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t) were analysed in pairs. MRI was performed at 1.5 T using two spin-echo pulse sequences, one with a repetition time (TR) of 600 ms and echo times (TEs) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 ms and the other with a TR of 2000 ms and TEs of 20, 40, 60 and 80 ms. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), spin-spin relaxation time (T2) and proton density (N0) were calculated for each volume element corresponding to a pixel. Synthetic MR images, pure T1, T2 and N0 images and spin-echo images with chosen values for TR and TE were generated from these data. T1, T2 and N0 distributions of tumour subregions, corresponding to necrotic regions and regions of viable tissue as defined by histological criteria, were also generated. T1 and T2 were significantly shorter in the necrotic regions than in the regions of viable tissue in all tumours. These differences were sufficiently large to allow the generation of synthetic spin-echo images showing clear contrast between necrosis and viable tissue. Maximum contrast was achieved with TRs within the range 2800-4000 ms and TEs within the range 160-200 ms. Necrotic tissue could also be distinguished from viable tissue in pure T1 and T2 images. Consequently, the possibility exists that MRI might be used for detection of necrotic regions in tumours and hence for prediction of tumour treatment response. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7880724

  3. Optical immunosensor for endocrine disruptor nanolayer detection by surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabchevsky, Alina; Tsapovsky, Lev; Marks, Robert S.; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2011-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as bisphenol A (BPA) and female hormone Estrone are especially prevalent in surface and waste-waters in nano-molar concentrations and therefore, there is a need for sensitive analytical device for their monitoring. We have designed a miniature, low cost and fast surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging liquid sensor based on the angular interrogation using Kretschmann configuration with diverged incident monochromatic light. During this paper we present a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensor to detect EDCs such as BPA and estrone. A pattern of SPR line which is dark intensity line on bright area was reflected at angles range depending on the dielectric constant of the analye: Rabbit Anti-Estrone polyclonal IgG + Estrone 11-MUA attached to the silver or non-specific sensing of BPA in water with nanoprecision. For analyzing the SPR signals we used an efficient detection algorithm based on Radon Transform with less sensitivity to laser speckle noise and nonuniformity of the illumination.

  4. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD. PMID:24967286

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Early Molecular and Cellular Changes in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; McCann, Bryony; Kauppinen, Risto A.; Coulthard, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical trials have demonstrated that slowing or reversing pathology in Alzheimer's disease is likely to be possible only in the earliest stages of disease, perhaps even before significant symptoms develop. Pathology in Alzheimer's disease accumulates for well over a decade before symptoms are detected giving a large potential window of opportunity for intervention. It is therefore important that imaging techniques detect subtle changes in brain tissue before significant macroscopic brain atrophy. Current diagnostic techniques often do not permit early diagnosis or are too expensive for routine clinical use. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the most versatile, affordable, and powerful imaging modality currently available, being able to deliver detailed analyses of anatomy, tissue volumes, and tissue state. In this mini-review, we consider how MRI might detect patients at risk of future dementia in the early stages of pathological change when symptoms are mild. We consider the contributions made by the various modalities of MRI (structural, diffusion, perfusion, relaxometry) in identifying not just atrophy (a late-stage AD symptom) but more subtle changes reflective of early dementia pathology. The sensitivity of MRI not just to gross anatomy but to the underlying “health” at the cellular (and even molecular) scales, makes it very well suited to this task. PMID:27378911

  6. Automated lesion detection in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xi; Kotagiri, Romamohanarao; Frazer, Helen; Yang, Qing

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automated method in detecting lesions to assist radiologists in interpreting dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of breast. The aim is to highlight the suspicious regions of interest to reduce the searching time of the lesions and the possibility of radiologists overlooking small regions. In our method, we locate the suspicious regions by applying a threshold on essential features. The features are normalized to reduce the variation between patients. Support vector machine classifier is then applied to exclude normal tissues from these regions, using both kinetic and morphological features extracted in the lesions. In the evaluation of the system on 21 patients with 50 lesions, all lesions were successfully detected with 5.02 false positive regions per breast.

  7. Positive Unanimous Voting Algorithm for Focal Cortical Dysplasia Detection on Magnetic Resonance Image.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoxia; Yang, Jian; Ma, Shaodong; Bai, Tingzhu; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the main cause of epilepsy and can be automatically detected via magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, visual detection of lesions is time consuming and highly dependent on the doctor's personal knowledge and experience. In this paper, we propose a new framework for positive unanimous voting (PUV) to detect FCD lesions. Maps of gray matter thickness, gradient, relative intensity, and gray/white matter width are computed in the proposed framework to enhance the differences between lesional and non-lesional regions. Feature maps are further compared with the feature distributions of healthy controls to obtain feature difference maps. PUV driven by feature and feature difference maps is then applied to classify image voxels into lesion and non-lesion. The connected region analysis then refines the classification results by removing the tiny fragment regions consisting of falsely classified positive voxels. The proposed method correctly identified 8/10 patients with FCD lesions and 30/31 healthy people. Experimental results on the small FCD samples demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively reduce the number of false positives and guarantee correct detection of lesion regions compared with four single classifiers and two recent methods. PMID:27092069

  8. Positive Unanimous Voting Algorithm for Focal Cortical Dysplasia Detection on Magnetic Resonance Image

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaoxia; Yang, Jian; Ma, Shaodong; Bai, Tingzhu; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the main cause of epilepsy and can be automatically detected via magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, visual detection of lesions is time consuming and highly dependent on the doctor's personal knowledge and experience. In this paper, we propose a new framework for positive unanimous voting (PUV) to detect FCD lesions. Maps of gray matter thickness, gradient, relative intensity, and gray/white matter width are computed in the proposed framework to enhance the differences between lesional and non-lesional regions. Feature maps are further compared with the feature distributions of healthy controls to obtain feature difference maps. PUV driven by feature and feature difference maps is then applied to classify image voxels into lesion and non-lesion. The connected region analysis then refines the classification results by removing the tiny fragment regions consisting of falsely classified positive voxels. The proposed method correctly identified 8/10 patients with FCD lesions and 30/31 healthy people. Experimental results on the small FCD samples demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively reduce the number of false positives and guarantee correct detection of lesion regions compared with four single classifiers and two recent methods. PMID:27092069

  9. Direct magnetic resonance detection of myelin and prospects for quantitative imaging of myelin density

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Ong, Henry H.; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Hackney, David B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has previously demonstrated its potential for indirectly mapping myelin density, either by relaxometric detection of myelin water or magnetization transfer. Here, we investigated whether myelin can be detected and possibly quantified directly. We identified the spectrum of myelin in the spinal cord in situ as well as in myelin lipids extracted via a sucrose gradient method, and investigated its spectral properties. High-resolution solution NMR spectroscopy showed the extract composition to be in agreement with myelin’s known chemical make-up. The 400-MHz 1H spectrum of the myelin extract, at 20 °C (room temperature) and 37 °C, consists of a narrow water resonance superimposed on a broad envelope shifted ∼3.5 ppm upfield, suggestive of long-chain methylene protons. Superimposed on this signal are narrow components resulting from functional groups matching the chemical shifts of the constituents making up myelin lipids. The spectrum could be modeled as a sum of super-Lorentzians with a T2* distribution covering a wide range of values (0.008–26 ms). Overall, there was a high degree of similarity between the spectral properties of extracted myelin lipids and those found in neural tissue. The normalized difference spectrum had the hallmarks of membrane proteins, not present in the myelin extract. Using 3D radially ramp-sampled proton MRI, with a combination of adiabatic inversion and echo subtraction, the feasibility of direct myelin imaging in situ is demonstrated. Last, the integrated signal from myelin suspensions is shown, both spectroscopically and by imaging, to scale with concentration, suggesting the potential for quantitative determination of myelin density. PMID:22628562

  10. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  11. Contrast-agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of neoplastic lesions of the CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Rosa, Louis; Rajan, Sunder S.; Francisco, John

    1991-06-01

    Even though the intrinsic soft tissue contrast sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords excellent visualization of anatomic detail, certain pathologic processes may be diagnosed earlier with the administration of a contrast-enhancing agent. At present there is one agent, gadopentetate dimeglumine, GdDTPA, that has received FDA approval for use in the MR scanning of the brain and spine in human patients. This paramagnetic chelate distributes throughout the extracellular fluid space as dictated by capillary permeability so that abnormal vascularity and sites of blood-CNS barrier breakdown are highlighted. Primary neoplastic disease, metastases, meningeal extension, residual and recurrent tumor have been found to be better distinguished in MR images acquired after administration of GdDTPA. Routine administration of GdDTPA for cranial imaging has resulted in the discovery of otherwise occult lesions in approximately 3 of patients. Although the clinical utility and high therapeutic safety index of the first approved magnetic resonance contrast agent, GdDTPA, have been well established, other contrast agents, having different physical, chemical and biological properties, may offer improved sensitivity and bio-specificity. Agents currently being evaluated in vivo include: low osmolal paramagnetic chelates, superparamagnetic particles, metalloporphyrins, liposome encapsulated agents, perfluorocarbons, intravascular macromolecular chelate complexes and labeled monoclonal antibodies. Concurrent with advances in the development of new compounds, innovations in scanning hardware, pulse sequence design and image post-processing are helping to extend the efficacy of contrast media. Additional clinical experience will indicate which contrast agents and which MR techniques can best facilitate the early detection of specific neoplastic lesions.

  12. Target detection: magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sonn, Geoffrey A; Margolis, Daniel J; Marks, Leonard S

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled image-guided detection of prostate cancer. Fusion of MRI with real-time ultrasound (US) allows the information from MRI to be used to direct biopsy needles under US guidance in an office-based procedure. Fusion can be performed either cognitively or electronically, using a fusion device. Fusion devices allow superimposition (coregistration) of stored MRI images on real-time US images; areas of suspicion found on MRI can then serve as targets during US-guided biopsy. Currently available fusion devices use a variety of technologies to perform coregistration: robotic tracking via a mechanical arm with built-in encoders (Artemis/Eigen, BioJet/Geoscan); electromagnetic tracking (UroNav/Philips-Invivo, Hi-RVS/Hitachi); or tracking with a 3D US probe (Urostation/Koelis). Targeted fusion biopsy has been shown to identify more clinically significant cancers and fewer insignificant cancers than conventional biopsy. Fusion biopsy appears to be a major advancement over conventional biopsy because it allows (1) direct targeting of suspicious areas not seen on US and (2) follow-up biopsy of specific cancerous sites in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:24239473

  13. Improving the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Detection Methods with Engineered Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Zhong, Xiaodong; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Engineering and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles have been an area of the extensive research and development in the biomedical and nanomedicine fields. Because their biocompatibility and toxicity are well investigated and better understood, magnetic nanoparticles, especially iron oxide nanoparticles, are better suited materials as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and for image-directed delivery of therapeutics. Given tunable magnetic properties and various surface chemistries from the coating materials, most applications of engineered magnetic nanoparticles take advantages of their superb MRI contrast enhancing capability as well as surface functionalities. It has been found that MRI contrast enhancement by magnetic nanoparticles is highly dependent on the composition, size and surface properties as well as the degree of aggregation of the nanoparticles. Therefore, understanding the relationships between these intrinsic parameters and the relaxivities that contribute to MRI contrast can lead to establishing essential guidance that may direct the design of engineered magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics applications. On the other hand, new contrast mechanism and imaging strategy can be developed based on the novel properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles. This review will focus on discussing the recent findings on some chemical and physical properties of engineered magnetic nanoparticles affecting the relaxivities as well as the impact on MRI contrast. Furthermore, MRI methods for imaging magnetic nanoparticles including several newly developed MRI approaches aiming at improving the detection and quantification of the engineered magnetic nanoparticles are described. PMID:22272222

  14. Target detection: Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion–guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Margolis, Daniel J.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled image-guided detection of prostate cancer. Fusion of MRI with real-time ultrasound (US) allows the information from MRI to be used to direct biopsy needles under US guidance in an office-based procedure. Fusion can be performed either cognitively or electronically, using a fusion device. Fusion devices allow superimposition (coregistration) of stored MRI images on real-time US images; areas of suspicion found on MRI can then serve as targets during US-guided biopsy. Currently available fusion devices use a variety of technologies to perform coregistration: robotic tracking via a mechanical arm with built-in encoders (Artemis/Eigen, BioJet/Geoscan); electromagnetic tracking (UroNav/Philips-Invivo, Hi-RVS/Hitachi); or tracking with a 3D US probe (Urostation/Koelis). Targeted fusion biopsy has been shown to identify more clinically significant cancers and fewer insignificant cancers than conventional biopsy. Fusion biopsy appears to be a major advancement over conventional biopsy because it allows (1) direct targeting of suspicious areas not seen on US and (2) follow-up biopsy of specific cancerous sites in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:24239473

  15. Detection of Myofascial Herniation on Dynamic Sonography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay M.; Kondapavuluri, Sushen Kumar; Kamal, Anubhav; Kalra, Raghav; Kamal, Vigyat

    2016-01-01

    Muscle hernia is an uncommon cause of leg swelling. It can be detected in the early stages only if there is a high index of suspicion. It is common in lower extremity compared to the upper extremity. Tibialis anterior muscle in the leg is commonly involved. Dynamic sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the mainstay in their diagnosis, which demonstrate a facial defect with herniation of muscle fibers. We report a case of 23-year-old male patient who presented with a painless swelling in the anterolateral aspect of the left upper leg. Dynamic sonography done with high-resolution probe demonstrated a defect in fascia overlying tibialis anterior with herniation of outer muscle fibers which increased during dorsiflexion and reduced in the supine position at rest. MRI of the left leg confirmed the findings. PMID:26885428

  16. Early detection of spondyloarthropathy in patients with psoriasis by using the ultrasonography and magnetic resonance image

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Maha; Omar, Gihan; Elshereef, Rawhya R; Ellaban, Abdou S; Amin, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of ultrasound (US) in the early detection of arthritis and enthesitis, with assessment of the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the early detection of sacroiliitis and spondylitis in patients with psoriasis and to compare the findings of clinical examination and conventional radiography. Material and Methods The study included 50 patients with psoriasis and 20 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent US and power Doppler analyses for the joints of both hands and feet and the entheseal sites. MRI of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints was performed. Results Abnormal US findings of arthritis were present in 18% patients, whereas only 6% patients had X-ray abnormalities, the enthesopathy represent 74%, at a higher percentage than clinical and radiological assessment (46, 26% respectively). MRI and radiological study demonstrated evidence of inflammation in the spine in 44% and 16% patients, respectively, and evidence of sacroiliitis in 10% and 6% patients, respectively. Conclusion Use of newer imaging modalities allows early diagnosis and early initiation of therapy.

  17. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detects mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Polli, Roberson S.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Longo, Beatriz M.; Mello, Luiz E.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) is a frequent finding following status epilepticus (SE). The present study aimed to test the feasibility of using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to detect MFS in the chronic phase of the well-established pilocarpine (Pilo) rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods To modulate MFS, cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with Pilo in a sub-group of animals. In vivo MEMRI was performed 3 months after induction of SE and compared to the neo-Timm histological labeling of zinc mossy fiber terminals in the dentate gyrus (DG). Key findings Chronically epileptic rats displaying MFS as detected by neo-Timm histology had a hyperintense MEMRI signal in the DG, while chronically epileptic animals that did not display MFS had minimal MEMRI signal enhancement compared to non-epileptic control animals. A strong correlation (r = 0.81, P<0.001) was found between MEMRI signal enhancement and MFS. Significance This study shows that MEMRI is an attractive non-invasive method to detect mossy fiber sprouting in vivo and can be used as an evaluation tool in testing therapeutic approaches to manage chronic epilepsy. PMID:22642664

  18. Towards MIB-1 and p53 detection in glioma magnetic resonance image: a novel computational image analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenbin; Zhang, Haishi; Pan, Ying; Huang, Fengping; Xia, Shunren

    2012-12-01

    Glioma is the primary tumor in the central nervous system, and poses one of the greatest challenges in clinical treatment. MIB-1 and p53 are the most useful biomarkers for gliomas and could help neurosurgeons establish a therapeutic schedule. However, these biomarkers are commonly detected with the help of immunohistochemistry (IHC), which wastes time and energy and is often influenced by subjective factors. To reduce the subjective factors and improve the efficiency in the judgment of IHC, a novel magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis method is proposed in the present study to detect the expression status of MIB-1 and p53 in IHC. The proposed method includes two kinds of MRI acquisition (FLAIR and T1 FLAIR images), regions of interest (ROIs) selection, texture features (i.e. the gray level gradient co-occurrence matrix (GLGCM), Minkowski functions (MFs), etc) extraction in ROIs, and classification with a support vector machine in a leave-one-out cross validation strategy. By classifying the ROIs, the performance of the method was evaluated by accuracy, area under ROC curve (AUC), etc. A high accuracy (0.7640 ± 0.0225) and AUC (0.7873 ± 0.0377) for MIB-I detection were achieved. In terms of the texture features, 0.7621 ± 0.0199, 0.7666 ± 0.0365 and 0.7426 ± 0.0451 AUC can be obtained using only GLCM, RLM or GLGCM for MIB-1 detection, respectively. In all, the experimental results demonstrated that MR image texture features are associated with the expression status of MIB-1 and p53. The proposed method has the potential to realize high accuracy and robust detection for MIB-I expression status, which makes it promising for clinical glioma diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. Numerical study of remote detection outside the magnet with travelling wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.; Vázquez, F.; Solís-Nájera, S.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    The use of the travelling wave approach for high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging has been used recently with very promising results. This approach offer images one with greater field-of-view and a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio using a circular waveguide. This scheme has been proved to be successful at 7 T and 9.4 T with whole-body imager. Images have also been acquired with clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems whose resonant frequencies were 64 MHz and 128 MHz. These results motivated the use of remote detection of the magnetic resonance signal using a parallel-plate waveguide together with 3 T clinical scanners, to acquired human leg images. The cut-off frequency of this waveguide is zero for the principal mode, allowing us to overcome the barrier of transmitting waves at lower frequency than 300 MHz or 7 T for protons. These motivated the study of remote detection outside the actual magnet. We performed electromagnetic field simulations of a parallel-plate waveguide and a phantom. The signal transmission was done at 128 MHz and using a circular surface coil located almost 200 cm away for the magnet isocentre. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the magnetic field of the principal mode propagate inside a waveguide outside the magnet. Numerical results were compared with previous experimental-acquired image data under similar conditions.

  20. Vibration-synchronized magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of myocardial elasticity changes.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, Thomas; Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hirsch, Sebastian; Krefting, Dagmar; Klatt, Dieter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-01

    Vibration synchronized magnetic resonance imaging of harmonically oscillating tissue interfaces is proposed for cardiac magnetic resonance elastography. The new approach exploits cardiac triggered cine imaging synchronized with extrinsic harmonic stimulation (f = 22.83 Hz) to display oscillatory tissue deformations in magnitude images. Oscillations are analyzed by intensity threshold-based image processing to track wave amplitude variations over the cardiac cycle. In agreement to literature data, results in 10 volunteers showed that endocardial wave amplitudes during systole (0.13 ± 0.07 mm) were significantly lower than during diastole (0.34 ± 0.14 mm, P < 0.001). Wave amplitudes were found to decrease 117 ± 40 ms before myocardial contraction and to increase 75 ± 31 ms before myocardial relaxation. Vibration synchronized magnetic resonance imaging improves the temporal resolution of magnetic resonance elastography as it overcomes the use of extra motion encoding gradients, is less sensitive to susceptibility artifacts, and does not suffer from dynamic range constraints frequently encountered in phase-based magnetic resonance elastography.

  1. Cranial anatomy and detection of ischemic stroke in the cat by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Kistler, J.P.; Vielma, J.; Brady, T.J.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-04-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cat heads were obtained using a small, experimental imaging system. As a prelude to the study of experimental ischemic brain infarction, the normal cat head was imaged for identification of anatomical features. Images of one cat which had undergone ligation of the middle cerebral artery three weeks previously showed brain changes associated with chronic ischemic stroke and compared favorably with findings on computed tomography (CT). The NMR images have millimetric spatial resolution. NMR parameters inherent in the tissues provide intensity variations and are sufficiently sensitive to yield contrast resolution surpassing that of CT.

  2. Incidental Memory Encoding Assessed with Signal Detection Theory and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Benjamin; Regenbogen, Christina; Koch, Kathrin; Backes, Volker; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Pauly, Katharina; Shah, N. Jon; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that apply a “subsequent memory” approach, successful encoding is indicated by increased fMRI activity during the encoding phase for hits vs. misses, in areas underlying memory encoding such as the hippocampal formation. Signal-detection theory (SDT) can be used to analyze memory-related fMRI activity as a function of the participant’s memory trace strength (d′). The goal of the present study was to use SDT to examine the relationship between fMRI activity during incidental encoding and participants’ recognition performance. To implement a new approach, post-experimental group assignment into High- or Low Performers (HP or LP) was based on 29 healthy participants’ recognition performance, assessed with SDT. The analyses focused on the interaction between the factors group (HP vs. LP) and recognition performance (hits vs. misses). A whole-brain analysis revealed increased activation for HP vs. LP during incidental encoding for remembered vs. forgotten items (hits > misses) in the insula/temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and the fusiform gyrus (FFG). Parameter estimates in these regions exhibited a significant positive correlation with d′. As these brain regions are highly relevant for salience detection (insula), stimulus-driven attention (TPJ), and content-specific processing of mnemonic stimuli (FFG), we suggest that HPs’ elevated memory performance was associated with enhanced attentional and content-specific sensory processing during the encoding phase. We provide first correlative evidence that encoding-related activity in content-specific sensory areas and content-independent attention and salience detection areas influences memory performance in a task with incidental encoding of facial stimuli. Based on our findings, we discuss whether the aforementioned group differences in brain activity during incidental encoding might constitute the basis of general differences in memory performance

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  4. Glomus Tumors: A Review of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Satellite Lesions.

    PubMed

    Giugale, Juan M; Fowler, John R

    2015-10-01

    Glomus tumors are malformations of the neuromyoarterial system that commonly develop in the digits and cause exquisite tenderness, especially with cold temperatures. Treatment typically involves surgical excision, although there is a tendency to avoid aggressive resections, which may lead to aesthetically displeasing nail plate deformities. In a minority of patients, symptoms may persist and the tumor may recur. The etiology of the persistent of symptoms is debatable. One theory for the persistence of symptoms is an incomplete initial excision of the glomus tumor. Another theory suggests that clinically unapparent satellite lesions exist at the time of diagnosis that are not excised, and they later mature into symptomatic recurrent tumors. Although not clinically visible, if present, these satellite lesions should be seen on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The authors reviewed all cases of pathology-confirmed glomus tumors in the past 7 years at a single institution in which preoperative magnetic resonance imaging using a high-powered 3.0 Tesla (General Electric, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom) magnet was performed. Six cases met inclusion criteria and only 1 case developed a recurrent glomus tumor. None of the cases were found to have satellite lesions associated with the primary glomus tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. Preventing recurrence seems to be dependent on the completeness of the initial excision. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool used to delineate the extent of the tumor for surgical planning. PMID:26488783

  5. A microwave detection way by electromagnetic and elastic resonance: Breaking the bottleneck of spatial resolution in microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhong; Lou, Cunguang; Shi, Yujiao; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-10-01

    The spatial resolution of microwave imaging depends on the geometrical size of the detector. The existing techniques mainly focus on optimizing the antenna design to achieve high detection sensitivity. However, since the optimal antenna size is closely related to the wavelength to be measured, and the miniaturization of the geometrical size is challenging, this limits the spatial resolution of microwave imaging. In this letter, a microwave detection technique based on the electromagnetic-elastic resonance effect is proposed. The piezoelectric materials can produce mechanical responses under microwave excitation, and the amplitude of the microwave can be detected by measuring these responses. In contrast to conventional microwave detection method, the proposed method has distinct advantages in terms of high sensitivity and wide spectral response. Most importantly, it overcomes the limitation of detector size, thus, significantly improving the detection resolution. Therefore, the proposed method has potential for microwave imaging in biomedical applications.

  6. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography to detect consciousness after severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, rapid technological developments in the field of neuroimaging have provided new methods for revealing thoughts, actions, and intentions based solely on the pattern of activity that is observed in the brain. In specialized centres, these methods are now being employed routinely in the assessment of patients diagnosed with so-called "disorders of consciousness," mapping patterns of residual function and dysfunction and helping to reduce diagnostic errors between related conditions such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) have now been shown to be effective tools for detecting covert awareness in behaviorally nonresponsive patients when standard clinical approaches have been unable to provide that information. Indeed, in some patients, communication with the outside world via simple "yes" and "no" questions has been achieved, even in cases where no possibility for behavioral interaction exists. These studies have profound implications for clinical care, diagnosis, prognosis and medical-legal decision making relating to the prolongation, or otherwise, of life after severe brain injury. Moreover, the results suggest an urgent need for a re-evaluation of the existing diagnostic guidelines for behaviorally nonresponsive patients to include information derived from functional neuroimaging.

  7. Fetal Central Nervous System Anomalies Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Two-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Dehghani, Sakineh; Safari, Maryam; Vafaei, Homeira; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gradually becoming more common for thorough visualization of the fetus than ultrasound (US), especially for neurological anomalies, which are the most common indications for fetal MRI and are a matter of concern for both families and society. Objectives We investigated fetal MRIs carried out in our center for frequency of central nervous system anomalies. This is the first such report in southern Iran. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven (107) pregnant women with suspicious fetal anomalies in prenatal ultrasound entered a cross-sectional retrospective study from 2011 to 2013. A 1.5 T Siemens Avanto scanner was employed for sequences, including T2 HASTE and Trufisp images in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes to mother’s body, T2 HASTE and Trufisp relative to the specific fetal body part being evaluated, and T1 flash images in at least one plane based on clinical indication. We investigated any abnormality in the central nervous system and performed descriptive analysis to achieve index of frequency. Results Mean gestational age ± standard deviation (SD) for fetuses was 25.54 ± 5.22 weeks, and mean maternal age ± SD was 28.38 ± 5.80 years Eighty out of 107 (74.7%) patients who were referred with initial impression of borderline ventriculomegaly. A total of 18 out of 107 (16.82%) patients were found to have fetuses with CNS anomalies and the remainder were neurologically normal. Detected anomalies were as follow: 3 (16.6%) fetuses each had the Dandy-Walker variant and Arnold-Chiari II (with myelomeningocele). Complete agenesis of corpus callosum, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, and aqueductal stenosis were each seen in 2 (11.1%) fetuses. Arnold-Chiari II without myelomeningocele, anterior spina bifida associated with neurenteric cyst, arachnoid cyst, lissencephaly, and isolated enlarged cisterna magna each presented in one (5.5%) fetus. One fetus had concomitant schizencephaly and complete agenesis of

  8. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detection of basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Hamlin, Adam S; Pannek, Kerstin; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Keller, Marianne D; Rose, Stephen E; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is an early and key feature of Alzheimer's disease, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric measurement of the basal forebrain has recently gained attention as a potential diagnostic tool for this condition. The aim of this study was to determine whether loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons underpins changes which can be detected through diffusion MRI using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography in a mouse model. To cause selective basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration, the toxin saporin conjugated to a p75 neurotrophin receptor antibody (mu-p75-SAP) was used. This resulted in ~25% loss of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and significant loss of terminal cholinergic projections in the hippocampus, as determined by histology. To test whether lesion of cholinergic neurons caused basal forebrain, hippocampal, or whole brain atrophy, we performed manual segmentation analysis, which revealed no significant atrophy in lesioned animals compared to controls (Rb-IgG-SAP). However, analysis by DTI of the basal forebrain area revealed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA; +7.7%), mean diffusivity (MD; +6.1%), axial diffusivity (AD; +8.5%) and radial diffusivity (RD; +4.0%) in lesioned mice compared to control animals. These parameters strongly inversely correlated with the number of choline acetyl transferase-positive neurons, with FA showing the greatest association (r(2)=0.72), followed by MD (r(2)=0.64), AD (r(2)=0.64) and RD (r(2)=0.61). Moreover, probabilistic tractography analysis of the septo-hippocampal tracts originating from the basal forebrain revealed an increase in streamline MD (+5.1%) and RD (+4.3%) in lesioned mice. This study illustrates that moderate loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (representing only a minor proportion of all septo-hippocampal axons) can be detected by measuring either DTI parameters of the basal forebrain nuclei or

  10. Prostate Cancer Detection with Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 1 versus Version 2

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhao-Yan; Wang, Liang; Min, Xiang-De; Wang, Shao-Gang; Wang, Guo-Ping; Cai, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) is a globally acceptable standardization for multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) in prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. The American College of Radiology revised the PI-RADS to address the limitations of version 1 in December 2014. This study aimed to determine whether the PI-RADS version 2 (PI-RADS v2) scoring system improves the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI of the prostate compared with PI-RADS v1. Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. A total of 401 consecutive patients, with clinically suspicious PCa undergoing 3.0 T mp-MRI (T2-weighted imaging + diffusion-weighted imaging + DCE) before transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy between June 2013 and July 2015, were included in the study. All patients were scored using the 5-point PI-RADS scoring system based on either PI-RADS v1 or v2. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated for statistical analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were compared using McNemar's test. Results: PCa was present in 150 of 401 (37.41%) patients. When we pooled data from both peripheral zone (PZ) and transition zone (TZ), the areas under the curve were 0.889 for PI-RADS v1 and 0.942 for v2 (P = 0.0001). Maximal accuracy was achieved with a score threshold of 4. At this threshold, in the PZ, similar sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were achieved with v1 and v2 (all P > 0.05). In the TZ, sensitivity was higher for v2 than for v1 (96.36% vs. 76.36%, P = 0.003), specificity was similar for v2 and v1 (90.24% vs. 84.15%, P = 0.227), and accuracy was higher for v2 than for v1 (92.70% vs. 81.02%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Both v1 and v2 showed good diagnostic performance for the detection of PCa. However, in the TZ, the performance was better with v2 than with v1. PMID:27748338

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  13. Automatic computer-aided detection of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, P. C.; Barentsz, J. O.; Karssemeijer, N.; Huisman, H. J.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic computer-aided detection (CAD) method is proposed for the detection of prostate cancer. The CAD method consists of multiple sequential steps in order to detect locations that are suspicious for prostate cancer. In the initial stage, a voxel classification is performed using a Hessian-based blob detection algorithm at multiple scales on an apparent diffusion coefficient map. Next, a parametric multi-object segmentation method is applied and the resulting segmentation is used as a mask to restrict the candidate detection to the prostate. The remaining candidates are characterized by performing histogram analysis on multiparametric MR images. The resulting feature set is summarized into a malignancy likelihood by a supervised classifier in a two-stage classification approach. The detection performance for prostate cancer was tested on a screening population of 200 consecutive patients and evaluated using the free response operating characteristic methodology. The results show that the CAD method obtained sensitivities of 0.41, 0.65 and 0.74 at false positive (FP) levels of 1, 3 and 5 per patient, respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that it is feasible to automatically detect prostate cancer at a FP rate lower than systematic biopsy. The CAD method may assist the radiologist to detect prostate cancer locations and could potentially guide biopsy towards the most aggressive part of the tumour.

  14. Automatic computer-aided detection of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance image analysis.

    PubMed

    Vos, P C; Barentsz, J O; Karssemeijer, N; Huisman, H J

    2012-03-21

    In this paper, a fully automatic computer-aided detection (CAD) method is proposed for the detection of prostate cancer. The CAD method consists of multiple sequential steps in order to detect locations that are suspicious for prostate cancer. In the initial stage, a voxel classification is performed using a Hessian-based blob detection algorithm at multiple scales on an apparent diffusion coefficient map. Next, a parametric multi-object segmentation method is applied and the resulting segmentation is used as a mask to restrict the candidate detection to the prostate. The remaining candidates are characterized by performing histogram analysis on multiparametric MR images. The resulting feature set is summarized into a malignancy likelihood by a supervised classifier in a two-stage classification approach. The detection performance for prostate cancer was tested on a screening population of 200 consecutive patients and evaluated using the free response operating characteristic methodology. The results show that the CAD method obtained sensitivities of 0.41, 0.65 and 0.74 at false positive (FP) levels of 1, 3 and 5 per patient, respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that it is feasible to automatically detect prostate cancer at a FP rate lower than systematic biopsy. The CAD method may assist the radiologist to detect prostate cancer locations and could potentially guide biopsy towards the most aggressive part of the tumour.

  15. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Schink, S. W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R. S.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.

    2007-04-16

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.

  16. The impact of data preprocessing in traumatic brain injury detection using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Victor M; Damaraju, Eswar; Mayer, Andrew B; Miller, Robyn; Cetin, Mustafa S; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can adversely affect a person's thinking, memory, personality and behavior. For this reason new and better biomarkers are being investigated. Resting state functional network connectivity (rsFNC) derived from functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging is emerging as a possible biomarker. One of the main concerns with this technique is the appropriateness of methods used to correct for subject movement. In this work we used 50 mild TBI patients and matched healthy controls to explore the outcomes obtained from different fMRI data preprocessing. Results suggest that correction for motion variance before spatial smoothing is the best alternative. Following this preprocessing option a significant group difference was found between cerebellum and supplementary motor area/paracentral lobule. In this case the mTBI group exhibits an increase in rsFNC.

  17. The impact of data preprocessing in traumatic brain injury detection using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Victor M; Damaraju, Eswar; Mayer, Andrew B; Miller, Robyn; Cetin, Mustafa S; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can adversely affect a person's thinking, memory, personality and behavior. For this reason new and better biomarkers are being investigated. Resting state functional network connectivity (rsFNC) derived from functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging is emerging as a possible biomarker. One of the main concerns with this technique is the appropriateness of methods used to correct for subject movement. In this work we used 50 mild TBI patients and matched healthy controls to explore the outcomes obtained from different fMRI data preprocessing. Results suggest that correction for motion variance before spatial smoothing is the best alternative. Following this preprocessing option a significant group difference was found between cerebellum and supplementary motor area/paracentral lobule. In this case the mTBI group exhibits an increase in rsFNC. PMID:26737520

  18. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Might Complement Two-Dimensional Echocardiography in the Detection of a Reversible Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madanieh, Raef; Mathew, Shawn; Shah, Pratik; Vatti, Satya K.; Madanieh, Abed; Kosmas, Constantine E.; Vittorio, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reversible nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in a male in his 60s who presented with an acute heart failure syndrome. Both conventional two-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) demonstrated severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction; however, both modalities were devoid of significant valvular heart disease as well as the presence of fibrosis, infiltration, inflammation, and scar. After six months of aggressive neurohumoral modulation, there was complete reverse remodeling and normalization of left ventricular function, which highlights the role of cMRI as an adjunct to two-dimensional echocardiography in the detection of a potentially reversible nonischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26740746

  19. Computer-assisted evaluation of contrast kinetics for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Bhargava, Puneet; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Mitsumori, Lee M; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of semiquantitative contrast-enhanced parameter analysis as an objective criteria for improving the magnetic resonance (MR) evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with cirrhosis. Contrast-enhanced MR examination findings from 19 patients with 21 pathologically proven HCC were evaluated using a dedicated liver image postprocessing workstation. Contrast-enhancement kinetic curves were created for each lesion, and 4 enhancement parameters (arterial wash-in slope, arterial-portal slope, arterial-equilibrium slope, and portal-equilibrium slope) were defined from the signal intensity-time plots. The accuracy of each enhancement parameter for the characterization of HCC was assessed. Statistical analysis revealed that an arterial-phase wash-in slope percentage value >1.35 per sec had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 71%, and an accuracy of 79% for the correct characterization of HCC, whereas an arterial-equilibrium wash-out slope percentage value<0.05 per sec had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 81%, and an accuracy of 83%. Although there were significant differences among all groups, the greatest accuracy for differentiation based on receiver operating curve analysis appears to be with arterial and arterial-equilibrium phases. Semiquantitative analysis of lesion contrast kinetics could provide objective parameters to improve the characterization of HCC on contrast-enhanced MR images.

  20. A meta-classifier for detecting prostate cancer by quantitative integration of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Recently, in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) have emerged as promising new modalities to aid in prostate cancer (CaP) detection. MRI provides anatomic and structural information of the prostate while MRS provides functional data pertaining to biochemical concentrations of metabolites such as creatine, choline and citrate. We have previously presented a hierarchical clustering scheme for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRS and have recently developed a computer-aided method for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRI. In this paper we present a novel scheme to develop a meta-classifier to detect CaP in vivo via quantitative integration of multimodal prostate MRS and MRI by use of non-linear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods including spectral clustering and locally linear embedding (LLE). Quantitative integration of multimodal image data (MRI and PET) involves the concatenation of image intensities following image registration. However multimodal data integration is non-trivial when the individual modalities include spectral and image intensity data. We propose a data combination solution wherein we project the feature spaces (image intensities and spectral data) associated with each of the modalities into a lower dimensional embedding space via NLDR. NLDR methods preserve the relationships between the objects in the original high dimensional space when projecting them into the reduced low dimensional space. Since the original spectral and image intensity data are divorced from their original physical meaning in the reduced dimensional space, data at the same spatial location can be integrated by concatenating the respective embedding vectors. Unsupervised consensus clustering is then used to partition objects into different classes in the combined MRS and MRI embedding space. Quantitative results of our multimodal computer-aided diagnosis scheme on 16 sets of patient data obtained from the ACRIN trial, for which

  1. Detection of intramyocardial hemorrhage using high-field proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lotan, C.S.; Miller, S.K.; Bouchard, A.; Cranney, G.B.; Reeves, R.C.; Bishop, S.P.; Elgavish, G.A.; Pohost, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has been used to define zones of myocardial infarction (MI), which appear as areas of relatively increased signal intensity (SI). However, zones of decreased SI have been observed within the areas of infarction and have been postulated to result from intramyocardial hemorrhage. To explore this phenomenon further, ex vivo spin-echo 1H NMR imaging at 1.5 Tesla was performed in 17 dogs after 24 hr (n = 9) and after 72 hr (n = 8) of coronary artery occlusion. In all dogs, a zone of increased SI (118 +/- 9% compared with normal myocardium) was observed in the distribution of the occluded coronary artery. In 12 of the 17 dogs, zones of decreased SI (92 +/- 8% compared with normal) were seen within or around the central zone of increased SI. Gross inspection and histological assessment of sliced myocardium usually disclosed hemorrhage in the regions of decreased SI. In three of the five dogs with no apparent zones of decreased SI on NMR, the infarct was small, and only minor hemorrhage was observed by gross inspection, whereas in the remaining two dogs no hemorrhage was seen. Myocardial flow in the hemorrhagic regions was significantly higher than in the necrotic core (59 +/- 29% vs. 31 +/- 24% compared with control, P less than 0.05). Image-derived calculation of T2 relaxation times in the different infarcted regions revealed a significant shortening of T2 in the infarcted hemorrhagic zones with decreased SI compared with the infarct zones with increased SI (49 +/- 8 msec vs. 66 +/- 8 msec, P less than 0.05).

  2. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  3. Hybrid photomultiplier tube and photodiode parallel detection array for wideband optical spectroscopy of the breast guided by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghussein, Fadi; Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    A new optical parallel detection system of hybrid frequency and continuous-wave domains was developed to improve the data quality and accuracy in recovery of all breast optical properties. This new system was deployed in a previously existing system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided spectroscopy, and allows incorporation of additional near-infrared wavelengths beyond 850 nm, with interlaced channels of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photodiodes (PDs). The acquisition time for obtaining frequency-domain data at six wavelengths (660, 735, 785, 808, 826, and 849 nm) and continuous-wave data at three wavelengths (903, 912, and 948 nm) is 12 min. The dynamic ranges of the detected signal are 105 and 106 for PMT and PD detectors, respectively. Compared to the previous detection system, the SNR ratio of frequency-domain detection was improved by nearly 103 through the addition of an RF amplifier and the utilization of programmable gain. The current system is being utilized in a clinical trial imaging suspected breast cancer tumors as detected by contrast MRI scans.

  4. Hybrid photomultiplier tube and photodiode parallel detection array for wideband optical spectroscopy of the breast guided by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    El-Ghussein, Fadi; Mastanduno, Michael A; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2014-01-01

    A new optical parallel detection system of hybrid frequency and continuous-wave domains was developed to improve the data quality and accuracy in recovery of all breast optical properties. This new system was deployed in a previously existing system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided spectroscopy, and allows incorporation of additional near-infrared wavelengths beyond 850 nm, with interlaced channels of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photodiodes (PDs). The acquisition time for obtaining frequency-domain data at six wavelengths (660, 735, 785, 808, 826, and 849 nm) and continuous-wave data at three wavelengths (903, 912, and 948 nm) is 12 min. The dynamic ranges of the detected signal are 105 and 106 for PMT and PD detectors, respectively. Compared to the previous detection system, the SNR ratio of frequency-domain detection was improved by nearly 103 through the addition of an RF amplifier and the utilization of programmable gain. The current system is being utilized in a clinical trial imaging suspected breast cancer tumors as detected by contrast MRI scans. PMID:23979460

  5. Hybrid photomultiplier tube and photodiode parallel detection array for wideband optical spectroscopy of the breast guided by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. A new optical parallel detection system of hybrid frequency and continuous-wave domains was developed to improve the data quality and accuracy in recovery of all breast optical properties. This new system was deployed in a previously existing system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided spectroscopy, and allows incorporation of additional near-infrared wavelengths beyond 850 nm, with interlaced channels of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photodiodes (PDs). The acquisition time for obtaining frequency-domain data at six wavelengths (660, 735, 785, 808, 826, and 849 nm) and continuous-wave data at three wavelengths (903, 912, and 948 nm) is 12 min. The dynamic ranges of the detected signal are 105 and 106 for PMT and PD detectors, respectively. Compared to the previous detection system, the SNR ratio of frequency-domain detection was improved by nearly 103 through the addition of an RF amplifier and the utilization of programmable gain. The current system is being utilized in a clinical trial imaging suspected breast cancer tumors as detected by contrast MRI scans. PMID:23979460

  6. Patellar segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images using guided recursive ray-tracing for edge pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Jackson, Jennifer N.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Gandler, William; Eijkenboom, J. J. F. A.; van Middelkoop, M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents an automatic segmentation methodology for the patellar bone, based on 3D gradient recalled echo and gradient recalled echo with fat suppression magnetic resonance images. Constricted search space outlines are incorporated into recursive ray-tracing to segment the outer cortical bone. A statistical analysis based on the dependence of information in adjacent slices is used to limit the search in each image to between an outer and inner search region. A section based recursive ray-tracing mechanism is used to skip inner noise regions and detect the edge boundary. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (0.23mm) than the current state-of-the-art methods with the average dice similarity coefficient of 96.0% (SD 1.3%) agreement between the auto-segmentation and ground truth surfaces.

  7. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. METHODS We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. RESULTS Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. Cancer 2014;120:2507–2513. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. Screening female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma for breast cancer with MRI and mammography detected tumors at an earlier stage than prior studies of mammography alone, although a substantial proportion of

  8. Brain 'Embolism' Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Commissurotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Paulo; Qanadli, Salah D.; Strumza, Pierre; Kacher, Safia; Aberkane, Linda; Aubry, Pierre; Rigaud, Michel; Lacombe, Pascal; Raffestin, Bernadette

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: The common finding of thrombi between the bifoil balloons when they were extracted after mitral dilation prompted us to look for evidence of minor brain embolisms using the sensitive technique of BMRI (brain magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging). Methods: BMRI was performed within 48 hr before and after a percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy (PMBC) in each of the 63 patients in this study. Results: There was evidence (hyperintensity foci: HI) of a previous asymptomatic brain embolism in 38 of 63 patients before PMBC and a new HI appeared in 18 of 63 patients after the procedure. New HI signals were found exclusively in the white matter in 8 of 18 patients and in only 3 of 18 were HI signs larger than 1 cm. One patient, with an HI signal >1 cm in the thalamus and another <1 cm in the brain stem, presented diplopia accompanied by other minor clinical signs. The differences in HI rate among four subgroups (1, older vs younger than 43 years; 2, sinus rhythm vs atrial fibrillation; 3, echo score <8 vs >8; 4, patients from western countries vs the others) were not statistically significant, probably because the number of patients in each subgroup was low. Patients in atrial fibrillation had slightly more (not significant) HI before PMBC (15/20, 75%) than patients in sinus rhythm (23/43, 53%), but after PMBC their HI frequencies were similar (atrial fibrillation: 5/20, 25%; sinus rhythm: 13/43, 30%). Conclusion: Brain microembolism is frequent during PMBC, but is often anatomically limited and free from clinical signs in most cases. Brain embolism seems to be related mainly to the procedure itself and not the features of the patient.

  9. Detection of cannabinoid agonist evoked increase in BOLD contrast in rats using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shah, Y B; Prior, M J W; Dixon, A L; Morris, P G; Marsden, C A

    2004-03-01

    BOLD-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the effects of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on the rat brain in order to determine potential CNS sites of action for the functional effects of cannabinoids. After obtaining basal data, rats (n=8) were given the cannabinoid agonist HU210 (10 microg/kg i.v.) and volume data sets collected for 85 mins. Significant increases in functional BOLD activity were observed in specific brain regions including those important in pain (PAG), reward (VTA and accumbens) and motor function (striatum). In order to confirm cannabinoid receptor involvement in the HU210 evoked functional BOLD activity, rats (n=8) were pre-treated with the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (100 microg/kg i.v.) prior to HU210. Pretreatment with SR141716A abolished all significant evoked HU210 functional BOLD activity. To exclude the involvement of potential systemic effects induced by the cannabinoid agonist administration on the observed evoked functional BOLD activity a separate experiment investigated the effect of HU210 (10 microg/kg i.v.) on mean arterial pressure and showed that HU210 had no significant effect on pressure under chloral hydrate anaesthesia. In summary, this study demonstrates that the cannabinoid agonist HU210 evokes a significant increase in BOLD functional activity in specific regions and that this was cannabinoid receptor mediated. Furthermore the study indicates the potential value of fMRI in rodents to delineate pharmacologically induced changes in regional brain function. PMID:14975693

  10. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles as new, smart contrast agents for cancer early detection using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mouffouk, Fouzi; Simão, Teresa; Dornelles, Daniel F; Lopes, André D; Sau, Pablo; Martins, Jorge; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Alrokayan, Salman A; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; dos Santos, Nuno R

    2015-01-01

    Early cancer detection is a major factor in the reduction of mortality and cancer management cost. Here we developed a smart and targeted micelle-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), able to turn on its imaging capability in the presence of acidic cancer tissues. This smart contrast agent consists of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles formed by self-assembly of a diblock copolymer (poly(ethyleneglycol-b-trimethylsilyl methacrylate)), loaded with a gadolinium hydrophobic complex ((t)BuBipyGd) and exploits the acidic pH in cancer tissues. In vitro MRI experiments showed that (t)BuBipyGd-loaded micelles were pH-sensitive, as they turned on their imaging capability only in an acidic microenvironment. The micelle-targeting ability toward cancer cells was enhanced by conjugation with an antibody against the MUC1 protein. The ability of our antibody-decorated micelles to be switched on in acidic microenvironments and to target cancer cells expressing specific antigens, together with its high Gd(III) content and its small size (35-40 nm) reveals their potential use for early cancer detection by MRI.

  11. Applying independent component analysis to detect silent speech in magnetic resonance imaging signals.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Arai, Hajime; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2011-10-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) can be usefully applied to functional imaging studies to evaluate the spatial extent and temporal profile of task-related brain activity. It requires no a priori assumptions about the anatomical areas that are activated or the temporal profile of the activity. We applied spatial ICA to detect a voluntary but hidden response of silent speech. To validate the method against a standard model-based approach, we used the silent speech of a tongue twister as a 'Yes' response to single questions that were delivered at given times. In the first task, we attempted to estimate one number that was chosen by a participant from 10 possibilities. In the second task, we increased the possibilities to 1000. In both tasks, spatial ICA was as effective as the model-based method for determining the number in the subject's mind (80-90% correct per digit), but spatial ICA outperformed the model-based method in terms of time, especially in the 1000-possibility task. In the model-based method, calculation time increased by 30-fold, to 15 h, because of the necessity of testing 1000 possibilities. In contrast, the calculation time for spatial ICA remained as short as 30 min. In addition, spatial ICA detected an unexpected response that occurred by mistake. This advantage was validated in a third task, with 13 500 possibilities, in which participants had the freedom to choose when to make one of four responses. We conclude that spatial ICA is effective for detecting the onset of silent speech, especially when it occurs unexpectedly.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  13. Detecting Vascular-Targeting Effects of the Hypoxic Cytotoxin Tirapazamine in Tumor Xenografts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, Lauren J.; Baker, Jennifer; Kyle, Alastair H.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Reinsberg, Stefan A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether vascular-targeting effects can be detected in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: MR images of HCT-116 xenograft-bearing mice were acquired at 7 Tesla before and 24 hours after intraperitoneal injections of tirapazamine. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses were performed to evaluate changes in tumor perfusion using two biomarkers: the volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) and the initial area under the concentration-time curve (IAUC). We used novel implanted fiducial markers to obtain cryosections that corresponded to MR image planes from excised tumors; quantitative immunohistochemical mapping of tumor vasculature, perfusion, and necrosis enabled correlative analysis between these and MR images. Results: Conventional histological analysis showed lower vascular perfusion or greater amounts of necrosis in the central regions of five of eight tirapazamine-treated tumors, with three treated tumors showing no vascular dysfunction response. MRI data reflected this result, and a striking decrease in both K{sup trans} and IAUC values was seen with the responsive tumors. Retrospective evaluation of pretreatment MRI parameters revealed that those tumors that did not respond to the vascular-targeting effects of tirapazamine had significantly higher pretreatment K{sup trans} and IAUC values. Conclusions: MRI-derived parameter maps showed good agreement with histological tumor mapping. MRI was found to be an effective tool for noninvasively monitoring and predicting tirapazamine-mediated central vascular dysfunction.

  14. Relevance of magnetic resonance imaging for early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Grothe, Michel; Lista, Simone; Toschi, Nicola; Garaci, Francesco G; Hampel, Harald

    2013-05-01

    Hippocampus volumetry currently is the best-established imaging biomarker for AD. However, the effect of multicenter acquisition on measurements of hippocampus volume needs to be explicitly considered when it is applied in large clinical trials, for example by using mixed-effects models to take the clustering of data within centers into account. The marker needs further validation in respect of the underlying neurobiological substrate and potential confounds such as vascular disease, inflammation, hydrocephalus, and alcoholism, and with regard to clinical outcomes such as cognition but also to demographic and socioeconomic outcomes such as mortality and institutionalization. The use of hippocampus volumetry for risk stratification of predementia study samples will further increase with the availability of automated measurement approaches. An important step in this respect will be the development of a standard hippocampus tracing protocol that harmonizes the large range of presently available manual protocols. In the near future, regionally differentiated automated methods will become available together with an appropriate statistical model, such as multivariate analysis of deformation fields, or techniques such as cortical-thickness measurements that yield a meaningful metrics for the detection of treatment effects. More advanced imaging protocols, including DTI, DSI, and functional MRI, are presently being used in monocenter and first multicenter studies. In the future these techniques will be relevant for the risk stratification in phase IIa type studies (small proof-of-concept trials). By contrast, the application of the broader established structural imaging biomarkers, such as hippocampus volume, for risk stratification and as surrogate end point is already today part of many clinical trial protocols. However, clinical care will also be affected by these new technologies. Radiologic expert centers already offer “dementia screening” for well-off middle

  15. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging - ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy outperforms standard approaches in detecting prostate cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuping; Zhang, Jiayi; Tang, Jingyuan; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Guo, Hongqian; Zhou, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging - ultrasound (MRI-US) fusion prostate biopsy is superior to systematic biopsy for making a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. The two strategies were also compared regarding their ability to detect clinically significant and insignificant prostate cancer. A literature search was conducted through the PubMed, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases using appropriate search terms. A total of 3,415 cases from 21 studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Data were expressed as relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval. The results revealed that MRI-US fusion biopsy achieved a higher rate of overall prostate cancer detection compared with systematic biopsy (RR=1.09; P=0.047). Moreover, MRI-US fusion biopsy detected more clinically significant cancers compared with systematic biopsy (RR=1.22; P<0.01). It is therefore recommended that multi-parametric MRI-US is performed in men suspected of having prostate cancer to optimize the detection of clinically significant disease, while reducing the burden of biopsies. PMID:27446568

  17. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ~3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22121333

  18. In Vivo Detection of Activated Platelets Allows Characterizing Rupture of Atherosclerotic Plaques with Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kristina; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Meissner, Mirko; Tilly, Peg; Charles, Anne-Laure; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; Fabre, Jean-Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Background Early and non-invasive detection of platelets on micro atherothrombosis provides a means to identify unstable plaque and thereby allowing prophylactic treatment towards prevention of stroke or myocardial infarction. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) of activated platelets as early markers of plaque rupture using targeted contrast agents is a promising strategy. In this study, we aim to specifically image activated platelets in murine atherothrombosis by in vivo mMRI, using a dedicated animal model of plaque rupture. Methods An antibody targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-receptor of activated platelets was conjugated to microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) to form the LIBS-MPIO contrast agent causing a signal-extinction in T2*-weighted MRI. ApoE−/− mice (60 weeks-old) were fed a high fat diet for 5 weeks. Using a small needle, the surface of their carotid plaques was scratched under blood flow to induce atherothrombosis. In vivo 9.4 Tesla MRI was performed before and repetitively after intravenous injection of either LIBS-MPIO versus non-targeted-MPIO. Results LIBS-MPIO injected animals showed a significant signal extinction (p<0.05) in MRI, corresponding to the site of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis in histology. The signal attenuation was effective for atherothrombosis occupying ≥2% of the vascular lumen. Histology further confirmed significant binding of LIBS-MPIO compared to control-MPIO on the thrombus developing on the surface of ruptured plaques (p<0.01). Conclusion in vivo mMRI detected activated platelets on mechanically ruptured atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE−/− mice with a high sensititvity. This imaging technology represents a unique opportunity for noninvasive detection of atherothrombosis and the identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques with the ultimate promise to prevent strokes and myocardial infarctions. PMID:23028736

  19. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Changes in Meniscal Volume in Vivo After Partial Meniscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Megan E.; Tung, Glenn A.; Oksendahl, Heidi L.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Fadale, Paul D.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantifying changes in meniscal volume in vivo before and after partial meniscectomy (PM) could help elucidate the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis development after meniscal injury and its surgical treatment. Purpose/Hypothesis To determine whether quantitative MRI (qMRI) could detect the immediate reduction in meniscal volume created by PM, while ruling out changes in unresected structures. We hypothesized that qMRI would be reliable for determining meniscal volume within the repeated images of unresected menisci. Additionally, we expected no significant difference in volume between the uninjured menisci of the injured knees and the same menisci of the uninjured knees. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Ten subjects with meniscal tears were evaluated with 3T MRI before and after arthroscopic PM. Manual segmentation was used to create models of the menisci and to determine the pre- and post-operative meniscal volumes for each subject. The responsiveness and reliability of qMRI for determining meniscal volume in vivo were evaluated using these measurements. We expected a decrease in volume of the resected menisci, but not in the uninjured menisci, after surgery. Results The mean pre-operative volume of the injured menisci was significantly greater than the mean post-operative volume (2896±277mm3 vs. 2480±277mm3; p=0.000). There was no significant difference between the mean pre- and post-operative volumes of the uninjured menisci (2687±256mm3 vs. 2694±256mm3; p=1.000). Conclusions Manual segmentation demonstrated a significant reduction in the volume of the surgically resected menisci after PM, but no significant change in the volume of unresected meniscal tissue, indicating that the manual segmentation method is responsive. Clinical Relevance This approach offers a novel, reliable method to study the relationship between the volume of meniscal tissue removed during PM and subsequent patient outcomes during long-term clinical

  20. Sensitive Trimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Fluorescence Detection of Cancer Cells with Stable Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Carrouée, Ambre; Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Même, Sandra; Szeremeta, Frederic; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Chourpa, Igor

    2015-11-17

    Novel magneto-plasmonic nanoprobes were designed for multimodal diagnosis of cancer by combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and fluorescence emission in the very near infrared (VNIR). A controlled electrostatic assembly of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), VNIR dye Nile Blue (NB), and biopolymer chitosan (Chi) was used to formulate the AgIONs-Chi nanoprobes. The formulation protocol did not involve organic solvents and was rapid and efficient as confirmed by magnetic sorting. The SERRS response of the nanoprobes was very intense and constant for days. It decreased linearly upon 1000-fold dilution and was still recognizable at 0.1 nM NB concentration. After 30 days of storage, the SERRS loss was less than 30% and the hydrodynamic size of the AgIONs-Chi in PBS remained below 200 nm. The gradual decrease of the ratio SERRS/fluorescence allowed one to monitor the release of the fluorescent molecule upon long-term nanoprobe dissociation. The AgIONs-Chi exhibited 2-fold higher MRI contrast than that of commercially available SPION suspensions. Finally, the nanoprobes were actively uptaken by HeLa cancer cells and ensured trimodal MRI-SERRS-fluorescence detection of 10 μL cell inclusions in cm-sized agarose gels used here as phantom models of microtumors. The above results show that the magneto-plasmonic AgIONs-Chi are promising substrates for SERRS analysis in solution and for multimodal imaging of cancer cells. PMID:26488315

  1. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Serum Biomarkers for Detection of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Teratomas

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Johannes; Ebert, Antje; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Qi; Wang, Mouer; Ameen, Mohamed; Kodo, Kazuki; Ong, Sang-Ging; Lee, Won Hee; Lee, Grace; Neofytou, Evgenios; Gold, Joseph D.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The use of cells derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for regenerative therapies confers a considerable risk for neoplastic growth and teratoma formation. Preclinical and clinical assessment of such therapies will require suitable monitoring strategies to understand and mitigate these risks. Here we generated human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), selected clones that continued to express reprogramming factors after differentiation into cardiomyocytes, and transplanted these cardiomyocytes into immunocompromised rat hearts post-myocardial infarction. We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cardiac ultrasound, and serum biomarkers for their ability to delineate teratoma formation and growth. MRI enabled the detection of teratomas with a volume >8 mm3. A combination of three plasma biomarkers (CEA, AFP, and HCG) was able to detect teratomas with a volume >17 mm3 and with a sensitivity of more than 87%. Based on our findings, a combination of serum biomarkers with MRI screening may offer the highest sensitivity for teratoma detection and tracking. PMID:26777057

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  3. Comparison of transrectal photoacoustic, Doppler, and magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the most popular imaging modality for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer. TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for the histological diagnosis of patients with elevated serum prostatespecific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory due to TRUS's low resolution. As a result, a considerable number of patients are required to undergo an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) can be used to provide microvascular network imaging using hemoglobin as an intrinsic, optical absorption molecule. We developed an original TRUS-type PAI probe consisting of a micro-convex array transducer with an optical illumination system to provide superimposed PAI and ultrasound images. TRUS-type PAI has the advantage of having much higher resolution and greater contrast than does Doppler TRUS. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the transrectal PAI system. We performed a clinical trial to compare the image of the cancerous area obtained by transrectal PAI with that obtained by TRUS Doppler during prostate biopsy. The obtained prostate biopsy cores were stained with anti-CD34 antibodies to provide a microvascular distribution map. We also confirmed its consistency with PAI and pre-biopsy MRI findings. Our study demonstrated that transrectal identification of tumor angiogenesis under superimposed photoacoustic and ultrasound images was easier than that under TRUS alone. We recognized a consistent relationship between PAI and MRI findings in most cases. However, there were no correspondences in some cases.

  4. Sodium-23 magnetic resonance imaging has potential for improving penumbra detection but not for estimating stroke onset time

    PubMed Central

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Gallagher, Lindsay; Mullin, Jim; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Chris; Macrae, I Mhairi; Fagan, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Tissue sodium concentration increases in irreversibly damaged (core) tissue following ischemic stroke and can potentially help to differentiate the core from the adjacent hypoperfused but viable penumbra. To test this, multinuclear hydrogen-1/sodium-23 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure the changing sodium signal and hydrogen-apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the ischemic core and penumbra after rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Penumbra and core were defined from perfusion imaging and histologically defined irreversibly damaged tissue. The sodium signal in the core increased linearly with time, whereas the ADC rapidly decreased by >30% within 20 minutes of stroke onset, with very little change thereafter (0.5–6 hours after MCAO). Previous reports suggest that the time point at which tissue sodium signal starts to rise above normal (onset of elevated tissue sodium, OETS) represents stroke onset time (SOT). However, extrapolating core data back in time resulted in a delay of 72±24 minutes in OETS compared with actual SOT. At the OETS in the core, penumbra sodium signal was significantly decreased (88±6%, P=0.0008), whereas penumbra ADC was not significantly different (92±18%, P=0.2) from contralateral tissue. In conclusion, reduced sodium-MRI signal may serve as a viability marker for penumbra detection and can complement hydrogen ADC and perfusion MRI in the time-independent assessment of tissue fate in acute stroke patients. PMID:25335803

  5. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  6. Semi-Automated Detection of Cerebral Microbleeds in Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Samuel R.S.; Haacke, E. Mark; Ayaz, Muhammad; Boikov, Alexander S.; Kirsch, Wolff; Kido, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMB) are increasingly being recognized as an important biomarker for neurovascular diseases. So far all attempts to count and quantify them have relied on manual methods that are time consuming and can be inconsistent. A technique is presented that semi-automatically identifies CMBs in susceptibility weighted images (SWI). This will both reduce the processing time and increase the consistency over manual methods. This technique relies on a statistical thresholding algorithm to identify hypointensities within the image. A support vector machine (SVM) supervised learning classifier is then used to separate true CMB from other marked hypointensities. The classifier relies on identifying features such as shape and signal intensity to identify true CMBs. The results from the automated section are then subject to manual review to remove false positives. This technique is able to achieve a sensitivity of 81.7% compared to the gold standard of manual review and consensus by multiple reviewers. In subjects with many CMBs this presents a faster alternative to current manual techniques at the cost of some lost sensitivity. PMID:21571479

  7. Ferromagnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Midzor, Melissa; Cross, Michael; Wigen, Philip; Hammel, Chris; Roukes, Michael

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) has been used to investigate magnetostatic waves on microscopic samples of YIG. This work elucidates the nature of scanned probe (local) imaging in ferromagnetically-coupled systems. Scanning was performed with a specially-designed ultrasharp tip with Permalloy (NiFe) deposited solely in the tip region, to yield a spatial sensitivity of <10um. This has provided the first direct imaging of fundamental and higher order magnetostatic modes in micromagnetic systems. The modal dependence upon applied field and sample size was measured and compares well with theoretical models. However, unlike traditional ferromagnetic resonance detection technique, MRFM not only serves as a non-perturbative detection tool of magnetostatic modes, but also can locally change their dispersion relations via the strong field gradients generated from the cantilever tip. As a result, when the tip is positioned closely to the YIG surface, certain modes of the magnetostatic waves are either enhanced or depressed, depending on their respective wavelengths. This corresponds to the fact when the tip is further away, the dispersion of the FMR modes is mainly determined by the sample size. As the tip moves closer to the surface, a new regime emerges where the FMR dispersion is dominated by the local magnetic field. A quantitative model based on DE theory is proposed, and it explains the main features of the observed tip influence on different magnetostatic modes.

  8. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: a tool for in situ detection, imaging and dating of biosignatures in primitive organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourier, D.; Binet, L.; Vezin, H.

    2012-04-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and imaging are based on the interaction of a microwave electromagnetic field (typically in the GHz range) with electron spins in presence of an external magnetic field. Contrary to UV-visible and Infrared light, microwave radiation can penetrate in most non conducting materials, so that EPR is sensitive to the bulk (and not to the surface) of samples. All the paramagnetic defects, impurities, point defects in the mineral matrix, radicals in carbonaceous matter of an ancient rock can be detected by this technique. As the most ancient traces of life, as old as 3.5 Gy, are recorded as carbonaceous microstructures in siliceous sedimentary structures (cherts), the radical defects of these microstructures can be probed in situ without sample preparation. By using continuous-wave EPR, the fossilized carbonaceous matter can be mapped at the sub-millimeter scale (EPR imaging)[1], and can be dated with respect to the host rock (evolution of the EPR lineshape)[2]. Thus this method could be used for contamination detection (endolithic bacteria, infiltration etc…). By using pulsed-EPR spectroscopy (instead of continuous wave), nuclear magnetic transitions of elements in and around radicals can be detected with a high resolution and sensitivity. We show that specific nuclear transitions for hydrogen (1H and 2D) and 13C (and other nuclei such as 29Si and 31P) can be identified in extraterrestrial carbonaceous matter (meteorites) and in Precambrian and younger cherts. These pulsed techniques provide molecular scale biosignatures for primitive life detection and internal probes to study the history of organic matter in the early solar system [3,4]. Paramagnetic biosignatures are not limited to the organic component of cherts. Specific EPR biosignatures of metal ions can be detected in biominerals such as MnO2 [5] or in molecular V4+ complexes [6]. EPR is thus a potential technique for the search of primitive life on Earth and

  9. Reversible hippocampal lesions detected on magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of transient selective amnesia for simple machine operation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yumiko; Bandoh, Mitsuaki; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases involving the development of transient selective retrograde amnesia for simple machine operation lasting for several hours. A 61-year-old male taxi driver suddenly became unable to operate a taximeter, and a 66-year-old female janitor suddenly became unable to use a fax machine. They could precisely recount their episodes to others both during and after the attacks, and their memories during their attacks corresponded to the memory of the witness and the medical records of the doctor, respectively. Therefore, it appears that these individuals remained alert and did not develop anterograde amnesia during their attacks. On day 4, they underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and diffusion-weighted MRI with 2-mm section thickness revealed small high-intensity signal lesions in the left hippocampal cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) region. However, these lesions disappeared during the chronic phase. This is the first report describing lesions detected by MRI in patients with transient selective amnesia without anterograde amnesia. Reversible damage to the hippocampal CA1 region may cause transient selective amnesia by impairing the retrieval of relevant memories. PMID:27367337

  10. More Specific Signal Detection in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging by False Discovery Rate Control for Hierarchically Structured Systems of Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Schildknecht, Konstantin; Tabelow, Karsten; Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Signal detection in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) inherently involves the problem of testing a large number of hypotheses. A popular strategy to address this multiplicity is the control of the false discovery rate (FDR). In this work we consider the case where prior knowledge is available to partition the set of all hypotheses into disjoint subsets or families, e. g., by a-priori knowledge on the functionality of certain regions of interest. If the proportion of true null hypotheses differs between families, this structural information can be used to increase statistical power. We propose a two-stage multiple test procedure which first excludes those families from the analysis for which there is no strong evidence for containing true alternatives. We show control of the family-wise error rate at this first stage of testing. Then, at the second stage, we proceed to test the hypotheses within each non-excluded family and obtain asymptotic control of the FDR within each family at this second stage. Our main mathematical result is that this two-stage strategy implies asymptotic control of the FDR with respect to all hypotheses. In simulations we demonstrate the increased power of this new procedure in comparison with established procedures in situations with highly unbalanced families. Finally, we apply the proposed method to simulated and to real fMRI data. PMID:26914144

  11. More Specific Signal Detection in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging by False Discovery Rate Control for Hierarchically Structured Systems of Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Schildknecht, Konstantin; Tabelow, Karsten; Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Signal detection in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) inherently involves the problem of testing a large number of hypotheses. A popular strategy to address this multiplicity is the control of the false discovery rate (FDR). In this work we consider the case where prior knowledge is available to partition the set of all hypotheses into disjoint subsets or families, e. g., by a-priori knowledge on the functionality of certain regions of interest. If the proportion of true null hypotheses differs between families, this structural information can be used to increase statistical power. We propose a two-stage multiple test procedure which first excludes those families from the analysis for which there is no strong evidence for containing true alternatives. We show control of the family-wise error rate at this first stage of testing. Then, at the second stage, we proceed to test the hypotheses within each non-excluded family and obtain asymptotic control of the FDR within each family at this second stage. Our main mathematical result is that this two-stage strategy implies asymptotic control of the FDR with respect to all hypotheses. In simulations we demonstrate the increased power of this new procedure in comparison with established procedures in situations with highly unbalanced families. Finally, we apply the proposed method to simulated and to real fMRI data.

  12. Development of surface plasmon resonance imaging biosensors for detection of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Sankiewicz, Anna; Laudanski, Piotr; Romanowicz, Lech; Hermanowicz, Adam; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Debek, Wojciech; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a new method for highly selective determination of the ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) concentration using a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) technique and two different biosensors. UCH-L1 was captured from a solution by immobilized specific rabbit monoclonal antibody or specific LDN-57444 inhibitor due to formation of receptor-UCH-L1 complex on the biosensor surface. The analytically useful dynamic response range of both biosensors is between 0.1 and 2.5ng/ml. The detection limit is 0.06ng/ml for the biosensor with antibody and 0.08ng/ml for the biosensor with inhibitor. Biosensors based on both antibody and inhibitor were found to be suitable for quantitative determination of the UCH-L1 and exhibit good tolerance to the potential interferents. Both biosensors gave comparable results in the range of 0 to 0.20ng/ml for plasma samples and 0.30 to 0.49ng/ml for cerebrospinal fluid samples. To validate the new methods, comparative determination of UCH-L1 by the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit was performed. In general, in terms of UCH-L1 concentration, a good correlation between SPRI and ELISA was found. The developed biosensors can be used successfully for the determination of UCH-L1 in body fluids. PMID:25312468

  13. Reversible hippocampal lesions detected on magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of transient selective amnesia for simple machine operation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yumiko; Bandoh, Mitsuaki; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases involving the development of transient selective retrograde amnesia for simple machine operation lasting for several hours. A 61-year-old male taxi driver suddenly became unable to operate a taximeter, and a 66-year-old female janitor suddenly became unable to use a fax machine. They could precisely recount their episodes to others both during and after the attacks, and their memories during their attacks corresponded to the memory of the witness and the medical records of the doctor, respectively. Therefore, it appears that these individuals remained alert and did not develop anterograde amnesia during their attacks. On day 4, they underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and diffusion-weighted MRI with 2-mm section thickness revealed small high-intensity signal lesions in the left hippocampal cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) region. However, these lesions disappeared during the chronic phase. This is the first report describing lesions detected by MRI in patients with transient selective amnesia without anterograde amnesia. Reversible damage to the hippocampal CA1 region may cause transient selective amnesia by impairing the retrieval of relevant memories.

  14. Specific detection of CD133-positive tumor cells with iron oxide nanoparticles labeling using noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Liou, Gunn-Guang; Pan, Huay-Ben; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hung, Yu-Ting; Chou, Chen-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to visualize cells has been applied clinically, showing the potential for monitoring cells in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). USPIO conjugated with anti-CD133 antibodies (USPIO-CD133 Ab) that recognize the CD133 molecule, a cancer stem cell marker in a variety of cancers, was studied as a novel and potent agent for MRI contrast enhancement of tumor cells. Materials and methods Anti-CD133 antibodies were used to conjugate with USPIO via interaction of streptavidin and biotin for in vivo labeling of CD133-positive cells in xenografted tumors and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced brain tumors. The specific binding of USPIO-CD133 Ab to CD133-positive tumor cells was subsequently detected by Prussian blue staining and MRI with T2-weighted, gradient echo and multiple echo recombined gradient echo images. In addition, the cellular toxicity of USPIO-CD133 Ab was determined by analyzing cell proliferation, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species production. Results USPIO-CD133 Ab specifically recognizes in vitro and labels CD133-positive cells, as validated using Prussian blue staining and MRI. The assays of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species production showed no significant differences in tumor cells with or without labeling of USPIO-CD133 Ab. In vivo imaging of CD133-positive cells was demonstrated by intravenous injection of USPIO-CD133 Ab in mice with HT29 xenografted tumors. The MRI of HT29 xenografts showed several clusters of hypotensive regions that correlated with CD133 expression and Prussian blue staining for iron. In rat, brain tumors induced by transplacental ENU mutagenesis, several clusters of hypointensive zones were observed in CD133-expressing brain tumors by MRI and intravenously administered USPIO-CD133 Ab. Conclusion Combination of USPIO-CD133 Ab and MRI is valuable in recognizing CD133-expressing tumor cells in vitro, extracellularly

  15. Scanning ferromagnetic resonance microscopy and resonant heating of magnetite nanoparticles: Demonstration of thermally detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakran, F.; Copty, A.; Golosovsky, M.; Davidov, D.; Monod, P.

    2004-05-01

    We report a 9 GHz microwave scanning probe based on a slit aperture for spatially resolved magnetic resonance detection. We use patterned layers of dispersed magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles and demonstrate low-field ferromagnetic resonance images with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. We also demonstrate localized heating of magnetite nanoparticles via ferromagnetic resonance absorption which can be controlled by an external dc magnetic field. Using our microwave probe as a transmitter and a temperature sensor (thermocouple or infrared detector), we show thermally detected magnetic resonance at room temperature.

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  18. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator.

    PubMed

    Scozzaro, N; Ruchotzke, W; Belding, A; Cardellino, J; Blomberg, E C; McCullian, B A; Bhallamudi, V P; Pelekhov, D V; Hammel, P C

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q∼10(6)[1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300K is 4fN/Hz, indicating a potential low temperature (4K) sensitivity of 25aN/Hz. Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches. PMID:27522542

  19. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, N.; Ruchotzke, W.; Belding, A.; Cardellino, J.; Blomberg, E. C.; McCullian, B. A.; Bhallamudi, V. P.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Hammel, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q ∼106 [1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300 K is 4 fN/√{Hz } , indicating a potential low temperature (4 K) sensitivity of 25 aN/√{Hz } . Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches.

  20. Usefulness of screening cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to detect aortic abnormalities after repair of coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shane F; Trivedi, Mira; Boettner, Bethany; Daniels, Curt J

    2011-01-15

    Guidelines recommend screening cardiovascular magnetic resonance (Sc-CMR) imaging for all patients after coarctation of the aorta repair, although there are limited data verifying its clinical utility. Therefore, we sought to assess the value of Sc-CMR in detecting aortic complications and at-risk abnormalities after coarctation of the aorta repair and to identify significant risk factors. We reviewed 76 patients (mean age 31 ± 10 years), including 40 with symptomatically indicated CMR (Sx-CMR) and 36 with Sc-CMR studies. CMR angiograms were evaluated for aortic abnormalities. Recoarctation was defined as residual narrowing/descending aorta at the diaphragm ≤0.5 (at risk ≤0.75), ascending aorta aneurysm as maximum ascending cross-sectional area/height ≥10 (at risk ≥5), and descending aorta aneurysm as maximum descending diameter/descending aorta at the diaphragm ≥1.5 (at risk ≥1.25). Aortic complications or abnormalities were found in 45 patients (59%). No patient met criteria for recoarctation (at risk 10 Sx-CMR vs 5 Sc-CMR). Significant risk factors included heart failure symptoms and female gender (p <0.05). One patient (Sc-CMR) had ascending aneurysm (at risk 17 Sx-CMR vs 8 Sc-CMR). Time from repair was a significant predictor (p <0.05). There were 10 patients (6 Sx-CMR vs 4 Sc-CMR) with descending aneurysm (at risk 8 Sx-CMR vs 7 Sc-CMR). Cardiovascular symptoms, hypertension, and echocardiogram were not predictive. In conclusion, >50% of patients undergoing Sc-CMR had aortic abnormalities, which was not significantly different from those undergoing Sx-CMR. In particular, Sc-CMR identified descending aorta aneurysms that were not predicted by clinical parameters or echocardiogram.

  1. Comparison of in-office magnetic resonance imaging versus conventional radiography in detecting changes in erosions after one year of infliximab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaylis, Norman B; Needell, Steven D; Rudensky, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare standard hand radiographs with in-office 0.2 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring response to therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were receiving infliximab, to evaluate the frequency and location of erosions, and to determine if there were differences in outcome based on disease duration at baseline. Patients who satisfied the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA and were receiving infliximab therapy were evaluated with a baseline and 1-year follow-up MRI. Magnetic resonance images were interpreted by two blinded, board-certified radiologists. Bone erosions were identified as well-defined defects extending through the cortical margin. The mean age of the 48 patients was 58.5 years. The median infliximab dosage was 4 mg/kg. Baseline data showed that 41 patients had abnormal MRIs. The mean time between the baseline and follow-up MRI examinations was 10.5 months. Follow-up MRI revealed regression in 11 patients. Thirty-one patients had both MRIs and radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging was approximately twice as sensitive as radiography in detecting erosions at baseline. In-office MRI was useful in monitoring disease response after the initiation of infliximab treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a very valuable diagnostic tool and prognostic indicator for use in patients with RA. PMID:17694258

  2. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Image-Guided Biopsy to Detect Seminal Vesicle Invasion by Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raskolnikov, Dima; George, Arvin K.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; Shakir, Nabeel A.; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Rothwax, Jason T.; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Su, Daniel; Stamatakis, Lambros; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between multiparametric prostate MRI (MP-MRI) suspicion for seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) by prostate cancer (PCa) and pathology on MRI/ultrasound (US) fusion-guided biopsy. Patients and Methods: From March 2007 to June 2013, 822 patients underwent MP-MRI at 3 Tesla and MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy. Of these, 25 patients underwent targeted biopsy of the seminal vesicles (SVs). In six patients, bilateral SVI was suspected, resulting in 31 samples. MP-MRI findings that triggered these SV biopsies were scored as low, moderate, or high suspicion for SVI based on the degree of involvement on MRI. Correlative prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) pathology were reviewed by a single genitourinary pathologist. Results: At the time of MP-MRI, the median age was 64 years with a median prostate-specific antigen of 10.74 ng/mL. Of the 31 SV lesions identified, MP-MRI suspicion scores of low, moderate, and high were assigned to 3, 19, and 9 lesions, respectively. MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy detected SVI in 20/31 (65%) of cases. For the four patients who underwent RP after a preoperative assessment of SVI, biopsy pathology and RP pathology were concordant in all cases. Conclusions: As this technology becomes more available, MP-MRI and MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy may play a role in the preoperative staging for PCa. Future work will determine if improved preoperative staging leads to better surgical outcomes. PMID:25010361

  3. Submarine UXO Detection Using Resonance Scattering Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, R.; Korneev, V. A.; Johnson, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    Resonance scattered waves from a dataset collected in a pond setting were utilized to detect and characterize unexploded ordnance (UXO) located proud off the bottom sediments. Furthermore, it was investigated whether UXO can be characterized by their size and filler velocities and whether medium velocities can be derived from the field data. Analysis of the field data was supported by numerical modeling. It was found that resonance scattered waves were present in all numerical data and in the field cases of a proud sphere and a buried cylinder. In all other cases of proud UXO the field data revealed frequency dependent scattered waves that were part of the direct reflected waves. Imaging UXO with monochromatic data produces surprisingly good results considering that in most investigated cases a small fraction of the data with very low amplitudes were used in comparison to data typically used for Kirchhoff migration or SAS imaging. The images derived from resonance scattered waves were generated by data obtained from narrow passbands throughout the whole frequency spectrum such that different parts of the UXO can be illumination separately. Range resolution is reduced when imaging is done with monochromatic signals. However, the image resolution can be dramatically improved by adding data from different azimuth as was demonstrated for the cases of a proud sphere and bomb. A suite of results ranging from numerical calculations to field data will be presented to show how the properties of resonance scattering can be utilized to detect, locate and characterize an UXO in littoral environments.

  4. A cerium oxide nanoparticle-based device for the detection of chronic inflammation via optical and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Santra, Santimukul; Asati, Atul; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Monitoring of microenvironmental parameters is critical in healthcare and disease management. Harnessing the antioxidant activity of nanoceria and the imaging capabilities of iron oxide nanoparticles in a device setup, we were able to image changes in the device's aqueous milieu. The device was able to convey and process changes in the microenvironment's pH and reactive oxygen species' concentration, distinguishing physiological from abnormal levels. As a result under physiological and transient inflammatory conditions, the device's fluorescence and magnetic resonance signals, emanating from multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, were similar. However, under chronic inflammatory conditions that are usually associated with high local concentrations of reactive oxygen species and pH decrease, the device's output was considerably different. Specifically, the device's fluorescence emission significantly decreased, while the magnetic resonance signal T2 increased. Further studies identified that the changes in the device's output are attributed to inactivation of the sensing component's nanoceria that prevents it from successfully scavenging the generated free radicals. Interestingly, the buildup of free radical excess led to polymerization of the iron oxide nanoparticle's coating, with concomitant formation of micron size aggregates. Our studies indicate that a nanoceria-based device can be utilized for the monitoring of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, having important applications in the management of numerous ailments while eliminating nanoparticle toxicity issues.Monitoring of microenvironmental parameters is critical in healthcare and disease management. Harnessing the antioxidant activity of nanoceria and the imaging capabilities of iron oxide nanoparticles in a device setup, we were able to image changes in the device's aqueous milieu. The device was able to convey and process changes in the microenvironment's pH and reactive oxygen species' concentration

  5. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  6. HiSStology: High Spectral and Spatial Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Vasculature Validated by Histology and Micro–Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Chad R.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Foxley, Sean; Zamora, Marta A.; Mustafi, Devkumar; Tretiakova, Maria; Li, Shihong; Fan, Xiaobing; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    High spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) data, acquired with echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI), can be used to acquire water spectra from each small image voxel. These images are sensitive to changes in local susceptibility caused by superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO); therefore, we hypothesized that images derived from HiSS data are very sensitive to tumor neovasculature following injection of SPIO. Accurate image registration was used to validate HiSS detection of neovasculature with histology and micro–computed tomographic (microCT) angiography. Athymic nude mice and Copenhagen rats were inoculated with Dunning AT6.1 prostate tumor cells in the right hind limb. The tumor region was imaged pre– and post–intravenous injection of SPIO. Three-dimensional assemblies of the CD31-stained histologic slices of the mouse legs and the microCT images of the rat vascular casts were registered with EPSI. The average distance between HiSS-predicted regions of high vascular density on magnetic resonance imaging and CD31-stained regions on histology was 200 µm. Similarly, vessels identified by HiSS in the rat images coincided with vasculature in the registered microCT image. The data demonstrate a strong correlation between tumor vasculature identified using HiSS and two gold standards: histology and microCT angiography. PMID:21443840

  7. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  9. Case report of a ureteral obstruction by Candida albicans fungus balls detected by magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Arichi, Naoko; Yasumoto, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Kohei; Nagami, Taichi; Anjiki, Haruki; Nakamura, Shigenobu; Mitsui, Yozo; Hiraoka, Takeo; Sumura, Masahiro; Shiina, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    In kidney transplant recipients, acute renal failure resulting from a ureteral obstruction by fungus balls is uncommon. We report a 60-year-old man diagnosed with ureteral obstruction caused by Candida albicans fungus balls early after transplant. Diagnosis was made by a T2-weighted magnetic resonance image, which demonstrated fungus balls as a low-intensity mass in the pelvis and microscopic examination findings in the urine. The patient was treated successfully with an antifungal agent and direct irrigation. It should be noted that fungus balls may cause ureteral obstruction of transplanted kidneys, possibly resulting in graft failure. Imaging of the kidneys and collecting system and aggressive debridement that adds to systemic therapy are necessary for early diagnosis and are central to a successful outcome.

  10. In vivo detection of copper ions by magnetic resonance imaging using a prion-based contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Makino, Satoshi; Umemoto, Tomohiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yezdimer, Eric M; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Abnormal distributions of transition metals inside the body are potential diagnostic markers for several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, and cancer. In this article, we demonstrate that P57/Gd, a novel prion-based contrast agent, can selectively image tissues with excessive copper accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). P57/Gd selectivity binds copper(II) over other physiologically relevant cations such as zinc, iron, manganese, and calcium. To simulate a metabolic copper disorder, we treated mice with an intraperitoneal injection of a CuSO(4) solution to induce a renal copper overload. The MRI signal intensities from the renal cortex and medulla of copper spiked animals that were administered P57/Gd were found to correlate with the ex vivo copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  12. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter <100 nm. These nanoparticles were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their structure and chemistry were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Cur-MNPs exhibited no cytotoxicity in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). The Papp of Cur-MNPs was 1.03 × 10(-6) cm/s in an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Amyloid plaques could be visualized in ex vivo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI.

  13. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter <100 nm. These nanoparticles were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their structure and chemistry were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Cur-MNPs exhibited no cytotoxicity in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). The Papp of Cur-MNPs was 1.03 × 10(-6) cm/s in an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Amyloid plaques could be visualized in ex vivo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI. PMID:25617135

  14. Increased microcirculation detected by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is of prognostic significance in asymptomatic myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hillengass, Jens; Ritsch, Judith; Merz, Maximilian; Wagner, Barbara; Kunz, Christina; Hielscher, Thomas; Laue, Hendrik; Bäuerle, Tobias; Zechmann, Christian M; Ho, Anthony D; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Moehler, Thomas M; Delorme, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) as a non-invasive imaging technique delivering the quantitative parameters amplitude A (reflecting blood volume) and exchange rate constant kep (reflecting vascular permeability) in patients with asymptomatic monoclonal plasma cell diseases. We analysed DCE-MRI parameters in 33 healthy controls and 148 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or smouldering multiple myeloma (SMM) according to the 2003 IMWG guidelines. All individuals underwent standardized DCE-MRI of the lumbar spine. Regions of interest were drawn manually on T1-weighted images encompassing the bone marrow of each of the 5 lumbar vertebrae sparing the vertebral vessel. Prognostic significance for median of amplitude A (univariate: P < 0·001, hazard ratio (HR) 2·42, multivariate P = 0·02, HR 2·7) and exchange rate constant kep (univariate P = 0·03, HR 1·92, multivariate P = 0·46, HR 1·5) for time to progression of 79 patients with SMM was found. Patients with amplitude A above the optimal cut-off point of 0·89 arbitrary units had a 2-year progression rate into symptomatic disease of 80%. In conclusion, DCE-MRI parameters are of prognostic significance for time to progression in patients with SMM but not in individuals with MGUS. PMID:26991959

  15. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Xie, Qiuping; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Jin; Zhai, Chuanxin; Yang, Deren; Jiang, Biao; Wu, Yulian

    2009-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet β-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into β-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  16. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  17. Explosives detection with quadrupole resonance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Thorson, Benjamin D.; Beevor, Simon; West, Rebecca; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1997-02-01

    The increase in international terrorist activity over the past decade has necessitated the exploration of new technologies for the detection of plastic explosives. Quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA) has proven effective as a technique for detecting the presence of plastic, sheet, and military explosive compounds in small quantities, and can also be used to identify narcotics such as heroin and cocaine base. QRA is similar to the widely used magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, but has the considerable advantage that the item being inspected does not need to be immersed in a steady, homogeneous magnetic field. The target compounds are conclusively identified by their unique quadrupole resonance frequencies. Quantum magnetics has develop and introduced a product line of explosives and narcotics detection devices based upon QRA technology. The work presented here concerns a multi-compound QRA detection system designed to screen checked baggage, cargo, and sacks of mail at airports and other high-security facilities. The design philosophy and performance are discussed and supported by test results from field trials conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. This detection system represents the current state of QRA technology for field use in both commercial and government sectors.

  18. Three-dimensional morphological and signal intensity features for detection of intervertebral disc degeneration from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, A; Fripp, J; Engstrom, C; Walker, D; Weber, M-A; Schwarz, R; Crozier, S

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Advances in MRI hardware and sequences are continually increasing the amount and complexity of data such as those generated in high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) scanning of the spine. Efficient informatics tools offer considerable opportunities for research and clinically based analyses of magnetic resonance studies. In this work, we present and validate a suite of informatics tools for automated detection of degenerative changes in lumbar intervertebral discs (IVD) from both 3D isotropic and routine two-dimensional (2D) clinical T2-weighted MRI. Materials and methods An automated segmentation approach was used to extract morphological (traditional 2D radiological measures and novel 3D shape descriptors) and signal appearance (extracted from signal intensity histograms) features. The features were validated against manual reference, compared between 2D and 3D MRI scans and used for quantification and classification of IVD degeneration across magnetic resonance datasets containing IVD with early and advanced stages of degeneration. Results and conclusions Combination of the novel 3D-based shape and signal intensity features on 3D (area under receiver operating curve (AUC) 0.984) and 2D (AUC 0.988) magnetic resonance data deliver a significant improvement in automated classification of IVD degeneration, compared to the combination of previously used 2D radiological measurement and signal intensity features (AUC 0.976 and 0.983, respectively). Further work is required regarding the usefulness of 2D and 3D shape data in relation to clinical scores of lower back pain. The results reveal the potential of the proposed informatics system for computer-aided IVD diagnosis from MRI in large-scale research studies and as a possible adjunct for clinical diagnosis. PMID:23813538

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations.

  1. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression and resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included conjugation of 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate to polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM−1s−1. GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor bearing mice 2 h post-injection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24044414

  2. Biodegradable human serum albumin nanoparticles as contrast agents for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Watcharin, Waralee; Schmithals, Christian; Pleli, Thomas; Köberle, Verena; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Huebner, Frank; Zeuzem, Stefan; Korf, Hans W; Vogl, Thomas J; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Terfort, Andreas; Piiper, Albrecht; Gelperina, Svetlana; Kreuter, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 235±19nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in endourology.

    PubMed

    Chan, A J; Prasad, P V; Saltzman, B

    2001-02-01

    Historically, the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endourology has been limited. The availability of faster and stronger gradient systems has given rise to a number of data acquisition strategies that have significantly broadened the scope of MRI applications. These methods have led to the evaluation of anatomy and function using a single modality, and we describe our experience with MRI for comprehensive evaluation of the obstructed ureteropelvic junction. We also utilize these new imaging sequences in the investigation of alterated renal hemodynamics after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and present our preliminary data on the application of MR perfusion imaging as a noninvasive technique for the evaluation of renal blood flow.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of the murine brain response to light: Temporal differentiation and negative functional MRI changes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei ||; Palyka, I. |; Li, HaiFang

    1996-06-11

    Using a 9.4 T MRI instrument, we have obtained images of the mouse brain response to photic stimulation during a period between deep anesthesia and the early stages of arousal. The large image enhancements we observe (often >30%) are consistent with literature results extrapolated to 9.4 T. However, there are also two unusual aspects to our findings. (i) The visual area of the brain responds only to changes in stimulus intensity, suggesting that we directly detect operations of the M visual system pathway. Such a channel has been observed in mice by invasive electrophysiology, and described in detail for primates. (ii) Along with the typical positive response in the area of the occipital portion of the brain containing the visual cortex; another area displays decreased signal intensity upon stimulation. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  6. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  7. Flaw detection in multi-layer, multi-material composites by resonance imaging: Utilizing Air-coupled Ultrasonics and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Ceramic tiles are the main ingredient of a multi-material, multi-layered composite being considered for the modernization of tank armors. The high stiffness, low attenuation, and precise dimensions of these uniform tiles make them remarkable resonators when driven to vibrate. Defects in the tile, during manufacture or after usage, are expected to change the resonance frequencies and resonance images of the tile. The comparison of the resonance frequencies and resonance images of a pristine tile/lay-up to a defective tile/lay-up will thus be a quantitative damage metric. By examining the vibrational behavior of these tiles and the composite lay-up with Finite Element Modeling and analytical plate vibration equations, the development of a new Nondestructive Evaluation technique is possible. This study examines the development of the Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Resonance Imaging technique as applied to a hexagonal ceramic tile and a multi-material, multi-layered composite.

  8. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  9. Imaging of Surfaces by Concurrent Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Yager, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon induced fluorescent are sensitive tools for surface analysis. However, existing instruments in this area have provided limited capability for concurrent detection, and may be large and expensive. We demonstrate a highly cost-effective system capable of concurrent surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF) imaging, allowing for simultaneous monitoring of reflectivity and fluorescence from discrete spatial regions. The instrument allows for high performance imaging and quantitative measurements with surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon induced fluorescence, with inexpensive off-the-shelf components. PMID:20360841

  10. Detection of vulnerable atherosclerosis plaques with a dual-modal single-photon-emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging probe targeting apoptotic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Chunfu; Tan, Hui; Wang, Cong; Pang, Lifang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), especially the vulnerable AS plaque rupture-induced acute obstructive vascular disease, is a leading cause of death. Accordingly, there is a need for an effective method to draw accurate predictions about AS progression and plaque vulnerability. Herein we report on an approach to constructing a hybrid nanoparticle system using a single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) multimodal probe, aiming for a comprehensive evaluation of AS progression by achieving high sensitivity along with high resolution. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) was covered by aminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxylated PEG simultaneously and then functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentacetate acid for (99m)Tc coordination and subsequently Annexin V for targeting apoptotic macrophages abundant in vulnerable plaques. The in vivo accumulations of imaging probe reflected by SPECT and MRI were consistent and accurate in highlighting lesions. Intense radioactive signals detected by SPECT facilitated focus recognization and quantification, while USPIO-based T2-weighted MRI improved the focal localization and volumetry of AS plaques. For subsequent ex vivo planar images, targeting effects were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, including CD-68 and TUNEL staining; meanwhile, the degree of concentration was proven to be statistically correlated with the Oil Red O staining results. In conclusion, these results indicated that the Annexin V-modified hybrid nanoparticle system specifically targeted the vulnerable AS plaques containing apoptotic macrophages and could be of great value in the invasively accurate detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:25569777

  11. Imaging by electromagnetic induction with resonant circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, Roberta; Watson, Joseph C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-05-01

    A new electromagnetic induction imaging system is presented which is capable of imaging metallic samples of different conductivities. The system is based on a parallel LCR circuit made up of a cylindrical ferrite-cored coil and a capacitor bank. An AC current is applied to the coil, thus generating an AC magnetic field. This field is modified when a conductive sample is placed within the magnetic field, as a consequence of eddy current induction inside the sample. The electrical properties of the LCR circuit, including the coil inductance, are modified due to the presence of this metallic sample. Position-resolved measurements of these modifications should then allow imaging of conductive objects as well as enable their characterization. A proof-of-principle system is presented in this paper. Two imaging techniques based on Q-factor and resonant frequency measurements are presented. Both techniques produced conductivity maps of 14 metallic objects with different geometries and values of conductivity ranging from 0.54х106 to 59.77х106 S/m. Experimental results highlighted a higher sensitivity for the Q-factor technique compared to the resonant frequency one; the respective measurements were found to vary within the following ranges: ΔQ=[-11,-2]%, Δf=[-0.3,0.7]%. The analysis of the images, conducted using a Canny edge detection algorithm, demonstrated the suitability of the Q-factor technique for accurate edge detection of both magnetic and non-magnetic metallic samples.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance imaging on a microchip for detection of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles deposited onto the surface in a non-cross-linking configuration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasunobu; Sato, Kae; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Maeda, Mizuo

    2006-08-01

    Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with fully matched duplexes on their surfaces are selectively deposited onto walls of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels at high salt concentrations. In this study, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique was applied to monitor this phenomenon for improvement of detection sensitivity and elucidation of the phenomenon. The microchip was fabricated by bonding a surface-patterned PDMS plate and a gold thin film-deposited glass substrate. Probe oligonucleotide-modified GNPs were hybridized with target oligonucleotides to make fully matched or single-base-mismatched duplexes. The hybridized GNP solution was mixed with an NaCl solution in a Y-shaped microchannel. The deposition of the GNPs onto the gold sensor surface was detected by SPR imaging. Discrimination of the targets was possible with limit of detection of 32 nM (19 fmol) without temperature control in 5 min. Detailed analysis indicated that a seed layer of GNPs was initially adsorbed onto the sensor surface regardless of the target sequence. Therefore, in combination with a portable SPR device, the proposed method is promising for point-of-care testing of single-nucleotide polymorphsims.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  14. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  15. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  16. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  17. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  18. Comparison of surface plasmon resonance imaging and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against iridovirus in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    PubMed

    Cho, Ho Seong; Kim, Tae Jung

    2007-07-01

    A protein chip based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) was developed for detecting fish iridovirus antibody using a recombinant 50-kDa fragment of major capsid protein (MCP) as an antigen. The diagnostic potential of SPRI for measuring antibodies to the iridovirus MCP was compared with that of a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using 40 juvenile rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) serum samples in a nursery. There was a strong positive correlation between the SPRI and ELISA (n = 40, r = 0.939, P < 0.01). Therefore, this recombinant 50-kDa MCP can be used as an antigen for serological studies, and the SPRI, which is a label-free and high-throughput method, is potentially a valuable tool in the serodiagnosis of an iridoviral infection. PMID:17609354

  19. Bcl-2-functionalized ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with amphiphilic polymer enhance the labeling efficiency of islets for detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Cai, Haolei; Qin, Wenjie; Zhang, Bo; Zhai, Chuanxin; Jiang, Biao; Wu, Yulian

    2013-01-01

    Based on their versatile, biocompatible properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) or ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are utilized for detecting and tracing cells or tumors in vivo. Here, we developed an innoxious and concise synthesis approach for a novel B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 monoclonal antibody-functionalized USPIO nanoparticle coated with an amphiphilic polymer (carboxylated polyethylene glycol monooleyl ether [OE-PEG-COOH]). These nanoparticles can be effectively internalized by beta cells and label primary islet cells, at relatively low iron concentration. The biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these products were investigated by comparison with the commercial USPIO product, FeraSpin™ S. We also assessed the safe dosage range of the product. Although some cases showed a hypointensity change at the site of transplant, a strong magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was detectable by a clinical MRI scanner, at field strength of 3.0 Tesla, in vivo, and the iron deposition/attached in islets was confirmed by Prussian blue and immunohistochemistry staining. It is noteworthy that based on our synthesis approach, in future, we could exchange the Bcl-2 with other probes that would be more specific for the targeted cells and that would have better labeling specificity in vivo. The combined results point to the promising potential of the novel Bcl-2-functionalized PEG-USPIO as a molecular imaging agent for in vivo monitoring of islet cells or other cells. PMID:24204136

  20. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions.

  1. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  2. Detection of prostate cancer by integration of line-scan diffusion, T2-mapping and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; a multichannel statistical classifier.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ian; Wells, William; Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven; Zhang, Jianqing; Zou, Kelly H; Maier, Stephan E; Tempany, Clare M C

    2003-09-01

    A multichannel statistical classifier for detecting prostate cancer was developed and validated by combining information from three different magnetic resonance (MR) methodologies: T2-weighted, T2-mapping, and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI). From these MR sequences, four different sets of image intensities were obtained: T2-weighted (T2W) from T2-weighted imaging, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) from LSDI, and proton density (PD) and T2 (T2 Map) from T2-mapping imaging. Manually segmented tumor labels from a radiologist, which were validated by biopsy results, served as tumor "ground truth." Textural features were extracted from the images using co-occurrence matrix (CM) and discrete cosine transform (DCT). Anatomical location of voxels was described by a cylindrical coordinate system. A statistical jack-knife approach was used to evaluate our classifiers. Single-channel maximum likelihood (ML) classifiers were based on 1 of the 4 basic image intensities. Our multichannel classifiers: support vector machine (SVM) and Fisher linear discriminant (FLD), utilized five different sets of derived features. Each classifier generated a summary statistical map that indicated tumor likelihood in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate gland. To assess classifier accuracy, the average areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves over all subjects were compared. Our best FLD classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.839(+/-0.064), and our best SVM classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.761(+/-0.043). The T2W ML classifier, our best single-channel classifier, only achieved an average ROC area of 0.599(+/-0.146). Compared to the best single-channel ML classifier, our best multichannel FLD and SVM classifiers have statistically superior ROC performance (P=0.0003 and 0.0017, respectively) from pairwise two-sided t-test. By integrating the information from multiple images and capturing the textural and anatomical features in tumor areas, summary

  3. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient's body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients' bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

  4. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  5. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge. PMID:18266413

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  7. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  8. Foundations of advanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E; Glover, Gary H

    2005-04-01

    During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now-within a few minutes-acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths.

  9. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Bodne, D; Quinn, S F; Murray, W T; Bolton, T; Rudd, S; Lewis, K; Daines, P; Bishop, J; Cochran, C

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included "jumper's knee" and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation.

  10. Multifunctional Magnetic Gd(3+) -Based Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles: Combination of Magnetic Resonance and Multispectral Optoacoustic Detections for Tumor-Targeted Imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Liu, Jing; Yu, Meng; Wan, Jiaxun; Li, Dian; Wang, Changchun; Chen, Chunying; Guo, Jia

    2015-11-11

    To overcome traditional barriers in optical imaging and microscopy, optoacoustic-imaging has been changed to combine the accuracy of spectroscopy with the depth resolution of ultrasound, achieving a novel modality with powerful in vivo imaging. However, magnetic resonance imaging provides better spatial and anatomical resolution. Thus, a single hybrid nanoprobe that allows for simultaneous multimodal imaging is significant not only for cutting edge research in imaging science, but also for accurate clinical diagnosis. A core-shell-structured coordination polymer composite microsphere has been designed for in vivo multimodality imaging. It consists of a Fe3 O4 nanocluster core, a carbon sandwiched layer, and a carbocyanine-Gd(III) (Cy-Gd(III) ) coordination polymer outer shell (Fe3 O4 @C@Cy-Gd(III) ). Folic acid-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) chains are embedded within the coordination polymer shell to achieve extended circulation and targeted delivery of probe particles in vivo. Control of Fe3 O4 core grain sizes results in optimal r2 relaxivity (224.5 × 10(-3) m(-1) s(-1) ) for T2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cy-Gd(III) coordination polymers are also regulated to obtain a maximum 25.1% of Cy ligands and 5.2% of Gd(III) ions for near-infrared fluorescence and T1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The results demonstrate their impressive abilities for targeted, multimodal, and reliable imaging.

  11. Role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of post-operative residual breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yili; Du, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of postoperative residual breast cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 10 patients who were diagnosed with non-malignant breast lesions by preoperative clinical, ultrasound and mammography examinations and intraoperative frozen-section pathology. These patients were finally confirmed as having malignant breast lesions by paraffin-embedded tissue histology and corresponding received second surgeries. Routine MRI, enhancement MRI and echo-planar imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging were performed on the 10 patients within 1 month after the first surgery. All the cases showed a local distortion of mammary architecture revealed by routine MRI and enhancement MRI images. The enhancement characteristics of the 10 cases were as follows: 3 cases featured stippled enhancement, 2 had small nodular enhancement, 1 showed dendritic enhancement, 1 had a ring-shaped enhancement of the cystic wall and 3 had no abnormal enhancement. The lesions of 7 cases had a type-I enhancement curve (progressive enhancement pattern) and 3 cases had a type-II curve (plateau pattern). The lesions of 4 cases had a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. In total, 4 cases of tumor residue were diagnosed by MRI and the second pathological examination, while in 1 case the tumor residue was misdiagnosed by MRI but confirmed by the second pathological examination. In conclusion, the present study suggested that short-term follow-up MRI may be of value in the diagnosis of postoperative residual breast tumors and may be helpful for surgeons to develop an accurate surgical plan. PMID:27446586

  12. Early Detection of Ventilation-Induced Brain Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: An In Vivo Study in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Skiöld, Béatrice; Wu, Qizhu; Hooper, Stuart B.; Davis, Peter G.; McIntyre, Richard; Tolcos, Mary; Pearson, James; Vreys, Ruth; Egan, Gary F.; Barton, Samantha K.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Polglase, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim High tidal volume (VT) ventilation during resuscitation of preterm lambs results in brain injury evident histologically within hours after birth. We aimed to investigate whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be used for early in vivo detection of ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs. Methods Newborn lambs (0.85 gestation) were stabilized with a “protective ventilation” strategy (PROT, n = 7: prophylactic Curosurf, sustained inflation, VT 7 mL/kg, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) 5 cmH2O) or an initial 15 minutes of “injurious ventilation” (INJ, n = 10: VT 12 mL/kg, no PEEP, late Curosurf) followed by PROT ventilation for the remainder of the experiment. At 1 hour, lambs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (Siemens, 3 Tesla). For measures of mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), 30 direction DTI was performed. Regions of interests encompassed the thalamus, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and the cerebellar vermis. MRS was performed using a localized single-voxel (15×15×20 mm3, echo time 270 ms) encompassing suptratentorial deep nuclear grey matter and central white matter. Peak-area ratios for lactate (Lac) relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) were calculated. Groups were compared using 2-way RM-ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlations. Results No cerebral injury was seen on structural MR images. Lambs in the INJ group had higher mean FA and lower mean RD in the thalamus compared to PROT lambs, but not in the other regions of interest. Peak-area lactate ratios >1.0 was only seen in INJ lambs. A trend of higher mean peak-area ratios for Lac/Cr and Lac/Cho was seen, which correlated with lower pH in both groups. Conclusion Acute changes in brain diffusion measures and metabolite peak-area ratios were observed after injurious ventilation. Early MRS/DTI is

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  14. A new magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent loaded into poly(lacide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for long-term detection of tumors.

    PubMed

    Rigaux, G; Roullin, V G; Cadiou, C; Portefaix, C; Van Gulick, L; Bœuf, G; Andry, M C; Hoeffel, C; Vander Elst, L; Laurent, S; Muller, R; Molinari, M; Chuburu, F

    2014-11-01

    The incorporation of a lipophilic Gd chelate (GdDO3A-C12) in biocompatible PLGA poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles was explored as an approach to increase the relaxivity of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. By nanoprecipitation, it was possible to obtain PEGylated gadolinium nanoparticles (mean diameter of 155 nm) with high Gd loading (1.1 × 10(4) Gd centers per nanoparticle). The corresponding GdDO3AC12 ⊂ NPs nanoparticles exhibited an enhanced relaxivity (up to sixfold greater than DOTAREM® at 40 MHz) because the nanoparticle framework constrained the lipophilic Gd chelate motion and favorably impacted the Gd chelate rotational correlation time. T1-weighted imaging at 3 T on phantoms showed enhanced contrast for the GdDO3AC12 ⊂ NPs. Importantly, Gd chelate leakage was almost nonexistent, which suggested that these GdDO3AC12 ⊂ NPs could be useful for long-term MRI detection.

  15. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  16. Factors predicting aggressiveness of non-hypervascular hepatic nodules detected on hepatobiliary phase of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Takano, Toru; Suda, Takeshi; Akazawa, Kouhei; Yokoo, Takeshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kamimura, Kenya; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Takamura, Masaaki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Nomoto, Minoru; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish a prognostic formula that distinguishes non-hypervascular hepatic nodules (NHNs) with higher aggressiveness from less hazardous one. METHODS: Seventy-three NHNs were detected in gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI) study and confirmed to change 2 mm or more in size and/or to gain hypervascularity. All images were interpreted independently by an experienced, board-certified abdominal radiologist and hepatologist; both knew that the patients were at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma development but were blinded to the clinical information. A formula predicting NHN destiny was developed using a generalized estimating equation model with thirteen explanatory variables: age, gender, background liver diseases, Child-Pugh class, NHN diameter, T1-weighted imaging/T2-weighted imaging detectability, fat deposition, lower signal intensity in arterial phase, lower signal intensity in equilibrium phase, α-fetoprotein, des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, α-fetoprotein-L3, and coexistence of classical hepatocellular carcinoma. The accuracy of the formula was validated in bootstrap samples that were created by resampling of 1000 iterations. RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 504 d, 73 NHNs with a median diameter of 9 mm (interquartile range: 8-12 mm) grew or shrank by 68.5% (fifty nodules) or 20.5% (fifteen nodules), respectively, whereas hypervascularity developed in 38.4% (twenty eight nodules). In the fifteen shrank nodules, twelve nodules disappeared, while 11.0% (eight nodules) were stable in size but acquired vascularity. A generalized estimating equation analysis selected five explanatories from the thirteen variables as significant factors to predict NHN progression. The estimated regression coefficients were 0.36 for age, 6.51 for lower signal intensity in arterial phase, 8.70 or 6.03 for positivity of hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, 9.37 for des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, and

  17. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  18. Impact of low signal intensity assessed by cine magnetic resonance imaging on detection of poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Orii, Makoto; Hirata, Kumiko; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-05-13

    Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) has been established as a modality to detect myocardial infarction (MI). However, the use of gadolinium contrast is limited in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. Although the signal intensity (SI) of infarct area assessed by cine MRI is low in some patients with prior MI, the prevalence and clinical significance of low SI has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how low SI assessed by cine MRI may relate to the myocardial viability in patients with prior MI. Fifty patients with prior MI underwent both cine MRI and LGE-MRI. The left ventricle was divided into 17 segments. The presence of low SI and the wall motion score (WMS) of each segment were assessed by cine MRI. The transmural extent of infarction was evaluated by LGE-MRI. LGE was detected in 329 of all 850 segments (39%). The low SI assessed by cine MRI was detected in 105 of 329 segments with LGE (32%). All segments with low SI had LGE. Of all 329 segments with LGE, the segments with low SI showed greater transmural extent of infarction (78 [72 - 84] % versus 53 [38 - 72] %, P < 0.01), thinner wall (4.0[3.1 - 4.8] mm versus 6.5 [5.2 - 8.1] mm, P < 0.01), and higher WMS (4.0 [4.0 - 4.0] versus 2.0 [2.0 - 3.0], P < 0.01). The low SI assessed by cine MRI may be effective for detecting poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior MI.

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate, Including Pre- and Postinterventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pritesh; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-09-01

    This article systematically reviews the rationale for magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer, in detection and following various treatment methods. A basic discussion of the identification of prostate cancer is imperative to understand postintervention imaging. Each available therapy, including surgery, radiation, hormone therapy, and focal therapies will be discussed along with associated imaging findings, providing the reader with a better understanding of current interventions in prostate cancer and imaging. PMID:27582606

  1. Differential detection of impact site versus rotational site injury by magnetic resonance imaging and microglial morphology in an unrestrained mild closed head injury model

    PubMed Central

    Grinberg, Yelena Y.; Obenaus, Andre; Carson, Monica J.

    2016-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of all traumatic brain injuries are mild and do not cause readily visible abnormalities on routine medical imaging making it difficult to predict which individuals will develop unwanted clinical sequelae. Microglia are brain-resident macrophages and early responders to brain insults. Their activation is associated with changes in morphology or expression of phenotypic markers including P2Y12 and major histocompatibility complex class II. Using a murine model of unrestrained mild closed head injury (mCHI), we used microglia as reporters of acute brain injury at sites of impact versus sites experiencing rotational stress 24 h post-mCHI. Consistent with mild injury, a modest 20% reduction in P2Y12 expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis but only in the impacted region of the cortex. Furthermore, neither an influx of blood-derived immune cells nor changes in microglial expression of CD45, TREM1, TREM2, major histocompatibility complex class II or CD40 were detected. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), small reductions in T2 weighted values were observed but only near the area of impact and without overt tissue damage (blood deposition, edema). Microglial morphology was quantified without cryosectioning artifacts using ScaleA2 clarified brains from CX3CR1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice. The cortex rostral to the mCHI impact site receives greater rotational stress but neither MRI nor molecular markers of microglial activation showed significant changes from shams in this region. However, microglia in this rostral region did display signs of morphologic activation equivalent to that observed in severe CHI. Thus, mCHI-triggered rotational stress is sufficient to cause injuries undetectable by routine MRI that could result in altered microglial surveillance of brain homeostasis. PMID:26806371

  2. Detection of Left Ventricular Regional Dysfunction and Myocardial Abnormalities Using Complementary Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis without Cardiac Symptoms: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Hitomi; T Giles, Jon; Yokoe, Isamu; Hirano, Masaharu; Nakajima, Yasuo; Takei, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to detect the presence of left ventricular regional dysfunction and myocardial abnormalities in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without cardiac symptoms using a complementary cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging approach. Methods Consecutive patients with SSc without cardiac symptoms and healthy controls underwent CMR on a 1.5 T scanner. The peak systolic regional function in the circumferential and radial strain (Ecc, % and Err, %) were calculated using a feature tracking analysis on the mid-left ventricular slices obtained with cine MRI. In addition, we investigated the myocardial characteristics by contrast MRI. Pharmacological stress and rest perfusion scans were performed to assess perfusion defect (PD) due to micro- or macrovascular impairment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were obtained for the assessment of myocarditis and/or fibrosis. Results We compared 15 SSc patients with 10 healthy controls. No statistically significant differences were observed in the baseline characteristics between the patients and healthy controls. The mean peak Err and Ecc of all segments was significantly lower in the patients than the controls (p=0.011 and p=0.003, respectively). Four patients with LGE (28.6%) and seven patients with PD (50.0%) were observed. PD was significantly associated with digital ulcers (p=0.005). Utilizing a linear regression model, the presence of myocardial LGE was significantly associated with the peak Ecc (p=0.024). After adjusting for age, the association between myocardial LGE and the peak Ecc was strengthened. Conclusion A subclinical myocardial involvement, as detected by CMR, was prevalent in the SSc patients without cardiac symptoms. Regional dysfunction might predict the myocardial abnormalities observed in SSc patients without cardiac symptoms.

  3. Automatic detection of local arterial input functions through Independent Component Analysis on Dynamic Contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Mario; Ruiz-Espana, Silvia; Arana, Estanislao; Moratal, David

    2015-08-01

    Arterial Input Function (AIF) is obtained from perfusion studies as a basic parameter for the calculus of hemodynamic variables used as surrogate markers of the vascular status of tissues. However, at present, its identification is made manually leading to high subjectivity, low repeatability and considerable time consumption. We propose an alternative method to automatically identify local AIF in perfusion images using Independent Component Analysis. PMID:26737244

  4. [Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Linera Prado, J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the main structural imaging in epilepsy. In patients with focal seizures, detection (and characterization) of a structural lesion consistent with electroclinical data allows therapeutic decisions without having to resort to other more expensive or invasive diagnostic procedures. The identification of some lesions may provide prognostic value, as in the case of Mesial Temporal Sclerosis (MTS) or may contribute to genetic counseling, as in the case of some Malformations of Cortical Development (MCD). The aim of this paper is to review the current state of structural MRI techniques, propose a basic protocol of epilepsy and mention the indications for structural MRI. Also, review the semiology of the main causes of epilepsy, with emphasis on MTS and MCD, by its highest frequency and by the special impact that MRI has shown in dealing with these entities.

  5. Dextran hydrogel coated surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor for sensitive and label-free detection of small molecule drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Johnston, Trevor G.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    The label-free and sensitive detection of small molecule drugs on SPRi is still a challenging task, mainly due to the limited surface immobilization capacity of the sensor. In this research, a dextran hydrogel-coated gold sensor chip for SPRi was successfully fabricated via photo-cross-linking for enhanced surface immobilization capacity. The density of the dextran hydrogel was optimized for protein immobilization and sensitive small molecule detection. The protein immobilization capacity of the hydrogel was 10 times greater than a bare gold surface, and 20 times greater than an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) surface. Such a drastic improvement in immobilization capacity allowed the SPRi sensor to detect adequate response signals when probing small molecule binding events. The binding signal of 4 nM liquid-phase biotin to streptavidin immobilized on the dextran surface reached 435 RU, while no response was observed on bare gold or MUA surfaces. The dextran hydrogel-coated SPRi sensor was also applied in a kinetic study of the binding between an immunosuppressive drug (FK506) and its target protein (FKBP12) in a high-throughput microarray format. The measured binding affinity was shown to be consistent with reported literature values, and a detection limit of 0.5 nM was achieved.

  6. Determinants of discrepancies in detection and comparison of the prognostic significance of left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Chen, Haiying; Estes, E Harvey; Mateasik, Anton; Bluemke, David A; Lima, Joao A C; Burke, Gregory L; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2015-02-15

    Despite the low sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ECG-LVH is known to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk. Understanding reasons for the discrepancies in detection of LVH by ECG versus imaging could help improve the diagnostic ability of ECG. We examined factors associated with false-positive and false-negative ECG-LVH, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. We also compared the prognostic significance of ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH as predictors of cardiovascular events. This analysis included 4,748 participants (mean age 61.9 years, 53.5% females, 61.7% nonwhites). Logistic regression with stepwise selection was used to identify factors associated with false-positive (n = 208) and false-negative (n = 387), compared with true-positive (n = 208) and true-negative (n = 4,041) ECG-LVH, respectively. A false-negative ECG-LVH status was associated with increased odds of Hispanic race/ethnicity, current smoking, hypertension, increased systolic blood pressure, prolongation of QRS duration, and higher body mass index and with lower odds of increased ejection fraction (model-generalized R(2) = 0.20). A false-positive ECG-LVH status was associated with lower odds of black race, Hispanic race/ethnicity, minor ST-T abnormalities, increased systolic blood pressure, and presence of any major electrocardiographic abnormalities (model-generalized R(2) = 0.29). Both ECG-LVH and MRI-LVH were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease events (hazard ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 2.20 and hazard ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 2.46, respectively). In conclusion, discrepancy in LVH detection by ECG and MRI can be relatively improved by considering certain participant characteristics. Discrepancy in diagnostic performance, yet agreement on predictive ability, suggests that LVH by ECG and LVH by imaging are likely to be two distinct but somehow related

  7. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  8. Combination of three-gene immunohistochemical panel and magnetic resonance imaging-detected extramural vascular invasion to assess prognosis in non-advanced rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fu; Jiang, Zheng; Gao, Ying; Li, Chun-Xiang; Shen, Bao-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a small, clinically applicable immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel that could be combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) for assessment of prognosis concerning the non-advanced rectal cancer patients prior to operation. METHODS About 329 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal carcinoma (RC) were screened in this research, all of whom had been examined via an MRI and were treatment-naïve from July 2011 to July 2014. The candidate proteins that were reported to be altered by RC were examined in tissues by IHC. All chosen samples were adopted from the fundamental cores of histopathologically confirmed carcinomas during the initial surgeries. RESULTS Of the three proteins that were tested, c-MYC, PCNA and TIMP1 were detected with relatively significant expression in tumors, 35.9%, 23.7% and 58.7% respectively. The expression of the three proteins were closely connected with prognosis (P = 0.032, 0.003, 0.021). The patients could be classified into different outcome groups according to an IHC panel (P < 0.01) via these three proteins. Taking into consideration known survival covariates, especially EMVI, the IHC panel served as an independent prognostic factor. The EMVI combined with the IHC panel could categorize patients into different prognostic groups with distinction (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION These studies argue that this three-protein panel of c-MYC, PCNA, coupled with TIMP1 combined with MRI-detected EMVI could offer extra prognostic details for preoperative treatment of RC. PMID:27784970

  9. A Novel Approach to Early Detection of Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity using Gadolinium Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, James C.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamilton, Craig A; Jordan, Jennifer; Torti, Frank M.; Kock, Nancy D.; Jordan, James; Workman, Susan; Hundley, W Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine if cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) measures of gadolinium (Gd) signal intensity (SI) within the left ventricular (LV) myocardium are associated with future changes in LV ejection fraction (LVEF) after receipt of doxorubicin (DOX). Methods and Results Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups scheduled to receive weekly intravenous doses of: normal saline (NS) (n=7), 1.5 mg/kg DOX (n=19), or 2.5 mg/kg DOX (n=14). MR determinations of LVEF and myocardial Gd-SI were performed before and then at 2, 4, 7, and 10 weeks after DOX initiation. During treatment, animals were sacrificed at different time points so that histopathological assessments of the LV myocardium could be obtained. Within group analyses were performed to examine time-dependent relationships between Gd-SI and primary events (a deterioration in LVEF or an unanticipated death). Six of 19 animals receiving 1.5 mg/kg of DOX and 10/14 animals receiving 2.5 mg/kg of DOX experienced a primary event; no NS animals experienced a primary event. In animals with a primary event, histopathological evidence of myocellular vacuolization occurred (p=0.04), and the Gd-SI was elevated relative to baseline at the time of the event (p<0.0001) and during the measurement period prior to the event (p=0.0001). In all animals (including NS) without an event, measures of Gd-SI did not differ from baseline. Conclusions After DOX, low serial measures of Gd-SI predict an absence of a LVEF drop or unanticipated death. An increase in Gd-SI after DOX forecasts a subsequent drop in LVEF as well as histopathologic evidence of intracellular vacuolization consistent with DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:20622140

  10. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found.

  11. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. PMID:25395066

  12. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  13. Imaging and Radiography with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence and Effective-Z (EZ-3D™) Determination; SNM Detection Using Prompt Neutrons from Photon Induced Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, William; Hasty, Richard; Klimenko, Alexei; Korbly, Stephen E.; Ledoux, Robert J.; Park, William

    2009-03-01

    Four new technologies have been developed for use in non-intrusive inspection systems to detect nuclear materials, explosives and contraband. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) provides a three dimensional image of the isotopic content of a container. NRF determines the isotopic composition of a region and specifies the isotopic structure of the neighboring regions, thus providing the detailed isotopic composition of any threat. In transmission mode, NRF provides a two dimensional projection of the isotopic content of a container, much as standard X-ray radiography provides for density. The effective-Z method (EZ-3D™) uses electromagnetic scattering processes to yield a three-dimensional map of the effective-Z and the density in a container. The EZ-3D™ method allows for a rapid discrimination based on effective Z and mass of materials such as those with high Z, as well as specifying regions of interest for other contraband. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons from photon induced fission (PNPF) provides a unique identification of the presence of actinides and SNM. These four new technologies can be used independently or together to automatically determine the presence of hazardous materials or contraband. They can also be combined with other technologies to provide added specificity.

  14. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  15. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  16. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  17. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) of brain activity and applications to early detection of brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ichio; Naruse, Shoji; Tanaka, Chuzo

    2004-12-01

    Divalent manganese ion (Mn2+) has been reported to be a useful contrast agent for functional MRI, through a technique named activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM). In AIM, signal enhancement is related to functional increases in calcium influx, and therefore AIM is, thus far, the only MRI method able to map brain activation in vivo independently of the surrogate hemodynamic changes used in functional MRI. Because of its high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity, AIM allows the use of multi-slice or three-dimensional MRI techniques to map functional activity at high spatial resolution. In the present review, we define AIM as a functional MRI tool based on the administration of divalent ionized manganese through an open or disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB). The adequacy and efficacy of AIM in detecting neural activation is described in light of supporting experiments on inhibition of calcium channels, FOS expression, and on direct comparison to BOLD- and perfusion-based functional MRI. Two main applications of AIM, mapping brain activation in rat somatosensory cortex, as well stroke research based on the well-established middle cerebral artery occlusion model, are described in detail. Methodological problems associated with a strong dependence on anesthetic conditions, potential corruption due to disruption of the BBB, and unspecific increase of the baseline signal due to acoustical noise are discussed. Finally, recommended preparation methods and experimental protocols for AIM are introduced.

  18. Differential detection of impact site versus rotational site injury by magnetic resonance imaging and microglial morphology in an unrestrained mild closed head injury model.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Alfredo; Donovan, Virgina; Grinberg, Yelena Y; Obenaus, Andre; Carson, Monica J

    2016-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of all traumatic brain injuries are mild and do not cause readily visible abnormalities on routine medical imaging making it difficult to predict which individuals will develop unwanted clinical sequelae. Microglia are brain-resident macrophages and early responders to brain insults. Their activation is associated with changes in morphology or expression of phenotypic markers including P2Y12 and major histocompatibility complex class II. Using a murine model of unrestrained mild closed head injury (mCHI), we used microglia as reporters of acute brain injury at sites of impact versus sites experiencing rotational stress 24 h post-mCHI. Consistent with mild injury, a modest 20% reduction in P2Y12 expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis but only in the impacted region of the cortex. Furthermore, neither an influx of blood-derived immune cells nor changes in microglial expression of CD45, TREM1, TREM2, major histocompatibility complex class II or CD40 were detected. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), small reductions in T2 weighted values were observed but only near the area of impact and without overt tissue damage (blood deposition, edema). Microglial morphology was quantified without cryosectioning artifacts using ScaleA(2) clarified brains from CX3CR1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice. The cortex rostral to the mCHI impact site receives greater rotational stress but neither MRI nor molecular markers of microglial activation showed significant changes from shams in this region. However, microglia in this rostral region did display signs of morphologic activation equivalent to that observed in severe CHI. Thus, mCHI-triggered rotational stress is sufficient to cause injuries undetectable by routine MRI that could result in altered microglial surveillance of brain homeostasis. Acute changes in microglial morphology reveal brain responses to unrestrained mild traumatic brain injury In areas subjected to

  19. Differential detection of impact site versus rotational site injury by magnetic resonance imaging and microglial morphology in an unrestrained mild closed head injury model.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Alfredo; Donovan, Virgina; Grinberg, Yelena Y; Obenaus, Andre; Carson, Monica J

    2016-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of all traumatic brain injuries are mild and do not cause readily visible abnormalities on routine medical imaging making it difficult to predict which individuals will develop unwanted clinical sequelae. Microglia are brain-resident macrophages and early responders to brain insults. Their activation is associated with changes in morphology or expression of phenotypic markers including P2Y12 and major histocompatibility complex class II. Using a murine model of unrestrained mild closed head injury (mCHI), we used microglia as reporters of acute brain injury at sites of impact versus sites experiencing rotational stress 24 h post-mCHI. Consistent with mild injury, a modest 20% reduction in P2Y12 expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis but only in the impacted region of the cortex. Furthermore, neither an influx of blood-derived immune cells nor changes in microglial expression of CD45, TREM1, TREM2, major histocompatibility complex class II or CD40 were detected. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), small reductions in T2 weighted values were observed but only near the area of impact and without overt tissue damage (blood deposition, edema). Microglial morphology was quantified without cryosectioning artifacts using ScaleA(2) clarified brains from CX3CR1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice. The cortex rostral to the mCHI impact site receives greater rotational stress but neither MRI nor molecular markers of microglial activation showed significant changes from shams in this region. However, microglia in this rostral region did display signs of morphologic activation equivalent to that observed in severe CHI. Thus, mCHI-triggered rotational stress is sufficient to cause injuries undetectable by routine MRI that could result in altered microglial surveillance of brain homeostasis. Acute changes in microglial morphology reveal brain responses to unrestrained mild traumatic brain injury In areas subjected to

  20. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  1. Concealed weapons detection using electromagnetic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen R.; Hogg, R. Douglas; Foreman, William

    1998-12-01

    Concealed weapons pose a significant threat to both law enforcement and security agency personnel. The uncontrolled environments associated with peacekeeping and the move toward relaxation of concealed weapons laws here in the U.S. provide a strong motivation for developing weapons detection technologies which are noninvasive and can function noncooperatively. Existing weapons detection systems are primarily oriented to detecting metal and require the cooperation of the person being searched. The new generation of detectors under development that focuses primarily on imaging methods, faces problems associated with privacy issues. There remains a need for a weapons detector which is portable, detects weapons remotely, avoids the issues associated with privacy rights, can tell the difference between car keys and a knife, and is affordable enough that one can be issued to every peacekeeper and law enforcement officer. AKELA is developing a concealed weapons detector that uses wideband radar techniques to excite natural electromagnetic resonances that characterize the size, shape, and material composition of an object. Neural network processing is used to classify the difference between weapons and nuisance objects. We have constructed both time and frequency domain test systems and used them to gather experimental data on a variety of armed and unarmed individuals. These experiments have been performed in an environment similar to the operational environment. Preliminary results from these experiments show that it is possible to detect a weapon being carried by an individual from a distance of 10 to 15 feet, and to detect a weapon being concealed behind the back. The power required is about 100 milliwatts. A breadboard system is being fabricated and will be used by AKELA and our law enforcement partner to gather data in operationally realistic situations. While a laptop computer will control the breadboard system, the wideband radar electronics will fit in a box the

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kollewe, Katja; Körner, Sonja; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne; Mohammadi, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disorder which is incurable to date. As there are many ongoing studies with therapeutic candidates, it is of major interest to develop biomarkers not only to facilitate early diagnosis but also as a monitoring tool to predict disease progression and to enable correct randomization of patients in clinical trials. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has made substantial progress over the last three decades and is a practical, noninvasive method to gain insights into the pathology of the disease. Disease-specific MRI changes therefore represent potential biomarkers for ALS. In this paper we give an overview of structural and functional MRI alterations in ALS with the focus on task-free resting-state investigations to detect cortical network failures. PMID:22848820

  3. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of oscillating electrical currents

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Teisseyre, Thomas Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become an important tool of researchers and clinicians who seek to understand patterns of neuronal activation that accompany sensory and cognitive processes. However, the interpretation of fMRI images rests on assumptions about the relationship between neuronal firing and hemodynamic response that are not firmly grounded in rigorous theory or experimental evidence. Further, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent effect, which correlates an MRI observable to neuronal firing, evolves over a period that is 2 orders of magnitude longer than the underlying processes that are thought to cause it. Here, we instead demonstrate experiments to directly image oscillating currents by MRI. The approach rests on a resonant interaction between an applied rf field and an oscillating magnetic field in the sample and, as such, permits quantitative, frequency-selective measurements of current density without spatial or temporal cancellation. We apply this method in a current loop phantom, mapping its magnetic field and achieving a detection sensitivity near the threshold required for the detection of neuronal currents. Because the contrast mechanism is under spectroscopic control, we are able to demonstrate how ramped and phase-modulated spin-lock radiation can enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the experiment. We further demonstrate the combination of these methods with remote detection, a technique in which the encoding and detection of an MRI experiment are separated by sample flow or translation. We illustrate that remotely detected MRI permits the measurement of currents in small volumes of flowing water with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PMID:20421504

  5. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (~1 mm) and in pO2 (1-3 mmHg). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20 dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, and require relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required spin

  6. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (∼1mm) and in pO2 (1-3 torr). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, which results in relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required

  7. Spin gravitational resonance and graviton detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quach, James Q.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a gravitational analogue of spin magnetic resonance, called spin gravitational resonance, whereby a gravitational wave interacts with a magnetic field to produce a spin transition. In particular, an external magnetic field separates the energy spin states of a spin-1 /2 particle, and the presence of the gravitational wave produces a perturbation in the components of the magnetic field orthogonal to the gravitational-wave propagation. In this framework we test Dyson's conjecture that individual gravitons cannot be detected. Although we find no fundamental laws preventing single gravitons being detected with spin gravitational resonance, we show that it cannot be used in practice, in support of Dyson's conjecture.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging: Review of imaging techniques and overview of liver imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Santhi; Szklaruk, Janio

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is slowly transitioning from a problem solving imaging modality to a first line imaging modality for many diseases of the liver. The well established advantages of MRI over other cross sectional imaging modalities may be the basis for this transition. Technological advancements in MRI that focus on producing high quality images and fast imaging, increasing diagnostic accuracy and developing newer function-specific contrast agents are essential in ensuring that MRI succeeds as a first line imaging modality. Newer imaging techniques, such as parallel imaging, are widely utilized to shorten scanning time. Diffusion weighted echo planar imaging, an adaptation from neuroimaging, is fast becoming a routine part of the MRI liver protocol to improve lesion detection and characterization of focal liver lesions. Contrast enhanced dynamic T1 weighted imaging is crucial in complete evaluation of diseases and the merit of this dynamic imaging relies heavily on the appropriate timing of the contrast injection. Newer techniques that include fluoro-triggered contrast enhanced MRI, an adaptation from 3D MRA imaging, are utilized to achieve good bolus timing that will allow for optimum scanning. For accurate interpretation of liver diseases, good understanding of the newer imaging techniques and familiarity with typical imaging features of liver diseases are essential. In this review, MR sequences for a time efficient liver MRI protocol utilizing newer imaging techniques are discussed and an overview of imaging features of selected common focal and diffuse liver diseases are presented. PMID:21160685

  9. The value of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion biopsy platforms in prostate cancer detection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gayet, Maudy; van der Aa, Anouk; Beerlage, Harrie P; Schrier, Bart Ph; Mulders, Peter F A; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2016-03-01

    Despite limitations considering the presence, staging and aggressiveness of prostate cancer, ultrasonography (US)-guided systematic biopsies (SBs) are still the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Recently, promising results have been published for targeted prostate biopsies (TBs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion platforms. Different platforms are USA Food and Drug Administration registered and have, mostly subjective, strengths and weaknesses. To our knowledge, no systematic review exists that objectively compares prostate cancer detection rates between the different platforms available. To assess the value of the different MRI/US-fusion platforms in prostate cancer detection, we compared platform-guided TB with SB, and other ways of MRI TB (cognitive fusion or in-bore MR fusion). We performed a systematic review of well-designed prospective randomised and non-randomised trials in the English language published between 1 January 2004 and 17 February 2015, using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included: 'prostate cancer', 'MR/ultrasound(US) fusion' and 'targeted biopsies'. Extraction of articles was performed by two authors (M.G. and A.A.) and were evaluated by the other authors. Randomised and non-randomised prospective clinical trials comparing TB using MRI/US-fusion platforms and SB, or other ways of TB (cognitive fusion or MR in-bore fusion) were included. In all, 11 of 1865 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving seven different fusion platforms and 2626 patients: 1119 biopsy naïve, 1433 with prior negative biopsy, 50 not mentioned (either biopsy naïve or with prior negative biopsy) and 24 on active surveillance (who were disregarded). The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool was used to assess the quality of included articles. No clear advantage of MRI/US fusion-guided TBs was seen for cancer detection rates (CDRs) of all prostate

  10. A comparative study of contrast enhanced ultrasound and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhu, Zheng; Huang, Beijian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Li, Chaolun; Zeng, Mengsu; Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Ling; Wang, Wenping; Chen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to compare contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas. Included in this retrospective study were 83 histopathologically confirmed lesions of hemangioma in 66 hospitalized patients who underwent both CEUS and CEMRI and received surgery. The enhancement patterns on CEUS and CEMRI in each lesion were compared and analyzed. In addition, data obtained by the two modalities were then compared with the pathological findings to determine their value in differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. CEUS diagnosed 78 lesions of hemangioma against 80 by CEMRI. There were no statistical significant differences in the diagnostic value between CEUS and CEMRI in terms of sensitivity (88.0% vs. 92.8%), specificity (99.0% vs. 99.4%), accuracy (97.3% vs. 98.4%), positive predictive value (93.6% vs. 96.3%), and negative predictive value (98.0% vs. 98.8%) (p > 0.05, all). In the arterial phase, the main enhancement pattern on both CEUS and CEMRI was peripheral nodular enhancement (73 vs. 76), but lesions with diffuse enhancement on CEUS outnumbered those on CEMRI (3 vs. 1) and lesions with circular enhancement on CEMRI outnumbered those on CEUS (3 vs. 2). In the portal venous phase and delayed phase, the main enhancement pattern was hyperechoic change on CEUS and hyperintense on CEMRI (66 vs. 65), some lesions presented isoechoic change (12 vs. 15). These results suggested CEUS, an equivalent to CEMRI, may have an added diagnostic value in hemangiomas.

  11. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  12. Differences in Supratentorial Damage of White Matter in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors With and Without Adjuvant Treatment as Detected by Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Luedemann, Lutz; Henze, Guenter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Patients and Methods: Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Results: Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients.

  13. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Role of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in detecting deltoideal acromial enthesopathy: an early finding in the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis and an under-recognized cause of posterior shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Arend, Carlos Frederico

    2014-04-01

    The acromial origin of the deltoid is a target structure of ankylosing spondylitis and related spondyloarthritis, which are often overlooked and underdiagnosed as causes of posterior shoulder pain. The objective of this article is to review the roles of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in detecting deltoideal acromial enthesopathy and their importance for optimizing management in individuals with posterior shoulder pain. Adequate awareness of such enthesopathy as a potential manifestation of inflammatory rheumatic disorders is critical for early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis.

  15. Long-term evaluation of asymptomatic patients operated on for intracranial epidermoid cysts. Comparison of the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and computer-assisted cisternography for detection of cholesterin fragments.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Fortuna, A; Cantore, G; Missori, P

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computer-assisted cisternography (CAc) assessment of latent late recurrences in long-term asymptomatic patients surgically treated for intracranial epidermoid cyst is here presented. MRI was exclusively utilized in one patient; CAc was exclusively employed in three patients with metalic operative clips; both CAc and MRI were employed in another four patients. CAc appears to be more reliable than MRI in detecting cholesterin fragments in asymptomatic patients operated on for intracranial epidermoid cyst.

  16. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications. PMID:26067911

  17. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-06-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications.

  18. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  20. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  1. A preclinical murine model for the early detection of radiation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral tests for learning and memory: with applications for the evaluation of possible stem cell imaging agents and therapies.

    PubMed

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Gandhi, Nishant; Kato, Yoshinori; Armour, Michael; Zhu, Wenlian; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapies are being developed for radiotherapy-induced brain injuries (RIBI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers advantages for imaging transplanted stem cells. However, most MRI cell-tracking techniques employ superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs), which are difficult to distinguish from hemorrhage. In current preclinical RIBI models, hemorrhage occurs concurrently with other injury markers. This makes the evaluation of the recruitment of transplanted SPIO-labeled stem cells to injury sites difficult. Here, we developed a RIBI model, with early injury markers reflective of hippocampal dysfunction, which can be detected noninvasively with MRI and behavioral tests. Lesions were generated by sub-hemispheric irradiation of mouse hippocampi with single X-ray beams of 80 Gy. Lesion formation was monitored with anatomical and contrast-enhanced MRI and changes in memory and learning were assessed with fear-conditioning tests. Early injury markers were detected 2 weeks after irradiation. These included an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrated by a 92 ± 20 % contrast enhancement of the irradiated versus the non-irradiated brain hemispheres, within 15 min of the administration of an MRI contrast agent. A change in short-term memory was also detected, as demonstrated by a 40.88 ± 5.03 % decrease in the freezing time measured during the short-term memory context test at this time point, compared to that before irradiation. SPIO-labeled stem cells transplanted contralateral to the lesion migrated toward the lesion at this time point. No hemorrhage was detected up to 10 weeks after irradiation. This model can be used to evaluate SPIO-based stem cell-tracking agents, short-term. PMID:27021492

  2. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  4. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A. Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.; Tao, Y.

    2015-05-25

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species ({sup 1}H, {sup 19}F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5 nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P < 0.05). Thickness of the iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Podberesky, Daniel J; Towbin, Alexander J; Eltomey, Mohamed A; Levitt, Marc A

    2013-11-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 newborns and is frequently accompanied by anomalies of the genitalia, gynecologic system, urinary tract, spine, and skeletal system. Diagnostic imaging plays a central role in ARM evaluation. Because of the lack of ionizing radiation, excellent intrinsic contrast resolution, multiplanar imaging capabilities, technical advances in hardware, and innovative imaging protocols, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly important in assessment of ARM patients in utero, postnatally before definitive surgical correction, and in the postoperative period. This article discusses the role of MR imaging in evaluating ARM patients. PMID:24183526

  7. Cardiomyocyte Death: Insights from Molecular and Microstructural Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Natalia C.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes can die via necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the molecular signals and pathways underlying these processes have been well elucidated, the pathophysiology of cardiomyocyte death remains incompletely understood. This review describes the development and application of novel imaging techniques to detect and characterize cardiomyocyte death noninvasively in vivo. It focuses on molecular and microstructural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and their respective abilities to image cellular events such as apoptosis, inflammation, and myofiber architecture. These in vivo imaging techniques have the potential to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte death and to help guide the development of novel cardioprotective therapies. PMID:21298427

  8. Further steps toward direct magnetic resonance (MR) imaging detection of neural action currents: optimization of MR sensitivity to transient and weak currents in a conductor.

    PubMed

    Pell, Gaby S; Abbott, David F; Fleming, Steven W; Prichard, James W; Jackson, Graeme D

    2006-05-01

    The characteristics of an MRI technique that could be used for direct detection of neuronal activity are investigated. It was shown that magnitude imaging using echo planar imaging can detect transient local currents. The sensitivity of this method was thoroughly investigated. A partial k-space EPI acquisition with homodyne reconstruction was found to increase the signal change. A unique sensitivity to the position of the current pulse within the imaging sequence was demonstrated with the greatest signal change occurring when the current pulse coincides with the acquisition of the center lines of k-space. The signal change was shown to be highly sensitive to the spatial position of the current conductor relative to the voxel. Furthermore, with the use of optimization of spatial and temporal placement of the current pulse, the level of signal change obtained at this lower limit of current detectability was considerably magnified. It was possible to detect a current of 1.7 microA applied for 20 ms with an imaging time of 1.8 min. The level of sensitivity observed in our study brings us closer to that theoretically required for the detection of action currents in nerves.

  9. Significance of Coronal Proset Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Hidden Zone of the Mid-Zone Stenosis in the Lumbar Spine and Morphometric Analysis of the Mid-Zone Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Sae; Son, Whee Sung; Shin, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Myun-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective exploratory imaging study. Purpose To investigate the significance of the coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Proset technique to detect the hidden zone in patients with mid-zone stenosis by comparing with conventional axial and sagittal MRI and to explore the morphologic characteristic patterns of the mid-zone stenosis. Overview of Literature Despite advancements in diagnostic modalities such as computed tomography and MRI, stenotic lesions under the pedicle and pars interarticularis, also called the mid-zone, are still difficult to definitely detect with the conventional axial and sagittal MRI due to its inherited anatomical peculiarity. Methods Of 180 patients scheduled to undergo selective nerve root block, 20 patients with mid-zone stenosis were analyzed using MRI. Characteristic group patterns were also explored morphologically by comparing MRI views of each group after verifying statistical differences between them. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to classify morphological characteristic groups based on three-dimensional radiologic grade for stenosis at all three zones. Results At the mid-zone, the stenosis of grade 2 or more was found in 14 cases in the coronal image,13 cases in the sagittal image, and 9 cases in the axial image (p<0.05). Especially, mid-zone stenosis was not detected in six of 20 cases at the axial images. At the entrance and exit-zone, coronal image was also associated with more accurate detection of hidden zone compared to other views such as axial and sagittal images. After repeated statistical verification, the morphological patterns of hidden zone were classified into 5 groups: 6 cases in group I; 1 case in group II; 4 cases in group III; 7 cases in group IV; and 2 cases in group V. Conclusions Coronal MRI using the Proset technique more accurately detected hidden zone of the mid-zone stenosis compared to conventional axial and sagittal images. PMID:27559443

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with 90-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamin, H J; Poggio, M; Degen, C L; Rugar, D

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging technique that typically operates on the scale of millimetres to micrometres. Conventional MRI is based on the manipulation of nuclear spins with radio-frequency fields, and the subsequent detection of spins with induction-based techniques. An alternative approach, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), uses force detection to overcome the sensitivity limitations of conventional MRI. Here, we show that the two-dimensional imaging of nuclear spins can be extended to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm using MRFM. The imaging of 19F nuclei in a patterned CaF(2) test object was enabled by a detection sensitivity of roughly 1,200 nuclear spins at a temperature of 600 mK. To achieve this sensitivity, we developed high-moment magnetic tips that produced field gradients up to 1.4 x 10(6) T m(-1), and implemented a measurement protocol based on force-gradient detection of naturally occurring spin fluctuations. The resulting detection volume was less than 650 zeptolitres. This is 60,000 times smaller than the previous smallest volume for nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy, and demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI into the nanoscale regime.

  11. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perirenal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F; Lee, Christine U

    2016-05-01

    The perirenal space can be involved by a variety of neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and proliferative disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is often an ideal technique for identification and staging of lesions arising within the perirenal space, with its superior soft tissue characterization as well as its ability to visualize extension into blood vessels and adjacent organs. This pictorial essay describes the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of a variety of pathologies which can arise from or involve the perirenal space, and provides a framework for categorization and differential diagnosis of these lesions.

  13. Comparing the Detectability of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by C-Arm Dual-Phase Cone-Beam Computed Tomography During Hepatic Arteriography With Conventional Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric; Lin, MingDe; Rao, Pramod; Bhagat, Nikhil; Noordhoek, Niels; Radaelli, Alessandro; Blijd, Jaerl; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of dual-phase cone-beam computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (CBCTHA) for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by comparing it with the diagnostic imaging 'gold standard': contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) of the liver. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight HCC lesions (mean diameter 3.9 {+-} 3.3 cm) in 20 patients (13 men, mean age 61.4 years [range 50 to 80]), who sequentially underwent baseline diagnostic liver CE-MRI and then underwent early arterial- and delayed portal venous-phase CBCTHA during drug eluting-bead transarterial chemoembolization, were evaluated. Dual-phase CBCTHA findings of each tumor in terms of conspicuity were compared with standard CE-MR images and classified into three grades: optimal, suboptimal, and nondiagnostic. Results: Seventy-seven (mean diameter 4.2 {+-} 3.4 cm [range 0.9 to 15.9]) (93.9%) of 82 tumors were detected. Sensitivity of arterial-phase (71.9%) was lower than that of venous-phase CBCTHA (86.6%) for the detection of HCC lesions. Of the 82 tumors, 33 (40.2%) and 52 (63.4%), 26 (31.7%) and 19 (23.2%), and 23 (28%) and 11 (13.4%) nodules were classed as optimal, suboptimal, and nondiagnostic on arterial- and venous-phase CBCTHA images, respectively. Seventeen (73.9%) of the 23 tumors that were not visible on arterial phase were detected on venous phase. Six (54.5%) of the 11 tumors that were not visible on venous phase were detected on arterial phase. Conclusions: Dual-phase CBCTHA has sufficient image quality to detect the majority of HCC lesions compared with the imaging 'gold standard': CE-MRI of the liver. Moreover, dual-phase CBCTHA is more useful and reliable than single-phasic imaging to depict HCC nodules.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  15. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  16. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Metabolic Imaging in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Lupo, Janine M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2015-11-01

    This review is focused on describing the use of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy for metabolic imaging of brain tumors. We will first review the MR metabolic imaging findings generated from preclinical models, focusing primarily on in vivo studies, and will then describe the use of metabolic imaging in the clinical setting. We will address relatively well-established (1) H MRS approaches, as well as (31) P MRS, (13) C MRS and emerging hyperpolarized (13) C MRS methodologies, and will describe the use of metabolic imaging for understanding the basic biology of glioma as well as for improving the characterization and monitoring of brain tumors in the clinic.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kawakyu-O'Connor, Daniel; Bordia, Ritu; Nicola, Refky

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine is increasingly being used in the evaluation of spinal emergencies because it is highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of acute conditions of the spine. The prompt and accurate recognition allows for appropriate medical and surgical intervention. This article reviews the MR imaging features of common emergent conditions, such as spinal trauma, acute disc herniation, infection, and tumors. In addition, we describe common MR imaging sequences, discuss challenges encountered in emergency imaging of the spine, and illustrate multiple mimics of acute conditions. PMID:27150322

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  19. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. PMID:26614130

  20. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, B.D. ); Zimmerman, R.D. )

    1990-03-23

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT.

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Krishna S; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Bernstein, Matt A; Markl, Michael; D Gatehouse, Peter; M Botnar, Rene; Saloner, David; Lorenz, Christine; Wen, Han; S Hu, Bob; Epstein, Frederick H; N Oshinski, John; Raman, Subha V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast imaging has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved calibration procedures, visualization tools, and analysis methods. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in CMR phase contrast imaging methodology, clinical applications including summaries of past clinical performance, and emerging research and clinical applications that utilize today's latest technology. PMID:26254979

  2. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    PubMed

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently considered a major keystone of the diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region. However, the relatively small size of the pituitary gland, its location deep at the skull base and the numerous physiological variants present in this area impede the precise assessment of the anatomical structures and, particularly, of the pituitary gland itself. The diagnosis of the often tiny lesions of this region--such as pituitary microadenomas--is then difficult if the MRI technology is not optimized and if potential artifacts and traps are not recognized. Advanced MRI technology can not only depict small lesions with greater reliability, but also help in the differential diagnosis of large tumors. In these, defining the presence or absence of invasion is a particularly important task. This review describes and illustrates the radiological diagnosis of the different tumors of the sellar region, from the common prolactinomas, nonfunctioning adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts, to the less frequent and more difficult to detect corticotroph pituitary adenomas in Cushing's disease, and other neoplastic and nonneoplastic entities. Finally, some hints are given to facilitate the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions. PMID:27003878

  4. Neural network segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Blaise

    1990-07-01

    Neural networks are well adapted to the task of grouping input patterns into subsets which share some similarity. Moreover once trained they can generalize their classification rules to classify new data sets. Sets of pixel intensities from magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a natural input to a neural network by varying imaging parameters MR images can reflect various independent physical parameters of tissues in their pixel intensities. A neural net can then be trained to classify physically similar tissue types based on sets of pixel intensities resulting from different imaging studies on the same subject. A neural network classifier for image segmentation was implemented on a Sun 4/60 and was tested on the task of classifying tissues of canine head MR images. Four images of a transaxial slice with different imaging sequences were taken as input to the network (three spin-echo images and an inversion recovery image). The training set consisted of 691 representative samples of gray matter white matter cerebrospinal fluid bone and muscle preclassified by a neuroscientist. The network was trained using a fast backpropagation algorithm to derive the decision criteria to classify any location in the image by its pixel intensities and the image was subsequently segmented by the classifier. The classifier''s performance was evaluated as a function of network size number of network layers and length of training. A single layer neural network performed quite well at

  5. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ADNI

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Barnes, Josephine; Bernstein, Matt A.; Borowski, Bret J.; Brewer, James; Clegg, Shona; Dale, Anders M.; Carmichael, Owen; Ching, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Desikan, Rahul S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fjell, Anders M.; Fletcher, Evan; Fox, Nick C.; Gunter, Jeff; Gutman, Boris A.; Holland, Dominic; Hua, Xue; Insel, Philip; Kantarci, Kejal; Killiany, Ron J.; Krueger, Gunnar; Leung, Kelvin K.; Mackin, Scott; Maillard, Pauline; Molone, Ian; Mattsson, Niklas; McEvoy, Linda; Modat, Marc; Mueller, Susanne; Nosheny, Rachel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schuff, Norbert; Senjem, Matthew L.; Simonson, Alix; Thompson, Paul M.; Rettmann, Dan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Walhovd, Kristine; Zhao, Yansong; Zuk, Samantha; Weiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ADNI is now in its 10th year. The primary objective of the MRI core of ADNI has been to improve methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. METHODS We review the contributions of the MRI core from present and past cycles of ADNI (ADNI 1, GO and 2). We also review plans for the future – ADNI 3. RESULTS Contributions of the MRI core include creating standardized acquisition protocols and quality control methods; examining the effect of technical features of image acquisition and analysis on outcome metrics; deriving sample size estimates for future trials based on those outcomes; and piloting the potential utility of MR perfusion, diffusion, and functional connectivity measures in multicenter clinical trials. DISCUSSION Over the past decade the MRI core of ADNI has fulfilled its mandate of improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:26194310

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Lanzardo, Stefania; Alberti, Diego; Belfiore, Simona; Ciampa, Anna; Giovenzana, Giovanni B; Lovazzano, Clara; Pagliarin, Roberto; Aime, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, Gd-AAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T1 measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs) has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR) visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety. PMID:18084612

  8. Terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Toshikazu

    2016-03-01

    We report a feasibility study of a terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) that oscillate at 0.30 THz. A pair of RTDs acted as an emitter and a detector in the system. Terahertz reflection images of opaque samples were acquired with our RTD imaging system. A spatial resolution of 1 mm, which is equal to the wavelength of the RTD emitter, was achieved. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection image was improved by 6 dB by using polarization optics that reduced interference effects. Additionally, the coherence of the RTD enabled a depth resolution of less than 3 µm to be achieved by an interferometric technique. Thus, RTDs are an attractive candidate for use in small THz imaging systems.

  9. Volume coil based on hybridized resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvaud, C.; Abdeddaim, R.; Larrat, B.; de Rosny, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an electromagnetic device based on hybridization of four half-wavelength dipoles which increases the uniformity and the strength of the radio-frequency (RF) field of a Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) apparatus. Numerical results show that this Hybridized Coil (HC) excited with a classical loop coil takes advantage of the magnetic hybrid modes. The distribution of the RF magnetic field is experimentally confirmed on a 7-T MRI with a gelatin phantom. Finally, the HC is validated in vivo by imaging the head of an anesthetized rat. We measure an overall increase of the signal to noise ratio with up to 2.4 fold increase in regions of interest far from the active loop coil.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art*

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate. PMID:25741058

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging using linear magneto-inductive waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syms, R. R. A.; Young, I. R.; Ahmad, M. M.; Rea, M.

    2012-12-01

    Magneto-inductive waveguides are arrays of magnetically coupled, lumped element resonators, which support slow waves at radio frequency. Their use in internal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where they may provide an intrinsically safe method of signal detection and transmission, is described. A catheter-based receiver formed from a thin-film printed circuit mounted on a tubular scaffold using heat-shrink tubing is demonstrated, and its electrical response and imaging sensitivity are explained in terms of the excitation and propagation of magneto-inductive waves. The theoretical predictions are confirmed using the results of electrical measurement and 1H MRI at 1.5 T, and imaging is achieved over a total length greater than 1.5 m using a single receiver.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-04-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Image Example Based Contrast Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of image analysis algorithms applied to magnetic resonance images is strongly influenced by the pulse sequences used to acquire the images. Algorithms are typically optimized for a targeted tissue contrast obtained from a particular implementation of a pulse sequence on a specific scanner. There are many practical situations, including multi-institution trials, rapid emergency scans, and scientific use of historical data, where the images are not acquired according to an optimal protocol or the desired tissue contrast is entirely missing. This paper introduces an image restoration technique that recovers images with both the desired tissue contrast and a normalized intensity profile. This is done using patches in the acquired images and an atlas containing patches of the acquired and desired tissue contrasts. The method is an example-based approach relying on sparse reconstruction from image patches. Its performance in demonstrated using several examples, including image intensity normalization, missing tissue contrast recovery, automatic segmentation, and multimodal registration. These examples demonstrate potential practical uses and also illustrate limitations of our approach. PMID:24058022

  15. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  16. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  17. High-resolution 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for pituitary adenoma detection in Cushing disease

    PubMed Central

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Montgomery, Blake K.; Millo, Corina; Herscovitch, Peter; Lonser, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT High-resolution PET (hrPET) performed using a high-resolution research tomograph is reported as having a resolution of 2 mm and could be used to detect corticotroph adenomas through uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). To determine the sensitivity of this imaging modality, the authors compared 18F-FDG hrPET and MRI detection of pituitary adenomas in Cushing disease (CD). METHODS Consecutive patients with CD who underwent preoperative 18F-FDG hrPET and MRI (spin echo [SE] and spoiled gradient recalled [SPGR] sequences) were prospectively analyzed. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated from hrPET and were compared with MRI findings. Imaging findings were correlated to operative and histological findings. RESULTS Ten patients (7 females and 3 males) were included (mean age 30.8 ± 19.3 years; range 11–59 years). MRI revealed a pituitary adenoma in 4 patients (40% of patients) on SE and 7 patients (70%) on SPGR sequences. 18F-FDG hrPET demonstrated increased 18F-FDG uptake consistent with an adenoma in 4 patients (40%; adenoma size range 3–14 mm). Maximum SUV was significantly higher for 18F-FDG hrPET–positive tumors (difference = 5.1, 95% CI 2.1–8.1; p = 0.004) than for 18F-FDG hrPET–negative tumors. 18F-FDG hrPET positivity was not associated with tumor volume (p = 0.2) or dural invasion (p = 0.5). Midnight and morning ACTH levels were associated with 18F-FDG hrPET positivity (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively) and correlated with the maximum SUV (R = 0.9; p = 0.001) and average SUV (R = 0.8; p = 0.01). All 18F-FDG hrPET–positive adenomas had a less than a 180% ACTH increase and 18F-FDG hrPET–negative adenomas had a greater than 180% ACTH increase after CRH stimulation (p = 0.03). Three adenomas were detected on SPGR MRI sequences that were not detected by 18F-FDG hrPET imaging. Two adenomas not detected on SE (but no adenomas not detected on SPGR) were detected on 18F-FDG hrPET. CONCLUSIONS While 18F-FDG hrPET imaging can detect

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in foals with infectious arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie; LeRoux, Alexandre; Trichel, Jessica; Riggs, Laura; Bragulla, Herman H; Rademacher, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of foals with infectious and noninfectious arthritis are described. Six foals with infectious arthritis and three foals with noninfectious arthritis were grouped based on synovial fluid analysis results and examined with radiography and MR imaging. Four out of six foals with infectious arthritis had osseous lesions in MR images indicative of osteomyelitis and only 4/19 lesions were detected on digital radiographs. The three foals with noninfectious arthritis had no osseous lesions in MR images or radiographically. Of the six joints that had osseous lesions detected with MR imaging, three had at least one lytic lesion detected radiographically. Osseous lesions in the epiphysis, metaphysis, and physis appeared in MR images as T2W, short tau inversion recovery, and proton density hyperintense foci with a hypointense halo. The same lesions appeared hyperintense in the 3D RSSG water excitation pulse sequence but lacked a surrounding hypointense halo. Most joints of foals with infectious arthritis had heterogenous signals within the synovial fluid whereas all of the nonseptic joints had homogenous synovial fluid signals. MR imaging appears to be better than radiography in the detection of osseous lesions in foals diagnosed with infectious arthritis and may be a valuable screening test for the presence of osteomyelitis.

  19. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges.

  20. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pediatric Neurologic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lall, Neil U; Stence, Nicholas V; Mirsky, David M

    2015-12-01

    Although computed tomography is often the first line of imaging in the emergency setting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of increasing importance in the evaluation of central nervous system emergencies in the pediatric population. As such, it is necessary to understand the indications for which MRI may be necessary. This article reviews the unique pathophysiologic entities affecting the pediatric population and the associated MRI findings. Specifically, utility of emergent MRI and characteristic appearances of traumatic brain injury, traumatic spinal injury, nonaccidental trauma, arterial ischemic stroke, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, stroke mimics, and central nervous system infections are described. PMID:26636636

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P D; Miller, D; Gledhill, R F; Rossor, M N

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients in whom a clinical diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) had been made. MRI showed lesions in the pons in both cases about 2 years after the illness, at a time when the spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy had recovered. The persisting abnormal signals in CPM are likely to be due to fibrillary gliosis. Persistence of lesions on MRI means that the diagnosis of CPM may be electively, after the acute illness has resolved. Images PMID:2732743

  3. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  4. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  7. Resonant Doppler imaging with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Szklumowska, Anna; Pircher, Michael; Gotzinger, Erich; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2005-04-01

    Fourier Domain Optical Coherene Tomography (FD OCT) is a high speed imaging modality with increased sensitivity as compared to standard time domain (TD) OCT. The higher sensitivity is especially important, if strongly scattering tissue such as blood is investigated. Recently it could be shown that retinal blood flow can be assessed in-vivo by high speed FD OCT. However the detection bandwidth of color Doppler (CD) FDOCT is strongly limited due to blurring of the detected interference fringes during exposure. This leads to a loss of sensitivity for detection of fast changes in tissue. Using a moving mirror as a reference one can effectively increase the detection bandwidth for CD FDOCT and perform perfusion sectioning. The modality is called resonant CD FDOCT imaging. The principle of the method is presented and experimentally verified.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging: present and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donald L.; Liu, Peter; Wismer, Gary L.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Stark, David D.; New, Paul F.J.; Okada, Robert D.; Brady, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has created considerable excitement in the medical community, largely because of its great potential to diagnose and characterize many different disease processes. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that, because MR imaging is similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning in identifying structural disorders and because it is more costly and difficult to use, this highly useful technique must be judged against CT before it can become an accepted investigative tool. At present MR imaging has demonstrated diagnostic superiority over CT in a limited number of important, mostly neurologic, disorders and is complementary to CT in the diagnosis of certain other disorders. For most of the remaining organ systems its usefulness is not clear, but the lack of ionizing radiation and MR's ability to produce images in any tomographic plane may eventually prove to be advantageous. The potential of MR imaging to display in-vivo spectra, multinuclear images and blood-flow data makes it an exciting investigative technique. At present, however, MR imaging units should be installed only in medical centres equipped with the clinical and basic research facilities that are essential to evaluate the ultimate role of this technique in the care of patients. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:3884120

  9. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here we propose the multi-dimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel RF coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. PMID:22926830

  10. PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2013-07-01

    Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion ({omega}) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of {omega}, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup obs} has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup true} has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f{sub koz}{sup obs} varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f{sub koz}{sup true}. We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f{sub koz}{sup true} and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.

  11. Successful serial imaging of the mouse cerebral arteries using conventional 3-T magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Hokamura, Kazuya; Natsume, Takahiro; Kimura, Tetsuro; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Magata, Yasuhiro; Namba, Hiroki; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Serial imaging studies can be useful in characterizing the pathologic and physiologic remodeling of cerebral arteries in various mouse models. We tested the feasibility of using a readily available, conventional 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to serially image cerebrovascular remodeling in mice. We utilized a mouse model of intracranial aneurysm as a mouse model of the dynamic, pathologic remodeling of cerebral arteries. Aneurysms were induced by hypertension and a single elastase injection into the cerebrospinal fluid. For the mouse cerebrovascular imaging, we used a conventional 3-T MRI system and a 40-mm saddle coil. We used non-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to detect intracranial aneurysm formation and T2-weighted imaging to detect aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A serial MRI was conducted every 2 to 3 days. MRI detection of aneurysm formation and subarachnoid hemorrhage was compared against the postmortem inspection of the brain that was perfused with dye. The imaging times for the MRA and T2-weighted imaging were 3.7±0.5 minutes and 4.8±0.0 minutes, respectively. All aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhages were correctly identified by two masked observers on MRI. This MRI-based serial imaging technique was useful in detecting intracranial aneurysm formation and subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice. PMID:25920958

  12. Osteomyelitis in children: detection by magnetic resonance: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Scoles, P.V.; Nelson, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five children, ages 9 to 12, with acute, subacute, chronic, and recurrent osteomyelitis. Saturation recovery (SR), T2-weighted spin echo, and inversion recovery (IR) pulse sequences were employed. A reduction in the normally bright image of bone marrow corresponded with abnormalities seen on radiographs, CT scans, and radionuclide scans. SR images produced the best signal-to-noise ratios. Contrast between normal and abnormal marrow was most pronounced on IR sequences, which suggested an increase in water content of inflamed marrow. Abnormalities were sometimes seen on MR images before they could be detected on radiographs. Some MR abnormalities were present when CT and radionuclide studies were normal or equivocal.

  13. Effect of water migration between arabinoxylans and gluten on baking quality of whole wheat bread detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Kang, Ji; Wang, Li; Li, Zhen; Wang, Ren; Chen, Zheng Xing; Hou, Gary G

    2012-07-01

    A new method, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique characterized by T(2) relaxation time, was developed to study the water migration mechanism between arabinoxylan (AX) gels and gluten matrix in a whole wheat dough (WWD) system prepared from whole wheat flour (WWF) of different particle sizes. The water sequestration of AX gels in wheat bran was verified by the bran fortification test. The evaluations of baking quality of whole wheat bread (WWB) made from WWF with different particle sizes were performed by using SEM, FT-IR, and RP-HPLC techniques. Results showed that the WWB made from WWF of average particle size of 96.99 μm had better baking quality than those of the breads made from WWF of two other particle sizes, 50.21 and 235.40 μm. T(2) relaxation time testing indicated that the decreased particle size of WWF increased the water absorption of AX gels, which led to water migration from the gluten network to the AX gels and resulted in inferior baking quality of WWB.

  14. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist Therapy in a Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Katherine E; Bade, Aditya N; Schutt, Charles R; Dong, Jingdong; Shandler, Scott J; Boska, Michael D; Mosley, R Lee; Gendelman, Howard E; Liu, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroprotective immunity is defined by transformation of T-cell polarity for therapeutic gain. For neurodegenerative disorders and specifically for Parkinson's disease (PD), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) agonists elicit robust anti-inflammatory microglial responses leading to neuronal sparing in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. While neurotherapeutic potential was demonstrated for PD, there remain inherent limitations in translating these inventions from the laboratory to patients. One obstacle in translating such novel neurotherapeutics centers on the availability of suitable noninvasive methods to track disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. To this end, we developed manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) assays as a way to track a linkage between glial activation and VIPR2 agonist (LBT-3627)-induced neuroprotective immunity for MPTP-induced nigrostriatal degeneration. Notably, LBT-3627-treated, MPTP-intoxicated mice show reduced MEMRI brain signal intensities. These changes paralleled reduced astrogliosis and resulted in sparing of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons. Most importantly, the data suggest that MEMRI can be developed as a biomarker tool to monitor neurotherapeutic responses that are relevant to common neurodegenerative disorders used to improve disease outcomes. PMID:27329163

  15. Bulk and surface sensitivity of a resonant waveguide grating imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Kovacs, Boglarka; Farkas, Eniko; Szabó, Bálint; Zaytseva, Natalya; Fang, Ye; Horvath, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report the assessment of the sensitivity of a microplate-compatible resonant waveguide grating imager. The sensitivity to bulk refractive index changes was determined using a serial dilution of glycerol solution with the help of a refractometer. The surface sensitivity was examined using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte films in conjunction with optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy and characterized by the binding of acetazolamide to immobilized carbonic anhydrase under microfluidics. The results suggest that the imager has a limit of detection down to 2.2 × 10-6 for refractive index change and 0.078 ng/cm2 for the adsorbed mass.

  16. Overview of left ventricular outpouchings on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular outpouchings commonly include aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, and diverticulum and are now being increasingly detected on imaging. Distinction between these entities is of prime importance to guide proper management as outcomes for these entities differ substantially. Chest radiograph is usually nonspecific in their diagnosis. Echocardiography, multi-detector computed tomography evaluation and angiography are helpful in the diagnosis with their inherit limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a very useful tool that allows simultaneous anatomical and functional evaluation along with tissue characterization, which has diagnostic, theraputic and prognostic implications. This article gives an overview of left ventricular outpouchings with special emphasis on their differentiation using cardiac MRI. PMID:26675616

  17. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  18. [Fetal ocular anomalies: the advantages of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Brémond-Gignac, D; Copin, H; Elmaleh, M; Milazzo, S

    2010-05-01

    Congenital ocular malformations are uncommon and require prenatal diagnosis. Severe anomalies are more often detected by trained teams and minor anomalies are more difficult to identify and must be systematically sought, particularly when multiple malformations or a family and maternal history is known. The prenatal diagnosis-imaging tool most commonly used is ultrasound but it can be completed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which contributes crucial information. Fetal dysmorphism can occur in various types of dysfunction and prenatal diagnosis must recognize fetal ocular anomalies. After systematic morphologic ultrasound imaging, different abnormalities detected by MRI are studied. Classical parameters such as binocular and interorbital measurements are used to detect hypotelorism and hypertelorism. Prenatal ocular anomalies such as cataract microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma have been described. Fetal MRI added to prenatal sonography is essential in detecting cerebral and general anomalies and can give more information on the size and morphology of the eyeball. Fetal abnormality detection includes a detailed family and maternal history, an amniotic fluid sample for karyotype, and other analyses for a better understanding of the images. Each pregnancy must be discussed with all specialists for genetic counseling. With severe malformations, termination of pregnancy is proposed because of risk of blindness and associated cerebral or systemic anomalies. Early prenatal diagnosis of ocular malformations can also detect associated abnormalities, taking congenital cataracts that need surgical treatment into account as early as possible. Finally, various associated syndromes need a pediatric check-up that could lead to emergency treatment.

  19. Recent advances in resonant optothermalacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, James H., III; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    Optothermal detection is a spectroscopic technique where the energy input into a gas or other media caused by absorption of optical radiation is measured directly by means of a thermal detector.1-3 A fraction of the absorbed energy is transported to the thermal detector by heat conduction or molecular diffusion. In this work a conventional thermal sensor was replaced by a quartz tuning fork (QTF), and the optical power input into the gas was modulated at the QTF resonant frequency. We call this approach "resonant optothermoacoustic detection", or ROTADE. The same experimental setup can be used to conduct a closely related technique, quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS).4 QEPAS relies on energy transfer from the initially excited molecular vibrational state to the translational degrees of freedom. In some cases this process is too slow to follow the modulation required for QEPAS. In other cases, the resonant energy transfer can result in vibrational excitation of nitrogen, which relaxes very slowly. ROTADE, on the other hand, detects the energy delivered by molecules even if this energy is still in the form of vibrational excitation. The molecules will then release their energy to the QTF upon collision with its surface. Experimental investigations of ROTADE and its comparison with QEPAS were performed in pure CO2 and 0.5% acetylene in N2 using near-infrared diode lasers. A fiber collimator and a refocusing lens were used to focus the laser to a ~15 μm diameter waist. Its position was scanned in the QTF plane using a 3D translation stage with computer-controlled actuators. Different QTFs were used to compare the effect of modulation frequency on the ROTADE signal.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  1. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. PMID:24931095

  2. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-04-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera.

  3. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging near metal implants.

    PubMed

    Koch, K M; Hargreaves, B A; Pauly, K Butts; Chen, W; Gold, G E; King, K F

    2010-10-01

    The desire to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in the vicinity of embedded metallic hardware is increasing. The soft-tissue contrast available with MR techniques is advantageous in diagnosing complications near an increasing variety of MR-safe metallic hardware. Near such hardware, the spatial encoding mechanisms utilized in conventional MRI methods are often severely compromised. Mitigating these encoding difficulties has been the focus of numerous research investigations over the past two decades. Such approaches include view-angle tilting, short echo-time projection reconstruction acquisitions, single-point imaging, prepolarized MRI, and postprocessing image correction. Various technical advances have also enabled the recent development of two alternative approaches that have shown promising clinical potential. Here, the physical principals and proposed solutions to the problem of MRI near embedded metal are discussed.

  5. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  6. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  7. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeseok

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used as a valuable diagnostic imaging modality that exploits water content and water relaxation properties to provide both structural and functional information with high resolution. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) in MRI has been recently introduced as a new mechanism of image contrast, wherein exchangeable protons from mobile proteins and peptides are indirectly detected through saturation transfer and are not observable using conventional MRI. It has been demonstrated that CEST MRI can detect important tissue metabolites and byproducts such as glucose, glycogen, and lactate. Additionally, CEST MRI is sensitive to pH or temperature and can calibrate microenvironment dependent on pH or temperature. In this work, we provide an overview on recent trends in CEST MRI, introducing general principles of CEST mechanism, quantitative description of proton transfer process between water pool and exchangeable solute pool in the presence or absence of conventional magnetization transfer effect, and its applications

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver lesions: exceptions and atypical lesions.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; de Man, Robert A; Zondervan, Pieter E; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Preda, A; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2008-01-01

    On state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, most lesions can be detected and characterized with confidence according to well-known criteria. However, atypical characteristics in some common lesions and the incidental encounter with rare lesions may pose diagnostic difficulties. In this article, six challenging hepatic lesions will be discussed and evaluated on the most important magnetic resonance imaging sequences, with histological correlation when available. In addition, the background information concerning these lesions will be described based on the most recent available literature. By reading this article, the reader will be able to (1) categorize the lesion in solid and fluid-containing lesions, based on the T2 signal intensity; and (2) define the benign or malignant nature of the lesion, in relation to the signal intensity and dynamic enhancement pattern, despite the presence of atypical characteristics of some lesions. PMID:18436109

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Price, Anthony N.; Cheung, King K.; Cleary, Jon O; Campbell, Adrienne E; Riegler, Johannes; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the modality of choice for clinical studies of the heart and vasculature, offering detailed images of both structure and function with high temporal resolution. Small animals are increasingly used for genetic and translational research, in conjunction with models of common pathologies such as myocardial infarction. In all cases, effective methods for characterising a wide range of functional and anatomical parameters are crucial for robust studies. CMR is the gold-standard for the non-invasive examination of these models, although physiological differences, such as rapid heart rate, make this a greater challenge than conventional clinical imaging. However, with the help of specialised magnetic resonance (MR) systems, novel gating strategies and optimised pulse sequences, high-quality images can be obtained in these animals despite their small size. In this review, we provide an overview of the principal CMR techniques for small animals for example cine, angiography and perfusion imaging, which can provide measures such as ejection fraction, vessel anatomy and local blood flow, respectively. In combination with MR contrast agents, regional dysfunction in the heart can also be identified and assessed. We also discuss optimal methods for analysing CMR data, particularly the use of semi-automated tools for parameter measurement to reduce analysis time. Finally, we describe current and emerging methods for imaging the developing heart, aiding characterisation of congenital cardiovascular defects. Advanced small animal CMR now offers an unparalleled range of cardiovascular assessments. Employing these methods should allow new insights into the structural, functional and molecular basis of the cardiovascular system. PMID:21331311

  11. An Electromagnetic Resonance Circuit for Liquid Level Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, B. L.; Helseth, L. E.

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonators are often used to detect foreign materials. Here we present a simple experiment for the measurement of liquid level. The resonator, consisting of a coil and a capacitor, is brought to resonance by an external magnetic field source, and the corresponding resonance frequency is determined using Fourier analysis combined…

  12. Detecting light in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Mohageg, Makan (Inventor); Le, Thanh M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical device including a whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator configured to support one or more whispering gallery modes; and a photodetector optically coupled to an exterior surface of the optical resonator to receive evanescent light from the optical resonator to detect light inside the optical resonator.

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance imaging of Co films using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, B.J.; Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Midzor, M.M.; Roukes, M.L.; Childress, J.R.

    1998-07-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) technique has been applied to the study of spatial imaging in thin Co ferromagnetic film. A novel approach is proposesd to improve spatial resolution in MRFM, which is limited by the broad width of Co ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line. The authors introduce a selective local field with a small yittrium iron garnet (YIG) grain. They have performed MRFM detected FMR on a sample consisting of two sections of Co films laterally separated by {approximately}20 {micro}m. The experimental results demonstrate the scanning imaging capabilities of MRFM. The results can be understood qualitatively by means of the calculated magnetic field and field gradient profiles generated by the YIG shere.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  16. Detection of lymph node metastases with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in oesophageal cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    van der Jagt, E.J.; van Westreenen, H.L.; van Dullemen, H.M.; Kappert, P.; Groen, H.; Sietsma, J.; Oudkerk, M.; Plukker, J.Th.M.; van Dam, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aim: In this feasibility study we investigated whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) can be used to identify regional and distant lymph nodes, including mediastinal and celiac lymph node metastases in patients with oesophageal cancer. Patients and methods: Ten patients with a potentially curative resectable cancer of the oesophagus were eligible for this study. All patients included in the study had positive lymph nodes on conventional staging (including endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography). Nine patients underwent MRI + USPIO before surgery. Results were restricted to those patients who had both MRI + USPIO and histological examination. Results were compared with conventional staging and histopathologic findings. Results: One patient was excluded due to expired study time. Five out of 9 patients underwent an exploration; in 1 patient prior to surgery MRI + USPIO diagnosed liver metastases and in 3 patients an oesophageal resection was performed. USPIO uptake in mediastinal lymph nodes was seen in 6 out of 9 patients; in 3 patients non-malignant nodes were not visible. In total, 9 lymph node stations (of 6 patients) were separately analysed; 7 lymph node stations were assessed as positive (N1) on MRI+USPIO compared with 9 by conventional staging. According to histology findings, there was one false-positive and one false-negative result in MRI + USPIO. Also, conventional staging modalities had one false-positive and one false-negative result. MRI + USPIO had surplus value in one patient. Not all lymph node stations could be compared due to unforeseen explorations. No adverse effects occurred after USPIO infusion. Conclusion: MRI+USPIO identified the majority of mediastinal and celiac (suspect) lymph nodes in 9 patients with oesophageal cancer. MRI+USPIO could have an additional value in loco-regional staging; however, more

  17. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Michael; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef; Harneit, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a "large-scale" state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  18. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, Michael Harneit, Wolfgang; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef

    2015-04-15

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  19. Creating a magnetic resonance imaging ontology.

    PubMed

    Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Duvauferrier, Régis; Burgun, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to build an ontology of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The MRI domain has been analysed regarding MRI simulators and the DICOM standard. Tow MRI simulators have been analysed: JEMRIS, which is developed in XML and C++, has a hierarchical organisation and SIMRI, which is developed in C, has a good representation of MRI physical processes. To build the ontology we have used Protégé 4, owl2 that allows quantitative representations. The ontology has been validated by a reasoner (Fact++) and by a good representation of DICOM headers and of MRI processes. The MRI ontology would improved MRI simulators and eased semantic interoperability. PMID:21893854

  20. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, L S; Fritz, R C; Tirman, P F; Uffman, M

    1997-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides useful information regarding the elbow joint. Many abnormalities seen in the elbow are a result of trauma, often from sports such as baseball and tennis. Elbow problems are frequently related to the medial tension-lateral compression phenomenon where repeated valgus stress produces flexor-pronator strain, ulnar collateral ligament sprain, ulnar traction spurring, and ulnar neuropathy. The lateral compression causes osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and radial head, degenerative arthritis, and loose bodies. Other elbow abnormalities seen on MRI include radial collateral ligament injuries, biceps and triceps tendon injuries, other nerve entrapment syndromes, loose bodies, osseous and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, and masses, including bursae.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of sports injuries of the foot and ankle: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Riley, Geoffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is playing an increasingly important role in evaluation of the injured athlete's foot and ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging allows accurate detection of bony abnormalities, such as stress fractures, and soft-tissue abnormalities, including ligament tears, tendon tears, and tendinopathy. The interpreter of magnetic resonance images should systematically review the images, noting normal structures and accounting for changes in soft-tissue and bony signal. PMID:17218626

  3. Tools for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Cheong, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In less than fifteen years, as a non-invasive imaging option, cardiovascular MR has grown from a being a mere curiosity to becoming a widely used clinical tool for evaluating cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is now routinely used to study myocardial structure, cardiac function, macro vascular blood flow, myocardial perfusion, and myocardial viability. For someone entering the field of cardiac MR, this rapid pace of development in the field of CMRI might make it difficult to identify a cohesive starting point. In this brief review, we have attempted to summarize the key cardiovascular imaging techniques that have found widespread clinical acceptance. In particular, we describe the essential cardiac and respiratory gating techniques that form the backbone of all cardiovascular imaging methods. It is followed by four sections that discuss: (I) the gradient echo techniques that are used to assess ventricular function; (II) black-blood turbo spin echo (SE) methods used for morphologic assessment of the heart; (III) phase-contrast based techniques for the assessment of blood flow; and (IV) CMR methods for the assessment of myocardial ischemia and viability. In each section, we briefly summarize technical considerations relevant to the clinical use of these techniques, followed by practical information for its clinical implementation. In each of those four areas, CMRI is considered either as the benchmark imaging modality against which the diagnostic performance of other imaging modalities are compared against, or provides a complementary capability to existing imaging techniques. We have deliberately avoided including cutting-edge CMR imaging techniques practiced at few academic centers, and restricted our discussion to methods that are widely used and are likely to be available in a clinical setting. Our hope is that this review would propel an interested reader toward more comprehensive reviews in the literature. PMID:24834409

  4. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  5. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  6. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    A-prototype explosives detection system that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear resonance absorption techniques is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection- alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  7. Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  8. One-pot synthesis of magnetic nanoclusters enabling atherosclerosis-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Aastha; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Yuna; Lee, Taeksu; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, dextran-encrusted magnetic nanoclusters (DMNCs) were synthesized using a one-pot solution phase method for detection of atherosclerosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Pyrenyl dextran was used as a surfactant because of its electron-stabilizing effect and its amphiphilic nature, rendering the DMNCs stable and water-dispersible. The DMNCs were 65.6±4.3 nm, had a narrow size distribution, and were superparamagnetic with a high magnetization value of 60.1 emu/g. Further, they showed biocompatibility and high cellular uptake efficiency, as indicated by a strong interaction between dextran and macrophages. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the ability of DMNCs to act as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent capable of targeted detection of atherosclerosis. In view of these findings, it is concluded that DMNCs can be used as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents to detect inflammatory disease. PMID:24904209

  9. One-pot synthesis of magnetic nanoclusters enabling atherosclerosis-targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Aastha; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Yuna; Lee, Taeksu; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, dextran-encrusted magnetic nanoclusters (DMNCs) were synthesized using a one-pot solution phase method for detection of atherosclerosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Pyrenyl dextran was used as a surfactant because of its electron-stabilizing effect and its amphiphilic nature, rendering the DMNCs stable and water-dispersible. The DMNCs were 65.6±4.3 nm, had a narrow size distribution, and were superparamagnetic with a high magnetization value of 60.1 emu/g. Further, they showed biocompatibility and high cellular uptake efficiency, as indicated by a strong interaction between dextran and macrophages. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the ability of DMNCs to act as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent capable of targeted detection of atherosclerosis. In view of these findings, it is concluded that DMNCs can be used as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents to detect inflammatory disease.

  10. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben E; Harris, Robert J; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive imaging technique with exquisite sensitivity to soft tissue composition. Magnetic resonance imaging is primary tool for brain tumor diagnosis, evaluation of drug response assessment, and clinical monitoring of the patient during the course of their disease. The flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence design allows for a variety of image contrasts to be acquired, including information about magnetic resonance-specific tissue characteristics, molecular dynamics, microstructural organization, vascular composition, and biochemical status. The current review highlights recent advancements and novel approaches in MR characterization of brain tumors.

  11. Penetrating power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, Roberta; Watson, Joseph C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of revealing the presence and identifying the nature of conductive targets is of central interest in many fields, including security, medicine, industry, archaeology and geophysics. In many applications, these targets are shielded by external materials and thus cannot be directly accessed. Hence, interrogation techniques are required that allow penetration through the shielding materials, in order for the target to be identified. Electromagnetic interrogation techniques represent a powerful solution to this challenge, as they enable penetration through conductive shields. In this work, we demonstrate the power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging to penetrate through metallic shields (1.5-mm-thick) and image targets (having conductivities σ ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm-1) concealed behind them.

  12. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of eye movements.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Kabala, J; Laitt, R; Weston, M; Goddard, P; Hoh, H B; Potts, M J; Harrad, R A

    1993-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique in which multiple sequential static orbital MRI films are taken while the patient fixates a series of targets across the visual field. These are then sequenced to give a graphic animation to the eyes. The excellent soft tissue differentiation of MRI, combined with the dynamic imaging, allows rapid visualisation, and functional assessment of the extraocular muscles. Good assessment of contractility can be obtained, but the technique does not allow study of saccadic or pursuit eye movements. We have used this technique in 36 patients with a range of ocular motility disorders, including thyroid-related ophthalmopathy, blow-out fracture, post-operative lost or slipped muscle, and Duane's syndrome.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  14. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  15. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  16. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  17. Skin detection in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Stephanie M.; Velez-Reyes, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral imagers collect information of the scene being imaged at close contiguous bands in the electromagnetic spectrum at high spectral resolutions. The number of applications for these imagers has grown over the years as they are now used in various fields. Many algorithms are described in the literature for skin detection in color imagery. However increased detection accuracy, in particularly over cluttered backgrounds, and of small targets and in low spatial resolution systems can be achieved by taking advantage of the spectral information that can be collected with multi/hyperspectral imagers. The ultimate goal of our research work is the development of a human presence detection system over different backgrounds using hyperspectral imaging in the 400-1000nm region of the spectrum that can be used in the context of search and rescue operations, and surveillance in defense and security applications. The 400-1000 nm region is chosen because of availability of low cost imagers in this region of the spectrum. This paper presents preliminary results in the use of combinations of normalized difference indices that can be used to detect regions of interest in a scene that can be used as a pre-processor in a human detection system. A new normalized difference ratio, the Skin Normalized Difference Index (SNDI) is proposed. Experimental results show that a combination the NDGRI+NDVI+SNDI results in a probability of detection similar to that of the NDGRI. However, the combination of features results in a much lower probability of false alarm.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using RASER

    PubMed Central

    Goerke, Ute; Garwood, Michael; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Although functional imaging of neuronal activity by magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary methodology employed in studying the brain, significant portions of the brain are inaccessible by this methodology due to its sensitivity to macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities induced near air filled cavities in the head. In this paper, we demonstrate that this sensitivity is eliminated by a novel pulse sequence, RASER (rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing) (Chamberlain et al., 2007), that can generate functional maps. This is accomplished because RASER acquired signals are purely and perfectly T2 weighted, without any T2*-effects that are inherent in the other image acquisition schemes employed to date. T2-weighted fMRI sequences are also more specific to the site of neuronal activity at ultrahigh magnetic fields than T2*-variations since they are dominated by signal components originating from the tissue in the capillary bed. The RASER based fMRI response is quantified; it is shown to have inherently less noisy time series and to provide fMRI in brain regions, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, which are challenging to image with conventional techniques. PMID:20699123

  20. Neutron Resonance Radiography for Explosives Detection: Technical Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Raas, W L; Blackburn, B; Boyd, E; Hall, J M; Kohse, G; Lanza, R; Rusnak, B; Watterson, J W

    2005-11-09

    Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (NRR) has recently become a focus of investigation as a supplement to conventional x-ray systems as a non-invasive, non-destructive means of detecting explosive material concealed in checked luggage or cargo containers at airports. Using fast (1-6 MeV) neutrons produced by the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, NRR provides both an imaging capability and the ability to determine the chemical composition of materials in baggage or cargo. Elemental discrimination is achieved by exploiting the resonance features of the neutron cross-section for oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen. Simulations have shown the effectiveness of multiple-element NRR through Monte Carlo transport methods; this work is focused on the development of a prototype system that will incorporate an accelerator-based neutron source and a neutron detection and imaging system to demonstrate the realistic capabilities of NRR in distinguishing the elemental components of concealed objects. Preliminary experiments have exposed significant technical difficulties unapparent in simulations, including the presence of image contamination from gamma ray production, the detection of low-fluence fast neutrons in a gamma field, and the mechanical difficulties inherent in the use of thin foil windows for gas cell confinement. To mitigate these concerns, a new gas target has been developed to simultaneously reduce gamma ray production and increase structural integrity in high flux gas targets. Development of a neutron imaging system and neutron counting based on characteristic neutron pulse shapes have been investigated as a means of improving signal to noise ratios, reducing irradiation times, and increasing the accuracy of elemental determination.

  1. Focal liver lesions: Practical magnetic resonance imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P; Velloni, Fernanda; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Rajapaksha, Aruna; Semelka, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread of cross-sectional imaging, a growth of incidentally detected focal liver lesions (FLL) has been observed. A reliable detection and characterization of FLL is critical for optimal patient management. Maximizing accuracy of imaging in the context of FLL is paramount in avoiding unnecessary biopsies, which may result in post-procedural complications. A tremendous development of new imaging techniques has taken place during these last years. Nowadays, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in management of liver lesions, using a radiation-free technique and a safe contrast agent profile. MRI plays a key role in the non-invasive correct characterization of FLL. MRI is capable of providing comprehensive and highly accurate diagnostic information, with the additional advantage of lack of harmful ionizing radiation. These properties make MRI the mainstay for the noninvasive evaluation of focal liver lesions. In this paper we review the state-of-the-art MRI liver protocol, briefly discussing different sequence types, the unique characteristics of imaging non-cooperative patients and discuss the role of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents. A review of the imaging features of the most common benign and malignant FLL is presented, supplemented by a schematic representation of a simplistic practical approach on MRI. PMID:26261689

  2. Surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Baccar, H; Mejri, M B; Hafaiedh, I; Ktari, T; Aouni, M; Abdelghani, A

    2010-07-15

    This work describes an approach for the development of two bacteria biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The first biosensor was based on functionalized gold substrate and the second one on immobilized gold nanoparticles. For the first biosensor, the gold substrate was functionalized with acid-thiol using the self-assembled monolayer technique, while the second one was functionalized with gold nanoparticles immobilized on modified gold substrate. A polyclonal anti-Escherichia coli antibody was immobilized for specific (E. coli) and non-specific (Lactobacillus) bacteria detection. Detection limit with a good reproducibility of 10(4) and 10(3) cfu mL(-1) of E. coli bacteria has been obtained for the first biosensor and for the second one respectively. A refractive index variation below 5x10(-3) due to bacteria adsorption is able to be detected. The refractive index of the multilayer structure and of the E. coli bacteria layer was estimated with a modeling software. PMID:20602974

  3. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  4. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Bell, Thomas M.; Rhodes, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component.

  5. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Bell, T.M.; Rhodes, G.W.

    1994-10-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component. 5 figs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Colliot, O; Hamelin, L; Sarazin, M

    2013-10-01

    A major challenge for neuroimaging is to contribute to the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detecting different types of structural and functional abnormalities at an early stage of the disease. Anatomical MRI is the most widely used technique and provides local and global measures of atrophy. The recent diagnostic criteria of "mild cognitive impairment due to AD" include hippocampal atrophy, which is considered a marker of neuronal injury. Advanced image analysis techniques generate automatic and reproducible measures both in the hippocampus and throughout the whole brain. Recent modalities such as diffusion-tensor imaging and resting-state functional MRI provide additional measures that could contribute to the early diagnosis but require further validation.

  7. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  8. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques.

  9. Saliency detection for stereoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuming; Wang, Junle; Narwaria, Manish; Le Callet, Patrick; Lin, Weisi

    2014-06-01

    Many saliency detection models for 2D images have been proposed for various multimedia processing applications during the past decades. Currently, the emerging applications of stereoscopic display require new saliency detection models for salient region extraction. Different from saliency detection for 2D images, the depth feature has to be taken into account in saliency detection for stereoscopic images. In this paper, we propose a novel stereoscopic saliency detection framework based on the feature contrast of color, luminance, texture, and depth. Four types of features, namely color, luminance, texture, and depth, are extracted from discrete cosine transform coefficients for feature contrast calculation. A Gaussian model of the spatial distance between image patches is adopted for consideration of local and global contrast calculation. Then, a new fusion method is designed to combine the feature maps to obtain the final saliency map for stereoscopic images. In addition, we adopt the center bias factor and human visual acuity, the important characteristics of the human visual system, to enhance the final saliency map for stereoscopic images. Experimental results on eye tracking databases show the superior performance of the proposed model over other existing methods.

  10. Microtesla magnetic resonance imaging with a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Robert; Lee, SeungKyun; ten Haken, Bennie; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-15

    We have constructed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) configured as a second-derivative gradiometer. The magnetic field sensitivity of the detector is independent of frequency; it is therefore possible to obtain high-resolution images by prepolarizing the nuclear spins in a field of 300 mT and detecting the signal at 132 fYT, corresponding to a proton Larmor frequency of 5.6 kHz. The reduction in the measurement field by a factor of 10,000 compared with conventional scanners eliminates inhomogeneous broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines, even in fields with relatively poor homogeneity. The narrow linewidths result in enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the magnetic field gradients used to encode the image. We present two-dimensional images of phantoms and pepper slices, obtained in typical magnetic field gradients of 100 fYT/m, with a spatial resolution of about 1mm. We further demonstrate a slice-selected image of an intact pepper. By varying the time delay between removal of the polarizing field and initiation of the spin echo sequence we acquire T1-weighted contrast images of water phantoms, some of which are doped with a paramagnetic salt; here, T1 is the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time. The techniques presented here could readily be adapted to existing multichannel SQUID systems used for magnetic source imaging of brain signals. Further potential applications include low-cost systems for tumor screening and imaging peripheral regions of the body.

  11. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging. PMID:22354793

  12. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging.

  13. In utero eyeball development study by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Brémond-Gignac, D S; Benali, K; Deplus, S; Cussenot, O; Ferkdadji, L; Elmaleh, M; Lassau, J P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure fetal ocular development and to determine a growth curve by means of measurements in utero. Fetal ocular development was recorded by analysis of the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomic study allowed definition of the best contrasted MRI sequences for calculation of the ocular surface. Biometric analysis of the values of the ocular surface in the neuro-ocular plane in 35 fetuses allowed establishment of a linear model of ocular growth curve in utero. Evaluation of ocular development may allow the detection and confirmation of malformational ocular anomalies such as microphthalmia.

  14. Detection of viability of transplanted beta cells labeled with a novel contrast agent - polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Biao; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hai; Xie, Qiuping; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Chuanxin; Wu, Yulian

    2012-01-01

    Islets can be visualized on MRI by labeling with superparamagnetic contrast agent during the transplantation procedure. However, whether the signal intensity reflects the cell number and cellular viability has not been determined. We used a self-synthesized novel superparamagnetic contrast agent -polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO) - to label β-TC-6 cells (a mouse insulinoma cell line) or primary islets with commercial Feridex as a control. The labeling efficiency of two agents was compared by Prussian blue staining, intracellular iron content determination and MR scanning. Cells were exposed to hypoxia, high-glucose or exogenous H₂O₂ stimulation before/after PVP-SPIO labeling. Normal and injured cells were also transplanted into renal subcapsule. A clinically used 3.0 T MR scan was performed in vitro and 24 h post-transplantation to investigate the correlation between cellular viability and signal. Our PVP-SPIO displayed superior biocompatibility and magnetic properties. All of the cells could be labeled at 100 µg/ml iron concentration after 24 h incubation. At 100 µg/ml iron concentration, 1 × 10⁵ β cells labeled with PVP-SPIO could already be visualized in vitro by MRI, less than the detection threshold of Feridex. There existed a linear correlation between the number of labeled cells and R₂ value on the T₂ -weighted images. The signal intensity and the intracellular iron content declined along with the decreased viability of labeled cells. There was also a significant difference in signal intensity between injured and normal labeled cells after transplantation. From these results, we concluded that PVP-SPIO possessed superior cell labeling efficiency, and β cells could be labeled without compromising viability and function. The signal intensity on MRI might be a useful predictor to evaluate the number and the viability of PVP-SPIO-labeled cells.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  17. Current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chevallier, Olivier; Moulin, Morgan; Favelier, Sylvain; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Crehange, Gilles; Cochet, Alexandre; Cormier, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer, and targeting or guiding prostate biopsy. mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) combined with several functional sequences including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) and spectroscopic imaging. Recently, mp-MRI has been used to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness and to identify anteriorly located tumors before and during active surveillance. Moreover, recent studies have reported that mp-MRI is a reliable imaging modality for detecting local recurrence after radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System (PI-RADS) scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the current place of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:26682144

  18. Evaluation of magnetic resonance sequences in imaging mediastinal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Stark, D.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moore, E.H.

    1984-10-01

    Ten patients having a mediastinal tumor were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using from two to four imaging sequences. Seven had bronchial carcinoma and three had benign lesions. The sequences included the spin-echo technique with repetition time (TR) values of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 sec and echo time (TE) values of 28 and 56 msec, and the inversion-recovery technique. The signal-intensity ratios of the mediastinal mass and mediastinal fat, which are a measure of image contrast, were compared for the different imaging sequences. Also signal-to-noise ratios were measured relative to both mediastinal fat and mediastinal mass. With spin-echo imaging, decreasing the TR value resulted in an increase in mass/fat contrast in all patients, making the masses easier to detect, but this also resulted in decreased signal-to-noise ratios. Inversion-recovery imaging with the sequence used resulted in a greatly increased mass/fat contrast, because of a relative decrease in signal from the mass. Spin-echo imaging with both short and long TR values provides good tissue contrast and good signal-to-noise ratios.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    PubMed

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  2. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. PMID:20630342

  3. Metabolomic Imaging for Human Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Lee; Jordan, Kate W.; Ratai, Eva M.; Sheng, Jinhua; Adkins, Christen B.; DeFeo, Elita M; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Ying, Leslie; McDougal, W. Scott; Cheng, Leo L.

    2010-01-01

    As current radiological approaches cannot accurately localize prostate cancer in vivo, biopsies are conducted at random within prostates for at-risk patients, leading to high false-negative rates. Metabolomic imaging can map cancer-specific biomolecular profile values onto anatomical structures to direct biopsy. In this preliminary study, we evaluated five prostatectomy-removed whole prostates from biopsy-proven cancer patients on a 7 Tesla human, whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. Localized, multi-cross-sectional, multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectra were used to construct a malignancy index based on prostate cancer metabolomic profiles obtained from previous, intact tissue analyses by a 14 Tesla spectrometer. This calculated Malignancy Index shows linear correlation with lesion size (p<0.013) and demonstrates a 93–97% overall accuracy for detecting the presence of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:20371475

  4. Small Animal Imaging with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Nouls, John; Badea, Alexandra; Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Petiet, Alexandra; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has evolved significantly from testing the boundaries of imaging physics to its expanding use today as a tool in non-invasive biomedical investigations. This review is intended to capture the state-of-the-art in MRM for scientists who may be unfamiliar with this modality, but who want to apply its capabilities to their research. We therefore include a brief review of MR concepts and methods of animal handling and support before covering a range of MRM applications including the heart, lung, brain, and the emerging field of MR histology. High-resolution anatomical imaging reveals increasingly exquisite detail in healthy animals and subtle architectural aberrations that occur in genetically altered models. Resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions is now routinely attained in living animals, and 10 µm3 is feasible in fixed specimens. Such images almost rival conventional histology while allowing the object to be viewed interactively in any plane. MRM is now increasingly used to provide functional information in living animals. Images of the beating heart, breathing lung, and functioning brain can be recorded. While clinical MRI focuses on diagnosis, MRM is used to reveal fundamental biology or to non-invasively measure subtle changes in the structure or function of organs during disease progression or in response to experimental therapies. The ability of MRM to provide a detailed functional and anatomical picture in rats and mice, and to track this picture over time, makes it a promising platform with broad applications in biomedical research. PMID:18172332

  5. Contactless ultrasound detection using an optical ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Guo, L. Jay; Fan, Xudong

    2016-03-01

    We develop an air-couple ultrasound detector based on an optical fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) suspended on a Ushaped holder. The OFRR is a glass capillary with an outer diameter of approximately 130 μm and a wall thickness in the order of 1~10 μm. The circular cross section of the OFRR supports the high-Q whispering gallery mode (WGM) that circulates along the circumference. Incoming ultrasound pressure results in a small refractive index change in the glass wall and geometrical change in the OFRR shape, both of which in turn lead to a spectral shift in the WGM that can be sensitively detected owing to WGM with high optical Q-factors (>107). Due to the suspension nature of the OFRR, the ultrasound detection can be carried out in air, which is advantageous in comparison with other ultrasound detections that require acoustic coupling media such water, gel or solid. The sensitivity can be tuned and optimized by changing the diameter and wall thickness. Besides the optical detection, we also demonstrate optomechanical ultrasound mixing, in which optomechanical vibration is first excited within the OFRR that subsequently modulates the ultrasound wave. Our work will lead to the development of a new type of air-coupled ultrasound detector that can be used for photo-acoustic imaging, non-invasive ultrasound detection of external objects, and ultrasound detection/characterization of internal objects (such as particles and liquids) flowing inside the capillary.

  6. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Florian, A.; Jurcut, R.; Ginghina, C.; Bogaert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a prime player in the clinical and preclinical detection of ischemic heart disease (IHD) as well in the prognosis assessment by offering a comprehensive approach for all spectrums of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The aim of this review is to provide the reader a state–of–the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study IHD patients. In patients with suspected/stable CAD, functional and perfusion imaging both at rest and during vasodilatatory stress (adenosine, dypiridamole)/dobutamine stress can accurately depict ischemic myocardium secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. In patients with acute MI, MRI is a robust tool for differentiating and sizing the jeopardized and the infarcted myocardium by using a combination of functional, edema, perfusion and Gd contrast imaging. Moreover, important prognostic factors like myocardial salvage, the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO), post reperfusion myocardial hemorrhage, RV involvement and infarct related complications can be assessed in the same examination. In patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, the role of the MRI extends from diagnosis by means of Gadolinium contrast scar imaging to therapy and prognosis by functional assessment and viability testing with rest and dobutamine stress imaging. In all the circumstances mentioned, MRI derived information has been proven valuable in every day clinical decision making and prognosis assessment. Thus, MRI is becoming more and more an accepted alternative to other imaging modalities both in the acute and chronic setting. PMID:22514564

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of total body fat.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Saeed, N; Hajnal, J V; Brynes, A; Goldstone, A P; Frost, G; Bell, J D

    1998-11-01

    In this study we assessed different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning regimes and examined some of the assumptions commonly made for measuring body fat content by MRI. Whole body MRI was used to quantify and study different body fat depots in 67 women. The whole body MRI results showed that there was a significant variation in the percentage of total internal, as well as visceral, adipose tissue across a range of adiposity, which could not be predicted from total body fat and/or subcutaneous fat. Furthermore, variation in the amount of total, subcutaneous, and visceral adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements such as skinfold measurements, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio. Finally, we show for the first time subjects with a percent body fat close to the theoretical maximum (68%). This study demonstrates that the large variation in individual internal fat content cannot be predicted from either indirect methods or direct imaging techniques, such as MRI or computed tomography, on the basis of a single-slice sampling strategy. PMID:9804581

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Dawson, C; Aitken, K; Ng, K; Dolke, G; Gadian, D; Whitfield, H N

    1994-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the response of an individual patient to lithotripsy remains impossible. Certain factors such as the chemical composition, size, and position of the calculus are known to be important in determining the success rate. This paper reports the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate 141 urinary calculi in vitro. A wide range of signals for each chemical type of calculus was found on each of the three imaging sequences used (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density). None of the chemical groups examined showed a typical MRI profile allowing it to be distinguished from the other groups. Analysis of variance showed a statistical difference between signals for apatite and struvite on the T1-weighted sequence, and between struvite and uric acid on the proton density sequence (both, P < 0.05). These results show for the first time that MRI is capable of distinguishing between different chemical types of stones. This is particularly important for the comparison of struvite and apatite which appear to be similar in conventional investigations but have quite different hardness values. Further work is in progress correlating the results of this study with stone microhardness and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy fragility tests to determine whether MRI accurately predicts the success of lithotripsy.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of total body fat.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Saeed, N; Hajnal, J V; Brynes, A; Goldstone, A P; Frost, G; Bell, J D

    1998-11-01

    In this study we assessed different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning regimes and examined some of the assumptions commonly made for measuring body fat content by MRI. Whole body MRI was used to quantify and study different body fat depots in 67 women. The whole body MRI results showed that there was a significant variation in the percentage of total internal, as well as visceral, adipose tissue across a range of adiposity, which could not be predicted from total body fat and/or subcutaneous fat. Furthermore, variation in the amount of total, subcutaneous, and visceral adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements such as skinfold measurements, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio. Finally, we show for the first time subjects with a percent body fat close to the theoretical maximum (68%). This study demonstrates that the large variation in individual internal fat content cannot be predicted from either indirect methods or direct imaging techniques, such as MRI or computed tomography, on the basis of a single-slice sampling strategy.

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  11. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology.

  12. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology. PMID:24006360

  13. Hands-on resonance-enhanced photoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2001-10-01

    The design of an improved photoacoustic converter cell using kitchen equipment is described. It operates by changing manually the Helmholtz resonance frequency of bottles by adjusting the distance between the bottleneck and the outer ear. The experiment helps to gain insights in ear performance, in photoacoustic detection methods, in resonance phenomena and their role for detecting small periodic signals in the presence of noise.

  14. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging investigation of resonance tuning in soprano singing

    PubMed Central

    Bresch, Erik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates using real-time magnetic resonance imaging the vocal tract shaping of 5 soprano singers during the production of two-octave scales of sung vowels. A systematic shift of the first vocal tract resonance frequency with respect to the fundamental is shown to exist for high vowels across all subjects. No consistent systematic effect on the vocal tract resonance could be shown across all of the subjects for other vowels or for the second vocal tract resonance. PMID:21110548

  15. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Viviani, Roberto; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Stingl, Julia C

    2014-01-01

    Because of the large variation in the response to psychoactive medication, many studies have attempted to uncover genetic factors that determine response. While considerable knowledge exists on the large effects of genetic polymorphisms on pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of drugs, effects of the concentration at the target site and pharmacodynamic effects on brain functions in disease are much less known. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize response to medication in brain behaviour circuits in vivo in humans and assess the influence of pharmacogenetic factors. Two types of studies have been used to characterize effects of medication and genetic variation. In task-related activation studies the focus is on changes in the activity of a neural circuit associated with a specific psychological process. The second type of study investigates resting state perfusion. These studies provide an assessment of vascular changes associated with bioavailability of drugs in the brain, but may also assess changes in neural activity after binding of centrally active agents. Task-related pharmacogenetic studies of cognitive function have characterized the effects in the prefrontal cortex of genetic polymorphisms of dopamine receptors (DRD2), metabolic enzymes (COMT) and in the post-synaptic signalling cascade under the administration of dopamine agonists and antagonists. In contrast, pharmacogenetic imaging with resting state perfusion is still in its infancy. However, the quantitative nature of perfusion imaging, its non-invasive character and its repeatability might be crucial assets in visualizing the effects of medication in vivo in man during therapy. PMID:23802603

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  17. Proposition for a protocol for anatomical studies on collection specimens by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chanet, Bruno; Guintard, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations for anatomical studies on collection specimens are becoming more and more frequent. As the presence of metallic objects within the specimens can disturb the acquisition of images and damage both specimens and materials, a simple protocol using radiographs is here proposed to detect these objects in collection specimens before conducting an MRI examination.

  18. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated.

  19. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Fraser, D D; Frank, J A; Dalakas, M; Miller, F W; Hicks, J E; Plotz, P

    1991-11-01

    We examined the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting active muscle disease in 40 patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Ten patients without evidence of an inflammatory neuromuscular disease were also studied. The fat-suppressive (STIR) image signal intensity correlated with clinical disease activity and, in most cases, with the presence of inflammation on muscle biopsy. Increased STIR signal intensity paralleled disease activity in 3 patients followed serially. MRI provided a detailed anatomic view of the extent of muscle changes in these diseases. Because of inherent limitations of other measures of disease in these disorders, MRI may prove to be a useful complimentary test for assessing disease activity and guiding therapeutic decisions and biopsy in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

  1. Prostate cancer risk stratification with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Felker, Ely R; Margolis, Daniel J; Nassiri, Nima; Marks, Leonard S

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has shown promise for prostate cancer (PCa) risk stratification. mpMRI, often followed by targeted biopsy, can be used to confirm low-grade disease before enrollment in active surveillance. In patients with intermediate or high-risk PCa, mpMRI can be used to inform surgical management. mpMRI has sensitivity of 44% to 87% for detection of clinically significant PCa and negative predictive value of 63% to 98% for exclusion of significant disease. In addition to tumor identification, mpMRI has also been shown to contribute significant incremental value to currently used clinical nomograms for predicting extraprostatic extension. In combination with conventional clinical criteria, accuracy of mpMRI for prediction of extraprostatic extension ranges from 92% to 94%, significantly higher than that achieved with clinical criteria alone. Supplemental sequences, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, allow quantitative evaluation of cancer-suspicious regions. Apparent diffusion coefficient appears to be an independent predictor of PCa aggressiveness. Addition of apparent diffusion coefficient to Epstein criteria may improve sensitivity for detection of significant PCa by as much as 16%. Limitations of mpMRI include variability in reporting, underestimation of PCa volume and failure to detect clinically significant disease in a small but significant number of cases. PMID:27040381

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron deposition in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brass, Steven D; Chen, Nan-kuei; Mulkern, Robert V; Bakshi, Rohit

    2006-02-01

    Deposition of iron in the brain is proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of the normal aging process and neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas iron is required for normal neuronal metabolism, excessive levels can contribute to the formation of free radicals, leading to lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool to detect excessive iron in the brain and longitudinally monitor changes in iron levels. Iron deposition is associated with a reduction in the T2 relaxation time, leading to hypointensity on spin-echo and gradient-echo T2-weighted images. The MRI changes associated with iron deposition have been observed both in normal aging and in various chronic neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. Magnetic resonance imaging metrics providing information about iron concentrations include R2, R2', and R2*. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of iron and its detection by MRI in various neurological disorders. We will review the basic biochemical properties of iron and its influence on MRI signal. We will also summarize the sensitivity and specificity of MRI techniques in detecting iron. The MRI and pathological findings pertaining to brain iron will be reviewed with respect to normal aging and a variety of neurological disorders. Finally, the biochemistry and pathophysiology surrounding iron, oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation in the brain will be discussed, including therapeutic implications. The potential role of iron deposition and its assessment by MRI provides exciting potential applications to the diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapeutic development for disorders of the brain.

  3. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27446601

  4. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  5. Amyloid imaging using fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F-MRI).

    PubMed

    Tooyama, Ikuo; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Kato, Tomoko; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2016-09-01

    The formation of senile plaques followed by the deposition of amyloid-β is the earliest pathological change in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the detection of senile plaques remains the most important early diagnostic indicator of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid imaging is a noninvasive technique for visualizing senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients using positron emission tomography (PET) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because fluorine-19 ((19)F) displays an intense nuclear magnetic resonance signal and is almost non-existent in the body, targets are detected with a higher signal-to-noise ratio using appropriate fluorinated contrast agents. The recent introduction of high-field MRI allows us to detect amyloid depositions in the brain of living mouse using (19)F-MRI. So far, at least three probes have been reported to detect amyloid deposition in the brain of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease; (E,E)-1-fluoro-2,5-bis-(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy)styrylbenzene (FSB), 1,7-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxycarbonylethyl-1,6-heptadiene3,5-dione (FMeC1, Shiga-Y5) and 6-(3',6',9',15',18',21'-heptaoxa-23',23',23'-trifluorotricosanyloxy)-2-(4'-dimethylaminostyryl)benzoxazole (XP7, Shiga-X22). This review presents the recent advances in amyloid imaging using (19)F-MRI, including our own studies.

  6. Parallel-scan based microarray imager capable of simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and hyperspectral fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyi; Yang, Lei; Liu, Le; Chong, Xinyuan; Guo, Jun; Ma, Suihua; Ji, Yanhong; He, Yonghong

    2011-12-15

    With the development of the microarray technology, demands for array detection techniques become higher and higher. For many microarrays, several biomolecular interactions occur simultaneously and the interplay of various factors that affect these interactions remains poorly understood. Detecting such interactions with a single technique can often be a difficult and complicated process. In this work we propose a combined technique which enables simultaneous angle-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing and hyperspectral fluorescence imaging. This tandem technique offers two-dimensional imaging of the whole array plane. The refractive index information obtained from SPR sensing and the physicochemical properties obtained from fluorescence imaging provide a comprehensive analysis of biological events on the array-chip. In addition, SPR and fluorescence detection techniques confirm each other in experimental results to exclude false-positive or false-negative cases. In terms of SPR sensing performance, the refractive index resolution is 3.86×10(-6) refractive index units (RIU), and the detection limit is 10(4) cfu/ml of Escherichia coli bacteria. The resolving power and detection sensitivity of fluorescence imaging are approximately 20 μm and 0.61 fluors/μm(2), respectively. Finally, two model experiments, detecting the DNA hybridization and biotin-avidin interactions respectively, demonstrate the biomedical application of this system. PMID:21996322

  7. Bianalyte mass detection with a single resonant microcantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Haitao; Li Xinxin

    2009-01-05

    Mass-loading detection of multiple kinds of analyte with a single resonant microcantilever is proposed and experimentally validated. By exciting the cantilever in different resonance modes and adsorbing the different analytes at different locations of the cantilever, the specific mass of either kind of analyte can be independently detected. The proposed micromechanical resonant cantilever sensor is designed and fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques. Used as simulant adsorbates, Au and Cr thin films are selectively implemented on the cantilever to verify the bianalyte detecting function. The testing results are consistent with the theoretical analysis, with the detection error being an order of magnitude lower than the analyzed mass.

  8. Fetal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings In Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection With Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Averill, Lauren W; Kandula, Vinay V R; Akyol, Yakup; Epelman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection, requiring a detailed search for specific features. A combination of anterior temporal lobe abnormalities, white matter lesions, and polymicrogyria is especially predictive. Fetal MRI may provide a unique opportunity to detect anterior temporal cysts and occipital horn septations, as dilation of these areas may decrease later in development. Cortical migration abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, cerebellar dysplasia, and periventricular calcifications are often better depicted on postnatal imaging but can also be detected on fetal MRI. We present the prenatal brain MRI findings seen in congenital cytomegalovirus infection and provide postnatal imaging correlation, highlighting the evolution of findings at different times in prenatal and postnatal developments. PMID:26614131

  9. SPRITE: a modern approach to scanning probe contact resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, A. B.; Killgore, J. P.; Hurley, D. C.

    2014-02-01

    We describe a system for contact resonance tracking called scanning probe resonance image tracking electronics (SPRITE). SPRITE can image two contact resonance frequencies simultaneously and thus can be used to acquire quantitative mechanical properties without requiring tedious image registration or other forms of post-processing. SPRITE is up to ten times faster than its predecessor, and its use of digital frequency synthesis makes the frequency 100 times more precise. In addition, SPRITE can acquire quality factor images, which can be used to determine viscoelastic material properties. The resonant frequency of two eigenmodes and two corresponding quality factor images can be acquired simultaneously. These new features can enable accurate nanomechanical imaging of surfaces and devices.

  10. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  11. Concentric Förster resonance energy transfer imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miao; Algar, W Russ

    2015-08-18

    Concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (cFRET) configurations based on semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are promising probes for biological sensing because they offer multiplexing capability in a single vector with robust ratiometric detection by exploiting a network of FRET pathways. To expand the scope and utility of cFRET probes, it is necessary to develop and validate cFRET imaging methodology. In this technical note, we present such a methodology using a protease-sensitive cFRET configuration that comprises a green-emitting QD, Alexa Fluor 555 (A555), and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647). Photoluminescence (PL) images were acquired with three filter-based emission channels to permit measurement of A555/QD and A647/QD PL ratios. With reference to calibration samples, these PL ratios were used to calculate quantitative progress curves for proteolytic activity in regions of interest in the acquired images. Importantly, the imaging methodology reproduces quantitative results obtained with a monochromator-based fluorescence plate reader. Spatiotemporal resolution is demonstrated by tracking the activity of two prototypical proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin, as they diffuse down the length of a capillary. This methodology is expected to enable the future use of cFRET probes for cellular sensing and other imaging assays. PMID:26214686

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sefrova, Jana; Odrazka, Karel; Paluska, Petr; Belobradek, Zdenek; Brodak, Milos; Dolezel, Martin; Prosvic, Petr; Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan; Hoffmann, Petr; Louda, Miroslav; Nejedla, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  14. Imaging tumor hypoxia by magnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia results from the negative balance between the oxygen demands of the tissue and the capacity of the neovasculature to deliver sufficient oxygen. The resulting oxygen deficit has important consequences with regard to the aggressiveness and malignancy of tumors, as well as their resistance to therapy, endowing the imaging of hypoxia with vital repercussions in tumor prognosis and therapy design. The molecular and cellular events underlying hypoxia are mediated mainly through hypoxia-inducible factor, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects over a variety of cellular processes, including oncologic transformation, invasion and metastasis. However, few methodologies have been able to monitor noninvasively the oxygen tensions in vivo. MRI and MRS are often used for this purpose. Most MRI approaches are based on the effects of the local oxygen tension on: (i) the relaxation times of (19)F or (1)H indicators, such as perfluorocarbons or their (1)H analogs; (ii) the hemodynamics and magnetic susceptibility effects of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin; and (iii) the effects of paramagnetic oxygen on the relaxation times of tissue water. (19)F MRS approaches monitor tumor hypoxia through the selective accumulation of reduced nitroimidazole derivatives in hypoxic zones, whereas electron spin resonance methods determine the oxygen level through its influence on the linewidths of appropriate paramagnetic probes in vivo. Finally, Overhauser-enhanced MRI combines the sensitivity of EPR methodology with the resolution of MRI, providing a window into the future use of hyperpolarized oxygen probes.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Li, Ke; Bryant, Nathan D

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases often exhibit a temporally varying, spatially heterogeneous, and multifaceted pathology. The goals of this chapter are to describe and evaluate the use of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to characterize muscle pathology. The following criteria are used for this evaluation: objective measurement of continuously distributed variables; clear and well-understood relationship to the pathology of interest; sensitivity to improvement or worsening of clinical status; and the measurement properties of accuracy and precision. Two major classes of MRI methods meet all of these criteria: (1) MRI methods for measuring muscle contractile volume or cross-sectional area by combining structural MRI and quantitative fat-water MRI; and (2) an MRI method for characterizing the edema caused by inflammation, the measurement of the transverse relaxation time constant (T2). These methods are evaluated with respect to the four criteria listed above and examples from neuromuscular disorders are provided. Finally, these methods are summarized and synthesized and recommendations for additional quantitative MRI developments are made. PMID:27430444

  16. Beyond Histologic Staging: Emerging Imaging Strategies in Colorectal Cancer with Special Focus on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fraum, Tyler J; Owen, Joseph W; Fowler, Kathryn J

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the staging and management of colorectal cancer. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has supplanted transrectal ultrasound as the preferred modality for the locoregional staging of rectal cancer. Furthermore, the advent of both diffusion-weighted imaging and hepatobiliary contrast agents has significantly enhanced the ability of MRI to detect colorectal liver metastases. In clinical practice, MRI routinely provides prognostic information, helps to guide surgical strategy, and determines the need for neoadjuvant therapies related to both the primary tumor and metastatic disease. Expanding on these roles for MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI is the newest clinical hybrid imaging modality and combines the metabolic information of PET with the high soft tissue contrast of MRI. The addition of PET/MRI to the clinical staging armamentarium has the potential to provide comprehensive state-of-the-art colorectal cancer staging in a single examination. PMID:27582645

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging in pediatric body magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B; Caro-Dominguez, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI is being increasingly used in pediatric body imaging. Its role is still emerging. It is used for detection of tumors and abscesses, differentiation of benign and malignant tumors, and detection of inflamed bowel segments in inflammatory bowel disease in children. It holds great promise in the assessment of therapy response in body tumors, with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value as a potential biomarker. Significant overlap of ADC values of benign and malignant processes and less reproducibility of ADC measurements are hampering its widespread use in clinical practice. With standardization of the technique, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is likely to be used more frequently in clinical practice. We discuss the principles and technique of DWI, selection of b value, qualitative and quantitative assessment, and current status of DWI in evaluation of disease processes in the pediatric body. PMID:27229502

  18. Cost effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging in the neurosciences.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A K; Fletcher, J; Fitz-Patrick, J D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To measure, in a service setting, the effect of magnetic resonance imaging on diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, and patient management in the neurosciences; to measure the cost per patient scanned; to estimate the marginal cost of imaging and compare this with its diagnostic impact; to measure changes in patients' quality of life; and to record the diagnostic pathway leading to magnetic resonance imaging. DESIGN--Controlled observational study using questionnaires on diagnosis and patient management before and after imaging. Detailed costing study. Quality of life questionnaires at the time of imaging and six months later. Diagnostic pathways extracted from medical records for a representative sample. SETTING--Regional superconducting 1.5 T magnetic resonance service. SUBJECTS--782 consecutive neuroscience patients referred by consultants for magnetic resonance imaging during June 1988-9; diagnostic pathways recorded for 158 cases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Costs of magnetic resonance imaging and preliminary investigations; changes in planned management and resulting savings; changes in principal diagnosis and diagnostic certainty; changes in patients' quality of life. RESULTS--Average cost of magnetic resonance imaging was estimated at 206.20/patient pounds (throughput 2250 patients/year, 1989-90 prices including contrast and upgrading). Before magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic procedures cost 164.40/patient pounds (including inpatient stays). Management changed after imaging in 208 (27%) cases; saving an estimated 80.90/patient pounds. Confidence in planned management increased in a further 226 (29%) referrals. Consultants' principal diagnosis changed in 159 of 782 (20%) referrals; marginal cost per diagnostic change was 626 pounds. Confidence in diagnosis increased in 236 (30%) referrals. No improvement in patients' quality of life at six month assessment. CONCLUSIONS--Any improvement in diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging is achieved at a

  19. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  20. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  1. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  3. Unsupervised detection of abnormalities in medical images using salient features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Sharon; Kisilev, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for abnormality detection in medical images which is based on the notion of medical saliency. The proposed method is general and is suitable for a variety of tasks related to detection of: 1) lesions and microcalcifications (MCC) in mammographic images, 2) stenoses in angiographic images, 3) lesions found in magnetic resonance (MRI) images of brain. The main idea of our approach is that abnormalities manifest as rare events, that is, as salient areas compared to normal tissues. We define the notion of medical saliency by combining local patch information from the lightness channel with geometric shape local descriptors. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method by applying it to various modalities, and to various abnormality detection problems. Promising results are demonstrated for detection of MCC and of masses in mammographic images, detection of stenoses in angiography images, and detection of lesions in brain MRI. We also demonstrate how the proposed automatic abnormality detection method can be combined with a system that performs supervised classification of mammogram images into benign or malignant/premalignant MCC's. We use a well known DDSM mammogram database for the experiment on MCC classification, and obtain 80% accuracy in classifying images containing premalignant MCC versus benign ones. In contrast to supervised detection methods, the proposed approach does not rely on ground truth markings, and, as such, is very attractive and applicable for big corpus image data processing.

  4. Resonant microwave cavity for 8.5-12 GHz optically detected electron spin resonance with simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, J. S.; Wienkes, L. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a newly developed microwave resonant cavity for use in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) experiments. The cylindrical quasi-TE011 mode cavity is designed to fit in a 1 in. magnet bore to allow the sample to be optically accessed and to have an adjustable resonant frequency between 8.5 and 12 GHz. The cavity uses cylinders of high dielectric material, so-called "dielectric resonators," in a double-stacked configuration to determine the resonant frequency. Wires in a pseudo-Helmholtz configuration are incorporated into the cavity to provide frequencies for simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The system was tested by measuring cavity absorption as microwave frequencies were swept, by performing ODMR on a zinc-doped InP sample, and by performing optically detected NMR on a GaAs sample. The results confirm the suitability of the cavity for ODMR with simultaneous NMR.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of microvessels using iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olamaei, N.; Cheriet, F.; Martel, S.

    2013-03-01

    The visualization of microstructures including blood vessels with an inner overall cross-sectional area below approximately 200 μm remains beyond the capabilities of current clinical imaging modalities. But with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, magnetic entities cause susceptibility artifacts in the images by disrupting the homogeneous magnetic field in a much larger scale than their actual size. As validated in this paper through simulation and in-vitro experiments, these artifacts can serve as a source of contrast, enabling microvessels with an inner diameter below the spatial resolution of any medical imaging modalities to be visualized using a clinical MR scanner. For such experiments, micron-sized agglomerations of iron-oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were injected in microchannels with internal diameters of 200 and 50 μm equivalent to a narrower artery or a larger arteriole, and down to a smaller arteriole, respectively. The results show the feasibility of the proposed method for micro-particle detection and the visualization of microvessels using a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner. It was confirmed that the method is reproducible and accurate at the sub-pixel level.

  6. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel Corey; Weinberg, Eric P; Hollenberg, Gary M; Meyers, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the prostate combines both morphological and functional MR techniques by utilizing small field of view T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and MR spectroscopy to accurately detect, localize, and stage primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Localizing the site of recurrence in patients with rising prostate-specific antigen following treatment affects decision making regarding treatment and can be accomplished with multiparametric prostate MR. Several different treatment options are available for prostate cancer including radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, brachytherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, or a number of focal therapy techniques. The findings of recurrent prostate cancer can be different depending on the treatment the patient has received, and the radiologist must be able to recognize the variety of imaging findings seen with this common disease. This review article will detail the findings of recurrent prostate cancer on multiparametric MR and describe common posttreatment changes which may create challenges to accurate interpretation. PMID:27195184

  7. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: assessment of skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Moynagh, Michael R; Colleran, Gabrielle C; Tavernaraki, Katarina; Eustace, Stephen J; Kavanagh, Eoin C

    2010-03-01

    The concept of a rapid whole-body imaging technique with high resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation for the assessment of osseous metastatic disease is a desirable tool. This review article outlines the current perspective of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of skeletal metastatic disease, with comparisons made to alternative whole-body imaging modalities.

  8. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer.

  9. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer. PMID:26586163

  10. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.J.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1996-05-01

    A laboratory prototype system has been developed for the experimental evaluation of an explosives detection technique based on nuclear resonance absorption of gamma rays in nitrogen. Major subsystems include a radiofrequency quadrupole proton accelerator and associated beam transport system, a high-power gamma-ray production target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection system, and an image- processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  11. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. • Atomic size optically detectable spin probe. • High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution. • Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  12. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  13. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G

    2016-04-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome found in the elderly, which is characterized by ventriculomegaly and deep white matter ischemia (DWMI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical triad of gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. NPH has been estimated to account for up to 10% of cases of dementia and is significant because it is treatable by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Patients with a known cause of chronic communicating hydrocephalus, that is, meningitis or hemorrhage, tend to respond better than patients with the so-called "idiopathic" form, most likely because of poor selection criteria in the past. Good response to shunting has been associated with hyperdynamic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct. In the early days of MRI, patients with a large CSF flow void extending from the foramen of Monro through the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle had an excellent chance of responding to ventriculoperitoneal shunting (P < 0.003). Today, we use phase-contrast MRI to measure the volume of CSF flowing through the aqueduct in either direction over a cardiac cycle. When this aqueductal CSF stroke volume is sufficiently elevated, there is an excellent chance of shunt responsiveness (100% positive predictive value in 1 study). Idiopathic NPH appears to be a "two-hit" disease-benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) in infancy followed by DWMI in late adulthood. As BEH occurs when the sutures are still open, these infants present with large heads, a finding also noted in patients with NPH. Although BEH has been attributed to immature arachnoidal granulations with decreased CSF resorptive capacity, this now appears to be permanent and may lead to a parallel pathway for CSF resorption via the extracellular space of the brain. With DWMI, the myelin lipid is lost, exposing the polar water molecules to myelin protein, increasing resistance to CSF outflow and leading to backing up of CSF and hydrocephalus.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G

    2016-04-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome found in the elderly, which is characterized by ventriculomegaly and deep white matter ischemia (DWMI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical triad of gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. NPH has been estimated to account for up to 10% of cases of dementia and is significant because it is treatable by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Patients with a known cause of chronic communicating hydrocephalus, that is, meningitis or hemorrhage, tend to respond better than patients with the so-called "idiopathic" form, most likely because of poor selection criteria in the past. Good response to shunting has been associated with hyperdynamic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct. In the early days of MRI, patients with a large CSF flow void extending from the foramen of Monro through the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle had an excellent chance of responding to ventriculoperitoneal shunting (P < 0.003). Today, we use phase-contrast MRI to measure the volume of CSF flowing through the aqueduct in either direction over a cardiac cycle. When this aqueductal CSF stroke volume is sufficiently elevated, there is an excellent chance of shunt responsiveness (100% positive predictive value in 1 study). Idiopathic NPH appears to be a "two-hit" disease-benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) in infancy followed by DWMI in late adulthood. As BEH occurs when the sutures are still open, these infants present with large heads, a finding also noted in patients with NPH. Although BEH has been attributed to immature arachnoidal granulations with decreased CSF resorptive capacity, this now appears to be permanent and may lead to a parallel pathway for CSF resorption via the extracellular space of the brain. With DWMI, the myelin lipid is lost, exposing the polar water molecules to myelin protein, increasing resistance to CSF outflow and leading to backing up of CSF and hydrocephalus. PMID:27063662

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, A.G.; Bowtell, R.W.; Köckenberger, W.; Wenseleers, T.; Ratnieks, F.L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables in vivo imaging of organisms. The recent development of the magnetic resonance microscope (MRM) has enabled organisms within the size range of many insects to be imaged. Here, we introduce the principles of MRI and MRM and review their use in entomology. We show that MRM has been successfully applied in studies of parasitology, development, metabolism, biomagnetism and morphology, and the advantages and disadvantages relative to other imaging techniques are discussed. In addition, we illustrate the images that can be obtained using MRM. We conclude that although MRM has significant potential, further improvements to the technique are still desirable if it is to become a mainstream imaging technology in entomology. Abbreviation: CSI chemical shift imaging. The dependence of the resonance frequency of a nucleus on the chemical binding of the atom or molecule in which it is contained. (N)MRI (nuclear) magnetic resonance imaging MRM magnetic resonance microscopy Voxel A contraction for volume element, which is the basic unit of MR reconstruction; represented as a pixel in the display of the MR image. PMID:15841222

  17. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Detected Long-Lived Spin Magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which combines magnetic resonance imaging with scanning probe microscopy together, is capable of performing ultra-sensitive detection of spin magnetization. In an attempt to observe dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in an MRFM experiment, which could possibly further improve its sensitivity towards a single proton spin, a film of perdeuterated polystyrene doped with a nitroxide electron-spin probe was prepared. A high-compliance cantilever with a 4 μm diameter magnetic tip was brought near the film at a temperature of 7.3 K and in a background magnetic field of ~0.6 T. The film was irradiated with 16.7 GHz microwaves while the resulting transient change in cantilever frequency was recorded in real time. In addition to observing the expected prompt change in cantilever frequency due to saturation of the nitroxide’s electron-spin magnetization, we observed a persistent cantilever frequency change. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute the persistent signal to polarized deuteron magnetization created via transfer of magnetization from electron spins. Further measurements of the persistent signal’s dependence on the cantilever amplitude and tip-sample separation are presented and explained by the cross-effect DNP mechanism in high magnetic field gradients. PMID:26097251

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious meningitis and ventriculitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Hazany, Saman; Go, John L; Law, Meng

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of meningitis are usually nonspecific with respect to the causative pathogen because the brain response to these insults is similar in most cases. In this article, we will use a few representative cases to describe the characteristic magnetic resonance findings of meningitis and its complications, including ventriculitis. PMID:25296276

  19. Functional imaging as an indicator of diagnostic information in cardiac magnetic-resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Joseph W.; Andrews, Lee T.; Begeman, Michael S.; Zeiss, Jacob; Leighton, Richard F.

    1990-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human heart provide three dimensional geometric information about the location of cardiac structures throughout the cardiac cycle. Analysis of this four dimensional data set allows detection of abnormal cardiac function related to the presence of coronary artery disease. To assist in this analysis, quantitative measurements of cardiac performance are made from the MR data including ejection fractions, regional wall motion and myocardial wall thickening. Analysis of cardiac performance provided by quantitative analysis of MR data can be aided by computer graphics presentation techniques. Two and three dimensional functional images are computed to indicate regions of abnormality based on the previous methods. The two dimensional images are created using color graphics overlays on the original MR image to represent performance. Polygon surface modeling techniques are used to represent data which is three dimensional, such as blood pool volumes. The surface of these images are color encoded by regional ejection fraction, wall motion or wall thickening. A functional image sequence is constructed at each phase of the cardiac cycle and displayed as a movie loop for review by the physician. Selection of a region on the functional image allows visual interpretation of the original MR images, graphical plots of cardiac function and tabular results. Color encoding is based on absolute measurements and comparison to standard normal templates of cardiac performance.

  20. Mechanical detection of electron spin resonance beyond 1 THz

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2015-11-02

    We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) in the terahertz (THz) region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever. The ESR absorption of a tiny single crystal of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅6H{sub 2}O, was observed in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz using a backward travelling wave oscillator as a THz-wave source. This is the highest frequency of mechanical detection of ESR till date. The spectral resolution was evaluated with the ratio of the peak separation to the sum of the half-width at half maximum of two absorption peaks. The highest resolution value of 8.59 ± 0.53 was achieved at 685 GHz, while 2.47 ± 0.01 at 80 GHz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging.

  1. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  2. A Review of Imaging Methods for Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saradwata; Das, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is playing an increasingly important role in the detection of prostate cancer (PCa). This review summarizes the key imaging modalities—multiparametric ultrasound (US), multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI–US fusion imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging—used in the diagnosis and localization of PCa. Emphasis is laid on the biological and functional characteristics of tumors that rationalize the use of a specific imaging technique. Changes to anatomical architecture of tissue can be detected by anatomical grayscale US and T2-weighted MRI. Tumors are known to progress through angiogenesis—a fact exploited by Doppler and contrast-enhanced US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The increased cellular density of tumors is targeted by elastography and diffusion-weighted MRI. PET imaging employs several different radionuclides to target the metabolic and cellular activities during tumor growth. Results from studies using these various imaging techniques are discussed and compared. PMID:26966397

  3. Far-field subwavelength imaging with near-field resonant metalens scanning at microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Gong, Zhi-Shuang; Ding, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A method for far-field subwavelength imaging at microwave frequencies using near-field resonant metalens scanning is proposed. The resonant metalens is composed of switchable split-ring resonators (SRRs). The on-SRR has a strong magnetic coupling ability and can convert evanescent waves into propagating waves using the localized resonant modes. In contrast, the off-SRR cannot achieve an effective conversion. By changing the switch status of each cell, we can obtain position information regarding the subwavelength source targets from the far field. Because the spatial response and Green’s function do not need to be measured and evaluated and only a narrow frequency band is required for the entire imaging process, this method is convenient and adaptable to various environment. This method can be used for many applications, such as subwavelength imaging, detection, and electromagnetic monitoring, in both free space and complex environments. PMID:26053074

  4. Multiparametric [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose/ [18F]Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/ Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer for the Non-Invasive Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, Piotr; Baltzer, Pascal; Polanec, Stephan H.; Sturdza, Alina; Georg, Dietmar; Helbich, Thomas H.; Karanikas, Georgios; Grimm, Christoph; Polterauer, Stephan; Poetter, Richard; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Georg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate fused multiparametric positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MP PET/MRI) at 3T in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, using high-resolution T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and the radiotracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and [18F]fluoromisonidazol ([18F]FMISO) for the non-invasive detection of tumor heterogeneity for an improved planning of chemo-radiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced cervix were enrolled in this IRB approved and were examined with fused MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI and in eleven patients complete data sets were acquired. MP PET/MRI was assessed for tumor volume, enhancement (EH)-kinetics, diffusivity, and [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO-avidity. Descriptive statistics and voxel-by-voxel analysis of MRI and PET parameters were performed. Correlations were assessed using multiple correlation analysis. Results All tumors displayed imaging parameters concordant with cervix cancer, i.e. type II/III EH-kinetics, restricted diffusivity (median ADC 0.80x10-3mm2/sec), [18F]FDG- (median SUVmax16.2) and [18F]FMISO-avidity (median SUVmax3.1). In all patients, [18F]FMISO PET identified the hypoxic tumor subvolume, which was independent of tumor volume. A voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed only weak correlations between the MRI and PET parameters (0.05–0.22), indicating that each individual parameter yields independent information and the presence of tumor heterogeneity. Conclusion MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI in patients with cervical cancer facilitates the acquisition of independent predictive and prognostic imaging parameters. MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI enables insights into tumor biology on multiple levels and provides information on tumor heterogeneity, which has the potential to improve the planning of CRT. PMID:27167829

  5. Bayesian spatiotemporal inference in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gössl, C; Auer, D P; Fahrmeir, L

    2001-06-01

    Mapping of the human brain by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an emerging field in cognitive and clinical neuroscience. Current techniques to detect activated areas of the brain mostly proceed in two steps. First, conventional methods of correlation, regression, and time series analysis are used to assess activation by a separate, pixelwise comparison of the fMRI signal time courses to the reference function of a presented stimulus. Spatial aspects caused by correlations between neighboring pixels are considered in a separate second step, if at all. The aim of this article is to present hierarchical Bayesian approaches that allow one to simultaneously incorporate temporal and spatial dependencies between pixels directly in the model formulation. For reasons of computational feasibility, models have to be comparatively parsimonious, without oversimplifying. We introduce parametric and semiparametric spatial and spatiotemporal models that proved appropriate and illustrate their performance applied to visual fMRI data.

  6. Imaging Prostate Cancer: An Update on Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Capala, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI allows functional assessment with techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The most common PET radiotracer, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with 18F or 11C), 11C-acetate, and 18F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:20425625

  7. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOEpatents

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  8. Diagnosis of symptomatic disc by magnetic resonance imaging: T2-weighted and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Tamai, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Saiki, Kazuhiko; Saotome, Koichi

    2002-06-01

    Although radial tear of the annulus fibrosus can be detected on T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images, the association between the annular tear on MR images and the symptomatic discs is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2-weighted, gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images and pain response through discography in patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 56 lumbar discs from 23 patients with chronic low back pain (13 to 47 years old) underwent MR imaging (T2-weighted, gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images) followed by provocative discography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of T2-weighted and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MR images in detecting the symptomatic discs were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of T2-weighted images in detecting the symptomatic disc were 94%, 71%, 59%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced images were 71%, 75%, 56%, and 86%, respectively. The high sensitivity and the high negative predictive value of T2-weighted MR imaging in detecting the symptomatic disc indicated that MR imaging can be a useful screening tool in avoiding unnecessary discography in patients with chronic low back pain.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Characterize a Rodent Model of Covert Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Sheryl Lyn

    Covert stroke (CS) comprises lesions in the brain often associated by risk factors such as a diet high in fat, salt, cholesterol and sugar (HFSCS). Developing a rodent model for CS incorporating these characteristics is useful for developing and testing interventions. The purpose of this thesis was to determine if magnetic resonance (MR) can detect brain abnormalities to confirm this model will have the desired anatomical effects. Ex vivo MR showed brain abnormalities for rats with the induced lesions and fed the HFSCS diet. Spectra acquired on the fixed livers had an average percent area under the fat peak relative to the water peak of (20+/-4)% for HFSCS and (2+/-2)% for control. In vivo MR images had significant differences between surgeries to induce the lesions (p=0.04). These results show that applying MR identified abnormalities in the rat model and therefore is important in the development of this CS rodent model.

  10. Resonant waveguide grating imager for live cell sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2010-11-01

    We report on a resonant waveguide grating imager for high throughput screening using live cells. This imager can generate a snapshot image of all biosensors in a 384-well microtiter plate with a time resolution of ˜3 s and a spatial resolution of 80 μm. This imager is well tolerant to variability in plate configurations and cell confluency. The resonant wavelength and its shifts induced by cell responses at each pixel correlate well with cell confluency. Data filtration protocol can be used to improve assay quality for partially confluent cells.

  11. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  12. Improving the detection sensitivity of chromatography by stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jianru; Xiang, Bingren; Fan, Hongyan; Xu, Fengguo

    2014-05-01

    Improving the detection sensitivity of analytical instruments has been a challenging task for chemometricians since undetectability has been almost unavoidable in trace analysis, even under optimized experimental conditions and with the use of modern instruments. Various chemometrics methods have been developed which attempt to address this detection problem but with limited success (e.g., fast Fourier transform and wavelet transform). However, the application of stochastic resonance (SR) creates an entirely new and effective methodology. Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon which is manifested in non-linear systems where a weak signal can be amplified and optimized with the assistance of noise. In this review, we summarize the use of basic SR, optimization of parameters and its modifications, including periodic modulation stochastic resonance (PSRA), linear modulation stochastic resonance (LSRA), single-well potential stochastic resonance (SSR) and the Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) for amplifying sub-threshold small signals. We also review the advantages and the disadvantages of various SR procedures. PMID:24622614

  13. Detecting response of microelectromechanical resonators by microwave reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, B.; Ducatteau, D.; Théron, D.; Walter, B.; Tanbakuchi, H.

    2013-07-01

    Microwave reflectometry is proposed as an effective technique to detect the vibration of capacitively transduced microelectromechanical resonators. The transducer capacitor is probed by an incident wave, which is reflected being modulated by the time variations of the resonator displacement. Calculations demonstrate that the sensitivity of the technique is maximum for a given microwave frequency depending on the transducer total capacitance. Experimental data show that capacitance variations as low as 3 zF/√Hz are measurable at 4 GHz for the studied devices. Such a performance corresponds to a sub-picometer resolution in vibration amplitude of the microelectromechanical resonator. The measurement technique is particularly appropriate for resonant sensors when high signal-to-noise ratio and fully electrical detection are required. It can be used for device resonance frequency up to several hundreds of MHz.

  14. Improving the accuracy of volumetric segmentation using pre-processing boundary detection and image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Rick; Hu, Jiuxiang; Gelb, Anne; Farin, Gerald

    2004-04-01

    The concentration edge -detection and Gegenbauer image-reconstruction methods were previously shown to improve the quality of segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, these methods are utilized as a pre-processing step to the Weibull E-SD field segmentation. It is demonstrated that the combination of the concentration edge detection and Gegenbauer reconstruction method improves the accuracy of segmentation for the simulated test data and real magnetic resonance images used in this study. PMID:15376580

  15. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  17. Dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation ACR phantom magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T: Assessment of the effect of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability in comparison with conventional single-source transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Bae; Park, Yong-Sung; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) excitation American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T compared with conventional single-source RF transmission and compared with the standard ACR MRI phantom test. We used a 3T MR scanner equipped with dual-source parallel RF excitation and an 8-channel head phased array coil. We employed T1- and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences for an assessment of the impact of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting and low-contrast object detectability following the ACR MRI quality control (QC) manual. With geometric accuracy and identical slice locations, dual RFs using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR showed an advantage over single RF using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR and conventional MR in terms of high-contrast spatial resolution (p < 0.010), percent signal ghosting (p < 0.010), and low-contrast object detectability (p < 0.010). The quality of the image from the dual-source parallel RF excitation MR equipment was superior to that of the image from conventional MR equipment for the ACR phantom. We need to pursue dual-source parallel RF excitation MR studies involving various clinical cases.

  18. Ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum based on the gold film sensor using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hg2+ ions are one of the most toxic heavy metal ion pollutants, and are caustic and carcinogenic materials with high cellular toxicity. The Hg2+ ions can accumulate in the human body through the food chain and cause serious and permanent damage to the brain with both acute and chronic toxicity. According to the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines, Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml (10 nM) in drinking water. If the Hg2+ ions are higher than 2.5 ng/ml in serum, that will bring mercury poisoning. The traditional testing for Hg2+ ions includes atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. These methods are usually coupled with gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. However, these instrument-based techniques are rather complicated, time-consuming, costly, and unsuitable for online and portable use. An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01 ng/ml for Hg2+ ions in fetal calf serum and that is lower than that was required Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. This sensor was designed on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg2+-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg2+ ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. A good liner relation was got with the coefficients of 0.9116 in 30% fetal calf serums with the linear part over a range of 0.01 ng/ml to10 ng/ml.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of penile cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Rajesh, Arumugam

    2014-05-01

    Penile cancer is a rare neoplasm that, although rare in the developed world, has devastating physical and psychological consequences for the patient. Novel MR imaging techniques such as lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MR imaging may help identify metastatic lymph node disease. This article reviews the normal penile anatomy and MR imaging techniques and features of primary and metastatic penile cancer. Recent advances in penile cancer imaging are discussed.

  1. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-03-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  2. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-01-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  3. Scanning magnetic resonance microscopy: Spatially resolved imaging of ferromagnetic resonance on yttrium iron garnet disk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Toshu; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    We developed a radio frequency (RF) probe which can be implemented into scanning probe microscope aiming for its spatially resolved imaging. The probe is composed of a sharp tip attached at the end of a semi-rigid coaxial cable which transmits RF over 10 GHz. To measure ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) of a sample, the probe is set close to the sample, and the S11 parameter was measured by using a network analyzer. As a test magnetic sample, a 10 mm-diameter and 1 mm-thickness polycrystalline YIG (yttrium iron garnet) disk was used. By locating the RF probe at the center of the YIG disk, FMR signal was detected as an absorption dip at 2.8 GHz in the S11 measurements under in-plane static magnetic field of 458 Oe. The detected FMR signal has a sharper dip compared with that obtained in the coplanar wave guide method, and by moving the RF probe to the edge of the YIG disk, two different frequencies of FMR signal appears depending on the moving direction parallel or perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The detected spatially dependent FMR signals are well explained by the magnetostatic waves.

  4. Big cat scan: magnetic resonance imaging of the tiger.

    PubMed

    Snow, Thomas M; Litster, Annette L; Gregory, Richard J W

    2004-03-01

    In August 2002, we performed MRI scans on a female juvenile Bengal tiger. We present the clinical course, imaging and autopsy findings, and some comparative anatomy of the tiger brain and skull. Magnetic resonance images of a tiger have not previously been published.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  6. Non-central nervous system fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Elspeth; Wright, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently offered in a limited number of centers but is predominantly used for suspected fetal central nervous system abnormalities. This article concentrates on the role of the different imaging sequences and their value to clinical practice. It also discusses the future of fetal MRI. PMID:26013057

  7. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, Derik L

    2015-01-01

    Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26136804

  9. Big cat scan: magnetic resonance imaging of the tiger.

    PubMed

    Snow, Thomas M; Litster, Annette L; Gregory, Richard J W

    2004-03-01

    In August 2002, we performed MRI scans on a female juvenile Bengal tiger. We present the clinical course, imaging and autopsy findings, and some comparative anatomy of the tiger brain and skull. Magnetic resonance images of a tiger have not previously been published. PMID:15027932

  10. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  11. [Combined application of magnetic resonance imaging and electrognathography for TMJ diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kordass, B; Böttger, H; Assheuer, J; Hugger, A; Mai, J K

    1989-12-01

    Based on the case of one patient with persistent TMJ disorders a method is described where the use of electrognathographic measurements allows the localization of particularly interesting functional TMJ positions for magnetic resonance imaging. This method renders morphological TMJ alterations of functional importance more easy to detect.

  12. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors' intention to provide a useful, consistent and comprehensive reference for both beginner residents and skilled radiologists who work with musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging, allowing for them to develop more precise reports and helping them to avoid making mistakes.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  14. Protein-Peptide Arrays for Detection of Specific Anti-Hepatitis D Virus (HDV) Genotype 1, 6, and 8 Antibodies among HDV-Infected Patients by Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Cortay, Jean-Claude; Cortès, Sandra; Bloquel, Bénédicte; Brichler, Ségolène; Brakha, Carine; Kay, Alan; Falah, Nisrine; Zoulim, Fabien; Marquette, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases linked to hepatitis B-hepatitis D virus co- or superinfections are more severe than those during hepatitis B virus (HBV) monoinfection. The diagnosis of hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection therefore remains crucial in monitoring patients but is often overlooked. To integrate HDV markers into high-throughput viral hepatitis diagnostics, we studied the binding of anti-HDV antibodies (Abs) using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). We focused on the ubiquitous HDV genotype 1 (HDV1) and the more uncommon African-HDV6 and HDV8 genotypes to define an array with recombinant proteins or peptides. Full-length and truncated small hepatitis D antigen (S-HDAg) recombinant proteins of HDV genotype 1 (HDV1) and 11 HDV peptides of HDV1, 6, and 8, representing various portions of the delta antigen were grafted onto biochips, allowing SPRi measurements to be made. Sixteen to 17 serum samples from patients infected with different HDV genotypes were injected onto protein and peptide chips. In all, Abs against HDV proteins and/or peptides were detected in 16 out of 17 infected patients (94.12%), although the amplitude of the SPR signal varied. The amino-terminal part of the protein was poorly immunogenic, while epitope 65-80, exposed on the viral ribonucleoprotein, may be immunodominant, as 9 patient samples led to a specific SPR signal on peptide 65 type 1 (65#1), independently of the infecting genotype. In this pilot study, we confirmed that HDV infection screening based on the reactivity of patient Abs against carefully chosen HDV peptides and/or proteins can be included in a syndrome-based viral hepatitis diagnostic assay. The preliminary results indicated that SPRi studying direct physical HDAg–anti-HDV Ab interactions was more convenient using linear peptide epitopes than full-length S-HDAg proteins, due to the regeneration process, and may represent an innovative approach for a hepatitis syndrome–viral etiology-exploring array. PMID:25631795

  15. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  16. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, R C; Pike, G B; Enzmann, D R

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has traditionally used the T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissue water (hydrogen protons) to manipulate contrast. Magnetization transfer (MT) is a new form of tissue contrast based on the physical concept that tissues contain two or more separate populations of hydrogen protons: a highly mobile (free) hydrogen (water) pool, Hr, and an immobile (restricted) hydrogen pool, Hr, the latter being those protons bound to large macromolecular proteins and lipids, such as those found in such cellular membranes as myelin. Direct observation of the Hr magnetization pool is normally not possible because of its extremely short T2 time (< 200 microseconds). But saturation of the restricted pool will have a detectable effect on the mobile (free) proton pool. Saturation of the restricted pool decreases the signal of the free pool by transferring the restricted pool's saturation. Exchange of magnetization between the free and restricted hydrogen protons is a substantial mechanism for spin-lattice (T1) relaxation in tissues and the physical basis of MT. Through an appropriately designed pulse sequence, magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) can be produced. MT contrast is different from T1, T2, and PD, and it likely reflects the structural integrity of the tissue being imaged. A variety of clinically important uses of MT have emerged. In this clinical review of the neuroradiological applications of MT, we briefly review the physics of MT, the appearance of normal brain with MT, and the use of MT as a method of contrast enhancement/background suppression and in tissue characterization, such as evaluation of multiple sclerosis and other white-matter lesions and tumors. The role of MT in small-vessel visualization on three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and in head and neck disease and newer applications of MT are also elaborated. PMID:8870180

  17. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  18. Nonlinear mechanical resonators for ultra-sensitive mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental sensitivity limit of an appropriately scaled down mechanical resonator can approach one atomic mass unit when only thermal noise is present in the system. However, operation of such nanoscale mechanical resonators is very challenging due to minuteness of their oscillation amplitudes and presence of multiple noise sources in real experimental environments. In order to surmount these challenges, we use microscale cantilever resonators driven to large amplitudes, far beyond their nonlinear instability onset. Our experiments show that such a nonlinear cantilever resonator, described analytically as a Duffing oscillator, has mass sensing performance comparable to that of much smaller resonators operating in a linear regime. We demonstrate femtogram level mass sensing that relies on a bifurcation point tracking that does not require any complex readout means. Our approaches enable straightforward detection of mass changes that are near the fundamental limit imposed by thermo-mechanical fluctuations.

  19. Petal Resonator Surface Coil with a Circular Envelope for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S. S.; Cuellar, G.; Solis, S. E.; Alejski, A.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    A modified version of the petal resonator surface (PERES) coil is proposed in which the petal coils are located inside a circular-shaped coil as opposed to the previous PERES version which did not have a circular envelope. An 8-petal coil was simulated using a finite element method and the quasi-static approach to numerically investigate its electromagnetic characteristics. Numerical simulations showed that the field uniformity is not greatly affected by the use of circular-shaped coil inside in the circular envelope. A coil prototype was developed using the same coil configuration as above and tested on a commercial 3 T imager and a General Electric phantom. Phantom images also demonstrated that the mutual inductance between petals does not alter the coil performance. Standard pulse sequences were used to acquire phantom images with the petal resonator surface coil. It was shown that this prototype resonator coil is fully compatible with clinical high field MR imagers and clinical pulse sequences.

  20. Multi-contrast magnetic resonance image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Chen, Yunmei; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    In clinical exams, multi-contrast images from conventional MRI are scanned with the same field of view (FOV) for complementary diagnostic information, such as proton density- (PD-), T1- and T2-weighted images. Their sharable information can be utilized for more robust and accurate image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a novel model and an efficient algorithm for joint image reconstruction and coil sensitivity estimation in multi-contrast partially parallel imaging (PPI) in MRI. Our algorithm restores the multi-contrast images by minimizing an energy function consisting of an L2-norm fidelity term to reduce construction errors caused by motion, a regularization term of underlying images to preserve common anatomical features by using vectorial total variation (VTV) regularizer, and updating sensitivity maps by Tikhonov smoothness based on their physical property. We present the numerical results including T1- and T2-weighted MR images recovered from partially scanned k-space data and provide the comparisons between our results and those obtained from the related existing works. Our numerical results indicate that the proposed method using vectorial TV and penalties on sensitivities can be made promising and widely used for multi-contrast multi-channel MR image reconstruction.

  1. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide a valuable methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  2. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2007-08-01

    The visibility of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide an interesting methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  3. A Quadricuspid Aortic Valve as Seen by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, James; Liotta, Robert; Hood, Maureen; Bustamante, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old active duty male with a rare quadricuspid aortic valve identified via transthoracic echocardiography following the detection of an incidental grade I/VI diastolic murmur. Further characterization of the anatomical findings and aortic valve flow dynamics were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Accurate assessment of the various valve morphologies is essential, as it guides surgical treatment options to correct the defect. Our case highlights the complimentary role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in defining the anatomy and functional consequences of a quadricuspid aortic valve. PMID:27612379

  4. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: techniques, clinical indications, and future applications.

    PubMed

    Walker, R E; Eustace, S J

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews developments in both pulse sequence design and gradient technology that facilitate rapid imaging of the whole body. It discusses its application in patients with bone marrow neoplasms, including metastases, lymphoma, and myeloma and emphasizes the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with known vertebral lesions to detect other bone lesions that are easier to biopsy. It outlines possible applications in well-defined clinical situations, including pregnancy and unknown primary tumor.

  5. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  6. 30 Years of sodium/X-nuclei magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-02-01

    In principle, all nuclei with nonzero spin can be employed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Special scanner hardware and MR sequences are required to select the nucleus-specific frequency and to enable imaging with "sufficient" signal-to-noise ratio. This Special Issue starts with an overview of different nuclei that can be used for MRI today, followed by a review article about techniques required for imaging of quadrupolar nuclei with short relaxation times. Sequence developments to improve image quality and applications on different organs and diseases are presented for different nuclei ((23)Na, (35)Cl, (17)O, and (19)F), with a focus on imaging at natural abundance.

  7. MAP segmentation of magnetic resonance images using mean field annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logenthiran, Ambalavaner; Snyder, Wesley E.; Santago, Peter, II; Link, Kerry M.

    1991-06-01

    An algorithm is described which segments magnetic resonance images while removing the noise from the images without blurring or other distortion of edges. The problem of segmentation and noise removal is posed as a restoration of an uncorrupted image, given additive white Gaussian noise and a segmentation cost. The problem is solved using a strategy called Mean Field Annealing. An a priori statistical model of the image, which includes the region classification, is chosen which drives the minimization toward solutions which are locally homogeneous and globally classified. Application of the algorithm to brain and knee images is presented.

  8. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  9. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies.

  10. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  11. Proton magnetic resonance imaging using a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, D.; Mamin, H. J.; Sherwood, M. H.; Kim, M.; Rettner, C. T.; Ohno, K.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, with its ability to provide three-dimensional, elementally selective imaging without radiation damage, has had a revolutionary impact in many fields, especially medicine and the neurosciences. Although challenging, its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences, especially if it can provide a means for non-destructively visualizing the full three-dimensional morphology of complex nanostructures, including biomolecules. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. One successful example is magnetic resonance force microscopy, which has demonstrated three-dimensional imaging of proton NMR with resolution on the order of 10 nm, but with the requirement of operating at cryogenic temperatures. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond offer an alternative detection strategy for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging that is operable at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate two-dimensional imaging of 1H NMR from a polymer test sample using a single NV centre in diamond as the sensor. The NV centre detects the oscillating magnetic field from precessing protons as the sample is scanned past the NV centre. A spatial resolution of ˜12 nm is shown, limited primarily by the scan resolution.

  12. Resonant acoustic nonlinearity for defect-selective imaging and NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck problem of nonlinear NDT is a low efficiency of conversion from fundamental frequency to nonlinear frequency components. In this paper, it is proposed to use a combination of mechanical resonance and nonlinearity of defects to enhance the input-output conversion. The concept of the defect as a nonlinear oscillator brings about new dynamic and frequency scenarios characteristic of parametric oscillations. The modes observed in experiment include sub- and superharmonic resonances with anomalously efficient generation of the higher harmonics and subharmonics. A modified version of the superharmonic resonance (combination frequency resonance) is used to enhance the efficiency of frequency mixing mode of nonlinear NDT. All the resonant nonlinear modes are strongly localized in the defect area that provides a background for high-contrast highly-sensitive defect- and frequency-selective imaging.

  13. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  14. Single molecule spin resonance spectroscopy and imaging by diamond-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangfeng

    Single-molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging is one of the ultimate goals in magnetic resonance and will has great applications in a broad range of scientific areas, from life science to physics and chemistry. The spin of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a highly sensitive magnetic-field sensor, which has been proposed for detection of single molecules or nanoscale targets. We and co-workers have successfully obtained the first single-protein spin resonance spectroscopy under ambient conditions, high-resolution vector microwave imaging, and realized atomic-scale structure analysis of single nuclear-spin clusters in diamond. Moreover, we have tried to improve the quantum control technique and succeed to achieve fault-tolerant universal quantum gates. As the last part, I will briefly introduce our most recently work on single protein imaging in situ in cell.

  15. Labeling of macrophages using bacterial magnetosomes and their characterization by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Annegret; Lisy, Marcus R.; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Hilger, Ingrid; Schüler, Dirk; Lang, Claus; Bellemann, Matthias E.; Kaiser, Werner A.; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2007-04-01

    This work investigated macrophages labeled with magnetosomes for the possible detection of inflammations by MR molecular imaging. Pure magnetosomes and macrophages containing magnetosomes were analyzed using a clinical 1.5 T MR-scanner. Relaxivities of magnetosomes and relaxation rates of cells containing magnetosomes were determined. Peritonitis was induced in two mice. T1, T2 and T2* weighted images were acquired following injection of the probes. Pure magnetosomes and labeled cells showed slight effects on T1, but strong effects on T2 and T2* images. Labeled macrophages were located with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the colon area, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  16. Magnetic resonance image denoising using multiple filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Danni; Wang, Jinjuan; Miwa, Yuichi

    2013-07-01

    We introduced and compared ten denoisingfilters which are all proposed during last fifteen years. Especially, the state-of-art denoisingalgorithms, NLM and BM3D, have attracted much attention. Several expansions are proposed to improve the noise reduction based on these two algorithms. On the other hand, optimal dictionaries, sparse representations and appropriate shapes of the transform's support are also considered for the image denoising. The comparison among variousfiltersis implemented by measuring the SNR of a phantom image and denoising effectiveness of a clinical image. The computational time is finally evaluated.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; "Stem Cells", "Cell Tracking", "Stroke", "Stem Cell Transplantation", "Nanoparticles", and "Magnetic Resonance Imaging" as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields.

  19. [Use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Sepcić, Juraj

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination and axonal loss. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging allows the demonstration of spatial and temporal dissemination of multiple sclerosis lesions earlier than is possible from clinical assessments. A variety of conventional magnetic resonance imaging protocols, in conjunction with clinical assessment, are now routinely used to increase the accuracy of diagnosis and long-term prognosis of multiple sclerosis. T2-weighted hyperintense lesions are related primarily to increased water content and thus cannot distinguish between inflammation, edema, demyelination, Wallerian degeneration, and axonal loss, whereas the contrast gadolinium-enhanced lesions on T1-weighted images reflect increased blood-brain barrier permeability associated with active inflammatory activity. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging metrics are not sufficiently sensitive to detect invisible brain damage in the normal appearing brain tissue, and they do not show a reliable correlation with clinical measures of disability. However, numerous studies showed that they can improve accuracy in the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. Recently, non-conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced to increase the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. Several studies have used brain atrophy, T1-hypointense lesion volume, magnetization transfer imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to test whether the extent and severity of tissue loss in lesions and in normal appearing gray and white matter at the time of clinically isolated syndrome may have diagnostic and prognostic value. These magnetic resonance imaging techniques represent a powerful tool to non-invasively study different pathological substrates of lesions and microscopic tissue changes. Additional short- and long-term prospective studies are requested to establish their value in the

  20. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-20

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen presents greater inherent difficulties than other anatomic regions. However, new techniques now allow imaging comparable in quality to computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging offers the advantages of greater tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging, and lack of ionizing radiation or risk of toxic reactions from iodinated contrast media. Its use remains limited by high cost, limited availability, lack of a bowel contrast agent, and long imaging time, which some patients cannot tolerate. In many areas of abdominal imaging, MRI is now comparable to CT, but because of the greater availability and lesser cost, CT remains the procedure of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging is more accurate for staging neoplasms of the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, bladder, prostate, uterus, and cervix and may aid in diagnosis of hepatic, adrenal, and uterine masses. In selected patients, especially those in whom CT is inconclusive or those who cannot tolerate iodinated contrast material, MRI can provide valuable information. Development of faster scanning techniques and MRI contrast agents and wider availability will probably increase the usefulness of abdominal MRI. At this time, MRI complements other abdominal imaging procedures. In a small number of patients, however, it can provide unique information in a virtually risk-free manner.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  3. A Smart Phone Image Database for Single Image Recapture Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinting; Qiu, Bo; Shen, Jingjing; Ng, Tian-Tsong; Shi, Yun Qing

    Image recapture detection (IRD) is to distinguish real-scene images from the recaptured ones. Being able to detect recaptured images, a single image based counter-measure for rebroadcast attack on a face authentication system becomes feasible. Being able to detect recaptured images, general object recognition can differentiate the objects on a poster from the real ones, so that robot vision is more intelligent. Being able to detect recaptured images, composite image can be detected when recapture is used as a tool to cover the composite clues. As more and more methods have been proposed for IRD, an open database is indispensable to provide a common platform to compare the performance of different methods and to expedite further research and collaboration in the field of IRD.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of meniscal tears has evolved secondary to a better understanding of the essential roles that the menisci play in the normal function of the knee, including load transmission, stress distribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication, resistance to capsular and synovial impingement, and maintenance of joint congruity. Imaging evaluation of the menisci requires an understanding of the normal anatomy, the imaging criteria necessary to accurately diagnose a meniscal tear, meniscal tear patterns, and awareness of common diagnostic pitfalls.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of meniscal tears has evolved secondary to a better understanding of the essential roles that the menisci play in the normal function of the knee, including load transmission, stress distribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication, resistance to capsular and synovial impingement, and maintenance of joint congruity. Imaging evaluation of the menisci requires an understanding of the normal anatomy, the imaging criteria necessary to accurately diagnose a meniscal tear, meniscal tear patterns, and awareness of common diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:25442021

  6. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  7. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm.

  8. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  9. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Adenosis in the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Gity, Masoumeh; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Shakiba, Madjid; Khademi, Yassaman; Bijan, Bijan; Sadaghiani, Mohammad Salehi; Jalali, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenosis lesions of the breast, including sclerosing adenosis and adenosis tumors, are a group of benign proliferative disorders that may mimic the features of malignancy on imaging. In this study, we aim to describe the features of breast adenosis lesions with suspicious or borderline findings on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods In our database, we identified 49 pathologically proven breast adenosis lesions for which the final assessment of the breast MRI report was classified as either category 4 (n=45) or category 5 (n=4), according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR). The lesions had a final diagnosis of either pure adenosis (n=33, 67.3%) or mixed adenosis associated with other benign pathologies (n=16, 32.7%). Results Of the 49 adenosis lesions detected on DCE-MRI, 32 (65.3%) appeared as enhancing masses, 16 (32.7%) as nonmass enhancements, and one (2.1%) as a tiny enhancing focus. Analysis of the enhancing masses based on the ACR BI-RADS lexicon revealed that among the mass descriptors, the most common features were irregular shape in 12 (37.5%), noncircumscribed margin in 20 (62.5%), heterogeneous internal pattern in 16 (50.0%), rapid initial enhancement in 32 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed en-hancement pattern in 21 (65.6%). Of the 16 nonmass enhancing lesions, the most common descriptors included focal distribution in seven (43.8%), segmental distribution in six (37.5%), clumped internal pattern in nine (56.3%), rapid initial enhancement in 16 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed enhancement pattern in eight (50.0%). Conclusion Adenosis lesions of the breast may appear suspicious on breast MRI. Awareness of these suspi-cious-appearing features would be helpful in obviating unnecessary breast biopsies. PMID:26155296

  11. Neonatal life support during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Groenendaal, F; Leusink, C; Nijenhuis, M; Janssen, M J H

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques are required frequently for the assessment of the brain of ill neonates. In the present study, the effects of a 1.5 T MR scanner on devices for life support were assessed. A ventilator (Dräger Babylog 2000) was tested in the 1.5 T magnet, using a neonatal ventilation tester and 1.5-5 m tubes. In a special MR incubator, temperature and humidity were measured at 1-min intervals. Infusion was tested with the pump outside the magnet room: infusion rates and time to alarm were tested with 7-m tubes. The ventilator performed normally at a magnetic field line of 2 mT, although the alarms failed. The incubator created a temperature of 35.9 degrees C and humidity of 40.7%, which was acceptable for examinations of 45 min. The alarm limits of the infusion pump placed outside the magnet at 7 m were within company limits. The study indicates that magnetic resonance examinations can be performed safely in ill preterm neonates who require life-support devices.

  12. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, T.A.

    1993-12-01

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Tracking of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Castillo, Rostislav; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2014-01-01

    To date, several stem cell labeling protocols have been developed, contributing to a fast growing and promising field of stem cell imaging by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Most of these methods utilize iron oxide nanoparticles (MION, SPIO, USPIO, VSIOP) for cell labeling, which provide negative (dark) signal effects on T2-weighted MR images. The following protocol describes stem cell labeling techniques with commercially available gadolinium chelates, which provide positive contrast on T1-weighted MR images, which can be advantageous for specific applications. PMID:23743862

  14. Image-processing pipelines: applications in magnetic resonance histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Anderson, Robert J.; Cook, James J.; Long, Christopher; Badea, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Image processing has become ubiquitous in imaging research—so ubiquitous that it is easy to loose track of how diverse this processing has become. The Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy has pioneered the development of Magnetic Resonance Histology (MRH), which generates large multidimensional data sets that can easily reach into the tens of gigabytes. A series of dedicated image-processing workstations and associated software have been assembled to optimize each step of acquisition, reconstruction, post-processing, registration, visualization, and dissemination. This talk will describe the image-processing pipelines from acquisition to dissemination that have become critical to our everyday work.

  15. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  16. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  17. Magnetic resonance detection of individual proton spins using quantum reporters.

    PubMed

    Sushkov, A O; Lovchinsky, I; Chisholm, N; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a method of magnetic resonance imaging with single nuclear-spin sensitivity under ambient conditions. Our method employs isolated electronic-spin quantum bits (qubits) as magnetic resonance "reporters" on the surface of high purity diamond. These spin qubits are localized with nanometer-scale uncertainty, and their quantum state is coherently manipulated and measured optically via a proximal nitrogen-vacancy color center located a few nanometers below the diamond surface. This system is then used for sensing, coherent coupling, and imaging of individual proton spins on the diamond surface with angstrom resolution. Our approach may enable direct structural imaging of complex molecules that cannot be accessed from bulk studies. It realizes a new platform for probing novel materials, monitoring chemical reactions, and manipulation of complex systems on surfaces at a quantum level. PMID:25415924

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the canine brain at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ko, Ki-Jin; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Han, Jae-Yong; Lim, Chae-Young; Park, Chul; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Won; Jung, Dong-In; Kim, Young-Bo; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe relevant canine brain structures as seen on T2-weighted images following magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 T and to compare the results with imaging at 1.5 T. Imaging was performed on five healthy laboratory beagle dogs using 1.5 and 7 T clinical scanners. At 1.5 T, spin echo images were acquired, while gradient echo images were acquired at 3 T. Image quality and conspicuity of anatomic structures were evaluated qualitatively by direct comparison of the images obtained from the two different magnetic fields. The signal-to-nose ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated and compared between 1.5 and 7 T. The T2-weighted images at 7 T provided good spatial and contrast resolution for the identification of clinically relevant brain anatomy; these images provided better delineation and conspicuity of the brain stem and cerebellar structures, which were difficult to unequivocally identify at 1.5 T. However, frontal and parietal lobe and the trigeminal nerve were difficult to identify at 7 T due to susceptibility artifact. The SNR and CNR of the images at 7 T were significantly increased up to 318% and 715% compared with the 1.5 T images. If some disadvantages of 7 T imaging, such as susceptibility artifacts, technical difficulties, and high cost, can be improved, 7 T clinical MR imaging could provide a good experimental and diagnostic tool for the evaluation of canine brain disorders.

  19. Sensitive magnetic force detection with a carbon nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Willick, Kyle; Haapamaki, Chris; Baugh, Jonathan

    2014-03-21

    We propose a technique for sensitive magnetic point force detection using a suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance frequency show that single Bohr magneton changes in the magnetic state of an individual magnetic molecule grafted to the CNT can translate to detectable frequency shifts, on the order of a few kHz. The dependences of the resonator response to device parameters such as length, tension, CNT diameter, and gate voltage are explored and optimal operating conditions are identified. A signal-to-noise analysis shows that, in principle, magnetic switching at the level of a single Bohr magneton can be read out in a single shot on timescales as short as 10 μs. This force sensor should enable new studies of spin dynamics in isolated single molecule magnets, free from the crystalline or ensemble settings typically studied.

  20. Arrays of dual nanomechanical resonators for selective biological detection.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Daniel; Arroyo-Hernández, María; Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Tong, Hien Duy; Van Rijn, Cees; Calleja, Montserrat; Tamayo, Javier

    2009-03-15

    Arrays of small nanomechanical resonators with dual geometry have been fabricated for sensitive biological detection. The arrays consist of silicon nitride resonating 100 nm thick cantilevers with sensing gold areas alternately placed on the free and fixed cantilever ends. The Au areas act as sensing regions as can be functionalized by means of thiol chemistry. The nanomechanical arrays provide a double flavor of the adsorbed molecules: the added mass reported by the cantilevers with the Au area at the tip and the nanoscale elasticity reported by the cantilevers with the Au area at the clamp. The devices were applied for DNA detection based on Watson-Crick pairing rules. The proposed design for nanomechanical resonators provides higher specificity for DNA sensing in comparison with conventional single cantilevers. The nanoscale elasticity induced by the DNA hybridization arises from the intermolecular interactions between the adsorbates bound to the cantilever and the surface stress.

  1. Detecting Copy Move Forgery In Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashima; Saxena, Nisheeth; Vasistha, S. K.

    2012-03-01

    In today's world several image manipulation software's are available. Manipulation of digital images has become a serious problem nowadays. There are many areas like medical imaging, digital forensics, journalism, scientific publications, etc, where image forgery can be done very easily. To determine whether a digital image is original or doctored is a big challenge. To find the marks of tampering in a digital image is a challenging task. The detection methods can be very useful in image forensics which can be used as a proof for the authenticity of a digital image. In this paper we propose the method to detect region duplication forgery by dividing the image into overlapping block and then perform searching to find out the duplicated region in the image.

  2. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging - current status

    SciTech Connect

    Cammoun, D.; Hendee, W.R.; Davis, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. 59 references, 9 figures.

  3. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cardiac imaging shows initial promise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3-D MRI) of the heart is already receiving encouraging reviews from heart surgeons, says Michael Vannier, MD, an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. In fact, the demand for his group's 3-D images is becoming overwhelming, Vannier says. So far, the group has used 3-D MRI to evaluate congenital heart disease. The advantage of the 3-D system is that, even to an untrained eye, anomalies are apparent and the images can even be animated. Many of the patients are infants, who are sedated while the images are acquired. When the information is combined, the averaged image produced represents a slice about 5 mm thick. The computer then stacks a number of those images together to make the 3-D image. Total scanning takes about one hour.

  5. Study on multispectral imaging detection and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Wang; Na, Ding; Gao, Jiaobo; Yu, Hu; Jun, Wu; Li, Junna; Zheng, Yawei; Fei, Gao; Sun, Kefeng

    2009-07-01

    Multispectral imaging detecting technology use target radiation character in spectral spatial distribution and relation between spectral and image to detect target and remote sensing measure. Its speciality is multi channel, narrow bandwidth, large amount of information, high accuracy. The ability of detecting target in environment of clutter, camouflage, concealment and beguilement is improved. At present, spectral imaging technology in the range of multispectral and hyperspectral develop greatly. The multispectral imaging equipment of unmanned aerial vehicle can be used in mine detection, information, surveillance and reconnaissance. Spectral imaging spectrometer operating in MWIR and LWIR has already been applied in the field of remote sensing and military in the advanced country. The paper presents the technology of multispectral imaging. It can enhance the reflectance, scatter and radiation character of the artificial targets among nature background. The targets among complex background and camouflage/stealth targets can be effectively identified. The experiment results and the data of spectral imaging is obtained.

  6. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  7. Intraocular lymphoma after cardiac transplantation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  8. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  9. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeck, W. W.; Ha, S.-H.; Farmaka, S.; Nalcioglu, O.

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  10. Efficient bias correction for magnetic resonance image denoising.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Qiu, Peihua

    2013-05-30

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular radiology technique that is used for visualizing detailed internal structure of the body. Observed MRI images are generated by the inverse Fourier transformation from received frequency signals of a magnetic resonance scanner system. Previous research has demonstrated that random noise involved in the observed MRI images can be described adequately by the so-called Rician noise model. Under that model, the observed image intensity at a given pixel is a nonlinear function of the true image intensity and of two independent zero-mean random variables with the same normal distribution. Because of such a complicated noise structure in the observed MRI images, denoised images by conventional denoising methods are usually biased, and the bias could reduce image contrast and negatively affect subsequent image analysis. Therefore, it is important to address the bias issue properly. To this end, several bias-correction procedures have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we study the Rician noise model and the corresponding bias-correction problem systematically and propose a new and more effective bias-correction formula based on the regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. Numerical studies show that our proposed method works well in various applications. PMID:23074149

  11. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roeck, W W; Ha, S-H; Farmaka, S; Nalcioglu, O

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  12. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  13. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kabala, J E; Gillatt, D A; Persad, R A; Penry, J B; Gingell, J C; Chadwick, D

    1991-08-01

    A prospective study has been carried out to examine the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the investigation of renal cell carcinoma in 24 patients. In all cases the inferior vena cava (IVC) was well demonstrated with MRI. In 14 out of 15 patients where surgical correlation was available, the MRI and operative staging were in agreement. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) staging were in agreement in 16 out of the 17 patients where both were performed. In one case, CT suggested hepatic invasion but this was found not to be present on MRI and at operation. Magnetic resonance imaging also provided substantial additional information in three patients, including two cases where MRI demonstrated a patent IVC that appeared occluded on CT (one of which also had vertebral metastases seen on MRI but missed on CT) and one case where CT failed to demonstrate minimal involvement of the IVC. Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of staging renal cell carcinoma with clear advantages over CT. In no case in this series was inferior vena cavography found to be necessary.

  15. Primary and recurrent inverting papilloma: appearances with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roobottom, C A; Jewell, F M; Kabala, J

    1995-07-01

    Inverting papilloma of the sinonasal cavity is of importance because of its association with squamous cell carcinoma and its tendency to local recurrence. Appearances of inverting papilloma have only been reported infrequently, and never in recurrent cases. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of four cases of inverting papilloma, three of which are recurrent.

  16. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  17. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  18. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This concise review attempts to highlight the recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to all the different aspects of prostate cancer (PCa), and outlines future implications of MRI in the diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance of PCa. PMID:21283654

  19. Near-Infrared Optical Imaging Noninvasively Detects Acutely Damaged Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Batra, Abhinandan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Vohra, Ravneet S; Forbes, Sean C; Jiang, Huabei; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle damage is currently assessed through methods such as muscle biopsy, serum biomarkers, functional testing, and imaging procedures, each with its own inherent limitations, and a pressing need for a safe, repeatable, inexpensive, and noninvasive modality to assess the state of muscle health remains. Our aim was to develop and assess near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging as a novel noninvasive method of detecting and quantifying muscle damage. An immobilization-reambulation model was used for inducing muscle damage and recovery in the lower hindlimbs in mice. Confirmation of muscle damage was obtained using in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and ex vivo tissue analysis. The soleus of the immobilized-reambulated hindlimb was found to have a greater amount of muscle damage compared to that in the contralateral nonimmobilized limb, confirmed by in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging (3.86-fold increase in radiant efficiency), magnetic resonance imaging (1.41-fold increase in T2), and an ex vivo spectrophotometric assay of indocyanine green uptake (1.87-fold increase in normalized absorbance). Contrast-enhanced NIR optical imaging provides a sensitive, rapid, and noninvasive screening method that can be used for imaging and quantifying muscle damage and recovery in vivo. PMID:27565039

  20. Prion protein detection in serum using micromechanical resonator arrays.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Madhukar; Waggoner, Philip S; Montagna, Richard A; Craighead, Harold G

    2009-12-15

    Prion proteins that have transformed from their normal cellular counterparts (PrP(c)) into infectious form (PrP(res)) are responsible for causing progressive neurodegenerative diseases in numerous species, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle (also known as mad cow disease), scrapie in sheep, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Due to a possible link between BSE and CJD it is highly desirable to develop non-invasive and ante mortem tests for the detection of prion proteins in bovine samples. Such ante mortem tests of all cows prior to slaughter will help to prevent the introduction of PrP(res) into the human food supply. Furthermore, detection of PrP(res) in donated blood will also help to prevent the transmission of CJD among humans through blood transfusion. In this study, we have continued development of a micromechanical resonator array that is capable of detecting PrP(c) in bovine blood serum. The sensitivity of the resonators for the detection of PrP(c) is further enhanced by the use of secondary mass labels. A pair of antibodies is used in a sandwich immunoassay format to immobilize PrP(c) on the surface of resonators and attach nanoparticles as secondary mass labels to PrP(c). Secondary mass labeling is optimized in terms of incubation time to maximize the frequency shifts that correspond to the presence of PrP(c) on the surface of resonators. Our results show that a minimum of 200 pg mL(-1) of PrP(c) in blood serum can be detected using micromechanical resonator arrays. PMID:19836525