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Sample records for resonance imaging evaluation

  1. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  2. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques.

  3. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  4. Thoracic magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Kim, Eun Young; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a pathologic condition characterized by permanently enlarged airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole with destruction of the alveolar walls. Functional information of the lungs is important to understand the pathophysiology of emphysema and that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With the recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, functional MRI with variable MR sequences can be used for the evaluation of different physiological and anatomic changes seen in cases of pulmonary emphysema. In this review article, we will focus on a brief description of each method, results of some of the most recent work, and the clinical application of such knowledge.

  5. Practical magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of peripheral nerves in children: magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Cesar; Ramos, Yanerys; Restrepo, Ricardo; Restrepo, Jose Andres; Grossman, John A I; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an excellent tool for the evaluation of peripheral nerves in children not only because of its excellent soft tissue contrast resolution but also because it is noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. In nonconclusive cases, MR neurography can be complementary to physical examination and electromyography in identifying a specific affected nerve and the site of the lesion. This article reviews the MR imaging technique used in the evaluation of peripheral nerves (ie, MR neurography), its major indications, and the common pathologic conditions encountered in the pediatric population.

  6. Orbital cavernous hemangiomas: ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulou, A; Damianidis, Ch; Kyriakou, V; Kotziamani, N; Emmanouilidou, M; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, I

    2010-03-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is the most common intraorbital lesion in adults. The aim of our study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) characteristics of cavernous hemangioma and their role in the differential diagnosis of orbital tumors. Eight patients with orbital cavernous hemangiomas, five women and three men with a mean age of 48 years were examined in a period of six years. All patients underwent MRI examination and four patients were also evaluated by US. In all cases MRI depicted a well-defined intraconal tumor. The lesions were homogeneous, isointense to muscle on T1-weighted sequence and hyperintense to muscle on T2-weighted sequence in six patients. In one patient the mass was isointense on T1WI with heterogeneous signal intensity on T2WI and in one patient the lesion had heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. After intravenous contrast medium administration, the tumors showed initial inhomogeneous enhancement with progressive accumulation of contrast material on delayed images in seven patients and initial homogeneous enhancement in one patient. On ultrasonography, the orbital masses appeared slightly hyperechoic, heterogeneous with small areas of slow blood flow. The analysis of imaging characteristics of a well-defined intraconal lesion in an adult patient with painless progressive proptosis can be highly suggestive of the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2014-10-01

    Image quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain currently approximate gross anatomy as would be viewed at autopsy. During the first decade of the 21st Century incredible advances in image processing and quantification have occurred permitting more refined methods for studying brain-behavior-cognitive functioning. The current presentation overviews the current status of MRI methods for routine clinical assessment of brain pathology, how these techniques identify neuropathology and how pathological findings are quantified. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and resting state fMRI are all reviewed, emphasizing how these techniques permit an examination of brain function and connectivity. General regional relationships of brain function associated with cognitive control will be highlighted.

  8. Evaluation of magnetic resonance sequences in imaging mediastinal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Stark, D.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moore, E.H.

    1984-10-01

    Ten patients having a mediastinal tumor were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using from two to four imaging sequences. Seven had bronchial carcinoma and three had benign lesions. The sequences included the spin-echo technique with repetition time (TR) values of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 sec and echo time (TE) values of 28 and 56 msec, and the inversion-recovery technique. The signal-intensity ratios of the mediastinal mass and mediastinal fat, which are a measure of image contrast, were compared for the different imaging sequences. Also signal-to-noise ratios were measured relative to both mediastinal fat and mediastinal mass. With spin-echo imaging, decreasing the TR value resulted in an increase in mass/fat contrast in all patients, making the masses easier to detect, but this also resulted in decreased signal-to-noise ratios. Inversion-recovery imaging with the sequence used resulted in a greatly increased mass/fat contrast, because of a relative decrease in signal from the mass. Spin-echo imaging with both short and long TR values provides good tissue contrast and good signal-to-noise ratios.

  9. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  10. Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Comprehensive Evaluation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, El-Sayed H.; Bajwa, Abubakr A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery (PA) pressure, which negatively affects the right ventricular (RV) function. This report shows a patient with severe PAH, on whom a comprehensive MRI exam was performed to evaluate both PA and RV. New imaging sequences were implemented for obtaining additional parameters about the patient's condition. The results show the capabilities of the developed exam of providing complete picture of the cardiovascular system in PAH, which helps the physician optimize treatment. PMID:26435871

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of sports injuries of the foot and ankle: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Riley, Geoffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is playing an increasingly important role in evaluation of the injured athlete's foot and ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging allows accurate detection of bony abnormalities, such as stress fractures, and soft-tissue abnormalities, including ligament tears, tendon tears, and tendinopathy. The interpreter of magnetic resonance images should systematically review the images, noting normal structures and accounting for changes in soft-tissue and bony signal. PMID:17218626

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver: New imaging strategies for evaluating focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The early detection of focal liver lesions, particularly those which are malignant, is of utmost importance. The resection of liver metastases of some malignancies (including colorectal cancer) has been shown to improve the survival of patients. Exact knowledge of the number, size, and regional distribution of liver metastases is essential to determine their resectability. Almost all focal liver lesions larger than 10 mm are demonstrated with current imaging techniques but the detection of smaller focal liver lesions is still relatively poor. One of the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is better soft tissue contrast (compared to other radiologic modalities), which allows better detection and characterization of the focal liver lesions in question. Developments in MRI hardware and software and the availability of novel MRI contrast agents have further improved the diagnostic yield of MRI in lesion detection and characterization. Although the primary modalities for liver imaging are ultrasound and computed tomography, recent studies have suggested that MRI is the most sensitive method for detecting small liver metastatic lesions, and MRI is now considered the pre-operative standard method for diagnosis. Two recent developments in MRI sequences for the upper abdomen comprise unenhanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and keyhole-based dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI (4D THRIVE). DWI allows improved detection (b = 10 s/mm2) of small (< 10 mm) focal liver lesions in particular, and is useful as a road map sequence. Also, using higher b-values, the calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient value, true diffusion coefficient, D, and the perfusion fraction, f, has been used for the characterization of focal liver lesions. DCE 4D THRIVE enables MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution and full liver coverage. 4D THRIVE improves evaluation of focal liver lesions, providing multiple arterial and venous phases, and

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias.

  15. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B; Fidler, Jeff L; Fletcher, Joel G; Knudsen, John M; Bruining, David H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn's disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  16. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Knudsen, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  17. Quantifiable Imaging Biomarkers for Evaluation of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament Using 3-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katharine J.; Surowiec, Rachel K.; Ho, Charles P.; Devitt, Brian M.; Fripp, Jurgen; Smith, W. Sean; Spiegl, Ulrich J.; Dornan, Grant J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2 and T2 star (T2*) mapping, have been used to evaluate ligamentous tissue in vitro and to identify significant changes in structural integrity of a healing ligament. These studies lay the foundation for a clinical study that uses quantitative mapping to evaluate ligaments in vivo, particularly the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To establish quantitative mapping as a clinical tool for identifying and evaluating chronic or acute PCL injuries, T2 and T2* values first must be determined for an asymptomatic population. Purpose: To quantify T2 and T2* mapping properties, including texture variables (entropy, variance, contrast, homogeneity), of the PCL in an asymptomatic population. It was hypothesized that biomarker values would be consistent throughout the ligament, as measured across 3 clinically relevant subregions (proximal, middle, and distal thirds) in the asymptomatic cohort. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Unilateral knee MRI scans were acquired for 25 asymptomatic subjects with a 3.0-T MRI system using T2 and T2* mapping sequences in the sagittal plane. The PCL was manually segmented and divided into thirds (proximal, middle, and distal). Summary statistics for T2 and T2* values were calculated. Intra- and interrater reliability was assessed across 3 raters to 2 time points. Results: The asymptomatic PCL cohort had mean T2 values of 36.7, 29.2, and 29.6 ms in the distal, middle, and proximal regions, respectively. The distal PCL exhibited significantly higher mean, variance, and contrast and lower homogeneity of T2 values than the middle and proximal subregions (P < .05). T2* results exhibited substantial positive skew and were therefore presented as median and quartile (Q) values. Median T2* values were 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.8-8.9 ms), 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 7.0-8.5 ms), and 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.4-8.2 ms) in the distal, middle, and proximal subregions

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Perianal Fistulae with Surgical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navdeep; Thukral, CL; Singh, Kunwar Pal; Bhalla, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in detection and characterization of perianal fistulae and correlating it with surgical findings. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with suspected perianal fistulae having one or more external openings were prospectively selected for MRI evaluation. Previously operated or patients with recurrent perianal disease were excluded from the study. MRI findings were recorded according to “St. James’s University Hospital MR Imaging Classification of Perianal Fistulae” and correlated with surgical observations. Finally, comparison between T2-weighted fat saturated and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences was done. Results: Amongst the total of 50 patients, per-operative findings confirmed perianal fistulae in 45 patients. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI in correctly detecting and grading the primary tract was found to be 95.56% and 80% respectively; for abscess, it was 87.50% and 95.24% respectively. High sensitivity was also discerned in identification of secondary tract (93.75%), correct localization of internal opening (95.83%) and for correctly detecting the horse-shoeing (87.50%). Our assumption of null hypothesis was accepted on comparing results of T2-weighted fat saturated sequences and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences. Conclusion: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was highly accurate in assessment of surgically important parameters (primary tract and its grading, internal opening, secondary tract, abscess, horseshoeing) of perianal fistulae. Comparison of results of imaging findings on T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences were statistically similar, so contrast study can be omitted, particularly while evaluating primary / previously unoperated perianal fistulae. PMID:25121040

  19. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Laningham, Fred H.; Glass, John O.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Method and results Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment Conclusion In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. PMID:17653705

  20. An infant with diaphragmatic hernia, anophthalmia and cardiac defect: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging autopsy.

    PubMed

    Ceylaner, S; Gozer, H E; Ceylaner, G; Ertas, I E; Kizilates, S U; Edguer, T

    2006-01-01

    We present an infant with diaphragmatic hernia, anophthalmia and cardiac defect evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) autopsy. This female infant was born at 39th weeks by vaginal delivery and presented with diaphragmatic hernia, anophthalmia, cardiac defect and died due to respiratory problems at 28th hours of life. MRI autopsy showed internal organ abnormalities including congenital hernia of the left diaphragm, secondary hypoplasia of the left lung, atrial and ventricular septal defect, dilatation of calices of the kidneys, bilateral anophthalmia, hypoplasia of the optic nerves, hyperintensity of pituitary gland possibly due to bleeding and a cyst of the septum pellucidum. This article shows that MRI autopsy is a valuable method for the evaluation of cases with congenital anomalies if autopsy is not possible.

  1. Hepatic hemangiomas: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.K.; Gomes, A.; King, W.; Pusey, E.; Lois, J.; Goldstein, L.; Busuttil, R.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    A study was performed to evaluate and compare the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide blood-pool scanning in the detection of hepatic hemangiomas. All patients had known hemangiomas which were first detected on either ultrasound or computed tomography. Sixteen patients with a total of 23 lesions were investigated. Eleven patients had both MRI and blood-pool scans performed. In the group studied by both modalities, 18 lesions were detected ranging in size from 1 to 11 cm. All lesions were detected by both techniques. However, two of the 18 lesions had an atypical appearance on MRI. Our experience to date indicates that the anatomic location and specific diagnosis of hemangiomas can be made with a high degree of certainty when both MRI and blood-pool scanning techniques are utilized.

  2. Evaluation of aortic stenosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with established routine clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kupfahl, C; Honold, M; Meinhardt, G; Vogelsberg, H; Wagner, A; Mahrholdt, H; Sechtem, U

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether direct planimetry of aortic valve area (AVA) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a reliable tool for determining the severity of aortic stenosis compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and cardiac catheterisation. Methods: 44 symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis were studied. By cardiac catheterisation AVA was calculated by the Gorlin equation. AVA was measured with CMR from steady state free precession (true fast imaging with steady state precession) by planimetry. AVA was also determined from TOE images by planimetry and from TTE images by the continuity equation. Results: Bland-Altman analysis evaluating intraobserver and interobserver variability showed a very small bias for both (−0.016 and 0.019, respectively; n  =  20). Bias and limits of agreement between CMR and TTE were 0.05 (−0.35, 0.44) cm2 (n  =  37), between CMR and TOE 0.02 (−0.39, 0.42) cm2 (n  =  32), and between CMR and cardiac catheterisation 0.09 (−0.30, 0.47) cm2 (n  =  36). The sensitivity and specificity of CMR to detect AVA ⩽ 0.80 cm2 measured by cardiac catheterisation was 78% and 89%, of TOE 70% and 70%, and of TTE 74% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry is highly reliable and reproducible. Further, CMR planimetry had the best sensitivity and specificity of all non-invasive methods for detecting severe aortic stenosis in comparison with cardiac catheterisation. Therefore, CMR planimetry of AVA with steady state free precession is a new powerful diagnostic tool, particularly for patients with uncertain or discrepant findings by other modalities. PMID:15253962

  3. Computer-assisted evaluation of contrast kinetics for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Bhargava, Puneet; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Mitsumori, Lee M; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of semiquantitative contrast-enhanced parameter analysis as an objective criteria for improving the magnetic resonance (MR) evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with cirrhosis. Contrast-enhanced MR examination findings from 19 patients with 21 pathologically proven HCC were evaluated using a dedicated liver image postprocessing workstation. Contrast-enhancement kinetic curves were created for each lesion, and 4 enhancement parameters (arterial wash-in slope, arterial-portal slope, arterial-equilibrium slope, and portal-equilibrium slope) were defined from the signal intensity-time plots. The accuracy of each enhancement parameter for the characterization of HCC was assessed. Statistical analysis revealed that an arterial-phase wash-in slope percentage value >1.35 per sec had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 71%, and an accuracy of 79% for the correct characterization of HCC, whereas an arterial-equilibrium wash-out slope percentage value<0.05 per sec had a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 81%, and an accuracy of 83%. Although there were significant differences among all groups, the greatest accuracy for differentiation based on receiver operating curve analysis appears to be with arterial and arterial-equilibrium phases. Semiquantitative analysis of lesion contrast kinetics could provide objective parameters to improve the characterization of HCC on contrast-enhanced MR images.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  5. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C.; Kuru, Timur H.; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B.; Agterhuis, Erik; Edler, Christopher; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hadaschik, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. Methods A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences). The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI) that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies. Results In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4–95.0), a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0–95.7) and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8–93.8) for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature. Conclusion The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction. PMID:27454770

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA {<=}0.3 ng/mL (P<.01). The median volume of recurrence was 0.26 cm{sup 3} and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA

  9. Early characteristic findings in bowleg deformities: evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Suzuki, S; Seto, Y; Kashiwagi, N; Hwang, E S

    2000-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate bowleg deformities in infancy. Twenty-five tibiae of 13 infants were examined and divided into two groups based on MRI findings: group A had high intensity area in the medial epiphyseal cartilage on T2-weighted images. Group B had depression of medial physis and abnormal signal in the perichondrial region in addition to the epiphyseal lesion. At the final follow-up, all cases in group A demonstrated normal lower leg alignments, whereas five cases in group B showed characteristic roentogenographic findings of Blount's disease. The improvement rate of metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was correlated with this classification. These findings suggested that abnormal findings in physis and perichondrial region might be preliminary findings in early stage of Blount's disease. The high intensity areas in the medial epiphyseal cartilage were commonly found among the cases with bowing deformities, which suggested that there might be a common pathomechanism between physiologic bowing and infantile Blount's disease. PMID:11008740

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Mohammed A.; Hammad, Moustafa S.; Abdelmoghny, Abobakr; Elsherif, Ashraf M.; Tawfik, Heba M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to computed tomography (CT) and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females) were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases), followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases). While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity. PMID:24179408

  11. Can we evaluate cranial aneurysms on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Emine; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kaya, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the contribution of conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the determination of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods: Brain MRI and computed tomography angiography (CTA) of 45 patients (29 women and 16 men; age range, 32–80 years) with aneurysm were analyzed. A comparison was made between brain MRI and CTA based on size and presence of aneurysm. The comparisons between MRI and CTA were investigated through Bland-Altman graphics, receiver operating characteristic curve, and Kappa statistics. Results: Fifty-seven aneurysms were evaluated. Forty-five percent of 57 aneurysms on CTA were detected on conventional brain MRI. A significant correlation was found between CTA and brain MRI in the diagnosis of aneurysm (P < 0.05). In an analysis of the size measurement, a significant correlation was observed between CTA and brain MRI. Seventy-seven percent of aneurysms <4 mm was not detected and the efficiency of MRI in the detection of aneurysms <4 mm was found to be low. Conclusion: Aneurysms can also be appreciated on conventional brain MRI, and vascular structures should be reviewed carefully while analyzing brain MRI. PMID:26933351

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in endourology.

    PubMed

    Chan, A J; Prasad, P V; Saltzman, B

    2001-02-01

    Historically, the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endourology has been limited. The availability of faster and stronger gradient systems has given rise to a number of data acquisition strategies that have significantly broadened the scope of MRI applications. These methods have led to the evaluation of anatomy and function using a single modality, and we describe our experience with MRI for comprehensive evaluation of the obstructed ureteropelvic junction. We also utilize these new imaging sequences in the investigation of alterated renal hemodynamics after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and present our preliminary data on the application of MR perfusion imaging as a noninvasive technique for the evaluation of renal blood flow.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound evaluation of "healthy" joints in young subjects with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Iervolino, S; Soscia, E; Tosetto, A; Coppola, A; Schiavulli, M; Marrone, E; Ruosi, C; Salvatore, M; Di Minno, G

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) are increasingly used in haemophilia A (HA) to detect early joint changes. A total of 40 clinically asymptomatic joints, never involved by bleeding events ["healthy joints" (HJ)], were evaluated by MRI and, in parallel, by US in 20 young subjects with severe HA (22.45 ± 2.72 years old; no history of arthritides, of viral infections or of inhibitors against factor VIII). The same joints were evaluated in 20 matched non-haemophilic (no-HA) subjects (mean age 23.90 ± 2.31 years, P = 0.078 vs. HA subjects). US images were obtained with specific probe positions according to validated procedures. A validated US score and progressive (P-MRI) and additive (A-MRI) MRI scores were employed for data collection and analysis. The US score was higher in HA than in no-HA subjects (3.40 ± 1.72 vs. 0.80 ± 1.10, P < 0.001). Taking into account only moderate/severe alterations, joint effusion was found in 55% of HA and in 5% of no-HA joints (P < 0.001); synovial hypertrophy was found in 20% of HA and in none of the no-HA joints; cartilage erosion was found in 30% of HA and in none of no-HA joints. MRI examinations confirmed these findings and the US score correlated with the A-MRI (r = 0.732, P < 0.001) and with the P-MRI (r = 0.598, P < 0.001) scores. MRI and US data significantly correlated as to effusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002), synovial hypertrophy (r = 0.633, P = 0.036) and cartilage erosion (r = 0.734, P = 0.010). Despite inherent limitations, joint US examination identified subclinical abnormalities of HJ in young subjects with severe HA.

  14. Validation of Supervised Automated Algorithm for Fast Quantitative Evaluation of Organ Motion on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Varuna; Stainsby, Jeffrey A.; Satkunasingham, Janakan; Craig, Tim; Catton, Charles; Chan, Philip; Dawson, Laura; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Sussman, Marshall S.; Lockwood, Gina; Menard, Cynthia

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To validate a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm applied to the supervised automated quantification of abdominal-pelvic organ motion captured on time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images of 21 patients across four anatomic sites were analyzed. Representative anatomic points of interest were chosen as surrogates for organ motion. The point of interest displacements across each image frame relative to baseline were quantified manually and through the use of a template-matching software tool, termed 'Motiontrack.' Automated and manually acquired displacement measures, as well as the standard deviation of intrafraction motion, were compared for each image frame and for each patient. Results: Discrepancies between the automated and manual displacements of {>=}2 mm were uncommon, ranging in frequency of 0-9.7% (liver and prostate, respectively). The standard deviations of intrafraction motion measured with each method correlated highly (r = 0.99). Considerable interpatient variability in organ motion was demonstrated by a wide range of standard deviations in the liver (1.4-7.5 mm), uterus (1.1-8.4 mm), and prostate gland (0.8-2.7 mm). The automated algorithm performed successfully in all patients but 1 and substantially improved efficiency compared with manual quantification techniques (5 min vs. 60-90 min). Conclusion: Supervised automated quantification of organ motion captured on magnetic resonance imaging using a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm was efficient, accurate, and may play an important role in off-line adaptive approaches to intrafraction motion management.

  15. Solitary fibrous tumor of the liver: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation and treatment with transarterial chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    El-Khouli, Riham H; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Bluemke, David A; Kamel, Ihab R

    2008-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon neoplasm first described as a tumor of mesenchymal origin that rarely involves the liver. This report presents a rare case of unresectable SFT of the liver and documents the first use of transarterial chemoembolization in its treatment. Three sessions of chemoembolization were performed aiming to reduce the tumor size or at least stabilize it. Subsequent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging examinations were performed to assess imaging response to treatment. We recommend further studies to be done to assess both the use of transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of unresectable SFT and the use of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of the tumor response to treatment.

  16. Evaluation of the acromiohumeral distance by means of magnetic resonance imaging umerus☆

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira França, Flávio; Godinho, André Couto; Ribeiro, Elísio José Salgado; Falster, Lorenzo; Búrigo, Lucas Emanuel Gava; Nunes, Rafael Berenstein

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the relationship between the size, degree of retraction and topography of rotator cuff injuries and the degree of rise of the humeral head, and to evaluate the influence of gravity, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods We evaluated 181 shoulder MRIs from 160 patients aged over 45 years, between November 2013 and July 2014. The patients were divided into two groups: one control (no lesion or partial damage to the rotator cuff); and the other with complete tears of the rotator cuff. We measured the acromiohumeral distance in the sagittal plane, and established the shortest distance between the apex of the head and the acromion. Results In this study, 96 examinations on female patients (53.04%) and 58 on male patients (46.96%) were evaluated. The mean age was 63.27 years: in the control group, 61.46; and in the group with injuries, 65.19. From analysis on the measurements of the subacromial space, we observed significantly higher values in the control group (7.71 mm) than in the group with injuries (6.99). In comparing the control group with some specific subgroup, i.e. posterosuperior (6.77), anteroposterior-superior (4.16) and retraction Patte III (5.01), we confirmed the importance of topography and degree of retraction in relation to the rise of the humeral head. Conclusion The rise of the humeral head was directly related to the size, degree of retraction and topography of the rotator cuff injuries, with greater degrees of rise in cases of superior and posterior lesions and anteroposterior-superior (massive) lesions. The assessment using MRI was not influenced by the force of gravity. PMID:27069885

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of tibial eminence fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Monto, Raymond Rocco; Cameron-Donaldson, Michelle L; Close, Matthew A; Ho, Charles P; Hawkins, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    Proton density and T2-weighted sagittal, axial, coronal, and inversion recovery fat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were reviewed in 21 adults (10 men and 11 women) with 22 tibial eminence fractures. Average patient age was 43 years (range: 19-62 years). There were 3 type I, 3 type II, 12 type III, and 4 type IV fractures. The average fracture fragment size was 21 x 23 mm, and the average displacement was 5.5 mm (range: 0-12 mm). The MRI disclosed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertional avulsions in 20 (91%), distal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsions in 4 (18%), intrasubstance ACL damage in 9 (41%), intrasubstance PCL injury in 3 (14%), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears in 9 (41%) knees, retinacular injury in 8 (36%), posterolateral corner damage in 8 (36%), medial meniscal tears in 5 (23%), and 4 (18%) had lateral meniscal tears. Occult subchondral osseous injuries were seen in the posterolateral tibial plateau in 13 (59%) knees, anterolateral femoral condyle in 4 (18%), and posteromedial tibial plateau in 5 (23%) knees. Discrete osteochondral fractures were present in 7 (32%) knees. Significant osseous, cartilaginous, meniscal, and ligamentous damage was discovered in all patients. Based on these findings, we recommend MRI evaluation of all tibial eminence fractures to accurately detect all knee damage.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of meniscoid superior labrum: normal variant or superior labral tear*

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Vinson, Emily N.; Spritzer, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of a "meniscoid" superior labrum. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 582 magnetic resonance imaging examinations of shoulders. Of those 582 examinations, 110 were excluded, for a variety of reasons, and the final analysis therefore included 472 cases. Consensus readings were performed by three musculoskeletal radiologists using specific criteria to diagnose meniscoid labra. Results A meniscoid superior labrum was identified in 48 (10.2%) of the 472 cases evaluated. Arthroscopic proof was available in 21 cases (43.8%). In 10 (47.6%) of those 21 cases, the operative report did not include the mention a superior labral tear, thus suggesting the presence of a meniscoid labrum. In only one of those cases were there specific comments about a mobile superior labrum (i.e., meniscoid labrum). In the remaining 11 (52.4%), surgical correlation demonstrated superior labral tears. Conclusion A meniscoid superior labrum is not an infrequent finding. Depending upon assumptions and the requirement of surgical proof, the prevalence of a meniscoid superior labrum in this study was between 2.1% (surgically proven) and 4.8% (projected). However, superior labral tears are just as common and are often confused with meniscoid labra. PMID:27777474

  19. [Evaluation of the risk of overheating and displacement of orthodontic devices in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yassi, K; Ziane, F; Bardinet, E; Moinard, M; Veyret, B; Chateil, J F

    2007-02-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the exploration of the orofacial region of patients who have orthodontic appliances can be disturbed by artifacts, with a theoretical risk of displacement and overheating of the different materials used in odontology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal effects and the risk of displacement induced by MRI on certain metallic devices used in orthodontics. The results show a very moderate increase in temperature of the materials during MRI exposure, less than 1 degrees C, in particular in the metal wire linking the brackets. The maximal forces observed were on the order of 0.27 N. The risk of detachment and displacement seems to be nonexistent at 1.5 Tesla when the usual recommendations are respected. Temporary removal of the wire and verification of the adhesive is recommended. However, priority should be given to nonmagnetic or slightly magnetic material to limit artifacts as much as possible when exploring the head region.

  20. Evaluation of expert criteria for preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Carolyn E; Tumyan, Lusine; Gonser, Laura; Shaw, Sara L; Vora, Lalit; Paz, I Benjamin; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Yim, John H

    2014-08-01

    Despite 2 randomized trials reporting no reduction in operations or local recurrence at 1 year, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in diagnostic workup of breast cancer. We evaluated 5 utilization criteria recently proposed by experts. Of women (n = 340) newly diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer who underwent bilateral MRI, most (69.4%) met at least 1 criterion before MRI: mammographic density (44.4%), under consideration for partial breast irradiation (PBI) (19.7%), genetic-familial risk (12.9%), invasive lobular carcinoma (11.8%), and multifocal/multicentric disease (10.6%). MRI detected occult malignant lesion or extension of index lesion in 21.2% of index, 3.3% of contralateral, breasts. No expert criterion was associated with MRI-detected malignant lesion, which associated instead with pre-MRI plan of lumpectomy without PBI (48.2% of subjects): Odds Ratio 3.05, 95% CI 1.57-5.91 (p adjusted for multiple hypothesis testing = 0.007, adjusted for index-vs-contralateral breast and covariates). The expert guidelines were not confirmed by clinical evidence.

  1. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke; Morawe, Gerald; Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  2. A comparison of magnetic resonance imaging sequences in evaluating pathological changes in the canine spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Z; Pomianowski, A; Zhalniarovich, Y; Kwiatkowska, M; Jaskólska, M; Bocheńska, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses 28 canine patients subjected to low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spinal cord for neurological indications. The authors describe and compare the used MRI sequences with an indication of the most effective sequences in MRI examinations that require short scanning time. The most effective sequences supporting a quick diagnosis of spinal diseases in dogs were SE (spin echo), FSE (fast spin echo) and 3D HYCE (hybrid contrast enhancement). PMID:21957746

  3. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian Walter, Thula Rump, Jens Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0{sup o} to 90{sup o}) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width <3.5 mm, tip error <2 mm) at 45{sup o} to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR{sub Muscle/Needle} >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and BMB score in the evaluation of bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease patients*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ricardo Andrade Fernandes; Mello, Melissa Bozzi Nonato; Pessanha, Laís Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging changes in bone marrow of patients undergoing treatment for type I Gaucher’s disease. Materials and Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional study of Gaucher’s disease patients submitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging of femurs and lumbar spine. The images were blindly reviewed and the findings were classified according to the semiquantitative bone marrow burden (BMB) scoring system. Results All of the seven evaluated patients (three men and four women) presented signs of bone marrow infiltration. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was found in three patients, Erlenmeyer flask deformity in five, and no patient had vertebral body collapse. The mean BMB score was 11, ranging from 9 to 14. Conclusion Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the method of choice for assessing bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease in adults due to its high sensitivity to detect both focal and diffuse bone marrow changes, and the BMB score is a simplified method for semiquantitative analysis, without depending on advanced sequences or sophisticated hardware, allowing for the classification of the disease extent and assisting in the treatment monitoring. PMID:26379319

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child’s ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. Materials and Methods: It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Results: Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was

  6. SU-E-J-157: Improving the Quality of T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, D; Mutic, S; Hu, Y; Caruthers, S; Glide-Hurst, C; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging technique that enables us to acquire T2- weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4DMRI) with sufficient spatial coverage, temporal resolution and spatial resolution for clinical evaluation. Methods: T2-weighed 4DMRI images were acquired from a healthy volunteer using a respiratory amplitude triggered T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence. 10 respiratory states were used to equally sample the respiratory range based on amplitude (0%, 20%i, 40%i, 60%i, 80%i, 100%, 80%e, 60%e, 40%e and 20%e). To avoid frequent scanning halts, a methodology was devised that split 10 respiratory states into two packages in an interleaved manner and packages were acquired separately. Sixty 3mm sagittal slices at 1.5mm in-plane spatial resolution were acquired to offer good spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. The in-plane field of view was 375mm × 260mm with nominal scan time of 3 minutes 42 seconds. Acquired 2D images at the same respiratory state were combined to form the 3D image set corresponding to that respiratory state and reconstructed in the coronal view to evaluate whether all slices were at the same respiratory state. 3D image sets of 10 respiratory states represented a complete 4D MRI image set. Results: T2-weighted 4DMRI image were acquired in 10 minutes which was within clinical acceptable range. Qualitatively, the acquired MRI images had good image quality for delineation purposes. There were no abrupt position changes in reconstructed coronal images which confirmed that all sagittal slices were in the same respiratory state. Conclusion: We demonstrated it was feasible to acquire T2-weighted 4DMRI image set within a practical amount of time (10 minutes) that had good temporal resolution (10 respiratory states), spatial resolution (1.5mm × 1.5mm × 3.0mm) and spatial coverage (60 slices) for future clinical evaluation.

  7. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  8. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  9. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRimaging of the atrial septum than does conventional MRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  11. Redistribution of renal blood flow after SWL evaluated by Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, M R; Chavez, D R; Cannillo, J; Saltzman, B; Prasad, P V

    1998-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is currently accepted as an effective noninvasive treatment for a wide variety of urinary tract calculi. However, the bioeffects of high-energy shockwaves on renal parenchyma have yet to be fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to measure the acute changes in regional renal hemodynamics associated with SWL utilizing dynamic gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seven patients who underwent SWL for renal calculi had an MRI study within 4 hours after the treatment. To assess renal hemodynamics, a bolus of Gd DTPA (0.03 mmol/kg) was administered, and dynamic contrast enhanced images was obtained. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined over the cortex and medulla to obtain signal intensity-v-time curves. The contralateral kidney in each patient was used as the control. The initial slope of the contrast-enhanced signal intensity-v-time curve was used as a measure of the perfusion index (PI). In six patients, perfusion imaging showed a consistent trend of decreased cortical flow (29+/-8%) and a concomitant increase in medullary flow (34+/-14%) in the region of the kidney that was targeted with SWL in six patients (86%). This study shows that renal hemodynamics are modified by SWL. We hypothesize that this change represents a shunting of flow from cortex to medulla in an attempt to prevent ischemia of the medulla.

  12. Evaluation of a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xin-Mei; Tang, Guang-Yu; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Zhou, Bi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model for the study of rectal carcinoma. METHODS: A suspension of VX2 cells was injected into the rectum wall under the guidance of X-ray fluoroscopy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to observe tumor growth and metastasis at different phases. Pathological changes and spontaneous survival time of the rabbits were recorded. RESULTS: Two weeks after VX2 cell implantation, the tumor diameter ranged 4.1-5.8 mm and the success implantation rate was 81.8%. CT scanning showed low-density foci of the tumor in the rectum wall, while enhanced CT scanning demonstrated asymmetrical intensification in tumor foci. MRI scanning showed a low signal of the tumor on T1-weighted imaging and a high signal of the tumor on T2-weighted imaging. Both types of signals were intensified with enhanced MRI. Metastases to the liver and lung could be observed 6 wk after VX2 cell implantation, and a large area of necrosis appeared in the primary tumor. The spontaneous survival time of rabbits with cachexia and multiple organ failure was about 7 wk after VX2 cell implantation. CONCLUSION: The rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model we established has a high stability, and can be used in the study of rectal carcinoma. PMID:19418587

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Ultrasound in Evaluating Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rebecca; Klein, Michelle A.; Mahboob, Sabrina; Gupta, Mala; Katz, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are a relatively rare form of ectopic pregnancy in which the embryo is implanted within the fibrous scar of a previous cesarean section. A greater number of cases of CSPs are currently being reported as the rates of cesarean section are increasing globally and as detection of scar pregnancy has improved with use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) with color Doppler imaging. Delayed diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening condition may result in complications, predominantly uterine rupture and hemorrhage with significant potential maternal morbidity. Diagnosis of a cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) requires a high index of clinical suspicion, as up to 40% of patients may be asymptomatic. TVUS has a reported sensitivity of 84.6% and has become the imaging examination of choice for diagnosis of a CSP. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in a small number of patients as an adjunct to TVUS. In the present report, MRI is highlighted as a problem-solving tool capable of more precisely identifying the relationship of a CSP to adjacent structures, thereby providing additional information critical to directing appropriate patient management and therapy. PMID:23814688

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  15. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  16. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza; Nasser, Felipe; Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. Methods: This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. Results: An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). Conclusion: After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings. PMID:23579745

  17. Preoperative evaluation of the ulnar collateral ligament by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography arthrography. Evaluation in 25 baseball players with surgical confirmation.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, L A; Schwartz, M L; Andrews, J R

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was completed on 25 baseball players with medial side elbow pain. They were evaluated preoperatively with both computed tomography arthrogram and magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the elbow to assess the ulnar collateral ligament. At surgery, 16 of 25 patients had an abnormal ulnar collateral ligament and 9 patients had a normal ulnar collateral ligament. The computed tomography arthrogram detected abnormalities in 12 of the 14 patients with ulnar collateral ligament tearing (sensitivity, 86%). The magnetic resonance imaging scan indicated abnormalities in 8 of 14 patients (sensitivity, 57%). The specificity of the computed tomography arthrogram was 91% and the magnetic resonance imaging was 100%. A newly described "T-sign" was seen on the computed tomography arthrogram in the patients with an undersurface tear of the ulnar collateral ligament. This represented the dye leaking around the detachment of the ulnar collateral ligament from its bony insertion but remaining contained within the intact superficial layer of the ulnar collateral ligament and capsule. Both the computed tomography arthrogram and the magnetic resonance imaging scan were accurate in diagnosing a complete tear of the ulnar collateral ligament preoperatively in all cases. The main advantage of the computed tomography arthrogram was in evaluating the partial undersurface tear.

  18. [New technique of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate peripheral circulation in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    Waveform analysis at the popliteal artery using the new technique of gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging is beneficial to assess peripheral circulation in both normal and diseased arteries. The normal subjects had a typically triphasic waveform, which could be clearly separated into systolic, and early and late diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. Diabetic patients are reported to have two types of insufficient arterial blood flow to the lower limbs associated with the vessel wall properties. Firstly, patients with atherosclerotic occlusion in the lower-leg arteries distal to the aortic bifurcation, resulting in a low ankle-brachial index, show an abnormal monophasic waveform. Secondly, patients with stiffer arteries characteristically show abnormal flow reversal in late diastole, suggesting higher vascular resistance.

  19. Early evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound sonication in the treatment of uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Y.; Sriharibabu, M.; Nyapathy, Vinay; Mishra, Anindita

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are common cause of morbidity in women of reproductive age group. High intensity focused ultrasound with the imaging guidance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) known as magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound sonication (MRgFUS) is now available. However, there are no available studies with this non invasive modality of treatment in Indian subjects. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and clinical efficacy of MRgFUS in the treatment of uterine fibroids. Methods: This prospective study included 32 consecutive women with clinically symptomatic uterine fibroids who were treated with MRgFUS from February 2011 to October 2011. Pre and post treatment symptom severity scores (SSS) were assessed at the time of enrolment and at one, three and six months follow up using a validated uterine fibroid symptom - quality of life questionnaire (UFS-QOL). Pre and post treatment fibroid volumes were compared immediately after treatment and at six months follow up using contrast enhanced MRI scan. Non perfused volume (NPV) ratios were calculated and correlated with fibroid volume reductions immediately after the treatment and at the end of six months follow up. Results: This procedure was well tolerated by the patients and procedure related adverse effects were non significant. Significant reductions in SSS were seen at one, three and six month intervals after the treatment (P<0.01). Significant reductions were noticed in fibroid volumes at six months follow up compared to pretreatment fibroid volumes (P<0.01). Significant positive correlations were observed between NPV ratios and reduction in fibroid volumes at six months follow-up (r=0.659, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: MRgFUS is relatively a safe and effective non invasive treatment modality for treating uterine fibroids in selected patients. Its long term efficacy is yet to be tested and compared with other available minimally invasive

  20. [A case of pentalogy of Fallot with numerous collaterals evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging: a report of an adult case].

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, S; Kagaya, A; Kuramoto, M; Kudo, K; Katagiri, M; Ozawa, S; Momata, S; Watanabe, S; Masuda, Y; Inagaki, Y

    1985-12-01

    In this report, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with that of two-dimensional echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac catheterization in a patient with pentalogy of Fallot who survived to her fortieth year. The advantages and disadvantages of MRI in diagnosing the present case were as follows: The cardiovascular system, with the exception of atrial septal defect, was evaluated precisely. Collateral vessels were detected using MRI, but impossible with other non-invasive methods. MRI was particularly suitable for imaging the cardiovascular system because of the high contrast between the lower intensity signal of the blood and higher intensity signal of the myocardium and blood vessel walls. Using MRI, data acquisition time was 1.5 min per section. Gated MRI required more time for data acquisition. However, various oblique tomographic projections and very clear static images could be obtained using gated MRI. MRI should be one of the best diagnostic techniques for diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings. PMID:18087936

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Novel Trifluorinated Imaging Agent for Assessment of Bile Acid Transport Using Fluorine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, Diana; Cheng, Kunrong; Khurana, Sandeep; Xu, Su; Dawson, Paul A.; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we developed a trifluorinated bile acid, CA-lys-TFA, with the objective of noninvasively assessing bile acid transport in vivo using 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CA-lys-TFA was successfully imaged in the mouse gallbladder, but was susceptible to deconjugation in vitro by choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH), a bacterial bile acid deconjugating enzyme found in the terminal ileum and colon. The objective of the present study was to develop a novel trifluorinated bile acid resistant to deconjugation by CGH. CA-sar-TFMA was designed, synthesized, and tested for in vitro transport properties, stability, imaging properties, and its ability to differentially accumulate in the gallbladders of normal mice, compared with mice with known impaired bile acid transport (deficient in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, ASBT). CA-sar-TFMA was a potent inhibitor and substrate of ASBT and the Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. Stability was favorable in all conditions tested, including the presence of CGH. CA-sar-TFMA was successfully imaged and accumulated at 16.1-fold higher concentrations in gallbladders from wild-type mice compared with those from Asbt-deficient mice. Our results support the potential of using MRI with CA-sar-TFMA as a noninvasive method to assess bile acid transport in vivo. PMID:25196788

  4. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Alexander W; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Shi, Jian; Rannard, Steven P; Liu, Quan; Yang, Chang-Tong; He, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm) possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently encapsulate hydrophobic guest molecules, which could allow simultaneous bioimaging and drug delivery. PMID:26425088

  5. Relationship between levodopa-independent symptoms and central atrophy evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Durif, F; Pollak, P; Hommel, M; Ardouin, C; Le Bas, J F; Crouzet, G; Perret, J

    1992-01-01

    Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease were studied for the purpose of investigation relations between motor symptoms and cerebral atrophy evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Axial symptoms (gait disorder, postural instability and difficulty in arising from a chair), assessed at the time of maximum clinical improvement, were significantly correlated with frontal atrophy, while no correlation was found between the basal parkinsonian disability score and cerebral atrophy. It is suggested that frontal atrophy observed by MRI is linked with axial motor symptoms resulting from non-dopaminergic lesions. The origin of this atrophy is unknown. PMID:1563452

  6. Evaluation of breast cancer chemotherapy efficacy with multifractal spectrum analysis of magnetic resonance image.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hu, Wen-yong; Liu, Li-zhi; Pang, Ya-chun; Shao, Yuan-zhi

    2014-01-01

    Multifractal spectrum analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) breast MR images was used to establish a new quantitative analysis method for solid tumor blood perfusion and to explore its applicability in evaluating efficacy of breast cancer chemotherapy. Five randomly selected patients suffering from newly diagnosed malignant breast nodule lesions were enrolled in this study, and four of them were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Their DCE breast MR images were collected before and after treatment. Chemotherapeutic efficacy was analyzed using international response evaluation criteria for solid tumors (RECIST). Sandbox method for statistical number density was employed to measure and calculate multifractal spectra of DCE breast MR images with spatiotemporal characteristics. Multifractal spectral data of malignant lesions before and after chemotherapy were compared. Multifractal spectra of malignant lesions show an asymmetric bell-shape. Chemotherapy efficacy was assessed to be partial remission (PR) for three patients and their multifractal spectral width significantly increased after chemotherapy while to be stable disease (SD) for other patient and of her changed slightly. Multifractal spectral width correlates with blood-supply condition of tumor lesion before and after chemotherapy, providing a potential suitable characteristic parameter for evaluating chemotherapeutic efficacy quantitatively.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of lipodystrophy in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eichler, K; Bickel, T M; Klauke, S; Eisen, J; Vogl, T J; Zangos, S

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated retrospectively an automated method for the separate detection of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the abdominal region by magnetic resonance studies in HIV-positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patients were divided into four different groups: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, mixed and the control group. The use of software for the automated detection of abdominal compartment visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was compared to manual evaluation methods (fuzzy C-mean). The results of ROC analysis showed that the parameters, particularly the VAT, are better than the VAT/TAT and at identifying patients with the symptoms of abdominal fat accumulation. A sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 79.5% resulted from a threshold VAT value of >87 cm(2). Moreover, the manual evaluation method was shown to provide greater values for VAT and the VAT/TAT ratio than those given by the automated method. In the present study, a rapid MRI protocol for the detection and assessment of the course of lipodystrophy was presented and tested on a group of patients with signs of HALS, as well as on an antiretroviral naïve control group.

  8. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  9. Dosimetric evaluation for exposure of patient to a z-gradient coil in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, time-varied gradient magnetic fields may stimulate nerves and muscles by inducing electric fields and currents in patients, which may potentially cause health problems. In this paper, a realistic z-gradient coil was numerically designed and the exposure level in a 3D real human man model was calculated by using the impedance method. It was found that the z-gradient coil produces a magnetic flux density (B-field) with two regions of good homogeneity along the coil length, separated by a very weak B-field in the middle of the coil. The spatially averaged B-field is 281 times greater than that of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection's (ICNIRP) reference level. The 1-cm{sup 2}-averaged induced current density in the central nervous system is 87 times greater than that of the ICNIRP's basic restriction. The maximum current density in all of the body tissues is above the nerve stimulation threshold.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation for exposure of patient to a z-gradient coil in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, time-varied gradient magnetic fields may stimulate nerves and muscles by inducing electric fields and currents in patients, which may potentially cause health problems. In this paper, a realistic z-gradient coil was numerically designed and the exposure level in a 3D real human man model was calculated by using the impedance method. It was found that the z-gradient coil produces a magnetic flux density (B-field) with two regions of good homogeneity along the coil length, separated by a very weak B-field in the middle of the coil. The spatially averaged B-field is 281 times greater than that of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection's (ICNIRP) reference level. The 1-cm2-averaged induced current density in the central nervous system is 87 times greater than that of the ICNIRP's basic restriction. The maximum current density in all of the body tissues is above the nerve stimulation threshold.

  11. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  12. Evaluation of Traumatic Spine by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Correlation with Neurological Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Sarita; Yadav, Rohtas Kanwar; Bala, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with clinical profile and neurological status of the patient and to correlate the MRI findings with neurological recovery of the patients and predict the outcome. Overview of Literature Previous studies have reported poor neurological recovery in patients with cord hemorrhage, as compared to cord edema in spine injury patients. High canal compromise, cord compression along with higher extent of cord injury also carries poor prognostic value. Methods Neurological status of patients was assessed at the time of admission and discharge in as accordance with the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Mean stay in hospital was 14.11±5.74 days. Neurological status at admission and neurological recovery at discharge was compared with various qualitative cord findings and quantitative parameters on MRI. In 27 patients, long-term follow-up was done at mean time of 285.9±43.94 days comparing same parameters. Results Cord edema and normal cord was associated with favorable neurological outcome. Cord contusion showed lesser neurological recovery, as compared to cord edema. Cord hemorrhage was associated with worst neurological status at admission and poor neurological recovery. Mean canal compromise (MCC), mean spinal cord compression (MSCC) and lesion length values were higher in patients presenting with ASIA A impairment scale injury and showed decreasing trends towards ASIA E impairment scale injury. Patients showing neurological recovery had lower mean MCC, MSCC, and lesion length, as compared to patients showing no neurological recovery (p<0.05). Conclusions Cord hemorrhage, higher MCC, MSCC, and lesion length values have poor prognostic value in spine injury patients. PMID:26435794

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acetabular orientation in normal Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Li, YiQiang; Liu, YuanZhong; Zhou, QingHe; Chen, WeiDong; Li, JingChun; Yu, LingJia; Xu, HongWen; Xie, DengHui

    2016-09-01

    There are no data regarding the acetabular orientation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); this study investigates the changes of acetabular orientation with age in normal Chinese children.We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of children who underwent hip MRI examination at our hospital from January 2009 to December 2015. A total of 180 patients with normal MRI reading of the hip joints were included and were divided into 14 groups according to age: from 6 months of age and then for each year from 1 to 16 years. The bony and cartilage acetabular anteversion angle (AAA), acetabular inclination angle (AIA), and acetabular index (AI) were measured. Total bony and cartilage femoral head coverage angles were measured on axial section total femoral head coverage angle (a-TCA) and coronal section total femoral head coverage angle (c-TCA).The mean bony AAA and AIA were 12.2 ± 2.5° and 50.9 ± 2.5°, respectively; both of them stayed constant from the age of 6 months to 16 years. Similar results were found in cartilage AAA (12.1 ± 2.5°) and AIA (41.2 ± 3.0°). There was no difference between bony and cartilage AAA, but bony AIA was significantly larger than cartilage AIA. Bony AI was 24.1 ± 2.4° at the age of 6 months, decreasing to 12.5 ± 2.3° by 12 to 13 years of age; cartilage AI (5.9 ± 1.7°) maintained a steady value with age. The mean bony a-TCA and c-TCA at 6 months were 117.0 ± 5.8° and 127.5 ± 5.1°, increasing to 144.5 ± 4.6° and 140.7 ± 2.5° at the age of 16 years. However, the cartilage a-TCA (145.2 ± 7.2°) and c-TCA (154.1 ± 5.7°) did not change significantly with age.Both bony and cartilage AAA and AIA remain constant up to the age of 16 years in normal Chinese pediatric population. Although the cartilage coverage of femoral head by the acetabulum remains unchanged with age, the bony coverage of femoral head increases. PMID:27631258

  16. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J. ); Noblett, B.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  17. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J.; Noblett, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Podberesky, Daniel J; Towbin, Alexander J; Eltomey, Mohamed A; Levitt, Marc A

    2013-11-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 newborns and is frequently accompanied by anomalies of the genitalia, gynecologic system, urinary tract, spine, and skeletal system. Diagnostic imaging plays a central role in ARM evaluation. Because of the lack of ionizing radiation, excellent intrinsic contrast resolution, multiplanar imaging capabilities, technical advances in hardware, and innovative imaging protocols, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly important in assessment of ARM patients in utero, postnatally before definitive surgical correction, and in the postoperative period. This article discusses the role of MR imaging in evaluating ARM patients. PMID:24183526

  19. Diagnostic Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of the Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Mehmet; Toprak, Hüseyin; Burgazli, Mehmet; Bilgin, S. Sennur; Chasan, Ritvan; Erdogan, Ali; Balcı, Cem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, our purpose was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method in the patients with bile duct obstruction. Materials and Methods. 108 consecutive patients (53 men, 55 women, mean age; 55.77 ± 14.62, range 18–86 years) were included in this study. All the patients underwent conventional upper abdomen MRI using intravenous contrast material (Gd-DTPA) and MRCP in 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. MRCP images were evaluated together with the T1 and T2w images, and both biliary ducts and surrounding tissues were examined for possible pathologies that may cause obstruction. Results. MRI/MRCP findings compared with final diagnoses, MRI/MRCP in the demonstration of bile duct obstruction sensitivity 96%, the specificity 100%, and accuracy 96.3%, in the detection of presence and level of obstruction, the sensitivity 96.7%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 97.2%, in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis, the sensitivity 82.3%, specificity 96%, and accuracy 91.7%, and in the determination of the character of the stenosis, sensitivity 95.6%, specificity 91.3%, and accuracy 94.5% were found. Conclusion. The combination of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MRCP techniques in patients with suspected biliary obstruction gives the detailed information about the presence of obstruction, location, and causes and is a highly specific and sensitive method. PMID:22489200

  20. Preclinical evaluation of biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi

    Macromolecular contrast agents have been shown to be superior to small molecular weight contrast agents for MRI in blood pool imaging, tumor diagnosis and grading. However, none has been approved by the FDA because they circulate in the bloodstream much longer than small molecular weight contrast agents and result in high tissue accumulation of toxic Gd(III) ions. Biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents (BMCA) were invented to alleviate the toxic accumulation. They have a cleavable disulfide bond based backbone that can be degraded in vivo and excreted out of the body via renal filtration. Furthermore, the side chain of the backbone can be modified to achieve various degradation rates. Three BMCA, (Gd-DTPA)-cystamine copolymers (GDCC), Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), and Gd-DTPA cystine diethyl ester copolymers (GDCEP), were evaluated as blood pool contrast agents in a rat model. They have excellent blood pool enhancement, preferred pharmacokinetics, and only minimal long-term tissue retention of toxic Gd(III) ions. GDCC and GDCP, the lead agents with desired degradation rates, with molecular weights of 20 KDa and 70 KDa, were chosen for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to differentiate human prostate tumor models of different malignancy and growth rates. GDCC and GDCP could differentiate these tumor models, providing more accurate estimations of plasma volume, flow leakage rate, and permeability surface area product than a small molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA-BMA when compared to the prototype macromolecular contrast agent albumin-Gd-DTPA. GDCC was favored for its neutral charge side chain and reasonable uptake rate by the tumors. GDCC with a molecular weight of 40 KDa (GDCC-40, above the renal filtration cutoff size) was used to assess the efficacy of two photothermal therapies (interstitial and indocyanine green enhanced). GDCC-40 provided excellent tumor enhancement shortly after its injection. Acute tumor response (4 hr) after therapies

  1. Dissociations between behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations of cognitive function after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Jonathan C; Fins, Joseph J; Katz, Douglas I; Hersh, Jennifer; Heier, Linda A; Tabelow, Karsten; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Schiff, Nicholas D; Voss, Henning U

    2011-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods hold promise for the identification of cognitive function and communication capacity in some severely brain-injured patients who may not retain sufficient motor function to demonstrate their abilities. We studied seven severely brain-injured patients and a control group of 14 subjects using a novel hierarchical functional magnetic resonance imaging assessment utilizing mental imagery responses. Whereas the control group showed consistent and accurate (for communication) blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses without exception, the brain-injured subjects showed a wide variation in the correlation of blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses and overt behavioural responses. Specifically, the brain-injured subjects dissociated bedside and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based command following and communication capabilities. These observations reveal significant challenges in developing validated functional magnetic resonance imaging-based methods for clinical use and raise interesting questions about underlying brain function assayed using these methods in brain-injured subjects.

  2. Evaluation of low back pain with low field open magnetic resonance imaging scanner in rural hospital of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Shrinuvasan, Sadhanandham; Chidambaram, Ranganathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is the most common symptom which is associated with limitation of normal activities and work-related disability. Imaging techniques are often essential in making the correct diagnosis for prompt management. Plain Radiography though remain a first imaging modality, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to its inherent softtissue contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation remains invaluable modality in the evaluation of LBP. Aim: To find the common causes of LBP in different age groups and the role of MRI in detecting the spectrum of various pathological findings. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study done in the Department of Radiodiagnosis during a period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015. The study population includes all the cases referred to our department with complaints of LBP. Patients with ferromagnetic metallic implants and uncooperative cases were excluded. HITACHI 0.4 Tesla open MRI machine was used for imaging. Results and Conclusion: This study involved a total of 235 cases. There were 121 males and 114 females. The age of the patient ranged from 21 to 68 years with an average of 41.3 years. Back pain was commonly observed in the third to fifth decade. The common causes for back pain are disc herniations (disc bulge – 35.3%, disc protrusion – 39.6%, disc extrusion – 7.2%) accounting to 82.1%, followed by normal study (10.2%), vertebral collapse (traumatic – 2.1%, osteoporotic – 1.7%), infections (2.1%), and neoplasm (1.7%). MRI provides valuable information regarding the underlying causes of LBP, especially in disc and marrow pathology. PMID:27365953

  3. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  4. Evaluation of left ventricular scar identification from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Lehmann, H. I.; Johnson, S. B.; Packer, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Patients with ventricular arrhythmias typically exhibit myocardial scarring, which is believed to be an important anatomic substrate for reentrant circuits, thereby making these regions a key target in catheter ablation therapy. In ablation therapy, a catheter is guided into the left ventricle and radiofrequency energy is delivered into the tissue to interrupt arrhythmic electrical pathways. Low bipolar voltage regions are typically localized during the procedure through point-by-point construction of an electroanatomic map by sampling the endocardial surface with the ablation catheter and are used as a surrogate for myocardial scar. This process is time consuming, requires significant skill, and has the potential to miss low voltage sites. This has led to efforts to quantify myocardial scar preoperatively using delayed, contrast-enhanced MRI. In this paper, we evaluate the utility of left ventricular scar identification from delayed contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias. Myocardial infarcts were created in three canines followed by a delayed, contrast enhanced MRI scan and electroanatomic mapping. The left ventricle and myocardial scar is segmented from preoperative MRI images and sampled points from the procedural electroanatomical map are registered to the segmented endocardial surface. Sampled points with low bipolar voltage points visually align with the segmented scar regions. This work demonstrates the potential utility of using preoperative delayed, enhanced MRI to identify myocardial scarring for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy.

  5. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26190429

  6. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  7. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  8. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  9. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in juvenile onset neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, M; Saunders, D; Brown, S; Ramsden, L; Martin, N; Moraitis, E; Pilkington, C A; Brogan, P A; Eleftheriou, D

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the abnormalities identified with conventional MRI in children with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). This was single-centre (Great Ormond Street Hospital, London) retrospective case series of patients with juvenile NPSLE seen in 2003-2013. Brain MR images of the first episode of active NPSLE were reviewed. All patients fulfilled the 1999 ACR case definitions for NPSLE syndromes. Presenting neuropsychiatric manifestations, immunological findings and treatment are reported. Results are expressed as median and ranges or percentages. Fisher's exact test was used to identify clinical predictors of abnormal MRI. A total of 27 patients (22 females), median age 11 years (4-15), were identified. Presenting clinical symptoms included the following: headaches (85.1 %), mood disorder/depression (62.9 %), seizures (22.2 %), acute psychosis (18.5 %), cognitive dysfunction (14.8 %), movement disorder (14.8 %), acute confusional state (14.8 %), aseptic meningitis (7.4 %), demyelinating syndrome (3.7 %), myelopathy (3.7 %), dysautonomia (3.7 %) and cranial neuropathy (3.7 %). The principal MR findings were as follows: (1) absence of MRI abnormalities despite signs and symptoms of active NPSLE (59 %); (2) basilar artery territory infarction (3 %); (3) focal white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted imaging (33 %); (4) cortical grey matter lesions (3 %); and (5) brain atrophy (18.5 %). The presence of an anxiety disorder strongly associated with abnormal MRI findings (p = 0.008). In over half the children with NPSLE, no conventional MRI abnormalities were observed; white matter hyperintensities were the most commonly described abnormalities. Improved MR techniques coupled with other alternative diagnostic imaging modalities may improve the detection rate of brain involvement in juvenile NPSLE. PMID:27527090

  10. Evaluation of folate conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for scintigraphic/magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ram Prakash; Mathur, Rashi; Singh, Gurjaspreet; Kaul, Ankur; Bag, Narmada; Singh, Sweta; Kumar, Hemanth; Patra, Manoj; Mishra, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles influence their pharmacokinetics and ability to accumulate in tumors. In this paper we report a facile method to conjugate folic acid molecule to iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the specific uptake of these nanoparticles by the tumor, which will be useful in targeted imaging of the tumor. The iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by alkaline co precipitation method and were surface modified with dextranto make them stable. The folic acid is conjugated to the dextran modified iron oxide nanoparticles by reductive amination process after the oxidation of the dextran with periodate. The synthesized folic acid conjugated nanoparticles were characterized for size, phase, morphology and magnetization by using various physicochemical characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, dynamic light scattering and zetasizer etc. The quantification of the generated carbonyl groups and folic acid conjugated to the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was done by colorimetric estimations using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The in vitro MR studies were carried out over a range of concentrations and showed significant shortening of the transverse relaxation rate, showing the ability of the nanoconjugate to act as an efficient probe for MR imaging. The biodistribution studies and the scintigraphy done by radiolabeling the nanoconjugate with 99mTc show the enhanced uptake at the tumor site showing its enhanced specificity. PMID:23620987

  11. Evaluation of folate conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for scintigraphic/magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ram Prakash; Mathur, Rashi; Singh, Gurjaspreet; Kaul, Ankur; Bag, Narmada; Singh, Sweta; Kumar, Hemanth; Patra, Manoj; Mishra, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles influence their pharmacokinetics and ability to accumulate in tumors. In this paper we report a facile method to conjugate folic acid molecule to iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the specific uptake of these nanoparticles by the tumor, which will be useful in targeted imaging of the tumor. The iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by alkaline co precipitation method and were surface modified with dextranto make them stable. The folic acid is conjugated to the dextran modified iron oxide nanoparticles by reductive amination process after the oxidation of the dextran with periodate. The synthesized folic acid conjugated nanoparticles were characterized for size, phase, morphology and magnetization by using various physicochemical characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, dynamic light scattering and zetasizer etc. The quantification of the generated carbonyl groups and folic acid conjugated to the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was done by colorimetric estimations using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The in vitro MR studies were carried out over a range of concentrations and showed significant shortening of the transverse relaxation rate, showing the ability of the nanoconjugate to act as an efficient probe for MR imaging. The biodistribution studies and the scintigraphy done by radiolabeling the nanoconjugate with 99mTc show the enhanced uptake at the tumor site showing its enhanced specificity.

  12. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE HIP FOR THE EVALUATION OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT; PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Geoffrey M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Stevens, Kathryn J.; Safran, Marc R.; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Gold, Garry E.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has, in a relatively short time, come to the forefront of orthopedic imaging. In just a few short years MRI findings that were in the past ascribed to degenerative change, normal variation, or other pathologies must now be described and included in radiology reports, as they have been shown, or are suspected to be related to, FAI. Crucial questions have come up in this time, including: what is the relationship of bony morphology to subsequent cartilage and labral damage, and most importantly, how is this morphology related to the development of osteoarthritis? In this review we attempt to place a historical perspective on the controversy, provide guidelines for interpretation of MRI examinations of patients with suspected FAI, and offer a glimpse into the future of MRI of this complex condition. PMID:25155435

  13. Low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas: differences in tumour microvascular permeability evaluated with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongzheng; Geng, Daoying; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xingrong; Zhang, Jun

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to quantitatively assess the microvascular permeability of oligodendroglioma using the volume transfer constant (K(trans)) and the volume of the extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (V(e)) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of K(trans) and V(e) in distinguishing between low-grade and anaplastic oligodendroglioma. The maximal values of K(trans) and V(e) for 65 patients with oligodendroglioma (27 grade II, 38 grade III) were obtained. Differences in K(trans) and V(e) between the two groups were analysed using the Mann-Whitney rank-sum test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to determine the cut-off values for the K(trans) and Ve that could differentiate between low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Values for K(trans) and Ve in low-grade oligodendrogliomas were significantly lower than those in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). ROC curve analysis showed that cut-off values of the K(trans) (0.037 min(-1)) and Ve (0.079) could be used to distinguish between low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas in a statistically significant manner. Our results suggest that DCE-MRI can distinguish the differences in microvascular permeability between low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas.

  14. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues for implantable microfabricated magnetic actuators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device.

  15. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Issues for Implantable Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device. PMID:24077662

  16. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kawakyu-O'Connor, Daniel; Bordia, Ritu; Nicola, Refky

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine is increasingly being used in the evaluation of spinal emergencies because it is highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of acute conditions of the spine. The prompt and accurate recognition allows for appropriate medical and surgical intervention. This article reviews the MR imaging features of common emergent conditions, such as spinal trauma, acute disc herniation, infection, and tumors. In addition, we describe common MR imaging sequences, discuss challenges encountered in emergency imaging of the spine, and illustrate multiple mimics of acute conditions. PMID:27150322

  18. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland <26 Gy). A DW sequence was performed once at rest and then repeated continuously during salivary stimulation. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for both parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

  19. Evaluation of a novel gadolinium-based contrast agent for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Wu, Genevieve N.; Chow, Rayland; Kim, Sung-Yop; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd) could serve as an efficient intraoperative contrast agent avoiding problems that arise with surgically-induced intracranial enhancement. F98 orthotopic brain tumors or surgical lesions were induced in Fisher rats. T1-weighted MRI studies were performed with either a single or multiple daily doses of MGd. The last contrast dose was administered either 7 or 24 h prior to scanning in both tumor-bearing and surgically treated animals. Animals receiving either 30 or 60 mg/kg MGd i.v. developed clinical signs of impaired motor activity, and increasing lethargy. MGd given i.p. was tolerated up to a dose of 140 mg/kg. Despite multiple dosages, and several administration modes (i.p. and i.v.), no significant enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 7 or 24 h following the last MGd dose. Clear enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 30 min. following MGd administration. Scans of necrotic lesions were positive 7 h post MGd injection. MGd scans showed no significant enhancement following surgically-induced lesions while scans with conventional contrast agents showed both meningeal and intraparenchymal enhancement. This study suggests that MGd is not sequestered in viable tumor for the necessary time interval required to allow delayed imaging in this model. The agent does seem to remain in necrotic tissue for longer time intervals. MGd therefore would not be suitable as a contrast agent in iMRI for the detection of residual tumor tissue during surgery.

  20. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  1. Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Computer-Assisted Segmentation of the Human Hypothalamus on 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E.; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures. PMID:23935821

  2. Evaluation of ventricular geometry and performance in congenital heart disease utilizing magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Mark A.

    1994-05-01

    We have recently embarked on a systematic evaluation of the regional and global mechanical processes of the systemic, morphologic right ventricle (RV) which is in either a single or dual chambered circulation as well as single left ventricles (LV). An MRI tagging technique which lays down 2 sets of parallel stripes perpendicular to each other on the myocardium as well as standard cine MRI were utilized. Finite strain analysis was applied to the grid lines to derive principle strains and the motion of the intersection points were tracked through systole to determine regional radial shortening and twist. Cine sequences were used to derive the various parameters of ventricular geometry and performance as well as visualizing flow profiles in the aorta. We noted a marked decrease in vol, EF, and CO in the Fontan group of patients when compared to other surgical subgroups. It is hypothesized that atrial stiffening by surgical placement of baffles may contribute to the observed changes in ventricular mechanics. Aortic flow profiles in the reconstructed aorta were noted to be heterogenous across the aortic diameter.

  3. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben E; Harris, Robert J; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive imaging technique with exquisite sensitivity to soft tissue composition. Magnetic resonance imaging is primary tool for brain tumor diagnosis, evaluation of drug response assessment, and clinical monitoring of the patient during the course of their disease. The flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence design allows for a variety of image contrasts to be acquired, including information about magnetic resonance-specific tissue characteristics, molecular dynamics, microstructural organization, vascular composition, and biochemical status. The current review highlights recent advancements and novel approaches in MR characterization of brain tumors.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  5. Direct comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and conductance microcatheter in the evaluation of left ventricular function in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Molojavyi, Andrei; Flögel, Ulrich; Merx, Marc W; Ding, Zhaoping; Schrader, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the reliability of conductance microcatheter volumetric measurements as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the same set of mice. Mice left ventricular (LV) volumes were monitored under basal conditions and in a hypertrophy model induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac function was evaluated in isoflurane anesthetized mice (n = 8) by MRI followed by 1.4 F Millar microtip catheter measurements. The second group of mice with TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy was studied eight weeks after surgery. Reliability of 3D-reconstructed MRI data was confirmed by comparison with autopsy masses (autopsy LV mass = 73.6 +/- 3.4 mg; MRI LV mass = 76.9 +/- 3.7 mg). Conduction catheter was found to greatly underestimate end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and thus stroke volume as well as cardiac output in control mice (MRI: EDV = 79 +/- 8 microl, ESV = 27+/-9 microl, SV = 51 +/- 9 microl, CO = 25 +/- 6 ml/min; Catheter: EDV = 28 +/- 5 microl, ESV = 8 +/- 4 microl, SV = 19 +/- 4 microl, CO = 10 +/- 2 ml/min). However, values for ejection fraction showed no significant differences between the two methods. In the hypertrophy model, stroke volume and cardiac output were increased when measured with MRI (SV: +19 +/- 20%; CO: +28 +/- 27%), whereas catheter data showed opposite directional changes (SV: -22 +/- 37%; CO: -31 +/- 37%). Ejection fraction was found to be reduced only in catheter measurements (-31 +/- 26%). In summary, our data demonstrate that absolute volumetric values are strikingly underestimated by conduction catheter measurements and that even detection of directional changes with this method may not always be feasible. PMID:16132173

  6. Direct comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and conductance microcatheter in the evaluation of left ventricular function in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Molojavyi, Andrei; Flögel, Ulrich; Merx, Marc W; Ding, Zhaoping; Schrader, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the reliability of conductance microcatheter volumetric measurements as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the same set of mice. Mice left ventricular (LV) volumes were monitored under basal conditions and in a hypertrophy model induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac function was evaluated in isoflurane anesthetized mice (n = 8) by MRI followed by 1.4 F Millar microtip catheter measurements. The second group of mice with TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy was studied eight weeks after surgery. Reliability of 3D-reconstructed MRI data was confirmed by comparison with autopsy masses (autopsy LV mass = 73.6 +/- 3.4 mg; MRI LV mass = 76.9 +/- 3.7 mg). Conduction catheter was found to greatly underestimate end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and thus stroke volume as well as cardiac output in control mice (MRI: EDV = 79 +/- 8 microl, ESV = 27+/-9 microl, SV = 51 +/- 9 microl, CO = 25 +/- 6 ml/min; Catheter: EDV = 28 +/- 5 microl, ESV = 8 +/- 4 microl, SV = 19 +/- 4 microl, CO = 10 +/- 2 ml/min). However, values for ejection fraction showed no significant differences between the two methods. In the hypertrophy model, stroke volume and cardiac output were increased when measured with MRI (SV: +19 +/- 20%; CO: +28 +/- 27%), whereas catheter data showed opposite directional changes (SV: -22 +/- 37%; CO: -31 +/- 37%). Ejection fraction was found to be reduced only in catheter measurements (-31 +/- 26%). In summary, our data demonstrate that absolute volumetric values are strikingly underestimated by conduction catheter measurements and that even detection of directional changes with this method may not always be feasible.

  7. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  8. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  9. Neural network segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Blaise

    1990-07-01

    Neural networks are well adapted to the task of grouping input patterns into subsets which share some similarity. Moreover once trained they can generalize their classification rules to classify new data sets. Sets of pixel intensities from magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a natural input to a neural network by varying imaging parameters MR images can reflect various independent physical parameters of tissues in their pixel intensities. A neural net can then be trained to classify physically similar tissue types based on sets of pixel intensities resulting from different imaging studies on the same subject. A neural network classifier for image segmentation was implemented on a Sun 4/60 and was tested on the task of classifying tissues of canine head MR images. Four images of a transaxial slice with different imaging sequences were taken as input to the network (three spin-echo images and an inversion recovery image). The training set consisted of 691 representative samples of gray matter white matter cerebrospinal fluid bone and muscle preclassified by a neuroscientist. The network was trained using a fast backpropagation algorithm to derive the decision criteria to classify any location in the image by its pixel intensities and the image was subsequently segmented by the classifier. The classifier''s performance was evaluated as a function of network size number of network layers and length of training. A single layer neural network performed quite well at

  10. Evaluation of different magnetic resonance imaging contrast materials to be used as dummy markers in image-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies*

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Camila Pessoa; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Taverna, Khallil Chaim; Pastorello, Bruno Fraccini; Rubo, Rodrigo Augusto; Borgonovi, Arthur Felipe; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Rodrigues, Laura Natal

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify a contrast material that could be used as a dummy marker for magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance images were acquired with six different catheter-filling materials-water, glucose 50%, saline, olive oil, glycerin, and copper sulfate (CuSO4) water solution (2.08 g/L)-inserted into compatible computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ring applicators placed in a phantom made of gelatin and CuSO4. The best contrast media were tested in four patients with the applicators in place. Results In T2-weighted sequences, the best contrast was achieved with the CuSO4-filled catheters, followed by saline- and glycerin-filled catheters, which presented poor visualization. In addition (also in T2-weighted sequences), CuSO4 presented better contrast when tested in the phantom than when tested in the patients, in which it provided some contrast but with poor identification of the first dwell position, mainly in the ring. Conclusion We found CuSO4 to be the best solution for visualization of the applicator channels, mainly in T2-weighted images in vitro, although the materials tested presented low signal intensity in the images obtained in vivo, as well as poor precision in determining the first dwell position. PMID:27403016

  11. Evaluation of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen <20 ng/ml

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-Ye; Li, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Qun; Wang, Jian-Long; Wan, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Min; Li, Sa-Ying; Wan, Gang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The European Society of Urogenital Radiology has built the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) for standardizing the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). This study evaluated the PI-RADS diagnosis method in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <20 ng/ml. Methods: A total of 133 patients with PSA <20 ng/ml were prospectively recruited. T2-weighted (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance images of the prostate were acquired before a 12-core transrectal prostate biopsy. Each patient's peripheral zone was divided into six regions on the images; each region corresponded to two of the 12 biopsy cores. T2WI, DWI, and T2WI + DWI scores were computed according to PI-RADS. The diagnostic accuracy of the PI-RADS score was evaluated using histopathology of prostate biopsies as the reference standard. Results: PCa was histologically diagnosed in 169 (21.2%) regions. Increased PI-RADS score correlated positively with increased cancer detection rate. The cancer detection rate for scores 1 to 5 was 2.8%, 15.0%, 34.6%, 52.6%, and 88.9%, respectively, using T2WI and 12.0%, 20.2%, 48.0%, 85.7%, and 93.3%, respectively, using DWI. For T2WI + DWI, the cancer detection rate was 1.5% (score 2), 13.5% (scores 3–4), 41.3% (scores 5–6), 75.9% (scores 7–8), and 92.3% (scores 9–10). The area under the curve for cancer detection was 0.700 (T2WI), 0.735 (DWI) and 0.749 (T2WI + DWI). The sensitivity and specificity were 53.8% and 89.2%, respectively, when using scores 5–6 as the cutoff value for T2WI + DWI. Conclusions: The PI-RADS score correlates with the PCa detection rate in patients with PSA <20 ng/ml. The summed score of T2WI + DWI has the highest accuracy in detection of PCa. However, the sensitivity should be further improved. PMID:27270538

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pediatric Neurologic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lall, Neil U; Stence, Nicholas V; Mirsky, David M

    2015-12-01

    Although computed tomography is often the first line of imaging in the emergency setting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of increasing importance in the evaluation of central nervous system emergencies in the pediatric population. As such, it is necessary to understand the indications for which MRI may be necessary. This article reviews the unique pathophysiologic entities affecting the pediatric population and the associated MRI findings. Specifically, utility of emergent MRI and characteristic appearances of traumatic brain injury, traumatic spinal injury, nonaccidental trauma, arterial ischemic stroke, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, stroke mimics, and central nervous system infections are described. PMID:26636636

  14. Use of Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Cranial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Wilson; Steven, Andrew; Gutierrez, Juan

    2016-05-01

    MR imaging is an extremely useful tool in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury in the emergency department. Although CT still plays the dominant role in urgent patient triage, MR imaging's impact on traumatic brain injury imaging continues to expand. MR imaging has shown superiority to CT for certain traumatic processes, such as diffuse axonal injury, cerebral contusion, and infarction. Magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance venography allow emergent vascular imaging for patients that should avoid ionizing radiation or intravenous contrast. PMID:27150321

  15. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  16. Ferromagnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Midzor, Melissa; Cross, Michael; Wigen, Philip; Hammel, Chris; Roukes, Michael

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) has been used to investigate magnetostatic waves on microscopic samples of YIG. This work elucidates the nature of scanned probe (local) imaging in ferromagnetically-coupled systems. Scanning was performed with a specially-designed ultrasharp tip with Permalloy (NiFe) deposited solely in the tip region, to yield a spatial sensitivity of <10um. This has provided the first direct imaging of fundamental and higher order magnetostatic modes in micromagnetic systems. The modal dependence upon applied field and sample size was measured and compares well with theoretical models. However, unlike traditional ferromagnetic resonance detection technique, MRFM not only serves as a non-perturbative detection tool of magnetostatic modes, but also can locally change their dispersion relations via the strong field gradients generated from the cantilever tip. As a result, when the tip is positioned closely to the YIG surface, certain modes of the magnetostatic waves are either enhanced or depressed, depending on their respective wavelengths. This corresponds to the fact when the tip is further away, the dispersion of the FMR modes is mainly determined by the sample size. As the tip moves closer to the surface, a new regime emerges where the FMR dispersion is dominated by the local magnetic field. A quantitative model based on DE theory is proposed, and it explains the main features of the observed tip influence on different magnetostatic modes.

  17. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Bodne, D; Quinn, S F; Murray, W T; Bolton, T; Rudd, S; Lewis, K; Daines, P; Bishop, J; Cochran, C

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included "jumper's knee" and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation.

  18. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient's body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients' bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

  19. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  20. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library and its application in cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Kang, Nam-Young; Yu, Xiaotong; Sahu, Srikanta; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report a new strategy for constructing a dye library with large Stokes shifts. By coupling a dark donor with BODIPY acceptors of tunable high quantum yield, a novel dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library, named BNM, has been synthesized. Upon excitation of the dark donor (BDN) at 490 nm, the absorbed energy is transferred to the acceptor (BDM) with high efficiency, which was tunable in a broad range from 557 nm to 716 nm, with a high quantum yield of up to 0.8. It is noteworthy to mention that the majority of the non-radiative energy loss of the donor was converted into the acceptor's fluorescence output with a minimum leak of donor emission. Fluorescence imaging tested in live cells showed that the BNM compounds are cell-permeable and can also be employed for live-cell imaging. This is a new library which can be excited through a dark donor allowing for strong fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, the BNM library is well suited for high-throughput screening or multiplex experiments in biological applications by using a single laser excitation source.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging: present and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donald L.; Liu, Peter; Wismer, Gary L.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Stark, David D.; New, Paul F.J.; Okada, Robert D.; Brady, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has created considerable excitement in the medical community, largely because of its great potential to diagnose and characterize many different disease processes. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that, because MR imaging is similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning in identifying structural disorders and because it is more costly and difficult to use, this highly useful technique must be judged against CT before it can become an accepted investigative tool. At present MR imaging has demonstrated diagnostic superiority over CT in a limited number of important, mostly neurologic, disorders and is complementary to CT in the diagnosis of certain other disorders. For most of the remaining organ systems its usefulness is not clear, but the lack of ionizing radiation and MR's ability to produce images in any tomographic plane may eventually prove to be advantageous. The potential of MR imaging to display in-vivo spectra, multinuclear images and blood-flow data makes it an exciting investigative technique. At present, however, MR imaging units should be installed only in medical centres equipped with the clinical and basic research facilities that are essential to evaluate the ultimate role of this technique in the care of patients. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:3884120

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows the Evaluation of Tissue Damage and Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zaccagnini, Germana; Palmisano, Anna; Canu, Tamara; Maimone, Biagina; Lo Russo, Francesco M.; Ambrogi, Federico; Gaetano, Carlo; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Esposito, Antonio; Martelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides non-invasive, repetitive measures in the same individual, allowing the study of a physio-pathological event over time. In this study, we tested the performance of 7 Tesla multi-parametric MRI to monitor the dynamic changes of mouse skeletal muscle injury and regeneration upon acute ischemia induced by femoral artery dissection. T2-mapping (T2 relaxation time), diffusion-tensor imaging (Fractional Anisotropy) and perfusion by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (K-trans) were measured and imaging results were correlated with histological morphometric analysis in both Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles. We found that tissue damage positively correlated with T2-relaxation time, while myofiber regeneration and capillary density positively correlated with Fractional Anisotropy. Interestingly, K-trans positively correlated with capillary density. Accordingly, repeated MRI measurements between day 1 and day 28 after surgery in ischemic muscles showed that: 1) T2-relaxation time rapidly increased upon ischemia and then gradually declined, returning almost to basal level in the last phases of the regeneration process; 2) Fractional Anisotropy dropped upon ischemic damage induction and then recovered along with muscle regeneration and neoangiogenesis; 3) K-trans reached a minimum upon ischemia, then progressively recovered. Overall, Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles displayed similar patterns of MRI parameters dynamic, with more marked responses and less variability in Tibialis anterior. We conclude that MRI provides quantitative information about both tissue damage after ischemia and the subsequent vascular and muscle regeneration, accounting for the differences between subjects and, within the same individual, between different muscles. PMID:26554362

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  4. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  6. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Xiao-hui; Zhai, Xu; He, Xi-jing

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury; fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P < 0.05); the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05). Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = –0.856, P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01), while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = –0.949, P < 0.01). Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:25878589

  7. [Evaluation of meniscal morphology and relation between the diagnostic findings of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy in lesions of the knee].

    PubMed

    Esparragoza-Montero, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Diaz, José; Lanier-Dominguez, Julio; Molero-Campos, María; Puccia-Scimonello, Marianela

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in the diagnosis of meniscal lesions of the knee. The purpose of this study was to relate the findings of MRI and arthroscopy and to evaluate the morphology of the menisci with tears. 39 patients of both genders were included, whose age range was 13 to 74 years old (mean: 42.6 years), with and without a history of trauma, who underwent MRI and arthroscopy of the knee, due to symptoms of articular lesion. The images of magnetic resonances were analyzed independently by two specialists prior to the arthroscopy. The measurements of the medial and lateral menisci were made in each meniscal horn with sagital images in protonic density and fat-suppression. MRI detected 8 cases of tear of the lateral meniscus of the 11 catalogued by arthroscopy, and 11 cases of tears of the medial meniscus of the 13 catalogued by arthroscopy. The sensibility and specificity of MRI for the lateral meniscal tears were 72% and 100%, and for the medial tears were 85% and 89%. The meniscal tears were localized mainly in the posterior horn. The dimensions of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus were larger in disrupted menisci (height, 7.1 +/- 1.3 mm vs. 6.1 +/- 0.7 mm, p < .05; wide, 10.2 +/- 1.6 mm vs. 8.8 +/- 1.3 mm, p < 0.05). A meniscal tear produces morphological changes, particularly in the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. Magnetic resonance constitutes the imaging technique of choice for the diagnosis of the meniscal tears.

  8. Comparison of noncontrast computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of Great Danes with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Drost, Wm Tod

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides excellent bony detail, whereas magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior in evaluating the neural structures. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess interobserver and intermethod agreement in the evaluation of cervical vertebral column morphology and lesion severity in Great Danes with cervical spondylomyelopathy by use of noncontrast CT and high-field MR imaging. Fifteen client-owned affected Great Danes were enrolled. All dogs underwent noncontrast CT under sedation and MR imaging under general anesthesia of the cervical vertebral column. Three observers independently evaluated the images to determine the main site of spinal cord compression, direction and cause of the compression, articular process joint characteristics, and presence of foraminal stenosis. Overall intermethod agreement, intermethod agreement for each observer, overall interobserver agreement, and interobserver agreement between pairs of observers were calculated by use of kappa (κ) statistics. The highest overall intermethod agreements were obtained for the main site of compression and direction of compression with substantial agreements (κ = 0.65 and 0.62, respectively), whereas the lowest was obtained for right-sided foraminal stenosis (κ = 0.39, fair agreement). For both imaging techniques, the highest and lowest interobserver agreements were recorded for the main site of compression and degree of articular joint proliferation, respectively. While different observers frequently agree on the main site of compression using both imaging techniques, there is considerable variation between modalities and among observers when assessing articular process characteristics and foraminal stenosis. Caution should be exerted when comparing image interpretations from multiple observers.

  9. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  10. Evaluation of the susceptibility artifacts and tissue injury caused by implanted microchips in dogs on 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Saito, Miyoko; Ono, Shin; Kayanuma, Hideki; Honnami, Muneki; Muto, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2010-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a metallic implant raises concern over the potential complications, including susceptibility artifacts, implant migration, and heat injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate these complications in dogs with implanted microchips by evaluating MR images and the histopathological changes after 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Five dogs underwent microchip implantation in the cervicothoracic area. One month later, the area was imaged using 1.5T MRI in three dogs. The microchips were removed surgically together with the surrounding tissue in all dogs. There was significant signal loss and image distortion over a wide range around the area where the microchip was implanted. This change was consistent with susceptibility artifacts, which rendered the affected area including the spinal cord undiagnostic. The artifact was more extensive in T2*-weighted images (gradient-echo) and less extensive in proton density-weighted images (fast spin-echo with short echo time). Histopathologically, all microchips were well-encapsulated with granulation tissue, and there were no evidence of migration of microchips. Cell debris and a moderate number of degenerated cells with fibrin were seen in the inner layer of the granulation tissue in each dog that underwent MRI. These changes were very subtle and did not seem to be clinically significant. The results of this study suggest that, in 1.5T MRI, susceptibility artifacts produced by implanted microchips can be marked, although the dogs with implants appeared to be scanned safely.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography imaging in the 21st century as tools for the evaluation and management of patients with invasive cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Aaron H

    2006-07-01

    For over 4 decades, the delivery of definitive radiotherapy to patients with carcinoma of the cervix has involved both external beam and brachytherapy. Both of these therapeutic modalities have been traditionally linked to 2-dimensional radiographic guidance. Currently, the staging of these tumors still resides in clinical examinations and 2-dimensional diagnostic x-rays. Recently, there have been significant technological developments in imaging, namely magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography. These novel radiologic advances have subsequently led to a number of investigational studies, which in turn have shown a "paradigm shift" not only in the diagnosis but also in the radiation delivery used for patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix.

  12. Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Using Texture Analysis on Combined-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Images at 3.0T

    PubMed Central

    Yokoo, Takeshi; Wolfson, Tanya; Iwaisako, Keiko; Peterson, Michael R.; Mani, Haresh; Goodman, Zachary; Changchien, Christopher; Middleton, Michael S.; Gamst, Anthony C.; Mazhar, Sameer M.; Kono, Yuko; Ho, Samuel B.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To noninvasively assess liver fibrosis using combined-contrast-enhanced (CCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and texture analysis. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 46 adults with newly diagnosed HCV infection and recent liver biopsy underwent CCE liver MRI following intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxides (ferumoxides) and gadolinium DTPA (gadopentetate dimeglumine). The image texture of the liver was quantified in regions-of-interest by calculating 165 texture features. Liver biopsy specimens were stained with Masson trichrome and assessed qualitatively (METAVIR fibrosis score) and quantitatively (% collagen stained area). Using L1 regularization path algorithm, two texture-based multivariate linear models were constructed, one for quantitative and the other for quantitative histology prediction. The prediction performance of each model was assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and correlation analyses. Results. The texture-based predicted fibrosis score significantly correlated with qualitative (r = 0.698, P < 0.001) and quantitative (r = 0.757, P < 0.001) histology. The prediction model for qualitative histology had 0.814–0.976 areas under the curve (AUC), 0.659–1.000 sensitivity, 0.778–0.930 specificity, and 0.674–0.935 accuracy, depending on the binary classification threshold. The prediction model for quantitative histology had 0.742–0.950 AUC, 0.688–1.000 sensitivity, 0.679–0.857 specificity, and 0.696–0.848 accuracy, depending on the binary classification threshold. Conclusion. CCE MRI and texture analysis may permit noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26421287

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  14. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  15. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease by in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Akihiro; Emoto, Miho C; Suzuki, Syuuichirou; Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Kawamata, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromi; Yamauchi, Ayano; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada G; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by progressive cognitive dysfunction. Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is the most important pathophysiological hallmark of AD. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is prominent in AD, and several reports suggest the relationship between a change in redox status and AD pathology containing progressive Aβ deposition, the activation of glial cells, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using a transgenic mouse model of AD (APdE9) and evaluated the activity of superoxide dismutase in brain tissue homogenates of APdE9 mice in vitro. Together with those analyses, in vivo changes in redox status with age in both wild-type (WT) and APdE9 mouse brains were measured noninvasively by three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxide (3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy) as a redox-sensitive probe. Both methods found similar changes in redox status with age, and in particular a significant change in redox status in the hippocampus was observed noninvasively by EPR imaging between APdE9 mice and age-matched WT mice from 9 to 18 months of age. EPR imaging clearly visualized the accelerated change in redox status of APdE9 mouse brain compared with WT. The evaluation of the redox status in the brain of AD model rodents by EPR imaging should be useful for diagnostic study of AD.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  18. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich; Piringer, Gudrun; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Saely, Christoph Hubert; Lukas, Peter; Öfner, Dietmar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  19. Cavernous and inferior petrosal sinus sampling and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the preoperative evaluation of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Potts, Matthew B; Shah, Jugal K; Molinaro, Annette M; Blevins, Lewis S; Tyrrell, J Blake; Kunwar, Sandeep; Dowd, Christopher F; Hetts, Steven W; Aghi, Manish K

    2014-02-01

    The surgical management of Cushing's disease is often complicated by difficulties detecting corticotropic adenomas. Various diagnostic modalities are used when conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is negative or inconclusive. We sought to analyze our use of two such modalities in the surgical management of Cushing's disease: (1) cavernous/inferior petrosal sinus sampling (central venous sampling, CVS) for adrenocorticotropic hormone and (2) dynamic MRI (dMRI). We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of all patients with Cushing's disease treated by a single neurosurgeon with endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. Accuracy of adenoma localization with CVS and dMRI was analyzed. Ninety-one consecutive patients were included. Pathology confirmed an adenoma in 66. Preoperative dMRI and CVS were performed in 40 and 37 patients, respectively, with 20 undergoing both studies. Surgical pathology was positive for adenoma in 31 dMRI patients, 25 CVS patients, and 13 who underwent both. Among patients with pathology confirming an adenoma, dMRI identified a lesion in 96.8% and correctly lateralized the lesion in 89.7%, while CVS correctly lateralized in 52.2-65.2% (depending on location of sampling). Among patients with both studies, dMRI and CVS correctly lateralized in 76.9 and 61.5-69.2%, respectively. Accuracy of CVS improved if only patients with symmetric venous drainage were considered. In this mixed population of Cushing's disease patients, dMRI was more accurate than CVS at localizing adenomas, supporting the use of advance MRI techniques in the work-up of Cushing's disease. CVS, however, remains an important tool in the workup of Cushing's syndrome.

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues’ temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990’s. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. Applications to peripheral perfusion DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Review outline The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and

  1. Evaluation of biocompatible alginate- and deferoxamine-coated ternary composites for magnetic resonance imaging and gene delivery into glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sham, Kathy W. Y.; Chak, Chun-Pong; Lai, Josie M. Y.; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper describes comparative studies in cytotoxicities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gene delivery into glioblastoma U87MG or U138MG cells with ternary composites that are consist of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs) (size: 8-10 nm) with different surface coatings, circular plasmid DNA (pDNA) (~4 kb) equipped with fluorescent/luminescent probe, and branched polyethylenimine (25 kDa, PDI 2.5). Methods Three types of SPIO-NPs were used, including: (I) naked iron oxide NPs with Fe-OH surface group (Bare-NP); (II) iron oxide NPs with a coating of alginate (Alg-NPs); and (III) iron oxide NPs with a coating of deferoxamine (Def-NPs). By tuning the polyethylenimine (PEI)/NP ratios and with a fixed DNA amount, different ternary composites were employed for NP/gene transfection into glioblastoma U87MG or U138MG cells, which were then characterized by Prussian blue staining, in vitro MRI, green fluorescence protein (GFP) fluorescence and luciferase assay. Results Among the composites prepared, 0.2 ng PEI/0.5 µg DNA/1.0 µg Bare-NP ternary composite possessed the best cellular uptake efficiency of NP to the cytoplasm, following the trend Bare-NP > Alg-NP > Def-NP. This observation was consistent to the MRI assessments with in vitro T2 relaxivity (r2) values of 46.0, 35.5, and 23.7 s−1·µM−1·Fe, respectively. For cellular uptake efficiency of the pDNA, all variations of PEI/NP ratios of the composites did not yield significant differences. However, cellular uptake efficiencies of pDNA in the ternary composites in U138MG cells were generally higher than that of U87MG cells by an order of magnitude. Exceptionally, the ternary composite 0.2 ng PEI/0.5 µg DNA/1.0 µg Bare-NP possessed a lowered luciferase activity RLU for gene expression in U138MG cells. A total of 0.2 ng PEI/0.5 µg DNA/0.1 µg Bare-NP would be uptaken to the cell nucleus with the highest luciferase activity. A working concentration range of PEI with at least

  2. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  3. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  4. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  5. Tools for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Cheong, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In less than fifteen years, as a non-invasive imaging option, cardiovascular MR has grown from a being a mere curiosity to becoming a widely used clinical tool for evaluating cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is now routinely used to study myocardial structure, cardiac function, macro vascular blood flow, myocardial perfusion, and myocardial viability. For someone entering the field of cardiac MR, this rapid pace of development in the field of CMRI might make it difficult to identify a cohesive starting point. In this brief review, we have attempted to summarize the key cardiovascular imaging techniques that have found widespread clinical acceptance. In particular, we describe the essential cardiac and respiratory gating techniques that form the backbone of all cardiovascular imaging methods. It is followed by four sections that discuss: (I) the gradient echo techniques that are used to assess ventricular function; (II) black-blood turbo spin echo (SE) methods used for morphologic assessment of the heart; (III) phase-contrast based techniques for the assessment of blood flow; and (IV) CMR methods for the assessment of myocardial ischemia and viability. In each section, we briefly summarize technical considerations relevant to the clinical use of these techniques, followed by practical information for its clinical implementation. In each of those four areas, CMRI is considered either as the benchmark imaging modality against which the diagnostic performance of other imaging modalities are compared against, or provides a complementary capability to existing imaging techniques. We have deliberately avoided including cutting-edge CMR imaging techniques practiced at few academic centers, and restricted our discussion to methods that are widely used and are likely to be available in a clinical setting. Our hope is that this review would propel an interested reader toward more comprehensive reviews in the literature. PMID:24834409

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  7. Evaluating Prostate Cancer Using Fractional Tissue Composition of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens and Pre-Operative Diffusional Kurtosis Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Edward M.; Warren, Anne Y.; Priest, Andrew N.; Barrett, Tristan; Goldman, Debra A.; Gill, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating tissue heterogeneity using non-invasive imaging could potentially improve prostate cancer assessment and treatment. Methods 20 patients with intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer underwent diffusion kurtosis imaging, including calculation of apparent diffusion (Dapp) and kurtosis (Kapp), prior to radical prostatectomy. Whole-mount tissue composition was quantified into: cellularity, luminal space, and fibromuscular stroma. Peripheral zone tumors were subdivided according to Gleason score. Results Peripheral zone tumors had increased cellularity (p<0.0001), decreased fibromuscular stroma (p<0.05) and decreased luminal space (p<0.0001). Gleason score ≥4+3 tumors had significantly increased cellularity and decreased fibromuscular stroma compared to Gleason score ≤3+4 (p<0.05). In tumors, there was a significant positive correlation between median Kapp and cellularity (ρ = 0.50; p<0.05), and a negative correlation with fibromuscular stroma (ρ = -0.45; p<0.05). In normal tissue, median Dapp had a significant positive correlation with luminal space (ρ = 0.65; p<0.05) and a negative correlation with cellularity (ρ = -0.49; p<0.05). Median Kapp and Dapp varied significantly between tumor and normal tissue (p<0.0001), but only median Kapp was significantly different between Gleason score ≥4+3 and ≤3+4 (p<0.05). Conclusions Peripheral zone tumors have increased cellular heterogeneity which is reflected in mean Kapp, while normal prostate has a more homogeneous luminal space and cellularity better represented by Dapp. PMID:27467064

  8. CARDIOVASCULAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN DELIVERING AND EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF HEPATOCYTE GROWTH FACTOR GENE IN CHRONIC INFARCT SCAR

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Saloner, David; Do, Loi; Wilson, Mark; Martin, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    Background In open-chest model of acute infarct, epicardial delivery of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene improved LV function. This study was designed to test 1) the efficacy of HGF gene in infarct scar delivered under MR guidance and 2) the potential of multiple MR sequences in assessing the effects of pCK-HGF (treatment) and pCK-LacZ (control) genes on myocardial structure and function. Methods and Materials Swine (6 per group) were subjected to myocardial infarct, under X-ray fluoroscopy, developed LV remodelling at 5weeks. Multiple clinical MR imaging sequences were performed before delivery of gene (at 5 weeks after infarction) and 5 weeks after delivery of gene. Under MR-guidance, the active endovascular catheter was introduced into LV to transendocardially deliver 3.96×1011 viral copies of pCK-HGF or pCK-LacZ in the border and core of the infarct scar. Histological evaluation of the infarct scar was performed 5 weeks after delivery of gene. Results At 5weeks after infarction, there was no significant difference in measured cardiovascular MR parameters between the groups. PCK-HGF gene caused significant improvement in the following parameters (P<0.05 for these parameters): 3D strain (radial, circumferential, and longitudinal) , perfusion (maximum upslope, peak signal intensity, and time to peak) compared with control pCK-LacZ at 5 weeks after delivery of the genes. The ejection fraction was higher in pCK-HGF treated (43±1%) than pCK-LacZ control (37±1%, P<0.05). These changes are associated with a decrease in infarct scar size (11.3±2.0% in pCK-LacZ control and 6.7±1.3%, in pCK-HGF treated, P<0.01) and transmurality in 4 out of 5 infarct scar segments (P<0.05) on DE-MR imaging. Microscopic study confirmed the increase in capillary (P<0.05), and arteriole (P<0.05) density of infarct scar in pCK-HGF treated compared with pCK-LacZ control animals. Conclusions HGF gene delivered under MR-guidance into infarct scar ameliorated global function, 3D strain

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Newly Diagnosed Heart Failure With Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene; Donnino, Robert; Srichai, Monvadi B; Sedlis, Steven P; Feit, Frederick; Rolnitzky, Linda; Miller, Louis H; Iqbal, Sohah N; Axel, Leon; Nguyen, Brian; Slater, James; Shah, Binita

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), cine imaging, and resting first-pass perfusion (FPP) in the evaluation for ischemic (IC) versus nonischemic (NIC) cardiomyopathy in new-onset heart failure with reduced (≤40%) left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF). A retrospective chart review analysis identified 83 patients from January 2009 to June 2012 referred for CMR imaging evaluation for new-onset HFrEF with coronary angiography performed within 6 months of CMR. The diagnosis of IC was established using Felker criteria on coronary angiography. CMR sequences were evaluated for the presence of patterns suggestive of severe underlying coronary artery disease as the cause of HFrEF (subendocardial and/or transmural LGE, regional wall motion abnormality on cine, regional hypoperfusion defect on resting FPP). Discriminative power was assessed using receiver operator characteristics curve analysis. Coronary angiography identified 36 patients (43%) with IC. Presence of subendocardial and/or transmural LGE alone demonstrated good discriminative power (C-statistic 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 0.94) for the diagnosis of IC. The presence of an ischemic pattern on both LGE and cine sequences resulted in a specificity of 87% for the diagnosis of IC, whereas the absence of an ischemic pattern on both LGE and cine sequences resulted in a specificity of 94% for the diagnosis of NIC. Addition of resting FPP on a subset of patients did not improve diagnostic values. In conclusion, CMR has potential value in the diagnostic evaluation of IC versus NIC.

  10. Evaluating bronchodilator effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Miranda; Heydarian, Mohammadreza; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the regional effects of bronchodilator administration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using hyperpolarized helium-3 ((3)He) MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Ten COPD ex-smokers provided written, informed consent and underwent diffusion-weighted, hyperpolarized (3)He MRI, spirometry, and plethysmography before and 25 ± 2 min after bronchodilator administration. Pre- and postsalbutamol whole-lung (WL) ADC maps were generated and registered together to identify the lung regions containing the (3)He signal at both time points, and mean ADC within those regions of interest (ROI) was determined for a measurement of previously ventilated ROI ADC (ADC(P)). Lung ROI with (3)He signal at both time points was used as a binary mask on postsalbutamol WL ADC maps to obtain an ADC measurement for newly ventilated ROI (ADC(N)). Postsalbutamol, no significant differences were detected in WL ADC (P = 0.516). There were no significant differences between ADC(N) and ADC(P) postsalbutamol (P = 1.00), suggesting that the ADC(N) lung regions were not more emphysematous than the lung ROI participating in ventilation before bronchodilator administration. Postsalbutamol, a statistically significant decrease in ADC(P) (P = 0.01) was detected, and there were significant differences between ADC(P) in the most anterior and most posterior image slices (P = 0.02), suggesting a reduction in regional gas trapping following bronchodilator administration. Regional evaluation of tissue microstructure using hyperpolarized (3)He MRI ADC provides insights into lung alterations that accompany improvements in regional (3)He gas distribution after bronchodilator administration.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  12. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke.

  13. Accuracy of computer-aided ultrasound as compared with magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese and eutrophic adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, José Hermes Ribas; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Epifanio, Matias; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of computer-aided ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by means of hepatorenal gradient analysis in the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adolescents. Materials and Methods This prospective, cross-sectional study evaluated 50 adolescents (aged 11–17 years), including 24 obese and 26 eutrophic individuals. All adolescents underwent computer-aided US, MRI, laboratory tests, and anthropometric evaluation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were evaluated for both imaging methods, with subsequent generation of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and calculation of the area under the ROC curve to determine the most appropriate cutoff point for the hepatorenal gradient in order to predict the degree of steatosis, utilizing MRI results as the gold-standard. Results The obese group included 29.2% girls and 70.8% boys, and the eutrophic group, 69.2% girls and 30.8% boys. The prevalence of NAFLD corresponded to 19.2% for the eutrophic group and 83% for the obese group. The ROC curve generated for the hepatorenal gradient with a cutoff point of 13 presented 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. As the same cutoff point was considered for the eutrophic group, false-positive results were observed in 9.5% of cases (90.5% specificity) and false-negative results in 0% (100% sensitivity). Conclusion Computer-aided US with hepatorenal gradient calculation is a simple and noninvasive technique for semiquantitative evaluation of hepatic echogenicity and could be useful in the follow-up of adolescents with NAFLD, population screening for this disease as well as for clinical studies. PMID:26379321

  14. Technique for designing and evaluating probe caps used in optical topography of infants using a real head model based on three dimensional magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroki; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Nakai, Akio; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed an effective technique for aiding the design and evaluating the performance of the probe caps used to perform optical topography (OT) on infants. To design and evaluate a probe cap, it is necessary to determine the measurement positions for conducting OT on the brain surface of subjects. One technique for determining these positions on the brain surface is to find their three-dimensional (3D) coordinates using a 3D magnetic space digitizer, which consists of a 3D magnetic source and a 3D magnetic sensor. The problem with this technique is that it takes a long time to determine all the measurement points on the subject's head and it is difficult to use with infants. It is a particular problem with infants who cannot support their own heads. Therefore, we have developed a real model of an infant subject's head based on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. The model is made from an optical-curable resin using 3D computer-aided-format coordinate data taken from 3D MR image-format coordinate data. We have determined the measurement positions on the surface of the model corresponding to a scalp using a 3D magnetic space digitizer and displayed the positions on a 3D MR image of the infant's brain. Using this technique, we then determined the actual 72 measurement positions located over the entire brain surface area for use with our new whole-head probe cap for neonates and infants. This method is useful for evaluating the performance of and designing probe caps.

  15. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. An evaluation of the left-brain vs. right-brain hypothesis with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jared A; Zielinski, Brandon A; Ferguson, Michael A; Lainhart, Janet E; Anderson, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    Lateralized brain regions subserve functions such as language and visuospatial processing. It has been conjectured that individuals may be left-brain dominant or right-brain dominant based on personality and cognitive style, but neuroimaging data has not provided clear evidence whether such phenotypic differences in the strength of left-dominant or right-dominant networks exist. We evaluated whether strongly lateralized connections covaried within the same individuals. Data were analyzed from publicly available resting state scans for 1011 individuals between the ages of 7 and 29. For each subject, functional lateralization was measured for each pair of 7266 regions covering the gray matter at 5-mm resolution as a difference in correlation before and after inverting images across the midsagittal plane. The difference in gray matter density between homotopic coordinates was used as a regressor to reduce the effect of structural asymmetries on functional lateralization. Nine left- and 11 right-lateralized hubs were identified as peaks in the degree map from the graph of significantly lateralized connections. The left-lateralized hubs included regions from the default mode network (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and temporoparietal junction) and language regions (e.g., Broca Area and Wernicke Area), whereas the right-lateralized hubs included regions from the attention control network (e.g., lateral intraparietal sulcus, anterior insula, area MT, and frontal eye fields). Left- and right-lateralized hubs formed two separable networks of mutually lateralized regions. Connections involving only left- or only right-lateralized hubs showed positive correlation across subjects, but only for connections sharing a node. Lateralization of brain connections appears to be a local rather than global property of brain networks, and our data are not consistent with a whole-brain phenotype of greater "left-brained" or greater "right-brained" network strength

  17. EVALUATION OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING GUIDELINES FOR DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN THORACOLUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISK EXTRUSIONS AND INTERVERTEBRAL DISK PROTRUSIONS IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    De Decker, Steven; Gomes, Sergio A; Packer, Rowena Ma; Kenny, Patrick J; Beltran, Elsa; Parzefall, Birgit; Fenn, Joe; Nair, Devi; Nye, George; Volk, Holger A

    2016-09-01

    Four MRI variables have recently been suggested to be independently associated with a diagnosis of thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion. Midline intervertebral disk herniation, and partial intervertebral disk degeneration were associated with intervertebral disk protrusion, while presence of a single intervertebral disk herniation and disk material dispersed beyond the boundaries of the intervertebral disk space were associated with intervertebral disk extrusion. The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine whether using these MRI variables improves differentiation between thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusions and protrusions. Eighty large breed dogs with surgically confirmed thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusions or protrusions were included. Randomized MRI studies were presented on two occasions to six blinded observers, which were divided into three experience categories. During the first assessment, observers made a presumptive diagnosis of thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion without guidelines. During the second assessment they were asked to make a presumptive diagnosis with the aid of guidelines. Agreement was evaluated by Kappa-statistics. Diagnostic accuracy significantly improved from 70.8 to 79.6% and interobserver agreement for making a diagnosis of intervertebral disk extrusion or intervertebral disk protrusion improved from fair (κ = 0.27) to moderate (κ = 0.41) after using the proposed guidelines. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly influenced by degree of observer experience. Intraobserver agreement for the assessed variables ranged from fair to excellent and interobserver agreement ranged from fair to moderate. The results of this study suggest that the proposed imaging guidelines can aid in differentiating thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusions from protrusions. PMID:27374979

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    PubMed

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging: Review of imaging techniques and overview of liver imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Santhi; Szklaruk, Janio

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is slowly transitioning from a problem solving imaging modality to a first line imaging modality for many diseases of the liver. The well established advantages of MRI over other cross sectional imaging modalities may be the basis for this transition. Technological advancements in MRI that focus on producing high quality images and fast imaging, increasing diagnostic accuracy and developing newer function-specific contrast agents are essential in ensuring that MRI succeeds as a first line imaging modality. Newer imaging techniques, such as parallel imaging, are widely utilized to shorten scanning time. Diffusion weighted echo planar imaging, an adaptation from neuroimaging, is fast becoming a routine part of the MRI liver protocol to improve lesion detection and characterization of focal liver lesions. Contrast enhanced dynamic T1 weighted imaging is crucial in complete evaluation of diseases and the merit of this dynamic imaging relies heavily on the appropriate timing of the contrast injection. Newer techniques that include fluoro-triggered contrast enhanced MRI, an adaptation from 3D MRA imaging, are utilized to achieve good bolus timing that will allow for optimum scanning. For accurate interpretation of liver diseases, good understanding of the newer imaging techniques and familiarity with typical imaging features of liver diseases are essential. In this review, MR sequences for a time efficient liver MRI protocol utilizing newer imaging techniques are discussed and an overview of imaging features of selected common focal and diffuse liver diseases are presented. PMID:21160685

  20. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  2. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  3. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  5. Pharmacologic Effects of Cannabidiol on Acute Reperfused Myocardial Infarction in Rabbits: Evaluated With 3.0T Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Yin, Ting; Xia, Qian; Liu, Yewei; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Jian; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) has anti-inflammatory effects. We explored its therapeutic effects on cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury with an experimental imaging platform. Reperfused acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was induced in rabbits with a 90-minute coronary artery occlusion followed by 24-hour reperfusion. Before reperfusion, rabbits received 2 intravenous doses of 100 μg/kg CBD (n = 10) or vehicle (control, n = 10). Evans blue was intravenously injected for later detection of the AMI core. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate cardiac morphology and function. After euthanasia, blood troponin I (cTnI) was assessed, and the heart was excised and infused with multifunctional red iodized oil dye. The heart was sliced for digital radiography to quantify the perfusion density rate, area at risk (AAR), and myocardial salvage index, followed by histomorphologic staining. Compared with controls, CBD treatment improved systolic wall thickening (P < 0.05), significantly increased blood flow in the AAR (P < 0.05), significantly decreased microvascular obstruction (P < 0.05), increased the perfusion density rate by 1.7-fold, lowered the AMI core/AAR ratio (P < 0.05), and increased the myocardial salvage index (P < 0.05). These improvements were associated with reductions in serum cTnI, cardiac leukocyte infiltration, and myocellular apoptosis (P < 0.05). Thus, CBD therapy reduced AMI size and facilitated restoration of left ventricular function. We demonstrated that this experimental platform has potential theragnostic utility.

  6. Myocardial Blood Flow Quantification for Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease by Positron Emission Tomography, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Alfonso H.; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications. PMID:24718671

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P < 0.05). Thickness of the iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  8. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, open hole logs and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.; Morganti, J.; White, H.

    1995-06-01

    NMR logging using the new C series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging (MRIL){trademark} is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeability and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low resistivity pays. In these instances, conventional open hole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. MRIL can also minimize unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water-cut. This case study will briefly discuss MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with the conventional logs and sidewall cores. SEM analysis will show a good correlation of varying grain size sands with the T{sub 2} distribution and bulk volume irreducible from MRIL. Discussions of each well in the study area will show how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data was not recorded on one of the wells, the advanced petrophysical program HORIZON was used to predict the MRIL bulk volume irreducible and effective porosity to estimate productive zones. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production and predicted producibility of the shaly sands will be presented.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Li, Ke; Bryant, Nathan D

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases often exhibit a temporally varying, spatially heterogeneous, and multifaceted pathology. The goals of this chapter are to describe and evaluate the use of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to characterize muscle pathology. The following criteria are used for this evaluation: objective measurement of continuously distributed variables; clear and well-understood relationship to the pathology of interest; sensitivity to improvement or worsening of clinical status; and the measurement properties of accuracy and precision. Two major classes of MRI methods meet all of these criteria: (1) MRI methods for measuring muscle contractile volume or cross-sectional area by combining structural MRI and quantitative fat-water MRI; and (2) an MRI method for characterizing the edema caused by inflammation, the measurement of the transverse relaxation time constant (T2). These methods are evaluated with respect to the four criteria listed above and examples from neuromuscular disorders are provided. Finally, these methods are summarized and synthesized and recommendations for additional quantitative MRI developments are made. PMID:27430444

  10. Terbium-based time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer imaging for evaluating protein-protein interactions on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Stina; Singh, Manish Kumar; Wegner, K David; Regairaz, Marie; Dautry, François; Treussart, François; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2015-03-21

    Fluorescence imaging of cells and subcellular compartments is an essential tool to investigate biological processes and to evaluate the development and progression of diseases. In particular, protein-protein interactions can be monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two proximal fluorophores that are attached to specific recognition biomolecules such as antibodies. We investigated the membrane expression of E- and N-cadherins in three different cell lines used as model systems to study epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a possible detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs). EMT is a key process in cancer metastasis, during which epithelial markers (such as E-cadherin) are down-regulated in the primary tumour whereas mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin) are up-regulated, leading to enhanced cell motility, intravasation, and appearance of CTCs. Various FRET donor-acceptor pairs and protein recognition strategies were utilized, in which Lumi4-Tb terbium complexes (Tb) and different organic dyes were conjugated to several distinct E- and N-cadherin-specific antibodies. Pulsed excitation of Tb at low repetition rates (100 Hz) and time-gated (TG) imaging of both the Tb-donor and the dye-acceptor photoluminescence (PL) allowed efficient detection of the EMT markers as well as FRET in the case of sufficient donor-acceptor proximity. Efficient FRET was observed only between two E-cadherin-specific antibodies and further experiments indicated that these antibodies recognized the same E-cadherin molecule, suggesting a limited accessibility of cadherins when they are clustered at adherens junctions. The investigated Tb-to-dye FRET systems provided reduced photobleaching compared to the AlexaFluor 488-568 donor-acceptor pair. Our results demonstrate the applicability and advantages of Tb-based TG FRET for efficient and stable imaging of antibody-antibody interactions on different cell lines. They also reveal the limitations of

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Dawson, C; Aitken, K; Ng, K; Dolke, G; Gadian, D; Whitfield, H N

    1994-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the response of an individual patient to lithotripsy remains impossible. Certain factors such as the chemical composition, size, and position of the calculus are known to be important in determining the success rate. This paper reports the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate 141 urinary calculi in vitro. A wide range of signals for each chemical type of calculus was found on each of the three imaging sequences used (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density). None of the chemical groups examined showed a typical MRI profile allowing it to be distinguished from the other groups. Analysis of variance showed a statistical difference between signals for apatite and struvite on the T1-weighted sequence, and between struvite and uric acid on the proton density sequence (both, P < 0.05). These results show for the first time that MRI is capable of distinguishing between different chemical types of stones. This is particularly important for the comparison of struvite and apatite which appear to be similar in conventional investigations but have quite different hardness values. Further work is in progress correlating the results of this study with stone microhardness and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy fragility tests to determine whether MRI accurately predicts the success of lithotripsy.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perirenal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F; Lee, Christine U

    2016-05-01

    The perirenal space can be involved by a variety of neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and proliferative disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is often an ideal technique for identification and staging of lesions arising within the perirenal space, with its superior soft tissue characterization as well as its ability to visualize extension into blood vessels and adjacent organs. This pictorial essay describes the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of a variety of pathologies which can arise from or involve the perirenal space, and provides a framework for categorization and differential diagnosis of these lesions.

  13. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  15. Importance of Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of the Treatment Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Acute Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Tuna; Bozgeyik, Zülküf; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Citil, Serdal; Erbay, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We planned to investigate contribution of DWMR to the treatment efficacy with ADC values which were measured in acute and chronic plaque before and after MS treatment. ADC changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with MS and healthy volunteers were also evaluated in this study. Material/Methods 25 patients with MS and 30 healthy subjects with normal brain MR findings were included to our study. Contrast enhancement in plaque was evaluated as an acute, and non-contrast enhancement in plaque was evaluated as a chronic. Also, ADC measurements were performed using the same parameters in NAWM in plaque neighborhood and volunteers. Results were compared with appropriate statistical methods. Results ADC values in acute and chronic plaques were decreased after the treatment, and these reductions were statistically significant for acute plaqus in b500 and for chronic plaques in b500 and b1000. The mean ADC values were measured as 1.53±0.49×10−3 and 1.43±0.58×10−3 in acute plaques and 1.40±0.35×10−3 and 1.34±0.36×10−3 mm2/sec in chronic plaques before and after the treatment. Conclusions We think that DWMR have important role due to quantitative measurement ability in the evaluation of the treatment efficacy of the MS patients with acute attack in addition to contrast-enhanced MR sequence. PMID:26740826

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  17. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  18. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Metabolic Imaging in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Lupo, Janine M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2015-11-01

    This review is focused on describing the use of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy for metabolic imaging of brain tumors. We will first review the MR metabolic imaging findings generated from preclinical models, focusing primarily on in vivo studies, and will then describe the use of metabolic imaging in the clinical setting. We will address relatively well-established (1) H MRS approaches, as well as (31) P MRS, (13) C MRS and emerging hyperpolarized (13) C MRS methodologies, and will describe the use of metabolic imaging for understanding the basic biology of glioma as well as for improving the characterization and monitoring of brain tumors in the clinic.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  20. Intraocular lymphoma after cardiac transplantation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  1. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. PMID:26614130

  2. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Treatment Response Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yunseon; Jung, Sang Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) as a response evaluation indicator for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria of this retrospective study were DW MRI acquisition within 1 month before and 3 to 5 months after RT. In total, 48 patients were enrolled. Two radiation oncologists measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Possible predictive factors, including alteration of the ADC value before and 3 to 5 month after RT, in relation to local progression-free survival (LPFS) were analyzed and compared. Results: Three months after RT, 6 patients (12.5%) showed a complete response, and 27 patients (56.3%) showed a partial response when evaluated using the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). The average ADC ± SD values were 1.21 ± 0.27 ( × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) before and 1.41 ± 0.36 ( × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) after RT (P<.001). The most significant prognostic factor related to LPFS was mRECIST (P<.001). The increment of ADC value (≥20%) was also a significant factor (P=.02), but RECIST (version 1.1; P=.11) was not. When RECIST was combined with the increment of ADC value (≥20%), the LPFS rates were significantly different between the groups (P=.004), and the area under the curve value (0.745) was comparable with that of mRECIST (0.765). Conclusions: ADC value change before and after RT in HCC was closely related to LPFS. ADC value and RECIST may substitute for mRECIST in patients who cannot receive contrast agents.

  3. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Krishna S; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Bernstein, Matt A; Markl, Michael; D Gatehouse, Peter; M Botnar, Rene; Saloner, David; Lorenz, Christine; Wen, Han; S Hu, Bob; Epstein, Frederick H; N Oshinski, John; Raman, Subha V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast imaging has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved calibration procedures, visualization tools, and analysis methods. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in CMR phase contrast imaging methodology, clinical applications including summaries of past clinical performance, and emerging research and clinical applications that utilize today's latest technology. PMID:26254979

  5. Intermediate-term evaluation of a pratical chelation protocol based on stratification of thalassemic patients by serum ferritin and magnetic resonance imaging cardiac t2*.

    PubMed

    Ha, Shau-Yin; Mok, Amanda Sio-Peng; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing; Rasalkar, Darshana Dattatray; Cheuk, Daniel Ka-Leung; Chiang, Alan Kwok-Shing; Ho, Marco Hok-Kung; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2011-01-01

    A standardized chelation protocol was applied by stratifying transfusion-dependent thalassemic patients into three groups, namely well chelated group (A), inadequately chelated group without (B) or with (C) risk of cardiac complications based on serum ferritin (SF) levels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cardiac T2* measurements. Group A patients were advised to continue with deferoxamine (DFO) (Regimen Ic). Group B patients were given options of either intensification of DFO alone (Regimen Ii), deferiprone (L1) alone (Regimen II) or combined therapy with L1 and DFO (Regimen III). Group C patients were advised to take either Regimen Ii or Regimen III. The 1-year result showed that the combined therapy (Regimen III) significantly reduced SF level, cardiac and liver iron in the groups of inadequately chelated patients. The same set of outcome parameters was repeated at 2.5 years of treatment so as to evaluate the intermediate-term effects of this risk stratified chelation protocol. The number of patients with cardiac T2* <20 ms decreased from 34 (60%) at baseline to 17 (30%) of the whole cohort of 57 patients at the end of the study. There were further improvements in SF, cardiac and liver T2* in Group C patients. Significant improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was demonstrated after 2.5 years of the combined therapy group in which the change was not initially apparent after the first year of assessment.

  6. In vivo evaluation of brain damage in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zimny, A; Szmyrka-Kaczmarek, M; Szewczyk, P; Bladowska, J; Pokryszko-Dragan, A; Gruszka, E; Wiland, P; Sasiadek, M

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-two neuropsychiatric (NPSLE) and 13 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with a normal appearing brain on plain magnetic resonance (MR) as well as 20 age-matched healthy controls underwent MR spectroscopy (MRS), perfusion-weighted (PWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). In MRS NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were calculated from the posterior cingulate cortex and left parietal white matter. In PWI, values of cerebral blood volume (CBV) were assessed from 14 regions, including gray and white matter. In DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) values were obtained from 14 white matter tracts including projection, commissural and association fibers. All MR measurements were correlated with clinical data. SLE and NPSLE patients showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower NAA/Cr ratios within both evaluated regions and FA values within the cingulum, as well as a tendency to cortical hypoperfusion. Compared to SLE, NPSLE subjects revealed lower FA values within a wide range of association fibers and corpus callosum. Advanced MR techniques are capable of in vivo detection of complex microstructural brain damage in SLE and NPSLE subjects regarding neuronal loss, mild hypoperfusion and white matter disintegrity. MRS and DTI seem to show the highest usefulness in depicting early changes in normal appearing gray and white matter in SLE patients. PMID:24192079

  7. The evaluation of lateral pterygoid muscle pathologic changes and insertion patterns in temporomandibular joints with or without disc displacement using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Imanimoghaddam, M; Madani, A S; Hashemi, E M

    2013-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a common disorder in patients with internal derangement. Certain anatomic features of TMJ may make the patient prone to this condition, namely lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) insertion variations. The aim of this study was to investigate LPM attachments and their relationships with disc displacement and subsequent pathologic changes. A total of 26 patients with clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and a control group of 14 unaffected individuals were studied. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were taken to evaluate LPM insertion patterns, superior LPM head pathologic changes, and relative disc to condyle position. Data registration and analysis were done using SPSS v. 16.0. The most common variation (type I) was shown to be the superior head with two bundles, one attached to the disc and another to the condyle. No significant relationship between LPM insertion type and disc displacement or pathologic changes of the muscle was found. However, a link between disc displacement and muscle pathologic changes was established (P=0.001).

  8. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  9. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    PubMed

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  10. Neuroimaging of pediatric brain tumors: from basic to advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the basic magnetic resonance concepts used in the imaging approach of a pediatric brain tumor are described with respect to different factors including understanding the significance of the patient's age. Also discussed are other factors directly related to the magnetic resonance scan itself including evaluating the location of the tumor, determining if the lesion is extra-axial or intra-axial, and evaluating the contrast characteristics of the lesion. Of note, there are key imaging features of pediatric brain tumors, which can give information about the cellularity of the lesion, which can then be confirmed with advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The second part of this review will provide an overview of the major advanced MRI techniques used in pediatric imaging, particularly, magnetic resonance diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance perfusion. The last part of the review will provide more specific information about the use of advanced magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of pediatric brain tumors.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the canine brain at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ko, Ki-Jin; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Han, Jae-Yong; Lim, Chae-Young; Park, Chul; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Won; Jung, Dong-In; Kim, Young-Bo; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe relevant canine brain structures as seen on T2-weighted images following magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 T and to compare the results with imaging at 1.5 T. Imaging was performed on five healthy laboratory beagle dogs using 1.5 and 7 T clinical scanners. At 1.5 T, spin echo images were acquired, while gradient echo images were acquired at 3 T. Image quality and conspicuity of anatomic structures were evaluated qualitatively by direct comparison of the images obtained from the two different magnetic fields. The signal-to-nose ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated and compared between 1.5 and 7 T. The T2-weighted images at 7 T provided good spatial and contrast resolution for the identification of clinically relevant brain anatomy; these images provided better delineation and conspicuity of the brain stem and cerebellar structures, which were difficult to unequivocally identify at 1.5 T. However, frontal and parietal lobe and the trigeminal nerve were difficult to identify at 7 T due to susceptibility artifact. The SNR and CNR of the images at 7 T were significantly increased up to 318% and 715% compared with the 1.5 T images. If some disadvantages of 7 T imaging, such as susceptibility artifacts, technical difficulties, and high cost, can be improved, 7 T clinical MR imaging could provide a good experimental and diagnostic tool for the evaluation of canine brain disorders.

  12. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  13. Value of hepatic diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating liver fibrosis following transarterial chemoembolization with low doses of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Na; Xiang, Qin; Zhou, Yan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the value of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) measured with magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in evaluating liver fibrosis and curative effects on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) with low doses of chemotherapy. In total, 84 patients with HCC not recommended for surgical resection underwent TACE. The patients were divided into small dose (n=46) and conventional dose (n=38) chemotherapy groups, and underwent MR-DWI prior to and following TACE. Examination of the four liver fibrosis indexes, hyaluronate, laminin, human procollagen type-III and collagen type-IV, as well as ADC values (b=600 sec/mm(2)), was conducted in the two groups. With small dose chemotherapy, the ADC values were not significantly different preoperatively and postoperatively (P>0.05). By contrast, with a conventional dose, statistically significant differences were observed between the preoperative and postoperative ADC values (P<0.01). ADC values in the small and conventional dose chemotherapy groups prior to the first cycle of TACE were 1.613±0.133×10(-3) and 1.488±0.248×10(-3) mm(2)/sec, respectively, while following four cycles of TACE, the ADC values were 1.598±0.147×10(-3) and 1.206±0.222×10(-3) mm(2)/sec, respectively. With regard to chemotherapy, the ADC values before and after TACE were significantly different (P<0.05). A significant negative correlation was observed between the ADC values and the fibrosis stage (P<0.05). Therefore, hepatic MR-DWI plays a key role in evaluating liver fibrosis following TACE with low doses of chemotherapy, resulting in improved curative effects of TACE. PMID:25009633

  14. [Magnetic resonance imaging of cancer of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Guinet, C; Buy, J N

    1988-01-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) has become a major diagnostic method, in many fields. Its results, in the pre-operative evaluation of rectal cancers, are presented here. The possibilities of determining by MRI, parietal extension, peri-rectal fat invasion, extension to adjoining organs and nodes, are specified. Then, the contribution of MRI to the measurement of the distance between the lower pole of the tumor and the levator muscles plane, is evaluated.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ADNI

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Barnes, Josephine; Bernstein, Matt A.; Borowski, Bret J.; Brewer, James; Clegg, Shona; Dale, Anders M.; Carmichael, Owen; Ching, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Desikan, Rahul S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fjell, Anders M.; Fletcher, Evan; Fox, Nick C.; Gunter, Jeff; Gutman, Boris A.; Holland, Dominic; Hua, Xue; Insel, Philip; Kantarci, Kejal; Killiany, Ron J.; Krueger, Gunnar; Leung, Kelvin K.; Mackin, Scott; Maillard, Pauline; Molone, Ian; Mattsson, Niklas; McEvoy, Linda; Modat, Marc; Mueller, Susanne; Nosheny, Rachel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schuff, Norbert; Senjem, Matthew L.; Simonson, Alix; Thompson, Paul M.; Rettmann, Dan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Walhovd, Kristine; Zhao, Yansong; Zuk, Samantha; Weiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ADNI is now in its 10th year. The primary objective of the MRI core of ADNI has been to improve methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. METHODS We review the contributions of the MRI core from present and past cycles of ADNI (ADNI 1, GO and 2). We also review plans for the future – ADNI 3. RESULTS Contributions of the MRI core include creating standardized acquisition protocols and quality control methods; examining the effect of technical features of image acquisition and analysis on outcome metrics; deriving sample size estimates for future trials based on those outcomes; and piloting the potential utility of MR perfusion, diffusion, and functional connectivity measures in multicenter clinical trials. DISCUSSION Over the past decade the MRI core of ADNI has fulfilled its mandate of improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:26194310

  16. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of semitendinosus tendon in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Does this have an effect on graft choice?

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Ozgezmez, Ferit Tufan; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Ozkan, Ilhan; Savk, Sevki Oner; Cullu, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with ST autograft is sometimes unsuccessful because of harvested thin graft. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be a useful tool to evaluate the thickness of the graft. This study is performed to evaluate whether there is any correlation between diameters and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the semitendinosus tendon (ST) on the preoperative magnetic MRI and the diameter of the 4-stranded ST autograft in ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with 4-stranded ST for full-thickness ACL ruptures were included in this study. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) diameters of ST at the levels of the joint line (JL) and femoral physeal line (PL), and also CSA at these levels were measured on T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI examinations. The data obtained were compared with intraoperatively measured diameters of 4-stranded ST autograft. Correlations between variables were evaluated using Spearman's rho. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve statistics were used to evaluate the cut-off value for the correlation between 4-stranded ST graft diameter of 8 mm and CSA (mm2) on MRI. Results: On MRI measurements, no correlation was found between AP diameters at the level of the JL and 4-stranded ST diameter (P = 0.180). However, correlations were found between diameter of 4-stranded ST and ML diameter at the level of JL (P = 0.003) and PL (P = 0.002), AP diameter at the level of the PL (P = 0.009), CSA at the level of the JL (P < 0.001) and at the level of PL (P < 0.001). Correlation between the diameter of 4-stranded ST and CSA at both levels was more significant than that between AP-ML diameters of ST and diameter of autograft. The cut-off value for the 8 mm diameter CSA of 4-stranded ST was 5.9 mm2 at the JL and 8.99 mm2 at the PL. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI evaluation of CSA at the JL of the ST is a reliable parameter to

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cardiac imaging shows initial promise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3-D MRI) of the heart is already receiving encouraging reviews from heart surgeons, says Michael Vannier, MD, an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. In fact, the demand for his group's 3-D images is becoming overwhelming, Vannier says. So far, the group has used 3-D MRI to evaluate congenital heart disease. The advantage of the 3-D system is that, even to an untrained eye, anomalies are apparent and the images can even be animated. Many of the patients are infants, who are sedated while the images are acquired. When the information is combined, the averaged image produced represents a slice about 5 mm thick. The computer then stacks a number of those images together to make the 3-D image. Total scanning takes about one hour.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sefrova, Jana; Odrazka, Karel; Paluska, Petr; Belobradek, Zdenek; Brodak, Milos; Dolezel, Martin; Prosvic, Petr; Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan; Hoffmann, Petr; Louda, Miroslav; Nejedla, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  19. Terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Toshikazu

    2016-03-01

    We report a feasibility study of a terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) that oscillate at 0.30 THz. A pair of RTDs acted as an emitter and a detector in the system. Terahertz reflection images of opaque samples were acquired with our RTD imaging system. A spatial resolution of 1 mm, which is equal to the wavelength of the RTD emitter, was achieved. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection image was improved by 6 dB by using polarization optics that reduced interference effects. Additionally, the coherence of the RTD enabled a depth resolution of less than 3 µm to be achieved by an interferometric technique. Thus, RTDs are an attractive candidate for use in small THz imaging systems.

  20. Volume coil based on hybridized resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvaud, C.; Abdeddaim, R.; Larrat, B.; de Rosny, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an electromagnetic device based on hybridization of four half-wavelength dipoles which increases the uniformity and the strength of the radio-frequency (RF) field of a Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) apparatus. Numerical results show that this Hybridized Coil (HC) excited with a classical loop coil takes advantage of the magnetic hybrid modes. The distribution of the RF magnetic field is experimentally confirmed on a 7-T MRI with a gelatin phantom. Finally, the HC is validated in vivo by imaging the head of an anesthetized rat. We measure an overall increase of the signal to noise ratio with up to 2.4 fold increase in regions of interest far from the active loop coil.

  1. Foodomics imaging by mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Canela, Núria; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Baiges, Isabel; Nadal, Pedro; Arola, Lluís

    2016-07-01

    This work explores the use of advanced imaging MS (IMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in food science and nutrition to evaluate food sensory characteristics, nutritional value and health benefits. Determining the chemical content and applying imaging tools to food metabolomics offer detailed information about food quality, safety, processing, storage and authenticity assessment. IMS and MRI are powerful analytical systems with an excellent capability for mapping the distribution of many molecules, and recent advances in these platforms are reviewed and discussed, showing the great potential of these techniques for small molecule-based food metabolomics research. PMID:26799681

  2. Evaluation of the Differences of Myocardial Fibers between Acute and Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Application of Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Rhesus Monkey Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqing; Cai, Wei; Wang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand microstructural changes after myocardial infarction (MI), we evaluated myocardial fibers of rhesus monkeys during acute or chronic MI, and identified the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI. Materials and Methods Six fixed hearts of rhesus monkeys with left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 1 hour or 84 days were scanned by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and helix angle (HA). Results Comparing with acute MI monkeys (FA: 0.59 ± 0.02; ADC: 5.0 ± 0.6 × 10-4 mm2/s; HA: 94.5 ± 4.4°), chronic MI monkeys showed remarkably decreased FA value (0.26 ± 0.03), increased ADC value (7.8 ± 0.8 × 10-4mm2/s), decreased HA transmural range (49.5 ± 4.6°) and serious defects on endocardium in infarcted regions. The HA in infarcted regions shifted to more components of negative left-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-38.3 ± 5.0°–11.2 ± 4.3°) than in acute MI monkeys (-41.4 ± 5.1°–53.1 ± 3.7°), but the HA in remote regions shifted to more components of positive right-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-43.8 ± 2.7°–66.5 ± 4.9°) than in acute MI monkeys (-59.5 ± 3.4°–64.9 ± 4.3°). Conclusion Diffusion tensor MRI method helps to quantify differences of mechanical microstructure and water diffusion of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI monkey's models. PMID:27587961

  3. Three-dimensional echocardiography in the evaluation of global and regional function in patients with recent myocardial infarction: a comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorstensen, Anders; Dalen, Håvard; Hala, Pavel; Kiss, Gabriel; D'hooge, Jan; Torp, Hans; Støylen, Asbjørn; Amundsen, Brage

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography in the evaluation of patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI), using late-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LE-MRI) as a reference method. Echocardiography and LE-MRI were performed approximately 1 month after first-time MI in 58 patients. Echocardiography was also performed on 35 healthy controls. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction by 3D echocardiography (3D-LVEF), 3D wall-motion score (WMS), 2D-WMS, 3D speckle tracking-based longitudinal, circumferential, transmural and area strain, and 2D speckle tracking-based longitudinal strain (LS) were measured. The global correlations to infarct size by LE-MRI were significantly higher (P < 0.03) for 3D-WMS and 2D-WMS compared with 3D-LVEF and the 4 different measurements of 3D strain, and 2D global longitudinal strain (GLS) was more closely correlated to LE-MRI than 3D GLS (P < 0.03). The segmental correlations to infarct size by LE-MRI were also significantly higher (P < 0.04) for 3D-WMS, 2D-WMS, and 2D LS compared with the other indices. Three-dimensional WMS showed a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 72% for identification of LV infarct size >12%, and a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 95% for identification of segments with transmural infarct extension. Three-dimensional WMS and 2D gray-scale echocardiography showed the strongest correlations to LE-MRI. The tested 3D strain method suffers from low temporal and spatial resolution in 3D acquisitions and added diagnostic value could not be proven.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Image Example Based Contrast Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of image analysis algorithms applied to magnetic resonance images is strongly influenced by the pulse sequences used to acquire the images. Algorithms are typically optimized for a targeted tissue contrast obtained from a particular implementation of a pulse sequence on a specific scanner. There are many practical situations, including multi-institution trials, rapid emergency scans, and scientific use of historical data, where the images are not acquired according to an optimal protocol or the desired tissue contrast is entirely missing. This paper introduces an image restoration technique that recovers images with both the desired tissue contrast and a normalized intensity profile. This is done using patches in the acquired images and an atlas containing patches of the acquired and desired tissue contrasts. The method is an example-based approach relying on sparse reconstruction from image patches. Its performance in demonstrated using several examples, including image intensity normalization, missing tissue contrast recovery, automatic segmentation, and multimodal registration. These examples demonstrate potential practical uses and also illustrate limitations of our approach. PMID:24058022

  5. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  6. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, G. J.; Comas, D. S.; González, M. A.; Capiel, C.; Ballarin, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health.

  7. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  8. Overview of left ventricular outpouchings on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular outpouchings commonly include aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, and diverticulum and are now being increasingly detected on imaging. Distinction between these entities is of prime importance to guide proper management as outcomes for these entities differ substantially. Chest radiograph is usually nonspecific in their diagnosis. Echocardiography, multi-detector computed tomography evaluation and angiography are helpful in the diagnosis with their inherit limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a very useful tool that allows simultaneous anatomical and functional evaluation along with tissue characterization, which has diagnostic, theraputic and prognostic implications. This article gives an overview of left ventricular outpouchings with special emphasis on their differentiation using cardiac MRI. PMID:26675616

  9. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeck, W. W.; Ha, S.-H.; Farmaka, S.; Nalcioglu, O.

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  10. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roeck, W W; Ha, S-H; Farmaka, S; Nalcioglu, O

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  11. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P D; Miller, D; Gledhill, R F; Rossor, M N

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients in whom a clinical diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) had been made. MRI showed lesions in the pons in both cases about 2 years after the illness, at a time when the spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy had recovered. The persisting abnormal signals in CPM are likely to be due to fibrillary gliosis. Persistence of lesions on MRI means that the diagnosis of CPM may be electively, after the acute illness has resolved. Images PMID:2732743

  13. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  16. Imaging by electromagnetic induction with resonant circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, Roberta; Watson, Joseph C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-05-01

    A new electromagnetic induction imaging system is presented which is capable of imaging metallic samples of different conductivities. The system is based on a parallel LCR circuit made up of a cylindrical ferrite-cored coil and a capacitor bank. An AC current is applied to the coil, thus generating an AC magnetic field. This field is modified when a conductive sample is placed within the magnetic field, as a consequence of eddy current induction inside the sample. The electrical properties of the LCR circuit, including the coil inductance, are modified due to the presence of this metallic sample. Position-resolved measurements of these modifications should then allow imaging of conductive objects as well as enable their characterization. A proof-of-principle system is presented in this paper. Two imaging techniques based on Q-factor and resonant frequency measurements are presented. Both techniques produced conductivity maps of 14 metallic objects with different geometries and values of conductivity ranging from 0.54х106 to 59.77х106 S/m. Experimental results highlighted a higher sensitivity for the Q-factor technique compared to the resonant frequency one; the respective measurements were found to vary within the following ranges: ΔQ=[-11,-2]%, Δf=[-0.3,0.7]%. The analysis of the images, conducted using a Canny edge detection algorithm, demonstrated the suitability of the Q-factor technique for accurate edge detection of both magnetic and non-magnetic metallic samples.

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in medicine and physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, C.T.W.; van Zijl, P.C.M.; Frank, J.A.; Bihan, D.L.; Becker, E.D. )

    1990-10-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established diagnostic tool that provides detailed information about macroscopic structure and anatomy. Recent advances in MRI allow the noninvasive spatial evaluation of various biophysical and biochemical processes in living systems. Specifically, the motion of water can be measured in processes such as vascular flow, capillary flow, diffusion, and exchange. In addition, the concentrations of various metabolites can be determined for the assessment of regional regulation of metabolism. Examples are given that demonstrate the use of functional MRI for clinical and research purposes. This development adds a new dimension to the application of magnetic resonance to medicine and physiology.

  18. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here we propose the multi-dimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel RF coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. PMID:22926830

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art*

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate. PMID:25741058

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate.

  1. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  2. Evaluation of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-manganese(II) complexes modified by narrow molecular weight distribution of chitosan oligosaccharides as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qi; Dai, Xueqin; Wu, Jingbo

    2011-05-01

    Novel conjugates of narrow molecular weight distribution of chitosan oligosaccharides (CSn; n=6, 8, 11) with manganese-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Mn-DTPA) as potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were synthesized. The structures were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, size exclusion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The characterization results showed that Mn-DTPA was successfully linked to aminated CSn by an amide function. The magnetic properties were characterized by in vitro and T(1)-weighted FLASH image experiments. Relaxivities studies indicated that Mn-DTPA-CSn (n=8, 11) provided higher relaxivity, either in aqueous or bovine serum albumin solution (0.725 mM), than commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA. The stability results showed that Mn-DTPA-CSn in aqueous were stable enough to prevent Mn(II) ions from releasing. The preliminary in vitro and T(1)-weighted FLASH image studies suggested that Mn-DTPA-CSn had the advantage of becoming promising MRI contrast agents.

  3. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions.

  4. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  5. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. PMID:24931095

  6. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-04-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  8. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging near metal implants.

    PubMed

    Koch, K M; Hargreaves, B A; Pauly, K Butts; Chen, W; Gold, G E; King, K F

    2010-10-01

    The desire to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in the vicinity of embedded metallic hardware is increasing. The soft-tissue contrast available with MR techniques is advantageous in diagnosing complications near an increasing variety of MR-safe metallic hardware. Near such hardware, the spatial encoding mechanisms utilized in conventional MRI methods are often severely compromised. Mitigating these encoding difficulties has been the focus of numerous research investigations over the past two decades. Such approaches include view-angle tilting, short echo-time projection reconstruction acquisitions, single-point imaging, prepolarized MRI, and postprocessing image correction. Various technical advances have also enabled the recent development of two alternative approaches that have shown promising clinical potential. Here, the physical principals and proposed solutions to the problem of MRI near embedded metal are discussed.

  10. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  11. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  12. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  13. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Price, Anthony N.; Cheung, King K.; Cleary, Jon O; Campbell, Adrienne E; Riegler, Johannes; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the modality of choice for clinical studies of the heart and vasculature, offering detailed images of both structure and function with high temporal resolution. Small animals are increasingly used for genetic and translational research, in conjunction with models of common pathologies such as myocardial infarction. In all cases, effective methods for characterising a wide range of functional and anatomical parameters are crucial for robust studies. CMR is the gold-standard for the non-invasive examination of these models, although physiological differences, such as rapid heart rate, make this a greater challenge than conventional clinical imaging. However, with the help of specialised magnetic resonance (MR) systems, novel gating strategies and optimised pulse sequences, high-quality images can be obtained in these animals despite their small size. In this review, we provide an overview of the principal CMR techniques for small animals for example cine, angiography and perfusion imaging, which can provide measures such as ejection fraction, vessel anatomy and local blood flow, respectively. In combination with MR contrast agents, regional dysfunction in the heart can also be identified and assessed. We also discuss optimal methods for analysing CMR data, particularly the use of semi-automated tools for parameter measurement to reduce analysis time. Finally, we describe current and emerging methods for imaging the developing heart, aiding characterisation of congenital cardiovascular defects. Advanced small animal CMR now offers an unparalleled range of cardiovascular assessments. Employing these methods should allow new insights into the structural, functional and molecular basis of the cardiovascular system. PMID:21331311

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of gel-cast ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckman, S.L.; Balss, K.M.; Waterfield, L.G.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  16. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Wang, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  17. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  18. Current Role of Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neurologic Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Karen; Cassady, Christopher; Jones, Jeremy; Paldino, Michael; Mehollin-Ray, Amy; Guimaraes, Carolina; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used increasingly to image the fetus when important questions remain unanswered after ultrasonography, which might occur particularly with abnormal amniotic fluid volumes, difficult fetal lie or position, and maternal obesity. Ultrasonography also has limitations due to sound attenuation by bone, such as within the cranium and spine, and therefore MRI has a real advantage in delineating potentially complex neuroanatomical relationships. This article outlines current MRI protocols for evaluation of the fetal neural axis, describes indications for the use of MRI in the fetal brain and spine, and provides examples to illustrate the uses of available fetal sequences. PMID:26296481

  19. A parametric vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a parametric three-dimensional body-cover vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human larynx. Major geometric features that are observed in the MRI images but missing in current vocal fold models are discussed, and their influence on vocal fold vibration is evaluated using eigenmode analysis. Proper boundary conditions for the model are also discussed. Based on control parameters corresponding to anatomic landmarks that can be easily measured, this model can be adapted toward a subject-specific vocal fold model for voice production research and clinical applications. PMID:27586774

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  1. Creating a magnetic resonance imaging ontology.

    PubMed

    Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Duvauferrier, Régis; Burgun, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to build an ontology of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The MRI domain has been analysed regarding MRI simulators and the DICOM standard. Tow MRI simulators have been analysed: JEMRIS, which is developed in XML and C++, has a hierarchical organisation and SIMRI, which is developed in C, has a good representation of MRI physical processes. To build the ontology we have used Protégé 4, owl2 that allows quantitative representations. The ontology has been validated by a reasoner (Fact++) and by a good representation of DICOM headers and of MRI processes. The MRI ontology would improved MRI simulators and eased semantic interoperability. PMID:21893854

  2. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  3. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  4. Foundations of advanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E; Glover, Gary H

    2005-04-01

    During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now-within a few minutes-acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, L S; Fritz, R C; Tirman, P F; Uffman, M

    1997-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides useful information regarding the elbow joint. Many abnormalities seen in the elbow are a result of trauma, often from sports such as baseball and tennis. Elbow problems are frequently related to the medial tension-lateral compression phenomenon where repeated valgus stress produces flexor-pronator strain, ulnar collateral ligament sprain, ulnar traction spurring, and ulnar neuropathy. The lateral compression causes osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and radial head, degenerative arthritis, and loose bodies. Other elbow abnormalities seen on MRI include radial collateral ligament injuries, biceps and triceps tendon injuries, other nerve entrapment syndromes, loose bodies, osseous and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, and masses, including bursae.

  6. A preclinical murine model for the early detection of radiation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral tests for learning and memory: with applications for the evaluation of possible stem cell imaging agents and therapies.

    PubMed

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Gandhi, Nishant; Kato, Yoshinori; Armour, Michael; Zhu, Wenlian; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapies are being developed for radiotherapy-induced brain injuries (RIBI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers advantages for imaging transplanted stem cells. However, most MRI cell-tracking techniques employ superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs), which are difficult to distinguish from hemorrhage. In current preclinical RIBI models, hemorrhage occurs concurrently with other injury markers. This makes the evaluation of the recruitment of transplanted SPIO-labeled stem cells to injury sites difficult. Here, we developed a RIBI model, with early injury markers reflective of hippocampal dysfunction, which can be detected noninvasively with MRI and behavioral tests. Lesions were generated by sub-hemispheric irradiation of mouse hippocampi with single X-ray beams of 80 Gy. Lesion formation was monitored with anatomical and contrast-enhanced MRI and changes in memory and learning were assessed with fear-conditioning tests. Early injury markers were detected 2 weeks after irradiation. These included an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrated by a 92 ± 20 % contrast enhancement of the irradiated versus the non-irradiated brain hemispheres, within 15 min of the administration of an MRI contrast agent. A change in short-term memory was also detected, as demonstrated by a 40.88 ± 5.03 % decrease in the freezing time measured during the short-term memory context test at this time point, compared to that before irradiation. SPIO-labeled stem cells transplanted contralateral to the lesion migrated toward the lesion at this time point. No hemorrhage was detected up to 10 weeks after irradiation. This model can be used to evaluate SPIO-based stem cell-tracking agents, short-term. PMID:27021492

  7. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver lesions: exceptions and atypical lesions.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; de Man, Robert A; Zondervan, Pieter E; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Preda, A; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2008-01-01

    On state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, most lesions can be detected and characterized with confidence according to well-known criteria. However, atypical characteristics in some common lesions and the incidental encounter with rare lesions may pose diagnostic difficulties. In this article, six challenging hepatic lesions will be discussed and evaluated on the most important magnetic resonance imaging sequences, with histological correlation when available. In addition, the background information concerning these lesions will be described based on the most recent available literature. By reading this article, the reader will be able to (1) categorize the lesion in solid and fluid-containing lesions, based on the T2 signal intensity; and (2) define the benign or malignant nature of the lesion, in relation to the signal intensity and dynamic enhancement pattern, despite the presence of atypical characteristics of some lesions. PMID:18436109

  9. Penetrating power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, Roberta; Watson, Joseph C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of revealing the presence and identifying the nature of conductive targets is of central interest in many fields, including security, medicine, industry, archaeology and geophysics. In many applications, these targets are shielded by external materials and thus cannot be directly accessed. Hence, interrogation techniques are required that allow penetration through the shielding materials, in order for the target to be identified. Electromagnetic interrogation techniques represent a powerful solution to this challenge, as they enable penetration through conductive shields. In this work, we demonstrate the power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging to penetrate through metallic shields (1.5-mm-thick) and image targets (having conductivities σ ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm-1) concealed behind them.

  10. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of eye movements.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Kabala, J; Laitt, R; Weston, M; Goddard, P; Hoh, H B; Potts, M J; Harrad, R A

    1993-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique in which multiple sequential static orbital MRI films are taken while the patient fixates a series of targets across the visual field. These are then sequenced to give a graphic animation to the eyes. The excellent soft tissue differentiation of MRI, combined with the dynamic imaging, allows rapid visualisation, and functional assessment of the extraocular muscles. Good assessment of contractility can be obtained, but the technique does not allow study of saccadic or pursuit eye movements. We have used this technique in 36 patients with a range of ocular motility disorders, including thyroid-related ophthalmopathy, blow-out fracture, post-operative lost or slipped muscle, and Duane's syndrome.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  12. [Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Linera Prado, J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the main structural imaging in epilepsy. In patients with focal seizures, detection (and characterization) of a structural lesion consistent with electroclinical data allows therapeutic decisions without having to resort to other more expensive or invasive diagnostic procedures. The identification of some lesions may provide prognostic value, as in the case of Mesial Temporal Sclerosis (MTS) or may contribute to genetic counseling, as in the case of some Malformations of Cortical Development (MCD). The aim of this paper is to review the current state of structural MRI techniques, propose a basic protocol of epilepsy and mention the indications for structural MRI. Also, review the semiology of the main causes of epilepsy, with emphasis on MTS and MCD, by its highest frequency and by the special impact that MRI has shown in dealing with these entities.

  13. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  15. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  16. Evaluation and Treatment of Resonance Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummer, Ann W.; Lee, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Resonance disorders can have a variety of causes but the appropriate evaluation includes a speech pathology evaluation and may require a videofluoroscopic speech study or nasopharyngoscopy assessment. Treatment may include surgery or the use of prosthetic devices, and usually speech therapy. An interdisciplinary approach is best. (Author/DB)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of meniscal tears has evolved secondary to a better understanding of the essential roles that the menisci play in the normal function of the knee, including load transmission, stress distribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication, resistance to capsular and synovial impingement, and maintenance of joint congruity. Imaging evaluation of the menisci requires an understanding of the normal anatomy, the imaging criteria necessary to accurately diagnose a meniscal tear, meniscal tear patterns, and awareness of common diagnostic pitfalls.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of meniscal tears has evolved secondary to a better understanding of the essential roles that the menisci play in the normal function of the knee, including load transmission, stress distribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication, resistance to capsular and synovial impingement, and maintenance of joint congruity. Imaging evaluation of the menisci requires an understanding of the normal anatomy, the imaging criteria necessary to accurately diagnose a meniscal tear, meniscal tear patterns, and awareness of common diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:25442021

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: a quick review.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Viratsinh; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy

    2010-01-01

    Ability to non-invasively map the hemodynamic changes occurring focally in areas of brain involved in various motor, sensory and cognitive functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revolutionized research in neuroscience in the last two decades. This technique has already gained clinical use especially in pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy and neurosurgical planning of resection of mass lesions adjacent to eloquent cortex. In this review we attempt to illustrate basic principles and techniques of fMRI, its applications, practical points to consider while performing and evaluating clinical fMRI and its limitations.

  20. Magnetic resonance image denoising using multiple filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Danni; Wang, Jinjuan; Miwa, Yuichi

    2013-07-01

    We introduced and compared ten denoisingfilters which are all proposed during last fifteen years. Especially, the state-of-art denoisingalgorithms, NLM and BM3D, have attracted much attention. Several expansions are proposed to improve the noise reduction based on these two algorithms. On the other hand, optimal dictionaries, sparse representations and appropriate shapes of the transform's support are also considered for the image denoising. The comparison among variousfiltersis implemented by measuring the SNR of a phantom image and denoising effectiveness of a clinical image. The computational time is finally evaluated.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using RASER

    PubMed Central

    Goerke, Ute; Garwood, Michael; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Although functional imaging of neuronal activity by magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary methodology employed in studying the brain, significant portions of the brain are inaccessible by this methodology due to its sensitivity to macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities induced near air filled cavities in the head. In this paper, we demonstrate that this sensitivity is eliminated by a novel pulse sequence, RASER (rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing) (Chamberlain et al., 2007), that can generate functional maps. This is accomplished because RASER acquired signals are purely and perfectly T2 weighted, without any T2*-effects that are inherent in the other image acquisition schemes employed to date. T2-weighted fMRI sequences are also more specific to the site of neuronal activity at ultrahigh magnetic fields than T2*-variations since they are dominated by signal components originating from the tissue in the capillary bed. The RASER based fMRI response is quantified; it is shown to have inherently less noisy time series and to provide fMRI in brain regions, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, which are challenging to image with conventional techniques. PMID:20699123

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging safety of deep brain stimulator devices.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care for the evaluation of different neurological disorders of the brain and spinal cord due to its multiplanar capabilities and excellent soft tissue resolution. With the large and increasing population of patients with implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, a significant proportion of these patients with chronic neurological diseases require evaluation of their primary neurological disease processes by MRI. The presence of an implanted DBS device in a magnetic resonance environment presents potential hazards. These include the potential for induction of electrical currents or heating in DBS devices, which can result in neurological tissue injury, magnetic field-induced device migration, or disruption of the operational aspects of the devices. In this chapter, we review the basic physics of potential interactions of the MRI environment with implanted DBS devices, summarize results from phantom studies and clinical series, and discuss present recommendations for safe MRI in patients with implanted DBS devices.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging safety of deep brain stimulator devices.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care for the evaluation of different neurological disorders of the brain and spinal cord due to its multiplanar capabilities and excellent soft tissue resolution. With the large and increasing population of patients with implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, a significant proportion of these patients with chronic neurological diseases require evaluation of their primary neurological disease processes by MRI. The presence of an implanted DBS device in a magnetic resonance environment presents potential hazards. These include the potential for induction of electrical currents or heating in DBS devices, which can result in neurological tissue injury, magnetic field-induced device migration, or disruption of the operational aspects of the devices. In this chapter, we review the basic physics of potential interactions of the MRI environment with implanted DBS devices, summarize results from phantom studies and clinical series, and discuss present recommendations for safe MRI in patients with implanted DBS devices. PMID:24112886

  4. Automatic slice-alignment method in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the right ventricle in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitta, Shuhei; Kuhara, Shigehide; Ishimura, Rieko; Kariyasu, Toshiya; Imai, Masamichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Shiodera, Taichiro

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new automatic slice-alignment method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, to simplify right ventricular cardiac scan planning and assess its accuracy and the clinical acceptability of the acquired imaging planes in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences covering the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase with ECG gating were used to acquire 2D axial multislice images. To realize right ventricular scan planning, two morphological feature points are added to be detected and a total of eight morphological features of the heart were extracted from these series of images, and six left ventricular planes and four right ventricular planes were calculated simultaneously based on the extracted features. The subjects were 33 patients (25 with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and 8 with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension). The four right ventricular reference planes including right ventricular short-axis, 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and 3-chamber images were evaluated. The acceptability of the acquired imaging planes was visually evaluated using a 4-point scale, and the angular differences between the results obtained by this method and by conventional manual annotation were measured for each view. The average visual scores were 3.9±0.4 for short-axis images, 3.8±0.4 for 4-chamber images, 3.8±0.4 for 2-chamber images, and 3.5±0.6 for 3-chamber images. The average angular differences were 8.7±5.3, 8.3±4.9, 8.1±4.8, and 7.9±5.3 degrees, respectively. The processing time was less than 2.5 seconds in all subjects. The proposed method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, can provide clinically acceptable planes in a short time and is useful because special proficiency in performing cardiac MR for

  5. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in anorectal disease

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Loren; Israel, Gary M; McCarthy, Shirley M; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Longo, Walter E

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of both benign and malignant anorectal diseases has traditionally posed a challenge to clinicians, and as a result history and physical exam have been relied on heavily. CT scanning and endorectal ultrasound have become popular in assessment of anatomy and staging of tumors, but have limitations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the capability to fill in the gaps left open by more conventional imaging modalities and continues to be promising as the definitive imaging technique in the pelvis, especially with advancement of emerging technologies in this field. A comprehensive review of this topic has been undertaken. Anorectal disease is divided into three broad categories: cancer, fistula/abscess, and pelvic floor disorders. A review of the literature is performed to evaluate the use of MRI and other imaging modalities in these three areas. Preoperative imaging is useful in the evaluation of all three areas of anorectal disease. MRI is an effective tool in delineating anatomy and, when correlating with the specific clinical scenario, is an effective adjunct in clinical decision-making in order to optimize outcome. MRI continues to be a promising and novel approach to imaging various afflictions of the anorectum and the pelvic floor. Its role is more well-established in some areas than in others, and there are still significant limitations. As technology advances, MRI will shed more light on a complex anatomical area. PMID:17589891

  6. Robust Intensity Standardization in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Giorgio; Cataldo, Rosella; Carlà, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    The paper is focused on a tiSsue-Based Standardization Technique (SBST) of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Magnetic Resonance Imaging intensities have no fixed tissue-specific numeric meaning, even within the same MRI protocol, for the same body region, or even for images of the same patient obtained on the same scanner in different moments. This affects postprocessing tasks such as automatic segmentation or unsupervised/supervised classification methods, which strictly depend on the observed image intensities, compromising the accuracy and efficiency of many image analyses algorithms. A large number of MR images from public databases, belonging to healthy people and to patients with different degrees of neurodegenerative pathology, were employed together with synthetic MRIs. Combining both histogram and tissue-specific intensity information, a correspondence is obtained for each tissue across images. The novelty consists of computing three standardizing transformations for the three main brain tissues, for each tissue class separately. In order to create a continuous intensity mapping, spline smoothing of the overall slightly discontinuous piecewise-linear intensity transformation is performed. The robustness of the technique is assessed in a post hoc manner, by verifying that automatic segmentation of images before and after standardization gives a high overlapping (Dice index >0.9) for each tissue class, even across images coming from different sources. Furthermore, SBST efficacy is tested by evaluating if and how much it increases intertissue discrimination and by assessing gaussianity of tissue gray-level distributions before and after standardization. Some quantitative comparisons to already existing different approaches available in the literature are performed.

  7. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (~1 mm) and in pO2 (1-3 mmHg). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20 dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, and require relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required spin

  8. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (∼1mm) and in pO2 (1-3 torr). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, which results in relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required

  9. Evaluation of response after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas; the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) and Imaging Group recommendations for radiological examination and reporting with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Messiou, C; Bonvalot, S; Gronchi, A; Vanel, D; Meyer, M; Robinson, P; Morosi, C; Bloem, J L; Terrier, P H; Lazar, A; Le Péchoux, C; Wardelman, E; Winfield, J M; Boulet, B; Bovée, J; Haas, R L

    2016-03-01

    At present, there is no standardised approach for the radiological evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas following radiotherapy (RT). This manuscript, produced by a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) and Imaging Group endorsed task force, aims to propose standardisation of magnetic resonance imaging techniques and interpretation after neoadjuvant RT for routine use and within clinical trials.

  10. Evaluation of response after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas; the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) and Imaging Group recommendations for radiological examination and reporting with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Messiou, C; Bonvalot, S; Gronchi, A; Vanel, D; Meyer, M; Robinson, P; Morosi, C; Bloem, J L; Terrier, P H; Lazar, A; Le Péchoux, C; Wardelman, E; Winfield, J M; Boulet, B; Bovée, J; Haas, R L

    2016-03-01

    At present, there is no standardised approach for the radiological evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas following radiotherapy (RT). This manuscript, produced by a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) and Imaging Group endorsed task force, aims to propose standardisation of magnetic resonance imaging techniques and interpretation after neoadjuvant RT for routine use and within clinical trials. PMID:26802529

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  12. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  16. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kollewe, Katja; Körner, Sonja; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne; Mohammadi, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disorder which is incurable to date. As there are many ongoing studies with therapeutic candidates, it is of major interest to develop biomarkers not only to facilitate early diagnosis but also as a monitoring tool to predict disease progression and to enable correct randomization of patients in clinical trials. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has made substantial progress over the last three decades and is a practical, noninvasive method to gain insights into the pathology of the disease. Disease-specific MRI changes therefore represent potential biomarkers for ALS. In this paper we give an overview of structural and functional MRI alterations in ALS with the focus on task-free resting-state investigations to detect cortical network failures. PMID:22848820

  18. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. PMID:20630342

  19. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Eric T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2013-10-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and ¹⁹F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo.

  20. Small Animal Imaging with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Nouls, John; Badea, Alexandra; Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Petiet, Alexandra; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has evolved significantly from testing the boundaries of imaging physics to its expanding use today as a tool in non-invasive biomedical investigations. This review is intended to capture the state-of-the-art in MRM for scientists who may be unfamiliar with this modality, but who want to apply its capabilities to their research. We therefore include a brief review of MR concepts and methods of animal handling and support before covering a range of MRM applications including the heart, lung, brain, and the emerging field of MR histology. High-resolution anatomical imaging reveals increasingly exquisite detail in healthy animals and subtle architectural aberrations that occur in genetically altered models. Resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions is now routinely attained in living animals, and 10 µm3 is feasible in fixed specimens. Such images almost rival conventional histology while allowing the object to be viewed interactively in any plane. MRM is now increasingly used to provide functional information in living animals. Images of the beating heart, breathing lung, and functioning brain can be recorded. While clinical MRI focuses on diagnosis, MRM is used to reveal fundamental biology or to non-invasively measure subtle changes in the structure or function of organs during disease progression or in response to experimental therapies. The ability of MRM to provide a detailed functional and anatomical picture in rats and mice, and to track this picture over time, makes it a promising platform with broad applications in biomedical research. PMID:18172332

  1. Echo-Planar Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Fraction of a Second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehling, Michael K.; Turner, Robert; Mansfield, Peter

    1991-10-01

    Progress has recently been made in implementing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that can be used to obtain images in a fraction of a second rather than in minutes. Echo-planar imaging (EPI) uses only one nuclear spin excitation per image and lends itself to a variety of critical medical and scientific applications. Among these are evaluation of cardiac function in real time, mapping of water diffusion and temperature in tissue, mapping of organ blood pool and perfusion, functional imaging of the central nervous system, depiction of blood and cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics, and movie imaging of the mobile fetus in utero. Through shortened patient examination times, higher patient throughput, and lower cost per MRI examination, EPI may become a powerful tool for early diagnosis of some common and potentially treatable diseases such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pericardium: normal and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Higgins, C.B.; Lanzer, P.; Lipton, M.J.; Schiller, N.; Crooks, L.E.; Botvinick, E.B.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-02-01

    Twenty normal subjects and ten patients with pericardial abnormalities underwent ECG-gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thorax using a 0.35-tesla superconducting system. The patients with pericardial abnormalities were also evaluated with serial chest radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, and/or angiography. ECG gating was necessary to identify the normal pericardium, which was visualized as a 1- to 2-mm-wide curvilinear structure of low signal intensity. Pericardial thickening in constrictive pericarditis was clearly delineated on gated MR images. Pericardial inflammation caused a marked increase in signal intensity as well as thickening of the pericardium. Pericardial effusions and pericardial adhesions were also demonstrated. A simple pericardial cyst and a complex pericardial mass were identified and differentiated from pericardial fat and diaphragmatic eventration. MR appears to be an important modality for the evaluation of pericardial disease.

  3. Single Acquisition Quantitative Single Point Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyungseok; Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Saito, Keita; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C; McMillan, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has emerged as a promising non-invasive technology to dynamically image tissue oxygenation. Due to its extremely short spin-spin relaxation times, EPRI benefits from a single-point imaging (SPI) scheme where the entire FID signal is captured using pure phase encoding. However, direct T2*/pO2 quantification is inhibited due to constant magnitude gradients which result in time-decreasing FOV. Therefore, conventional acquisition techniques require repeated imaging experiments with differing gradient amplitudes (typically 3), which results in long acquisition time. Methods In this study, gridding was evaluated as a method to reconstruct images with equal FOV to enable direct T2*/pO2 quantification within a single imaging experiment. Additionally, an enhanced reconstruction technique that shares high spatial k-space regions throughout different phase encoding time delays was investigated (k-space extrapolation). Results The combined application of gridding and k-space extrapolation enables pixelwise quantification of T2* from a single acquisition with improved image quality across a wide range of phase encoding delay times. The calculated T2*/pO2 does not vary across this time range. Conclusion By utilizing gridding and k-space extrapolation, accurate T2*/pO2 quantification can be achieved within a single dataset to allow enhanced temporal resolution (by a factor of 3). PMID:23913515

  4. In utero eyeball development study by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Brémond-Gignac, D S; Benali, K; Deplus, S; Cussenot, O; Ferkdadji, L; Elmaleh, M; Lassau, J P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure fetal ocular development and to determine a growth curve by means of measurements in utero. Fetal ocular development was recorded by analysis of the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomic study allowed definition of the best contrasted MRI sequences for calculation of the ocular surface. Biometric analysis of the values of the ocular surface in the neuro-ocular plane in 35 fetuses allowed establishment of a linear model of ocular growth curve in utero. Evaluation of ocular development may allow the detection and confirmation of malformational ocular anomalies such as microphthalmia.

  5. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of total body fat.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Saeed, N; Hajnal, J V; Brynes, A; Goldstone, A P; Frost, G; Bell, J D

    1998-11-01

    In this study we assessed different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning regimes and examined some of the assumptions commonly made for measuring body fat content by MRI. Whole body MRI was used to quantify and study different body fat depots in 67 women. The whole body MRI results showed that there was a significant variation in the percentage of total internal, as well as visceral, adipose tissue across a range of adiposity, which could not be predicted from total body fat and/or subcutaneous fat. Furthermore, variation in the amount of total, subcutaneous, and visceral adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements such as skinfold measurements, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio. Finally, we show for the first time subjects with a percent body fat close to the theoretical maximum (68%). This study demonstrates that the large variation in individual internal fat content cannot be predicted from either indirect methods or direct imaging techniques, such as MRI or computed tomography, on the basis of a single-slice sampling strategy. PMID:9804581

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of total body fat.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Saeed, N; Hajnal, J V; Brynes, A; Goldstone, A P; Frost, G; Bell, J D

    1998-11-01

    In this study we assessed different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning regimes and examined some of the assumptions commonly made for measuring body fat content by MRI. Whole body MRI was used to quantify and study different body fat depots in 67 women. The whole body MRI results showed that there was a significant variation in the percentage of total internal, as well as visceral, adipose tissue across a range of adiposity, which could not be predicted from total body fat and/or subcutaneous fat. Furthermore, variation in the amount of total, subcutaneous, and visceral adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements such as skinfold measurements, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio. Finally, we show for the first time subjects with a percent body fat close to the theoretical maximum (68%). This study demonstrates that the large variation in individual internal fat content cannot be predicted from either indirect methods or direct imaging techniques, such as MRI or computed tomography, on the basis of a single-slice sampling strategy.

  8. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  9. Imaging of Surfaces by Concurrent Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Yager, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon induced fluorescent are sensitive tools for surface analysis. However, existing instruments in this area have provided limited capability for concurrent detection, and may be large and expensive. We demonstrate a highly cost-effective system capable of concurrent surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF) imaging, allowing for simultaneous monitoring of reflectivity and fluorescence from discrete spatial regions. The instrument allows for high performance imaging and quantitative measurements with surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon induced fluorescence, with inexpensive off-the-shelf components. PMID:20360841

  10. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect

    Testylier, Guy . E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  11. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging investigation of resonance tuning in soprano singing

    PubMed Central

    Bresch, Erik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates using real-time magnetic resonance imaging the vocal tract shaping of 5 soprano singers during the production of two-octave scales of sung vowels. A systematic shift of the first vocal tract resonance frequency with respect to the fundamental is shown to exist for high vowels across all subjects. No consistent systematic effect on the vocal tract resonance could be shown across all of the subjects for other vowels or for the second vocal tract resonance. PMID:21110548

  12. Effectiveness of Adalimumab in Non-radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis: Evaluation of Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Outcomes in a Monocentric Cohort.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Fabbroni, Marta; Talarico, Rosaria; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Cuneo, Gian Luca; Frediani, Bruno; Faralli, Gabriele; Vitale, Antonio; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Sabadini, Luciano; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of adalimumab (ADA) in a cohort of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA), and the secondary aims were to identify predictive factors of response and evaluate radiological progression.We evaluated 37 patients (male/female: 12/25; mean age 49 ± 14; mean disease duration: 6.3 ± 5.8) with active nr-axSpA (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria), despite the treatment with ≥1 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for at least 3 months, initiating the treatment with ADA 40 mg every other week. Patients were treated for 24 months, and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Outcome measures included Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. Radiograph of the spine and sacroiliac joints and magnetic resonance of the sacroiliac joints were performed at baseline and according to the standard of assessment for the disease.The proportion of patients that achieved a BASDAI50 response at 6, 12 and 24 months was 51.3%, 70.3%, and 76.8%, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected adverse events and/or serious adverse events. All patients remained on treatment for 2 years, with a good compliance. We did not identify any predictive factor of response to therapy. Moreover, modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score and Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada scores showed a trend of improvement during the study period.ADA was effective on clinical and radiological outcomes at 2-year follow-up; thus, early treatment with ADA may prevent radiographic damage and be associated with low disease activity or remission. Moreover, data from this cohort study have confirmed safety and tolerability profile of ADA in nr-axSpA in the long term.

  13. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Viviani, Roberto; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Stingl, Julia C

    2014-01-01

    Because of the large variation in the response to psychoactive medication, many studies have attempted to uncover genetic factors that determine response. While considerable knowledge exists on the large effects of genetic polymorphisms on pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of drugs, effects of the concentration at the target site and pharmacodynamic effects on brain functions in disease are much less known. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize response to medication in brain behaviour circuits in vivo in humans and assess the influence of pharmacogenetic factors. Two types of studies have been used to characterize effects of medication and genetic variation. In task-related activation studies the focus is on changes in the activity of a neural circuit associated with a specific psychological process. The second type of study investigates resting state perfusion. These studies provide an assessment of vascular changes associated with bioavailability of drugs in the brain, but may also assess changes in neural activity after binding of centrally active agents. Task-related pharmacogenetic studies of cognitive function have characterized the effects in the prefrontal cortex of genetic polymorphisms of dopamine receptors (DRD2), metabolic enzymes (COMT) and in the post-synaptic signalling cascade under the administration of dopamine agonists and antagonists. In contrast, pharmacogenetic imaging with resting state perfusion is still in its infancy. However, the quantitative nature of perfusion imaging, its non-invasive character and its repeatability might be crucial assets in visualizing the effects of medication in vivo in man during therapy. PMID:23802603

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Narak, Jill; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies may interfere with interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies. Additionally, migration of metallic objects may pose a risk to patients undergoing MR imaging. Our purpose was to investigate prevalence, underlying cause, and diagnostic implications of susceptibility artifacts in small animal MR imaging and report associated adverse effects. MR imaging studies performed in dogs and cats between April 2008 and March 2010 were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of susceptibility artifacts associated with metallic foreign bodies. Studies were performed using a 1.0 T scanner. Severity of artifacts was graded as 0 (no interference with area of interest), 1 (extension of artifact to area of interest without impairment of diagnostic quality), 2 (impairment of diagnostic quality but diagnosis still possible), or 3 (severe involvement of area of interest resulting in nondiagnostic study). Medical records were evaluated retrospectively to identify adverse effects. Susceptibility artifacts were present in 99/754 (13.1%) of MR imaging studies and were most common in examinations of the brachial plexus, thorax, and cervical spine. Artifacts were caused by identification microchips, ballistic fragments, skin staples/suture material, hemoclips, an ameroid constrictor, and surgical hardware. Three studies were nondiagnostic due to the susceptibility artifact. Adverse effects were not documented.

  16. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  17. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27446601

  18. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  19. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  20. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  1. Focal liver lesions: Practical magnetic resonance imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P; Velloni, Fernanda; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Rajapaksha, Aruna; Semelka, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread of cross-sectional imaging, a growth of incidentally detected focal liver lesions (FLL) has been observed. A reliable detection and characterization of FLL is critical for optimal patient management. Maximizing accuracy of imaging in the context of FLL is paramount in avoiding unnecessary biopsies, which may result in post-procedural complications. A tremendous development of new imaging techniques has taken place during these last years. Nowadays, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in management of liver lesions, using a radiation-free technique and a safe contrast agent profile. MRI plays a key role in the non-invasive correct characterization of FLL. MRI is capable of providing comprehensive and highly accurate diagnostic information, with the additional advantage of lack of harmful ionizing radiation. These properties make MRI the mainstay for the noninvasive evaluation of focal liver lesions. In this paper we review the state-of-the-art MRI liver protocol, briefly discussing different sequence types, the unique characteristics of imaging non-cooperative patients and discuss the role of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents. A review of the imaging features of the most common benign and malignant FLL is presented, supplemented by a schematic representation of a simplistic practical approach on MRI. PMID:26261689

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  3. CRT image recording evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Performance capabilities and limitations of a fiber optic coupled line scan CRT image recording system were investigated. The test program evaluated the following components: (1). P31 phosphor CRT with EMA faceplate; (2). P31 phosphor CRT with clear clad faceplate; (3). Type 7743 semi-gloss dry process positive print paper; (4). Type 777 flat finish dry process positive print paper; (5). Type 7842 dry process positive film; and (6). Type 1971 semi-gloss wet process positive print paper. Detailed test procedures used in each test are provided along with a description of each test, the test data, and an analysis of the results.

  4. SPRITE: a modern approach to scanning probe contact resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, A. B.; Killgore, J. P.; Hurley, D. C.

    2014-02-01

    We describe a system for contact resonance tracking called scanning probe resonance image tracking electronics (SPRITE). SPRITE can image two contact resonance frequencies simultaneously and thus can be used to acquire quantitative mechanical properties without requiring tedious image registration or other forms of post-processing. SPRITE is up to ten times faster than its predecessor, and its use of digital frequency synthesis makes the frequency 100 times more precise. In addition, SPRITE can acquire quality factor images, which can be used to determine viscoelastic material properties. The resonant frequency of two eigenmodes and two corresponding quality factor images can be acquired simultaneously. These new features can enable accurate nanomechanical imaging of surfaces and devices.

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi-Mucelli, R S

    1992-02-01

    The evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is based upon ultrasonography (US) which has proved to have a high sensitivity and is also extremely useful in guiding the percutaneous needle biopsy. The main role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to supplement US in evaluating the extent of HCC. The Authors discuss the different techniques of examinations of the liver both for CT and MRI as far as the modalities of contrast enhancement, site of injection, and type of contrast agents are concerned. The differences between low field and high field magnets are also discussed. The main CT and MRI findings are illustrated, depending upon the technique of examination. Finally the role of these techniques is discussed. Based upon personal experience and the data in CT literature, and if performed with updated technology and intraarterial injection (lipiodol), CT is the method of choice in order to supplement US in the evaluation of HCC.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in malignant external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gherini, S.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Bradley, W.G.

    1986-05-01

    In malignant external otitis (MEO), determining the anatomic extent of disease and evaluating the physiologic response to therapy remain a problem. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently become available in limited clinical settings. Four patients with MEO were evaluated using MRI, computerized tomography (CT), technetium-99 (Tc-99) bone scanning, and gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67 citrate) scanning. MRI is superior to CT, Tc-99 bone scanning, and Ga-67 citrate scanning in evaluating the anatomic extent of soft tissue changes in MEO. MRI alone cannot be relied upon to determine the physiologic response to therapy. MRI can, however, serve as a valuable guide to the interpretation of Tc-99 bone and Ga-67 citrate scans, and in this respect, MRI is extremely useful in the treatment of MEO.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Adhesive Capsulitis: Correlation with Clinical Staging

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarra, Gina A.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of adhesive capsulitis and correlate them with clinical stages of adhesive capsulitis. This will hopefully define a role for shoulder MR imaging in the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis as well as in potentially directing appropriate treatment. Forty-seven consecutive non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging examinations of 46 patients with a clinical diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with clinical staging. Specific MRI criteria correlated with the clinical stage of adhesive capsulitis, including the thickness and signal intensity of the joint capsule and synovium as well as the presence and severity of scarring in the rotator interval. Routine MRI of the shoulder without intraarticular administration of gadolinium can be used to diagnose all stages of adhesive capsulitis, including stage 1, where findings may be subtle on clinical examination. We believe that future studies assessing the role of MRI in guiding the initiation of appropriate treatment should be undertaken. PMID:18815860

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of oscillating electrical currents

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Teisseyre, Thomas Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become an important tool of researchers and clinicians who seek to understand patterns of neuronal activation that accompany sensory and cognitive processes. However, the interpretation of fMRI images rests on assumptions about the relationship between neuronal firing and hemodynamic response that are not firmly grounded in rigorous theory or experimental evidence. Further, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent effect, which correlates an MRI observable to neuronal firing, evolves over a period that is 2 orders of magnitude longer than the underlying processes that are thought to cause it. Here, we instead demonstrate experiments to directly image oscillating currents by MRI. The approach rests on a resonant interaction between an applied rf field and an oscillating magnetic field in the sample and, as such, permits quantitative, frequency-selective measurements of current density without spatial or temporal cancellation. We apply this method in a current loop phantom, mapping its magnetic field and achieving a detection sensitivity near the threshold required for the detection of neuronal currents. Because the contrast mechanism is under spectroscopic control, we are able to demonstrate how ramped and phase-modulated spin-lock radiation can enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the experiment. We further demonstrate the combination of these methods with remote detection, a technique in which the encoding and detection of an MRI experiment are separated by sample flow or translation. We illustrate that remotely detected MRI permits the measurement of currents in small volumes of flowing water with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PMID:20421504

  9. Quantitative evaluation of biliary elimination of gadoxetate, a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, via geometrical isomer-specific transporting system in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Junji; Yokota, Azusa; Araki, Takuya; Aomori, Tohru; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Koujirou; Koshiishi, Ichiro

    2014-09-01

    Gadoxetate, a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, is eliminated into bile. Gadoxetate geometrical isomers are chromatographically classified into two groups by differences between their ionic states (GIs-I and GIs-II; 65:35 w/w); however, the elimination mechanism of each isomer in vivo remains controversial. Thus, the contribution of carrier-mediated transport systems on the biliary elimination of gadoxetate was examined. Gadoxetate was injected intravenously into rats, and the time courses of the plasma concentrations and biliary elimination of GIs-I and GIs-II were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. The results showed that 34.7% of GIs-I (GIs-I(s); 22.6% of gadoxetate) was quickly eliminated into bile within 30 min after injection. The contents of the residual GIs-I (GIs-I(r)) and GIs-II in plasma similarly decreased according to a first-order elimination process (t1/2=23-27 min), and 64.0% of GIs-I(r) and GIs-II (49.6% of gadoxetate) was eliminated into the bile within 2 h after injection. There was no significant difference between the elimination half-lives of GIs-I(r) and GIs-II in rats. In conclusion, the geometrical isomer with specific conformation corresponding to 22.6% of gadoxetate was eliminated into bile in rats via a carrier-mediated transport system no later than 30 min after intravenous injection.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently considered a major keystone of the diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region. However, the relatively small size of the pituitary gland, its location deep at the skull base and the numerous physiological variants present in this area impede the precise assessment of the anatomical structures and, particularly, of the pituitary gland itself. The diagnosis of the often tiny lesions of this region--such as pituitary microadenomas--is then difficult if the MRI technology is not optimized and if potential artifacts and traps are not recognized. Advanced MRI technology can not only depict small lesions with greater reliability, but also help in the differential diagnosis of large tumors. In these, defining the presence or absence of invasion is a particularly important task. This review describes and illustrates the radiological diagnosis of the different tumors of the sellar region, from the common prolactinomas, nonfunctioning adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts, to the less frequent and more difficult to detect corticotroph pituitary adenomas in Cushing's disease, and other neoplastic and nonneoplastic entities. Finally, some hints are given to facilitate the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions. PMID:27003878

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  12. Imaging tumor hypoxia by magnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia results from the negative balance between the oxygen demands of the tissue and the capacity of the neovasculature to deliver sufficient oxygen. The resulting oxygen deficit has important consequences with regard to the aggressiveness and malignancy of tumors, as well as their resistance to therapy, endowing the imaging of hypoxia with vital repercussions in tumor prognosis and therapy design. The molecular and cellular events underlying hypoxia are mediated mainly through hypoxia-inducible factor, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects over a variety of cellular processes, including oncologic transformation, invasion and metastasis. However, few methodologies have been able to monitor noninvasively the oxygen tensions in vivo. MRI and MRS are often used for this purpose. Most MRI approaches are based on the effects of the local oxygen tension on: (i) the relaxation times of (19)F or (1)H indicators, such as perfluorocarbons or their (1)H analogs; (ii) the hemodynamics and magnetic susceptibility effects of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin; and (iii) the effects of paramagnetic oxygen on the relaxation times of tissue water. (19)F MRS approaches monitor tumor hypoxia through the selective accumulation of reduced nitroimidazole derivatives in hypoxic zones, whereas electron spin resonance methods determine the oxygen level through its influence on the linewidths of appropriate paramagnetic probes in vivo. Finally, Overhauser-enhanced MRI combines the sensitivity of EPR methodology with the resolution of MRI, providing a window into the future use of hyperpolarized oxygen probes.

  13. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated.

  14. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  15. Pulmonary functional magnetic resonance imaging for paediatric lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Miranda; Coxson, Harvey O; Parraga, Grace

    2013-09-01

    A better understanding of the anatomic structure and physiological function of the lung is fundamental to understanding the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease and how to design and deliver better treatments and measure response to intervention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the hyperpolarised noble gases helium-3 ((3)He) and xenon-129 ((129)Xe) provides both structural and functional pulmonary measurements, and because it does not require the use of x-rays or other ionising radiation, offers the potential for intensive serial and longitudinal studies in paediatric patients. These facts are particularly important in the evaluation of chronic lung diseases such as asthma and cystic fibrosis- both of which can be considered paediatric respiratory diseases with unmet therapy needs. This review discusses MRI-based imaging methods with a focus on hyperpolarised gas MRI. We also discuss the strengths and limitations as well as the future work required for clinical translation towards paediatric respiratory disease. PMID:23522599

  16. Middle cerebellar peduncles: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Tomsick, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), offering a systematic approach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities (e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases. PMID:26751508

  17. Cost effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging in the neurosciences.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A K; Fletcher, J; Fitz-Patrick, J D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To measure, in a service setting, the effect of magnetic resonance imaging on diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, and patient management in the neurosciences; to measure the cost per patient scanned; to estimate the marginal cost of imaging and compare this with its diagnostic impact; to measure changes in patients' quality of life; and to record the diagnostic pathway leading to magnetic resonance imaging. DESIGN--Controlled observational study using questionnaires on diagnosis and patient management before and after imaging. Detailed costing study. Quality of life questionnaires at the time of imaging and six months later. Diagnostic pathways extracted from medical records for a representative sample. SETTING--Regional superconducting 1.5 T magnetic resonance service. SUBJECTS--782 consecutive neuroscience patients referred by consultants for magnetic resonance imaging during June 1988-9; diagnostic pathways recorded for 158 cases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Costs of magnetic resonance imaging and preliminary investigations; changes in planned management and resulting savings; changes in principal diagnosis and diagnostic certainty; changes in patients' quality of life. RESULTS--Average cost of magnetic resonance imaging was estimated at 206.20/patient pounds (throughput 2250 patients/year, 1989-90 prices including contrast and upgrading). Before magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic procedures cost 164.40/patient pounds (including inpatient stays). Management changed after imaging in 208 (27%) cases; saving an estimated 80.90/patient pounds. Confidence in planned management increased in a further 226 (29%) referrals. Consultants' principal diagnosis changed in 159 of 782 (20%) referrals; marginal cost per diagnostic change was 626 pounds. Confidence in diagnosis increased in 236 (30%) referrals. No improvement in patients' quality of life at six month assessment. CONCLUSIONS--Any improvement in diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging is achieved at a

  18. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  19. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  20. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  1. In vitro evaluation of the L-peptide modified magnetic lipid nanoparticles as targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for the nasopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chu; Min, Chia-Na; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Chin-Tarng; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the encapsulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) by the lipid nanoparticle conjugated with the 12-mer peptides (RLLDTNRPLLPY, L-peptide), and the delivery of this complex into living cells. The lipid nanoparticles employed in this work were highly hydrophilic, stable, and contained poly(ethylene-glycol) for conjugation to the bioactive L-peptide. The particle sizes of two different magnetic lipid nanoparticles, L-peptide modified (LML) and non-L-peptide modified (ML), were both around 170 nm with a narrow range of size disparity. The transversal relaxivity, r2, for both LML and ML nanoparticles were found to be significantly higher than the longitudinal relaxivity r1 (r2/r1 > 20). The in vitro tumor cell targeting efficacy of the LML nanoparticles were evaluated and compared to the ML nanoparticles, upon observing cellular uptake of magnetic lipid nanoparticles by the nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, which express cell surface specific protein for the L-peptide binding revealed. In the Prussian blue staining experiment, cells incubated with LML nanoparticles indicated much higher intracellular iron density than cells incubated with only the ML and SPION nanoparticles. In addition, the MTT assay showed the negligible cell cytotoxicity for LML, ML and SPION nanoparticles. The MR imaging studies demonstrate the better T2-weighted images for the LML-nanoparticle-loaded nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells than the ML- and SPION-loaded cells.

  2. Automated Brain Extraction from T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop and implement an automated and robust technique to extract brain from T2-weighted images. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 75 adult volunteers to acquire dual fast spin echo (FSE) images with fat-saturation technique on a 3T Philips scanner. Histogram-derived thresholds were derived directly from the original images followed by the application of regional labeling, regional connectivity, and mathematical morphological operations to extract brain from axial late-echo FSE (T2-weighted) images. The proposed technique was evaluated subjectively by an expert and quantitatively using Bland-Altman plot and Jaccard and Dice similarity measures. Results Excellent agreement between the extracted brain volumes with the proposed technique and manual stripping by an expert was observed based on Bland-Altman plot and also as assessed by high similarity indices (Jaccard: 0.9825± 0.0045; Dice: 0.9912 ±0.0023). Conclusion Brain extraction using proposed automated methodology is robust and the results are reproducible. PMID:21448946

  3. Evaluating Mesorectal Lymph Nodes in Rectal Cancer Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Using Thin-Section T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dow-Mu Chau, Ian; Tait, Diana; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Brown, Gina

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To apply thin-section T2-weighted magnetic resoance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the number, size, distribution, and morphology of benign and malignant mesorectal lymph nodes before and after chemoradiation treatment compared with histopathologic findings. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with poor-risk adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were evaluated prospectively. Thin-section T2-weighted MR images obtained before and after chemoradiation treatment were independently reviewed in consensus by 2 expert radiologists to determine the tumor stage, nodal size, nodal distribution, and nodal stage. Total mesorectal excision surgery after chemoradiation allowed MR nodal stage to be compared with histopathology using {kappa} statistics. Nodal downstaging was compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Before chemoradiation, 152 mesorectal nodes were visible (mean, 6.2 mm; 100 benign, 52 malignant) and 4 of 52 malignant nodes were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. The nodal staging was 7/25 N0, 10/25 N1, and 7/25 N2. After chemoradiation, only 29 nodes (mean, 4.1 mm; 24 benign, 5 malignant) were visible, and none were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. Nodal downstaging was observed: 20/25 N0 and 5/25 N1 (p < 0.01, Chi-square test). There was good agreement between MRI and pathologic T-staging ({kappa} = 0.64) and N-staging ({kappa} = 0.65) after chemoradiation. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment resulted in a decrease in size and number of malignant- and benign-appearing mesorectal nodes on MRI. Nodal downstaging and nodal regression from the mesorectal fascia were observed after treatment. MRI is a useful tool for assessing nodal response to neoadjuvant treatment.

  4. From Roentgen to magnetic resonance imaging: the history of medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Scatliff, James H; Morris, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging has advanced in remarkable ways since the discovery of x-rays 120 years ago. Today's radiologists can image the human body in intricate detail using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, ultrasound, and various other modalities. Such technology allows for improved screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease, but it also comes with risks. Many imaging modalities expose patients to ionizing radiation, which potentially increases their risk of developing cancer in the future, and imaging may also be associated with possible allergic reactions or risks related to the use of intravenous contrast agents. In addition, the financial costs of imaging are taxing our health care system, and incidental findings can trigger anxiety and further testing. This issue of the NCMJ addresses the pros and cons of medical imaging and discusses in detail the following uses of medical imaging: screening for breast cancer with mammography, screening for osteoporosis and monitoring of bone mineral density with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, screening for congenital hip dysplasia in infants with ultrasound, and evaluation of various heart conditions with cardiac imaging. Together, these articles show the challenges that must be met as we seek to harness the power of today's imaging technologies, as well as the potential benefits that can be achieved when these hurdles are overcome. PMID:24663131

  5. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: assessment of skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Moynagh, Michael R; Colleran, Gabrielle C; Tavernaraki, Katarina; Eustace, Stephen J; Kavanagh, Eoin C

    2010-03-01

    The concept of a rapid whole-body imaging technique with high resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation for the assessment of osseous metastatic disease is a desirable tool. This review article outlines the current perspective of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of skeletal metastatic disease, with comparisons made to alternative whole-body imaging modalities.

  6. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in the preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinet, C; Buy, J N; Ghossain, M A; Sézeur, A; Mallet, A; Bigot, J M; Vadrot, D; Ecoiffier, J

    1990-03-01

    Nineteen patients with middle and lower rectal carcinomas were operated on, with abdominoperineal resection in 10 patients, lower anterior resection with coloanal anastomosis in 6 patients, and colorectal anastomosis in 3 patients. The distance of the lower margin of the tumor to insertion of the levator ani on the rectal wall was correctly evaluated by computed tomography in 12 (63%) of 19 patients and by magnetic resonance imaging in 13 (68%) of 19 patients, while digital examination correctly assessed the distance in 15 (79%) of 19 patients. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were unable to assess extension through the rectal wall. No significant difference was observed between computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in assessing extension to the perivesical fat, adjacent organs, pelvic side wall, or lymph nodes. According to the TNM classification, magnetic resonance imaging correctly staged 74% (14/19) of carcinomas, while computed tomography correctly staged 68% (13/19).

  7. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer.

  8. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer. PMID:26586163

  9. Ultrasonic Evaluation and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Larche, Michael R.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic evaluation of materials for material characterization and flaw detection is as simple as manually moving a single-element probe across a speci-men and looking at an oscilloscope display in real time or as complex as automatically (under computer control) scanning a phased-array probe across a specimen and collecting encoded data for immediate or off-line data analyses. The reliability of the results in the second technique is greatly increased because of a higher density of measurements per scanned area and measurements that can be more precisely related to the specimen geometry. This chapter will briefly discuss applications of the collection of spatially encoded data and focus primarily on the off-line analyses in the form of data imaging. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with as-sessing and advancing the reliability of inservice inspections of nuclear power plant components for over 35 years. Modern ultrasonic imaging techniques such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), phased-array (PA) technolo-gy and sound field mapping have undergone considerable improvements to effec-tively assess and better understand material constraints.

  10. The Evaluation and Observation of "Hidden" Hypertrophy of Cervical Ligamentum Flavum, Cervical Canal, and Related Factors Using Kinetic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Cheng; Xiong, Jian; Wang, Jeffrey C; Inoue, Hirokazu; Tan, Yanlin; Tian, Haijun; Aghdasi, Bayan

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective The objective was to measure the change of flavum ligament diameter during positional changes of the cervical spine using kinetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to examine the correlational diameter changes of the flavum ligament, disk bulging, and the spinal canal from extension to flexion positions. Methods One hundred eight-nine patients underwent kinetic MRI in neutral, extension, and flexion positions. The diameters of cervical ligamentum flavum, disk bulging, and cervical spinal canal and the disk degeneration grade and Cobb angles were measured from C2-C3 to C7-T1. Results In all, 1,134 cervical spinal segments from 189 patients were included. There was a 0.26 ± 0.85-mm average increase in the diameter of the ligamentum flavum from flexion to extension, and 62.70% of the segments had increased ligamentum flavum diameter from flexion to extension. For all segments of the 189 patients, the cervical spinal canal diameters had an average decrease at the disk level of 0.56 ± 1.21 mm from flexion to extension. For all segments with cervical spinal canal narrowing ≥1 mm from flexion to extension view, the ligamentum flavum diameters at C3-C4 to C5-C6 had significant increases compared with patients with spinal canal narrowing < 1 mm (p < 0.05). For patients with ligamentum flavum hypertrophy of ≥1 mm from the flexion to extension view, the cervical spinal canal diameters at C2-C3, C4-C5, and C5-C6 had significant decreases compared with patients with ligamentum flavum hypertrophy of <1 mm (p < 0.05). Conclusion The "hidden" hypertrophy of ligamentum flavum was significant at C4-C5 and C5-C6 and significantly contributes to the stenosis of cervical spinal canal in the extension position. PMID:26933617

  11. Volumetric evaluation of the relations among the cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem in young subjects: a combination of stereology and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Nihat; Acer, Niyazi; Akkaya, Akcan; Sankur, Seref; Kabadayi, Taner; Sahin, Bünyamin

    2008-08-01

    The Cavalieri estimator using a point grid is used to estimate the volume of three-dimensional structures based on two-dimensional slices of the object. The size of the components of intracranial neural structures should have proportional relations among them. The volume fraction approach of stereological methods provides information about volumetric relations of the components of structures. The purpose of our study is to estimate the volume and volume fraction data related to the cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. In this study, volume of the total brain, cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem were estimated in 24 young Turkish volunteers (12 males and 12 females) who are free of any neurological symptoms and signs. The volume and volume fraction of the total brain, cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images using the point-counting approach of stereological methods. The mean (+/-SD) total brain, cerebrum and cerebellum volumes were 1,202.05 +/- 103.51, 1,143.65 +/- 106.25 cm3 in males and females, 1,060.0 +/- 94.6, 1,008.9 +/- 104.3 cm3 in males and females, 117.75 +/- 10.7, 111.83 +/- 8.0 cm3 in males and females, respectively. The mean brain stem volumes were 24.3 +/- 2.89, 22.9 +/- 4.49 cm3 in males and females, respectively. Our results revealed that female subjects have less cerebral, cerebellar and brain stem volumes compared to males, although there was no statistically significant difference between genders (P > 0.05). The volume ratio of the cerebrum to total brain volume (TBV), cerebellum to TBV and brain stem to TBV were 88.16 and 88.13% in males and females, 9.8 and 9.8% in males and females, 2.03 and 2.03% in males and females, respectively. The volume ratio of the cerebellum to cerebrum, brain stem to cerebrum and brain stem to cerebellum were 11.12 and 11.16% in males and females, 2.30 and 2.31% in males and females, 20.7 and 20.6% in males and females, respectively. The difference between the genders was

  12. Variations of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of breast cancer therapy response: a multicenter data analysis challenge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Li, Xin; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Xia; Chang, Ming-Ching; Oborski, Matthew J; Malyarenko, Dariya I; Muzi, Mark; Jajamovich, Guido H; Fedorov, Andriy; Tudorica, Alina; Gupta, Sandeep N; Laymon, Charles M; Marro, Kenneth I; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Miller, James V; Barbodiak, Daniel P; Chenevert, Thomas L; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mountz, James M; Kinahan, Paul E; Kikinis, Ron; Taouli, Bachir; Fennessy, Fiona; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) time-course data allows estimation of quantitative parameters such as K (trans) (rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast agent transfer), v e (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), and v p (plasma volume fraction). A plethora of factors in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis can affect accuracy and precision of these parameters and, consequently, the utility of quantitative DCE-MRI for assessing therapy response. In this multicenter data analysis challenge, DCE-MRI data acquired at one center from 10 patients with breast cancer before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were shared and processed with 12 software tools based on the Tofts model (TM), extended TM, and Shutter-Speed model. Inputs of tumor region of interest definition, pre-contrast T1, and arterial input function were controlled to focus on the variations in parameter value and response prediction capability caused by differences in models and associated algorithms. Considerable parameter variations were observed with the within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV) values for K (trans) and v p being as high as 0.59 and 0.82, respectively. Parameter agreement improved when only algorithms based on the same model were compared, e.g., the K (trans) intraclass correlation coefficient increased to as high as 0.84. Agreement in parameter percentage change was much better than that in absolute parameter value, e.g., the pairwise concordance correlation coefficient improved from 0.047 (for K (trans)) to 0.92 (for K (trans) percentage change) in comparing two TM algorithms. Nearly all algorithms provided good to excellent (univariate logistic regression c-statistic value ranging from 0.8 to 1.0) early prediction of therapy response using the metrics of mean tumor K (trans) and k ep (=K (trans)/v e, intravasation rate constant) after the first therapy cycle and the corresponding

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G

    2016-04-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome found in the elderly, which is characterized by ventriculomegaly and deep white matter ischemia (DWMI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical triad of gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. NPH has been estimated to account for up to 10% of cases of dementia and is significant because it is treatable by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Patients with a known cause of chronic communicating hydrocephalus, that is, meningitis or hemorrhage, tend to respond better than patients with the so-called "idiopathic" form, most likely because of poor selection criteria in the past. Good response to shunting has been associated with hyperdynamic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct. In the early days of MRI, patients with a large CSF flow void extending from the foramen of Monro through the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle had an excellent chance of responding to ventriculoperitoneal shunting (P < 0.003). Today, we use phase-contrast MRI to measure the volume of CSF flowing through the aqueduct in either direction over a cardiac cycle. When this aqueductal CSF stroke volume is sufficiently elevated, there is an excellent chance of shunt responsiveness (100% positive predictive value in 1 study). Idiopathic NPH appears to be a "two-hit" disease-benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) in infancy followed by DWMI in late adulthood. As BEH occurs when the sutures are still open, these infants present with large heads, a finding also noted in patients with NPH. Although BEH has been attributed to immature arachnoidal granulations with decreased CSF resorptive capacity, this now appears to be permanent and may lead to a parallel pathway for CSF resorption via the extracellular space of the brain. With DWMI, the myelin lipid is lost, exposing the polar water molecules to myelin protein, increasing resistance to CSF outflow and leading to backing up of CSF and hydrocephalus.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G

    2016-04-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome found in the elderly, which is characterized by ventriculomegaly and deep white matter ischemia (DWMI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical triad of gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. NPH has been estimated to account for up to 10% of cases of dementia and is significant because it is treatable by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Patients with a known cause of chronic communicating hydrocephalus, that is, meningitis or hemorrhage, tend to respond better than patients with the so-called "idiopathic" form, most likely because of poor selection criteria in the past. Good response to shunting has been associated with hyperdynamic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct. In the early days of MRI, patients with a large CSF flow void extending from the foramen of Monro through the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle had an excellent chance of responding to ventriculoperitoneal shunting (P < 0.003). Today, we use phase-contrast MRI to measure the volume of CSF flowing through the aqueduct in either direction over a cardiac cycle. When this aqueductal CSF stroke volume is sufficiently elevated, there is an excellent chance of shunt responsiveness (100% positive predictive value in 1 study). Idiopathic NPH appears to be a "two-hit" disease-benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) in infancy followed by DWMI in late adulthood. As BEH occurs when the sutures are still open, these infants present with large heads, a finding also noted in patients with NPH. Although BEH has been attributed to immature arachnoidal granulations with decreased CSF resorptive capacity, this now appears to be permanent and may lead to a parallel pathway for CSF resorption via the extracellular space of the brain. With DWMI, the myelin lipid is lost, exposing the polar water molecules to myelin protein, increasing resistance to CSF outflow and leading to backing up of CSF and hydrocephalus. PMID:27063662

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, A.G.; Bowtell, R.W.; Köckenberger, W.; Wenseleers, T.; Ratnieks, F.L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables in vivo imaging of organisms. The recent development of the magnetic resonance microscope (MRM) has enabled organisms within the size range of many insects to be imaged. Here, we introduce the principles of MRI and MRM and review their use in entomology. We show that MRM has been successfully applied in studies of parasitology, development, metabolism, biomagnetism and morphology, and the advantages and disadvantages relative to other imaging techniques are discussed. In addition, we illustrate the images that can be obtained using MRM. We conclude that although MRM has significant potential, further improvements to the technique are still desirable if it is to become a mainstream imaging technology in entomology. Abbreviation: CSI chemical shift imaging. The dependence of the resonance frequency of a nucleus on the chemical binding of the atom or molecule in which it is contained. (N)MRI (nuclear) magnetic resonance imaging MRM magnetic resonance microscopy Voxel A contraction for volume element, which is the basic unit of MR reconstruction; represented as a pixel in the display of the MR image. PMID:15841222

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious meningitis and ventriculitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Hazany, Saman; Go, John L; Law, Meng

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of meningitis are usually nonspecific with respect to the causative pathogen because the brain response to these insults is similar in most cases. In this article, we will use a few representative cases to describe the characteristic magnetic resonance findings of meningitis and its complications, including ventriculitis. PMID:25296276

  17. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  18. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Sialography Findings of Submandibular Ducts Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karaca Erdoğan, Nezahat; Altay, Canan; Özenler, Nesibe; Bozkurt, Tuğba; Uluç, Engin; Dirim Mete, Berna; Özdemir, İsmail

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to assess the problem solving capability of magnetic resonance sialography (MR sialography), a noninvasive method for imaging submandibular gland ducts and determining duct-related pathologies, by comparing diseased and healthy cases. Materials and Methods. We conducted radiological assessment on a total of 60 submandibular glands (mean age 44.7) in 20 cases and 10 volunteers. MR sialography examinations were conducted with single-shot fast spin-echo sequence by using a surface coil placed on the submandibular gland. Each gland was evaluated in terms of the length, width and stricture of the main duct, as well as the difference between the intraparenchymal duct width, and the main duct width. Statistical analysis was performed. Results. In the MR sialography the primary duct mean length was determined as 51 mm (40–57 mm) in all submandibular glands. On the MR sialography imaging, the visualization ratio of the ductal system of submandibular gland was evaluated in the cases and volunteers. Conclusion. MR sialography is an effective and a noninvasive method in imaging submandibular gland ducts, demonstrating the presence, location and degree of stricture/dilatation, and elucidating the disease etiology. PMID:23984362

  20. Resonant waveguide grating imager for live cell sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2010-11-01

    We report on a resonant waveguide grating imager for high throughput screening using live cells. This imager can generate a snapshot image of all biosensors in a 384-well microtiter plate with a time resolution of ˜3 s and a spatial resolution of 80 μm. This imager is well tolerant to variability in plate configurations and cell confluency. The resonant wavelength and its shifts induced by cell responses at each pixel correlate well with cell confluency. Data filtration protocol can be used to improve assay quality for partially confluent cells.

  1. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate, Including Pre- and Postinterventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pritesh; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-09-01

    This article systematically reviews the rationale for magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer, in detection and following various treatment methods. A basic discussion of the identification of prostate cancer is imperative to understand postintervention imaging. Each available therapy, including surgery, radiation, hormone therapy, and focal therapies will be discussed along with associated imaging findings, providing the reader with a better understanding of current interventions in prostate cancer and imaging. PMID:27582606

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging in pediatric body magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B; Caro-Dominguez, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI is being increasingly used in pediatric body imaging. Its role is still emerging. It is used for detection of tumors and abscesses, differentiation of benign and malignant tumors, and detection of inflamed bowel segments in inflammatory bowel disease in children. It holds great promise in the assessment of therapy response in body tumors, with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value as a potential biomarker. Significant overlap of ADC values of benign and malignant processes and less reproducibility of ADC measurements are hampering its widespread use in clinical practice. With standardization of the technique, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is likely to be used more frequently in clinical practice. We discuss the principles and technique of DWI, selection of b value, qualitative and quantitative assessment, and current status of DWI in evaluation of disease processes in the pediatric body. PMID:27229502

  4. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  5. Intervertebral disc magnetic resonance image: correlation with gross morphology and biochemical composition

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Paul B

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic resonance image, gross morphology, and biochemical composition of the intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP), anulus fibrosus (AF) and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) from two groups of three human lumbar spines were compared. Group I consisted of all healthy discs from young donors (Grade I) and group II was comprised of discs that had undergone degeneration and age-related changes (average Grade 4). The gross morphological changes in the individual disc tissues associated with ageing/degeneration were consistent with specific changes in the characteristics of the magnetic resonance image. In particular, the mid-nuclear band of decreased magnetic resonance signal intensity seen in Grade 4 discs was associated with the appearance of clefts and fissures as well as a region of mucinous infiltration. The results of the biochemical analysis suggest that the changes in signal intensity are not due merely to changes in water content, but are also associated with changes in proteoglycan content. The changes associated with ageing/degeneration in the magnetic resonance image of the disc were related to a decrease in the proteoglycan content of the AF and NP. The water content of the NP also decreased. There was no clear association between the biochemical composition of the CEP and the magnetic resonance image. These results demonstrate that magnetic resonance imaging is an effective technique for evaluating subtle morphological changes in the intervertebral disc tissues and may be a sensitive indicator of the proteoglycan content of the AF and NP. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  6. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image enhancement for automatic disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To sufficiently improve magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) quality to enable reliable computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). METHODS: A set of image enhancement strategies that included filters (i.e. Gaussian, median, Wiener and Perona-Malik), wavelets (i.e. contourlet, ridgelet and a non-orthogonal noise compensation implementation), graph-cut approaches using lazy-snapping and Phase Unwrapping MAxflow, and binary thresholding using a fixed threshold and dynamic thresholding via histogram analysis were implemented to overcome the adverse characteristics of MRCP images such as acquisition noise, artifacts, partial volume effect and large inter- and intra-patient image intensity variations, all of which pose problems in application development. Subjective evaluation of several popular pre-processing techniques was undertaken to improve the quality of the 2D MRCP images and enhance the detection of the significant biliary structures within them, with the purpose of biliary disease detection. RESULTS: The results varied as expected since each algorithm capitalized on different characteristics of the images. For denoising, the Perona-Malik and contourlet approaches were found to be the most suitable. In terms of extraction of the significant biliary structures and removal of background, the thresholding approaches performed well. The interactive scheme performed the best, especially by using the strengths of the graph-cut algorithm enhanced by user-friendly lazy-snapping for foreground and background marker selection. CONCLUSION: Tests show promising results for some techniques, but not others, as viable image enhancement modules for automatic CAD systems for biliary and liver diseases. PMID:21160667

  7. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. Materials and Methods In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45–60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. Results The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R2 of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Conclusion Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer. PMID:27104169

  8. Four cases of Japanese patients with psoriatic arthritis in whom effective treatments by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging together with improvement of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Yonenaga, Takenori; Saeki, Hidehisa; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Fukuchi, Osamu; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Mitsuha; Ito, Toshihiro; Yanaba, Koichi; Tojyo, Shinjiro; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    Because psoriatic skin lesions of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) usually precede the onset of joint symptom, dermatologists are in an ideal position to screen and find individuals with PsA early in the disease course. There have been no reports from the dermatology field evaluating the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α drugs on joint disorders using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PsA patients. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effectiveness of MRI in the evaluation of anti-TNF-α drugs on joint disease of Japanese PsA patients. Data were collected from four adult Japanese male PsA patients. MRI of the affected hand was performed at baseline and 1-7 months after infliximab or adalimumab treatment. T1 -weighted gadolinium-enhanced images with fat suppression were acquired in the coronal, sagittal and/or axial planes. We determined the apparent improvement of synovitis, periarticular inflammation, tenosynovitis and/or bone marrow edema by MRI after anti-TNF-α treatments in all the patients together with the improvement of skin lesions. We also determined in one patient that these symptoms detected by MRI before treatment were alleviated within 1 month and had disappeared 6 months after treatment, suggesting the potentially early detection of the effect of anti-TNF-α drugs on joint disease. We present four cases of Japanese patients with PsA in whom effective treatments by anti-TNF-α drugs were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MRI. This imaging enables dermatologists and radiologists to assess and monitor early inflammatory changes, and to grant PsA patients earlier access to modern treatment such as biologics.

  9. Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer: Incremental Value

    PubMed Central

    Felker, Ely R.; Wu, Jason; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J.; Raman, Steven S.; Huang, Jiaoti; Dorey, Fred; Marks, Leonard S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed whether changes in serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can help predict the pathological progression of prostate cancer in men on active surveillance. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 49 consecutive men with Gleason 6 prostate cancer who underwent multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and again more than 6 months later, each followed by a targeted prostate biopsy, between January 2011 and May 2015. We evaluated whether progression on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (an increase in index lesion suspicion score, increase in index lesion volume or decrease in index lesion apparent diffusion coefficient) could predict pathological progression (Gleason 3 + 4 or greater on subsequent biopsy, in systematic or targeted cores). Diagnostic performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was determined with and without clinical data using a binary logistic regression model. Results The mean interval between baseline and followup multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was 28.3 months (range 11 to 43). Pathological progression occurred in 19 patients (39%). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was 37%, 90%, 69% and 70%, respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.63. A logistic regression model using clinical information (maximum cancer core length greater than 3 mm on baseline biopsy or a prostate specific antigen density greater than 0.15 ng/ml2 at followup biopsy) had an AUC of 0.87 for predicting pathological progression. The addition of serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging data significantly improved the AUC to 0.91 (p = 0.044). Conclusions Serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging adds incremental value to prostate specific antigen density and baseline cancer core length for predicting Gleason 6 upgrading in men on

  10. Far-field subwavelength imaging with near-field resonant metalens scanning at microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Gong, Zhi-Shuang; Ding, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A method for far-field subwavelength imaging at microwave frequencies using near-field resonant metalens scanning is proposed. The resonant metalens is composed of switchable split-ring resonators (SRRs). The on-SRR has a strong magnetic coupling ability and can convert evanescent waves into propagating waves using the localized resonant modes. In contrast, the off-SRR cannot achieve an effective conversion. By changing the switch status of each cell, we can obtain position information regarding the subwavelength source targets from the far field. Because the spatial response and Green’s function do not need to be measured and evaluated and only a narrow frequency band is required for the entire imaging process, this method is convenient and adaptable to various environment. This method can be used for many applications, such as subwavelength imaging, detection, and electromagnetic monitoring, in both free space and complex environments. PMID:26053074

  11. Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cardiac Venous Anatomic Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Eckart, Robert E. Leitch, W. Shad; Shry, Eric A.; Krasuski, Richard A.; Lane, Michael J.; Leclerc, Kenneth M.

    2003-06-15

    The incidence of persistent left superior venacava (PLSVC) is approximately 0.5% in the general population; however,the coexistent absence of the right SVC has a reported incidence in tertiary centers of 0.1%. The vast majority of reports are limited to pediatric cardiology. Likewise, sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of 0.1-3.5% of all congenital heart defects. We present a 71-year-old patient undergoing preoperative evaluation for incidental finding of aortic root aneurysm,and found to have all three in coexistence. Suggestive findings were demonstrated on cardiac catheterization and definitive diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging. The use of MRI for the diagnosis of asymptomatic adult congenital heart disease will be reviewed.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of penile cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Rajesh, Arumugam

    2014-05-01

    Penile cancer is a rare neoplasm that, although rare in the developed world, has devastating physical and psychological consequences for the patient. Novel MR imaging techniques such as lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MR imaging may help identify metastatic lymph node disease. This article reviews the normal penile anatomy and MR imaging techniques and features of primary and metastatic penile cancer. Recent advances in penile cancer imaging are discussed.

  14. Big cat scan: magnetic resonance imaging of the tiger.

    PubMed

    Snow, Thomas M; Litster, Annette L; Gregory, Richard J W

    2004-03-01

    In August 2002, we performed MRI scans on a female juvenile Bengal tiger. We present the clinical course, imaging and autopsy findings, and some comparative anatomy of the tiger brain and skull. Magnetic resonance images of a tiger have not previously been published.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  16. Non-central nervous system fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Elspeth; Wright, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently offered in a limited number of centers but is predominantly used for suspected fetal central nervous system abnormalities. This article concentrates on the role of the different imaging sequences and their value to clinical practice. It also discusses the future of fetal MRI. PMID:26013057

  17. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, Derik L

    2015-01-01

    Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26136804

  19. Big cat scan: magnetic resonance imaging of the tiger.

    PubMed

    Snow, Thomas M; Litster, Annette L; Gregory, Richard J W

    2004-03-01

    In August 2002, we performed MRI scans on a female juvenile Bengal tiger. We present the clinical course, imaging and autopsy findings, and some comparative anatomy of the tiger brain and skull. Magnetic resonance images of a tiger have not previously been published. PMID:15027932

  20. Optically Detected Scanned Probe Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Wang, Hailong; Du, Chunhui; Manuilov, Sergei; Adur, Rohan; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance is a powerful tool for studying magnetic properties and dynamics of spin systems. Scanned magnetic probes can induce spatially localized resonance due to the strong magnetic field and gradient near the magnetic tip., Nitrogen vacancy centers (NV) in diamond provide a sensitive means of measuring magnetic fields at the nanoscale. We report preliminary results towards using the high sensitivity of NV detection with a scanned magnetic probe to study local magnetic phenomena. This work is supported by the Center for Emergent Materials at The Ohio State University, a NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (DMR-0820414).

  1. Prostate cancer risk stratification with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Felker, Ely R; Margolis, Daniel J; Nassiri, Nima; Marks, Leonard S

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has shown promise for prostate cancer (PCa) risk stratification. mpMRI, often followed by targeted biopsy, can be used to confirm low-grade disease before enrollment in active surveillance. In patients with intermediate or high-risk PCa, mpMRI can be used to inform surgical management. mpMRI has sensitivity of 44% to 87% for detection of clinically significant PCa and negative predictive value of 63% to 98% for exclusion of significant disease. In addition to tumor identification, mpMRI has also been shown to contribute significant incremental value to currently used clinical nomograms for predicting extraprostatic extension. In combination with conventional clinical criteria, accuracy of mpMRI for prediction of extraprostatic extension ranges from 92% to 94%, significantly higher than that achieved with clinical criteria alone. Supplemental sequences, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, allow quantitative evaluation of cancer-suspicious regions. Apparent diffusion coefficient appears to be an independent predictor of PCa aggressiveness. Addition of apparent diffusion coefficient to Epstein criteria may improve sensitivity for detection of significant PCa by as much as 16%. Limitations of mpMRI include variability in reporting, underestimation of PCa volume and failure to detect clinically significant disease in a small but significant number of cases. PMID:27040381

  2. Diseased Region Detection of Longitudinal Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Shan, Liang; Charles, H. Cecil; Wirth, Wolfgang; Niethammer, Marc; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important imaging technique for quantifying the spatial location and magnitude/direction of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Although several analytical methods, such as subregion-based analysis, have been developed to refine and improve quantitative cartilage analyses, they can be suboptimal due to two major issues: the lack of spatial correspondence across subjects and time and the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across subjects. The aim of this paper is to present a statistical method for longitudinal cartilage quantification in OA patients, while addressing these two issues. The 3D knee image data is preprocessed to establish spatial correspondence across subjects and/or time. Then, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) is proposed to deal with the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across both time and OA subjects. To estimate unknown parameters in GHMM, we employ a pseudo-likelihood function and optimize it by using an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model can effectively detect diseased regions in each OA subject and present a localized analysis of longitudinal cartilage thickness within each latent subpopulation. Our GHMM integrates the strengths of two standard statistical methods including the local subregion-based analysis and the ordered value approach. We use simulation studies and the Pfizer longitudinal knee MRI dataset to evaluate the finite sample performance of GHMM in the quantification of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes. Our results indicate that GHMM significantly outperforms several standard analytical methods. PMID:25823031

  3. [Prostatic pathology imaged by magnetic resonance. 58 cases].

    PubMed

    Gevenois, P A; Van Regemorter, G; Van Gansbeke, D; Delcour, C; Corbusier, A; Struyven, J

    1987-03-01

    Forty-eight patients with prostatic disease (benign prostatic hyperplasia (B.P.H.), carcinoma, cysts, myoma and prostatitis) and 10 normal volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (M.R.I.) of the prostate. The prostatic parenchyma was best evaluated by a T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequence. The prostate in patients with B.P.H. often had a homogeneous or more rarely a nodular appearance on T2-weighted images. In most cases, a peripheral dark rim is observed. All prostate in patients with carcinoma had an heterogeneous appearance on T2-weighted images. While most of the prostatic carcinomas appeared hypo-intense relative to adjacent prostatic parenchyma, some of the neoplasms had a high or mixed-high and low signal. The myoma showed a low-signal nodule like carcinoma. The cyst appears as a liquid tumor. The prostatitis had an homogeneous bright signal. With the used methodology, MRI can differentiate prostatic diseases in many cases. Nevertheless the technique has to be optimized to improve its accuracy.

  4. Utility of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Ammar A; Gul, Maryam; Gould, Elaine; Teng, Mathew; Baker, Kevin; Matthews, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has established itself as one of the key clinical tools in evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. However, MRI still has several key limitations which require supplemental information from additional modalities to complete evaluation of various disorders. This has led to the development hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)-MRI which is rapidly evolving to address key clinical questions by using the morphological strengths of MRI and functional information of PET imaging. In this article, we aim to review physical principles and techniques of PET-MRI and discuss clinical utility of functional information obtained from PET imaging and structural information obtained from MRI imaging for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. More specifically, this review highlights the role of PET-MRI in musculoskeletal oncology including initial diagnosis and staging, treatment planning and post-treatment follow-up. Also we will review utility of PET-MRI in evaluating musculoskeletal infections (especially in the immunocompromised and diabetics) and inflammatory condition. Additionally, common pitfalls of PET-MRI will be addressed. PMID:27027320

  5. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors' intention to provide a useful, consistent and comprehensive reference for both beginner residents and skilled radiologists who work with musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging, allowing for them to develop more precise reports and helping them to avoid making mistakes.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of live freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Holliman F.; Davis, D.; Bogan, A.E.; Kwak, T.J.; Gregory, Cope W.; Levine, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the soft tissues of live freshwater mussels, Eastern elliptio Elliptio complanata, via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acquiring data with a widely available human whole-body MRI system. Anatomical features depicted in the profile images included the foot, stomach, intestine, anterior and posterior adductor muscles, and pericardial cavity. Noteworthy observations on soft tissue morphology included a concentration of lipids at the most posterior aspect of the foot, the presence of hemolymph-filled fissures in the posterior adductor muscle, the presence of a relatively large hemolymph-filled sinus adjacent to the posterior adductor muscle (at the ventral-anterior aspect), and segmentation of the intestine (a diagnostic description not reported previously in Unionidae). Relatively little is known about the basic biology and ecological physiology of freshwater mussels. Traditional approaches for studying anatomy and tissue processes, and for measuring sub-lethal physiological stress, are destructive or invasive. Our study, the first to evaluate freshwater mussel soft tissues by MRI, clarifies the body plan of unionid mussels and demonstrates the efficacy of this technology for in vivo evaluation of the structure, function, and integrity of mussel soft tissues. ?? 2008, The American Microscopical Society, Inc.

  8. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  10. Petal Resonator Surface Coil with a Circular Envelope for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S. S.; Cuellar, G.; Solis, S. E.; Alejski, A.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    A modified version of the petal resonator surface (PERES) coil is proposed in which the petal coils are located inside a circular-shaped coil as opposed to the previous PERES version which did not have a circular envelope. An 8-petal coil was simulated using a finite element method and the quasi-static approach to numerically investigate its electromagnetic characteristics. Numerical simulations showed that the field uniformity is not greatly affected by the use of circular-shaped coil inside in the circular envelope. A coil prototype was developed using the same coil configuration as above and tested on a commercial 3 T imager and a General Electric phantom. Phantom images also demonstrated that the mutual inductance between petals does not alter the coil performance. Standard pulse sequences were used to acquire phantom images with the petal resonator surface coil. It was shown that this prototype resonator coil is fully compatible with clinical high field MR imagers and clinical pulse sequences.

  11. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications. PMID:26067911

  12. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-06-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications.

  13. Evaluation of the Lactate-to-N-Acetyl-aspartate Ratio Defined With Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Before Radiation Therapy as a New Predictive Marker of the Site of Relapse in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Deviers, Alexandra; Ken, Soléakhéna; Filleron, Thomas; Rowland, Benjamin; Laruelo, Andrea; Catalaa, Isabelle; Lubrano, Vincent; Celsis, Pierre; and others

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Because lactate accumulation is considered a surrogate for hypoxia and tumor radiation resistance, we studied the spatial distribution of the lactate-to-N-acetyl-aspartate ratio (LNR) before radiation therapy (RT) with 3D proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-{sup 1}H-MRSI) and assessed its impact on local tumor control in glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with newly diagnosed GBM included in a phase 2 chemoradiation therapy trial constituted our database. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI data before RT were evaluated and correlated to MRI data at relapse. The optimal threshold for tumor-associated LNR was determined with receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the pre-RT LNR values and MRI characteristics of the tumor. This threshold was used to segment pre-RT normalized LNR maps. Two spatial analyses were performed: (1) a pre-RT volumetric comparison of abnormal LNR areas with regions of MRI-defined lesions and a choline (Cho)-to- N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio ≥2 (CNR2); and (2) a voxel-by-voxel spatial analysis of 4,186,185 voxels with the intention of evaluating whether pre-RT abnormal LNR areas were predictive of the site of local recurrence. Results: A LNR of ≥0.4 (LNR-0.4) discriminated between tumor-associated and normal LNR values with 88.8% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. LNR-0.4 voxels were spatially different from those of MRI-defined lesions, representing 44% of contrast enhancement, 64% of central necrosis, and 26% of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) abnormality volumes before RT. They extended beyond the overlap with CNR2 for most patients (median: 20 cm{sup 3}; range: 6-49 cm{sup 3}). LNR-0.4 voxels were significantly predictive of local recurrence, regarded as contrast enhancement at relapse: 71% of voxels with a LNR-0.4 before RT were contrast enhanced at relapse versus 10% of voxels with a normal LNR (P<.01). Conclusions: Pre-RT LNR-0.4 in GBM

  14. Multi-contrast magnetic resonance image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Chen, Yunmei; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    In clinical exams, multi-contrast images from conventional MRI are scanned with the same field of view (FOV) for complementary diagnostic information, such as proton density- (PD-), T1- and T2-weighted images. Their sharable information can be utilized for more robust and accurate image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a novel model and an efficient algorithm for joint image reconstruction and coil sensitivity estimation in multi-contrast partially parallel imaging (PPI) in MRI. Our algorithm restores the multi-contrast images by minimizing an energy function consisting of an L2-norm fidelity term to reduce construction errors caused by motion, a regularization term of underlying images to preserve common anatomical features by using vectorial total variation (VTV) regularizer, and updating sensitivity maps by Tikhonov smoothness based on their physical property. We present the numerical results including T1- and T2-weighted MR images recovered from partially scanned k-space data and provide the comparisons between our results and those obtained from the related existing works. Our numerical results indicate that the proposed method using vectorial TV and penalties on sensitivities can be made promising and widely used for multi-contrast multi-channel MR image reconstruction.

  15. Potential role of the posterior cruciate ligament synovio-entheseal complex in joint effusion in early osteoarthritis: a magnetic resonance imaging and histological evaluation of cadaveric tissue and data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Binks, D.A.; Bergin, D.; Freemont, A.J.; Hodgson, R.J.; Yonenaga, T.; McGonagle, D.; Radjenovic, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explored posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) synovio-entheseal complex (SEC) microanatomy to determine whether it may participate in the early osteoarthritis (OA) disease process. Methods SEC microanatomy and OA features were evaluated in 14 non-arthritic cadaveric knees (mean age = 69.9) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. MRI images of 49 subjects selected from the progression cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) were evaluated by a musculoskeletal radiologist using an original semi-quantitative method for features associated with OA at the PCL tibial enthesis. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to evaluate associations between SEC configuration and OA features. Results The PCL formed a SEC-like structure encompassing bone- and ligament-lining intra-articular cartilages to which the posterior root of the medial meniscus contributed. Degenerative features at the PCL-SEC included: neovascularisation (44%), enthesis chondrocyte clustering (44%), collagen matrix fissuring at the enthesis (56%) and in the PCL itself (67%), tidemark duplication (44%), bone remodelling (44%) and microscopic inflammatory changes (33%). In the OAI cohort, SEC-related pathology included bone marrow lesions (BMLs) (69%) and osteophytosis (94%) at locations that corresponded to SEC-related cartilages. Posterior joint recess effusion (49%) was linked to MRI abnormalities at PCL-SEC cartilages (χ2 = 7.27, P = 0.007). Conclusions The PCL has a prominent SEC configuration that is associated with microscopic OA changes in aged clinically non-diseased joints. MRI determined knee OA commonly exhibited pathological features at this site which was associated with adjacent joint effusion. Thus, the PCL-SEC could play a hitherto unappreciated role in the early OA disease process. PMID:25008208

  16. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  17. 30 Years of sodium/X-nuclei magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-02-01

    In principle, all nuclei with nonzero spin can be employed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Special scanner hardware and MR sequences are required to select the nucleus-specific frequency and to enable imaging with "sufficient" signal-to-noise ratio. This Special Issue starts with an overview of different nuclei that can be used for MRI today, followed by a review article about techniques required for imaging of quadrupolar nuclei with short relaxation times. Sequence developments to improve image quality and applications on different organs and diseases are presented for different nuclei ((23)Na, (35)Cl, (17)O, and (19)F), with a focus on imaging at natural abundance.

  18. MAP segmentation of magnetic resonance images using mean field annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logenthiran, Ambalavaner; Snyder, Wesley E.; Santago, Peter, II; Link, Kerry M.

    1991-06-01

    An algorithm is described which segments magnetic resonance images while removing the noise from the images without blurring or other distortion of edges. The problem of segmentation and noise removal is posed as a restoration of an uncorrupted image, given additive white Gaussian noise and a segmentation cost. The problem is solved using a strategy called Mean Field Annealing. An a priori statistical model of the image, which includes the region classification, is chosen which drives the minimization toward solutions which are locally homogeneous and globally classified. Application of the algorithm to brain and knee images is presented.

  19. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, R C; Pike, G B; Enzmann, D R

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has traditionally used the T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissue water (hydrogen protons) to manipulate contrast. Magnetization transfer (MT) is a new form of tissue contrast based on the physical concept that tissues contain two or more separate populations of hydrogen protons: a highly mobile (free) hydrogen (water) pool, Hr, and an immobile (restricted) hydrogen pool, Hr, the latter being those protons bound to large macromolecular proteins and lipids, such as those found in such cellular membranes as myelin. Direct observation of the Hr magnetization pool is normally not possible because of its extremely short T2 time (< 200 microseconds). But saturation of the restricted pool will have a detectable effect on the mobile (free) proton pool. Saturation of the restricted pool decreases the signal of the free pool by transferring the restricted pool's saturation. Exchange of magnetization between the free and restricted hydrogen protons is a substantial mechanism for spin-lattice (T1) relaxation in tissues and the physical basis of MT. Through an appropriately designed pulse sequence, magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) can be produced. MT contrast is different from T1, T2, and PD, and it likely reflects the structural integrity of the tissue being imaged. A variety of clinically important uses of MT have emerged. In this clinical review of the neuroradiological applications of MT, we briefly review the physics of MT, the appearance of normal brain with MT, and the use of MT as a method of contrast enhancement/background suppression and in tissue characterization, such as evaluation of multiple sclerosis and other white-matter lesions and tumors. The role of MT in small-vessel visualization on three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and in head and neck disease and newer applications of MT are also elaborated. PMID:8870180

  20. Resonant acoustic nonlinearity for defect-selective imaging and NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck problem of nonlinear NDT is a low efficiency of conversion from fundamental frequency to nonlinear frequency components. In this paper, it is proposed to use a combination of mechanical resonance and nonlinearity of defects to enhance the input-output conversion. The concept of the defect as a nonlinear oscillator brings about new dynamic and frequency scenarios characteristic of parametric oscillations. The modes observed in experiment include sub- and superharmonic resonances with anomalously efficient generation of the higher harmonics and subharmonics. A modified version of the superharmonic resonance (combination frequency resonance) is used to enhance the efficiency of frequency mixing mode of nonlinear NDT. All the resonant nonlinear modes are strongly localized in the defect area that provides a background for high-contrast highly-sensitive defect- and frequency-selective imaging.

  1. Imaging Prostate Cancer: An Update on Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Capala, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI allows functional assessment with techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The most common PET radiotracer, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with 18F or 11C), 11C-acetate, and 18F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:20425625

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; "Stem Cells", "Cell Tracking", "Stroke", "Stem Cell Transplantation", "Nanoparticles", and "Magnetic Resonance Imaging" as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-20

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen presents greater inherent difficulties than other anatomic regions. However, new techniques now allow imaging comparable in quality to computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging offers the advantages of greater tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging, and lack of ionizing radiation or risk of toxic reactions from iodinated contrast media. Its use remains limited by high cost, limited availability, lack of a bowel contrast agent, and long imaging time, which some patients cannot tolerate. In many areas of abdominal imaging, MRI is now comparable to CT, but because of the greater availability and lesser cost, CT remains the procedure of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging is more accurate for staging neoplasms of the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, bladder, prostate, uterus, and cervix and may aid in diagnosis of hepatic, adrenal, and uterine masses. In selected patients, especially those in whom CT is inconclusive or those who cannot tolerate iodinated contrast material, MRI can provide valuable information. Development of faster scanning techniques and MRI contrast agents and wider availability will probably increase the usefulness of abdominal MRI. At this time, MRI complements other abdominal imaging procedures. In a small number of patients, however, it can provide unique information in a virtually risk-free manner.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  6. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spur, Eva-Margarete; Decelle, Emily A; Cheng, Leo L

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases.

  7. Metabolomic Imaging of Prostate Cancer with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Spur, Eva-Margarete; Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized non-invasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth for newly biopsy-diagnosed, asymptomatic PCa patients. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, the study of PCa metabolomics is mainly accomplished utilizing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness non-invasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be possible not only with PCa, but applied to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies or metabolic diseases. PMID:23549758

  8. The role of time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the evaluation of head–neck vascular anomalies: a preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, F; Rossi Espagnet, M C; Terenzi, V; Cassoni, A; Suma, G; Boellis, A; Pierallini, A; Valentini, V; Bozzao, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this preliminary report, we describe our experience with time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics–MR angiography (TRICKS-MRA) in the assessment of head–neck vascular anomalies (HNVAs). Methods: We prospectively studied six consecutive patients with clinically suspected or diagnosed HNVAs. All of them underwent TRICKS-MRA of the head and neck as part of the routine for treatment planning. A digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was also performed. Results: TRICKS-MRA could be achieved in all cases. Three subjects were treated based on TRICKS-MRA imaging findings and subsequent DSA examination. In all of them, DSA confirmed the vascular architecture of HNVAs shown by TRICKS-MRA. In the other three patients, a close follow up to assess the evolution of the suspected haemangioma was preferred. Conclusions: TRICKS sequences add important diagnostic information in cases of HNVAs, helpful for therapeutic decisions and post-treatment follow up. We recommend TRICKS-MRA use (if technically possible) as part of routine MRI protocol for HNVAs, representing a possible alternative imaging tool to conventional DSA. PMID:25410709

  9. 2D label-free imaging of resonant grating biochips in ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Bougot-Robin, K; Reverchon, J-L; Fromant, M; Mugherli, L; Plateau, P; Benisty, H

    2010-05-24

    2D images of label-free biochips exploiting resonant waveguide grating (RWG) are presented. They indicate sensitivities on the order of 1 pg/mm2 for proteins in air, and hence 10 pg/mm2 in water can be safely expected. A 320x256 pixels Aluminum-Gallium-Nitride-based sensor array is used, with an intrinsic narrow spectral window centered at 280 nm. The additional role of characteristic biological layer absorption at this wavelength is calculated, and regimes revealing its impact are discussed. Experimentally, the resonance of a chip coated with protein is revealed and the sensitivity evaluated through angular spectroscopy and imaging. In addition to a sensitivity similar to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the RWGs resonance can be flexibly tailored to gain spatial, biochemical, or spectral sensitivity.

  10. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to determine the inter-reliability and intra-observer reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lateral epicondylitis and investigate whether there is a potential relationship between MRI abnormalities of the common extensor tendon (CET) and its clinical symptom. The study group comprised 96 consecutive patients (46 men and 50 women) with a clinical diagnosis of chronic lateral epicondylitis, which were examined on 3.0 T MR. An MRI scoring system was used to grade the degree of tendinopahty. Three independent musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to the patients’ clinical information, scored images separately. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE). Of all the patients, total 96 elbows had MRI-assessed tendinopathy, including 38 (39.6%) with grade 1, 31 (32.3%) with grade 2, and 27 (28.1%) with grade 3. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer agreement for MRI interpretation of the grades of tendinopathy was good, and a positive correlation between the grades of tendinopathy and PRTEE was determined. MRI is a reliable tool in determining radiological severity of chronical lateral epicondylitis. The severity of MR signal changes positively correlate with the patient's clinical symptom. PMID:26844506

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: initial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.

    1983-12-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in 21 female subjects: seven volunteers, 12 patients scanned for reasons unrelated to the lower genitourinary tract, and two patients referred with gynecologic disease. The uterus at several stages was examined; the premenarcheal uterus (one patient), the uterus of reproductive age (12 patients), the postmenopausal uterus (two patients), and in an 8 week pregnancy (one patient). The myometrium and cyclic endometrium in the reproductive age separated by a low-intensity line (probably stratum basale), which allows recognition of changes in thickness of the cyclic endometrium during the menstrual cycle. The corpus uteri can be distinguished from the cervix by the transitional zone of the isthmus. The anatomic relation of the uterus to bladder and rectum is easily outlined. The vagina can be distinguished from the cervix, and the anatomic display of the closely apposed bladder, vagina, and rectum is clear on axial and coronal images. The ovary is identified; the signal intensity from the ovary depends on the acquisition parameter used. Uterine leiomyoma, endometriosis, and dermoid cyst were depicted, but further experience is needed to ascertain the specificity of the findings.

  13. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  14. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  15. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A. Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.; Tao, Y.

    2015-05-25

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species ({sup 1}H, {sup 19}F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5 nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  16. Frequency, Prognosis and Surgical Treatment of Structural Abnormalities Seen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Anne T.; Mathern, Gary W.; Bronen, Richard A.; Fulbright, Robert K.; DiMario, Francis; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of lesions identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with the use of pre-surgical evaluations and surgery in childhood-onset epilepsy patients has not previously been described. In a prospectively identified community-based cohort of children enrolled from 1993 to 1997, we examined (i) the frequency of lesions…

  17. Neonatal life support during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Groenendaal, F; Leusink, C; Nijenhuis, M; Janssen, M J H

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques are required frequently for the assessment of the brain of ill neonates. In the present study, the effects of a 1.5 T MR scanner on devices for life support were assessed. A ventilator (Dräger Babylog 2000) was tested in the 1.5 T magnet, using a neonatal ventilation tester and 1.5-5 m tubes. In a special MR incubator, temperature and humidity were measured at 1-min intervals. Infusion was tested with the pump outside the magnet room: infusion rates and time to alarm were tested with 7-m tubes. The ventilator performed normally at a magnetic field line of 2 mT, although the alarms failed. The incubator created a temperature of 35.9 degrees C and humidity of 40.7%, which was acceptable for examinations of 45 min. The alarm limits of the infusion pump placed outside the magnet at 7 m were within company limits. The study indicates that magnetic resonance examinations can be performed safely in ill preterm neonates who require life-support devices.

  18. A Quadricuspid Aortic Valve as Seen by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, James; Liotta, Robert; Hood, Maureen; Bustamante, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old active duty male with a rare quadricuspid aortic valve identified via transthoracic echocardiography following the detection of an incidental grade I/VI diastolic murmur. Further characterization of the anatomical findings and aortic valve flow dynamics were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Accurate assessment of the various valve morphologies is essential, as it guides surgical treatment options to correct the defect. Our case highlights the complimentary role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in defining the anatomy and functional consequences of a quadricuspid aortic valve. PMID:27612379

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the vagina: an overview for radiologists with emphasis on clinical decision making*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daian Miranda; Bezerra, Régis Otaviano França; Ortega, Cinthia Denise; Blasbalg, Roberto; Viana, Públio César Cavalcante; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto; Rocha, Manoel de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method with high contrast resolution widely used in the assessment of pelvic gynecological diseases. However, the potential of such method to diagnose vaginal lesions is still underestimated, probably due to the scarce literature approaching the theme, the poor familiarity of radiologists with vaginal diseases, some of them relatively rare, and to the many peculiarities involved in the assessment of the vagina. Thus, the authors illustrate the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of vaginal diseases and the main relevant findings to be considered in the clinical decision making process. PMID:26379324

  20. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  1. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies.

  2. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Tracking of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Castillo, Rostislav; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2014-01-01

    To date, several stem cell labeling protocols have been developed, contributing to a fast growing and promising field of stem cell imaging by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Most of these methods utilize iron oxide nanoparticles (MION, SPIO, USPIO, VSIOP) for cell labeling, which provide negative (dark) signal effects on T2-weighted MR images. The following protocol describes stem cell labeling techniques with commercially available gadolinium chelates, which provide positive contrast on T1-weighted MR images, which can be advantageous for specific applications. PMID:23743862

  4. Image-processing pipelines: applications in magnetic resonance histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Anderson, Robert J.; Cook, James J.; Long, Christopher; Badea, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Image processing has become ubiquitous in imaging research—so ubiquitous that it is easy to loose track of how diverse this processing has become. The Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy has pioneered the development of Magnetic Resonance Histology (MRH), which generates large multidimensional data sets that can easily reach into the tens of gigabytes. A series of dedicated image-processing workstations and associated software have been assembled to optimize each step of acquisition, reconstruction, post-processing, registration, visualization, and dissemination. This talk will describe the image-processing pipelines from acquisition to dissemination that have become critical to our everyday work.

  5. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  6. Cardiomyocyte Death: Insights from Molecular and Microstructural Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Natalia C.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes can die via necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the molecular signals and pathways underlying these processes have been well elucidated, the pathophysiology of cardiomyocyte death remains incompletely understood. This review describes the development and application of novel imaging techniques to detect and characterize cardiomyocyte death noninvasively in vivo. It focuses on molecular and microstructural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and their respective abilities to image cellular events such as apoptosis, inflammation, and myofiber architecture. These in vivo imaging techniques have the potential to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte death and to help guide the development of novel cardioprotective therapies. PMID:21298427

  7. Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Other Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Chronic Liver Disease: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Heng; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive imaging of chronic liver disease have led to improvements in diagnosis, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comprehensive evaluation of the liver may be performed with the quantification of the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver iron concentration, and liver fibrosis. In addition, MRI of the liver may be used to identify complications of cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, ascites, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review article, we discuss the state of the art techniques in liver MRI, namely, magnetic resonance elastography, hepatobiliary phase MRI, and liver fat and iron quantification MRI. The use of these advanced techniques in the management of chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, will be elaborated. PMID:27563019

  8. Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Other Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Chronic Liver Disease: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Heng; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2016-09-15

    Recent advances in the noninvasive imaging of chronic liver disease have led to improvements in diagnosis, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comprehensive evaluation of the liver may be performed with the quantification of the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver iron concentration, and liver fibrosis. In addition, MRI of the liver may be used to identify complications of cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, ascites, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review article, we discuss the state of the art techniques in liver MRI, namely, magnetic resonance elastography, hepatobiliary phase MRI, and liver fat and iron quantification MRI. The use of these advanced techniques in the management of chronic liver diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, will be elaborated. PMID:27563019

  9. Threshold Doses for Focal Liver Reaction After Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma Depend on Liver Function: Evaluation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gd-EOB-DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Nishimura, Shuichi; Aoki, Yosuke; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Iwabuchi, Shogo; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Focal liver reaction (FLR) appears on radiographic images after stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. We investigated the threshold dose (TD) of FLR and possible factors affecting the TD on gadoxetate acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: In 50 patients who were treated with SABR for small HCC and followed up by MRI for >6 months, FLR, seen as a hypointense area, was evaluated on the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI. The follow-up MRI with the largest extent of FLR was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) image, and patients with good image fusion concordance were eligible. After delineating the border of the FLR manually, a dose–volume histogram was used to identify the TD for the FLR. Clinical and volumetric factors were analyzed for correlation with the TD. Results: A total of 45 patients were eligible for analysis with a median image fusion concordance of 84.9% (range, 71.6-95.4%). The median duration between SABR and subsequent hepatobiliary phase MRI with the largest extent of FLR was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). The median TD for FLR was 28.0 Gy (range, 22.3-36.4 Gy). On univariate analysis, pre-treatment Child-Pugh (CP) score and platelet count were significantly correlated with the TD. On multiple linear regression analysis, CP score was the only parameter that predicted TD. Median TDs were 30.5 Gy (range, 26.2.3-36.4 Gy) and 25.2 Gy (range, 22.3-27.5 Gy) for patients with CP-A and CP-B disease, respectively. Conclusion: The TD was significantly correlated with baseline liver function. We propose 30 Gy for CP-A disease and 25 Gy for CP-B disease in 5 fractions as TDs for FLR after SABR for patients with HCC and chronic liver disease. Use of these TDs will help to predict potential loss of liver tissue after SABR.

  10. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging - current status

    SciTech Connect

    Cammoun, D.; Hendee, W.R.; Davis, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. 59 references, 9 figures.

  11. Flaw investigation in a multi-layered, multi-material composite: Using air-coupled ultrasonic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, R. A.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.

    2012-05-01

    Ceramic tiles are the main ingredient of a multi-material, multi-layered composite being considered for the modernization of tank armors. The high stiffness, low attenuation, and precise dimensions of these uniform tiles make them remarkable resonators when driven to vibrate. Defects in the tile, during manufacture or after usage, are expected to change the resonance frequencies and resonance images of the tile. The comparison of the resonance frequencies and resonance images of a pristine tile/lay-up to a defective tile/lay-up will thus be a quantitative damage metric. By examining the vibrational behavior of these tiles and the composite lay-up with Finite Element Modeling and analytical plate vibration equations, the development of a new Nondestructive Evaluation technique is possible. This study examines the development of the Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Resonance Imaging technique as applied to a hexagonal ceramic tile and a multi-material, multi-layered composite.

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  13. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic chordoma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Iseri, Toshie; Shimizu, Junichiro; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Kusuda, Kayo; Hayashi, Akiyoshi; Mie, Keiichiro; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji; Fujimoto, Yuka; Ohashi, Fumihito

    2015-07-01

    A Bengal tiger was presented for evaluation of weakness, ataxia and inappetance. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass extending from the T7-8 vertebral body to the left rib and compressing the spinal cord. On CT, the bone destruction and sequestrum were shown. On MRI, the multilobulated mass appeared hypo- to isointense in T1-weighted and hyperintense in T2-weighted images. The tiger died after imaging, most likely from renal failure. Chordoma without metastasis was diagnosed on necropsy. The imaging characteristics were similar to those found in chordoma in humans. This report describes the use of CT and MRI in an exotic species.

  14. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  15. Efficient bias correction for magnetic resonance image denoising.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Qiu, Peihua

    2013-05-30

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular radiology technique that is used for visualizing detailed internal structure of the body. Observed MRI images are generated by the inverse Fourier transformation from received frequency signals of a magnetic resonance scanner system. Previous research has demonstrated that random noise involved in the observed MRI images can be described adequately by the so-called Rician noise model. Under that model, the observed image intensity at a given pixel is a nonlinear function of the true image intensity and of two independent zero-mean random variables with the same normal distribution. Because of such a complicated noise structure in the observed MRI images, denoised images by conventional denoising methods are usually biased, and the bias could reduce image contrast and negatively affect subsequent image analysis. Therefore, it is important to address the bias issue properly. To this end, several bias-correction procedures have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we study the Rician noise model and the corresponding bias-correction problem systematically and propose a new and more effective bias-correction formula based on the regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. Numerical studies show that our proposed method works well in various applications. PMID:23074149

  16. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970’s, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique’s potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver’s complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique. PMID:26755862

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in asymptomatic professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Anthony; Mascia, Anthony T; Salonen, David C; Becker, Edna J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging findings in both shoulders of asymptomatic professional baseball pitchers. Fourteen pitchers who were without significant prior injury underwent a blinded clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of both shoulders. All images were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The appearance of the rotator cuff tendons was graded, with additional evaluation of the biceps, labrum, and osseous structures. Ten athletes were found to have stable shoulders and painless full range of motion. Clinically, four athletes had at least a 40 degrees loss in internal rotation as compared with the nonthrowing arm. There were no significant differences in magnetic resonance imaging findings of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons between the throwing and nonthrowing shoulders. The labrum was abnormal in 79% of the 28 shoulders. Enthesopathic changes of the posterior glenoid labrum were identified in the four pitchers who had loss of internal rotation. We conclude that unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in asymptomatic high performance throwing athletes reveals abnormalities that may encompass a spectrum of "nonclinical" findings. These data can be useful in separating symptomatic pathologic findings from these variants. Enthesopathic changes of the posterior glenoid labrum in the throwing arm may represent an early Bennett-type lesion. The cause may be excessive traction on the posterior capsule during the pitching motion, with subclinical injury to this area.

  18. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Knee Anterolateral Ligament Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have recently characterized the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL). So far, no study has focused on confirming whether the evaluated MRI parameters truly correspond with ALL anatomy. Purpose: To assess the validity of MRI in detecting the ALL using an anatomic evaluation as reference. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 13 cadaveric knees were subjected to MRI and then to anatomic dissection. Dissection was performed according to previous anatomic study methodology. MRIs were performed with a 0.6- to 1.5-mm slice thickness and prior saline injection. The following variables were analyzed: distance from the origin of the ALL to the origin of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), distance from the origin of the ALL to its bifurcation point, maximum length of the ALL, distance from the tibial insertion of the ALL to the articular surface of the tibia, ALL thickness, and ALL width. The 2 sets of measurements were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ) and Bland-Altman plots. Results: The ALL was clearly observed in all dissected knees and MRI scans. It originated anterior and distal to the LCL, close to the lateral epycondile center, and showed an anteroinferior path toward the tibia, inserting between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, around 5 mm under the lateral plateau. The ρ values tended to increase together for all studied variables between the 2 methods, and all were statistically significant, except for thickness (P = .077). Bland-Altman plots showed a tendency toward a reduction of ALL thickness and width by MRI compared with anatomic dissection. Conclusion: MRI scanning as described can accurately assess the ALL and demonstrates characteristics similar to those seen under anatomic dissection. Clinical Relevance: MRI can accurately characterize the ALL in the anterolateral region of the knee, despite the presence of structures that might

  19. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  20. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kabala, J E; Gillatt, D A; Persad, R A; Penry, J B; Gingell, J C; Chadwick, D

    1991-08-01

    A prospective study has been carried out to examine the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the investigation of renal cell carcinoma in 24 patients. In all cases the inferior vena cava (IVC) was well demonstrated with MRI. In 14 out of 15 patients where surgical correlation was available, the MRI and operative staging were in agreement. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) staging were in agreement in 16 out of the 17 patients where both were performed. In one case, CT suggested hepatic invasion but this was found not to be present on MRI and at operation. Magnetic resonance imaging also provided substantial additional information in three patients, including two cases where MRI demonstrated a patent IVC that appeared occluded on CT (one of which also had vertebral metastases seen on MRI but missed on CT) and one case where CT failed to demonstrate minimal involvement of the IVC. Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of staging renal cell carcinoma with clear advantages over CT. In no case in this series was inferior vena cavography found to be necessary.

  2. Primary and recurrent inverting papilloma: appearances with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roobottom, C A; Jewell, F M; Kabala, J

    1995-07-01

    Inverting papilloma of the sinonasal cavity is of importance because of its association with squamous cell carcinoma and its tendency to local recurrence. Appearances of inverting papilloma have only been reported infrequently, and never in recurrent cases. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of four cases of inverting papilloma, three of which are recurrent.

  3. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  4. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  5. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This concise review attempts to highlight the recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to all the different aspects of prostate cancer (PCa), and outlines future implications of MRI in the diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance of PCa. PMID:21283654

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gd-EOB-DTPA for the Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Xiang; Wang, Zhen J.; Luo, Song; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) for detecting liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Methods This study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Liver fibrosis in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1 mL/kg 50% CCl4 twice a week for 4-13 weeks. Control rats were injected with saline. Liver fibrosis was graded using the Metaviar score: no fibrosis (F0), mild fibrosis (F1-F2) and advanced fibrosis (F3-F4). DCE-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA was performed for all rats. Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC of the liver parenchyma were measured. Relative enhancement (RE) value of the liver was calculated on T1-weighted images at 15, 20 and 25 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration. Results Thirty-five rats were included: no fibrosis (n=13), mild fibrosis (n=11) and advanced fibrosis (n=11). Ktrans and iAUC values were highest in advanced fibrosis group and lowest in no fibrosis group (P<0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for fibrosis (stages F1 and greater) were 0.773 and 0.882 for Ktrans and iAUC, respectively. AUROC for advanced fibrosis were 0.835 and 0.867 for Ktrans and iAUC, respectively. Kep and RE values were not able to differentiate fibrosis stages (all P>0.05). Conclusion Ktrans and iAUC obtained from DCE-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA are useful for the detection and staging of rat liver fibrosis induced by CCl4. PMID:26076199

  7. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals. PMID:14706710

  8. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges.

  9. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and diseased heart

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, J.M.; Alfidi, R.J.; Nelson, A.D.; Botti, R.E.; Moir, T.W.; Haaga, J.R.; Kopiwoda, S.; Miraldi, F.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Butler, H.E.

    1984-08-01

    Gated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained in two normal volunteers and 21 adults with a variety of cardiovascular abnormalities. The images were correlated with data from clinical examination, electrocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization. Gated cardiac images were superior to nongated images. Combined cardiac and respiratory gated images were superior to images obtained with cardiac gating only, but acquisition time was longer. Portions of the coronary arteries were visualized in seven of 23 examinations (30%), and subacute and old myocardial infarcts were seen in five of nine patients (55%) as areas of thinned myocardium. Normal cardiac anatomy (chambers, valves, and papillary muscles) was well visualized. Examples of aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta are shown.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  11. High-resolution breath-hold cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation work is composed of investigations of three methods for fast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These methods include (1) 2D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) cardiac imaging, (2) 3D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo cardiac imaging, and (3) real-time monitoring, feedback, and triggering for breath-hold MRI. The hypothesis of this work is that high resolution 2D and 3D magnetic resonance data sets for the heart can be acquired with the combination of magnetization prepared blood suppression for gradient echo techniques and accurate breath-holding methods. The 2D method included development of magnetic resonance data acquisition for cardiac imaging. The acquisition time is within a single breath-hold of 16 seconds (assuming heart 60/min). The data acquisition is synchronized with the electrocardiogram signal. Based on consistent observations of specific small cardiac structures like the papillary muscle, trabeculae, moderator band, and coronary vessels in studies of normal volunteers, the image quality represents a significant improvement over that obtained with fast imaging methods previously. To further improve the image quality provided by the 2D method, the first 3D cardiac MRI technique was developed. This method provides even better spatial resolution for cardiac images, with a voxel size of 1.09 [times] 2.19 [times] 4 mm[sup 3]. A 3D acquisition is completed in 8 breath-holds. The data acquisition for 3D cardiac imaging requires a consistent breath-hold position to avoid respiratory artifacts. To improve the reliability of the 3DFT acquisition, a new technique called MR breath-hold feedback was developed to provide reproducible breathholding. The diaphragm location is used as the index for breath-hold reproducibility measurement. The range of the diaphragm displacement in different breath-hold is reduced from 8.3 mm without the technique, to 1.3 mm with the technique.

  12. Seven topics in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bandettini, Peter A

    2009-09-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging methodology that started in 1991 and allows human brain activation to be imaged at high resolution within only a few minutes. Because it has extremely high sensitivity, is relatively easy to implement, and can be performed on most standard clinical MRI scanners. It continues to grow at an explosive rate throughout the world. Over the years, at any given time, fMRI has been defined by only a handful of major topics that have been the focus of researchers using and developing the methodology. In this review, I attempt to take a snapshot of the field of fMRI as it is in mid-2009 by discussing the seven topics that I feel are most on the minds of fMRI researchers. The topics are, in no particular order or grouping: (1) Clinical impact, (2) Utilization of individual functional maps, (3) fMRI signal interpretation, (4) Pattern effect mapping and decoding, (5) Endogenous oscillations, (6) MRI technology, and (7) Alternative functional contrast mechanisms. Most of these topics are highly interdependent, each advancing as the others advance. While most fMRI involves applications towards clinical or neuroscience questions, all applications are fundamentally dependent on advances in basic methodology as well as advances in our understanding of the relationship between neuronal activity and fMRI signal changes. This review neglects almost completely an in-depth discussion of applications. Rather the discussions are on the methods and interpretation.

  13. SEVEN TOPICS IN FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    BANDETTINI, PETER A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging methodology that started in 1991 and allows human brain activation to be imaged at high resolution within only a few minutes. Because it has extremely high sensitivity, is relatively easy to implement, and can be performed on most standard clinical MRI scanners. It continues to grow at an explosive rate throughout the world. Over the years, at any given time, fMRI has been defined by only a handful of major topics that have been the focus of researchers using and developing the methodology. In this review, I attempt to take a snapshot of the field of fMRI as it is in mid-2009 by discussing the seven topics that I feel are most on the minds of fMRI researchers. The topics are, in no particular order or grouping: (1) Clinical impact, (2) Utilization of individual functional maps, (3) fMRI signal interpretation, (4) Pattern effect mapping and decoding, (5) Endogenous oscillations, (6) MRI technology, and (7) Alternative functional contrast mechanisms. Most of these topics are highly interdependent, each advancing as the others advance. While most fMRI involves applications towards clinical or neuroscience questions, all applications are fundamentally dependent on advances in basic methodology as well as advances in our understanding of the relationship between neuronal activity and fMRI signal changes. This review neglects almost completely an in-depth discussion of applications. Rather the discussions are on the methods and interpretation. PMID:19938211

  14. Multivariate Strategies in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    We discuss aspects of multivariate fMRI modeling, including the statistical evaluation of multivariate models and means for dimensional reduction. In a case study we analyze linear and non-linear dimensional reduction tools in the context of a "mind reading" predictive multivariate fMRI model.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  16. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliarik, Marek; Párová, Lucie; Vaisocherová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    2009-05-01

    We report a novel high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for rapid and parallelized detection of protein biomarkers. The biosensor is based on a high-performance SPR imaging sensor with polarization contrast and internal referencing which yields a considerably higher sensitivity and resolution than conventional SPR imaging systems (refractive index resolution 2 × 10-7 RIU). We combined the SPR imaging biosensor with microspotting to create an array of antibodies. DNA-directed protein immobilization was utilized for the spatially resolved attachment of antibodies. Using Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) as model protein biomarker, we demonstrated the potential for simultaneous detection of proteins in up to 100 channels.

  18. Interactions between magnetic resonance imaging and dental material

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Chalakuzhiyl Abraham; Maller, Sudhakara; Maheshwaran

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common and important life-saving diagnostic tool in recent times, for diseases of the head and neck region. Dentists should be aware of the interactions of various restorative dental materials and different technical factors put to use by an MRI scanning machine. Specific knowledge about these impacts, at the dentist level and at the level of the personnel at the MRI centers can save valuable time for the patient and prevent errors in MRI images. Artifacts from metal restorations are a major hindrance at such times, as they result in disappearance or distortion of the image and loss of important information. PMID:23946562

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Amrita; Adam, Sharon Z; Wood, Cecil; Hoff, Frederick; Harmath, Carla B; Miller, Frank H

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare but are thought to be most commonly from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These metastases can present many years after the initial tumor is resected, and accordingly, these patients require prolonged imaging follow-up. Although the computed tomographic findings of these metastases have been extensively reviewed in the literature, little has been written about the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of these metastases. Pancreatic metastases from RCC are typically T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense. After intravenous administration of gadolinium, they are typically hypervascular and less commonly hypovascular. Chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging can aid in the diagnosis of these metastases.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging: Atlas of the head, neck and spine

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; De Groot, J.; Posin, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this atlas is to provide the reader with a means to complement existing sources of information and to correlate the superb soft tissue contrast realized in magnetic resonance images with the appropriate anatomic and functional structures. Where appropriate, pathologic examples have been included to complement normal images. In addition, since MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) clearly separates gray from white matter, and thus accurately visualizes the position of functional tracts as they extend from cortex to spinal cord, a separate section on functional neuroanatomy has been provided. Likewise, the improved visualization of vascular structures and associated pathologic processes has led to the inclusion of vascular anatomy and associated perfusion territories. These additions will be of particular use in clinical practice, as precise lesion identification and localization can now be correlated to specific clinical symptomatology.

  1. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials. PMID:27503610

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging using linear magneto-inductive waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syms, R. R. A.; Young, I. R.; Ahmad, M. M.; Rea, M.

    2012-12-01

    Magneto-inductive waveguides are arrays of magnetically coupled, lumped element resonators, which support slow waves at radio frequency. Their use in internal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where they may provide an intrinsically safe method of signal detection and transmission, is described. A catheter-based receiver formed from a thin-film printed circuit mounted on a tubular scaffold using heat-shrink tubing is demonstrated, and its electrical response and imaging sensitivity are explained in terms of the excitation and propagation of magneto-inductive waves. The theoretical predictions are confirmed using the results of electrical measurement and 1H MRI at 1.5 T, and imaging is achieved over a total length greater than 1.5 m using a single receiver.

  3. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  5. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  6. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  7. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs.

  8. Precision and accuracy in diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews some of the key factors influencing the accuracy and precision of quantitative metrics derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. It focuses on the study pipeline beginning at the choice of imaging protocol, through preprocessing and model fitting up to the point of extracting quantitative estimates for subsequent analysis. The aim was to provide the newcomers to the field with sufficient knowledge of how their decisions at each stage along this process might impact on precision and accuracy, to design their study/approach, and to use diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in the clinic. More specifically, emphasis is placed on improving accuracy and precision. I illustrate how careful choices along the way can substantially affect the sample size needed to make an inference from the data.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Kress, Bodo; Fiebach, Jochen; Rieker, Marcus; Spitzenberg, Doreen; Marmulla, Rüdiger; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Image guided implantology using navigation systems is more accurate than manual dental implant insertion. The underlying image data are usually derived from computer tomography. The suitability of MR imaging for dental implant planning is a marginal issue so far. MRI data from cadaver heads were acquired using various MRI sequences. The data were assessed for the quality of anatomical imaging, geometric accuracy and susceptibility to dental metal artefacts. For dental implant planning, 3D models of the jaws were created. A software system for segmentation of the mandible and maxilla MRI data was implemented using c++, mitk, and qt. With the VIBE_15 sequence, image data with high geometric accuracy were acquired. Dental metal artefacts were lower than in CT data of the same heads. The segmentation of the jaws was feasible, in contrast to the segmentation of the dentition, since there is a lack of contrast to the intraoral soft tissue structures. MRI is a suitable method for imaging of the region of mouth and jaws. The geometric accuracy is excellent and the susceptibility to artefacts is low. However, there are yet two limitations: Firstly, the imaging of the dentition needs further improvement to allow accurate segmentation of these regions. Secondly, the sequence used in this study takes several minutes and hence is susceptible to motion artefacts.

  10. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and management of ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Heffez, L.; Mafee, M.F.; Vaiana, J.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of ameloblastoma are compared with computed tomographic (CT) images with the use of three parameters: artifact degradation, edge definition, and conspicuity. As a basis for comparison, MR imaging characterization of normal tissues is reviewed. The three cases studied demonstrate the importance of weighing heavily on MR for evaluation of tumor-normal tissue interface. MR generally proved to be superior to CT in the evaluation of recurrent disease because of its ability to differentiate tissues on the basis of their proton composition. CT images reflect the electron densities of tissues. Hence, interpreting inflammatory and postsurgical changes and differentiating them from neoplasm may be difficult. At the present time, familiarity with CT dictates that the MR evaluation complement and not substitute the CT evaluation.

  11. Noninvasive Imaging of Head-Brain Conductivity Profiles Using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Yan, Dandan; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a recently introduced non-invasive conductivity imaging modality, which combines the magnetic resonance current density imaging (CDI) and the traditional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) techniques. MREIT is aimed at providing high spatial resolution images of electrical conductivity, by avoiding solving the well-known ill-posed problem in the traditional EIT. In this paper, we review our research activities in MREIT imaging of head-brain tissue conductivity profiles. We have developed several imaging algorithms and conducted a series of computer simulations for MREIT imaging of the head and brain tissues. Our work suggests MREIT brain imaging may become a useful tool in imaging conductivity distributions of the brain and head. PMID:18799394

  12. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of unsuspected cases of Parsonage-Turner syndrome: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of shoulder pain, especially in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injuries and conditions that mimic them. Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a well-defined clinical entity that presents with acute-onset shoulder pain and weakness, often first recognized on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Case presentation We studied magnetic resonance imaging features of two Asian men (ages 24 and 31 years) who presented with variable-onset shoulder pain and weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2-weighted signal intensity of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles in both patients. Conclusion Magnetic resonance imaging findings are distinctive, although nonspecific, in cases of Parsonage-Turner syndrome, and knowledge of the imaging and clinical features of this disease enable clinicians to arrive at the correct diagnosis and guide appropriate management. PMID:24199631

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S S; Zimmerman, R A; Bilaniuk, L T; Hackney, D B; Goldberg, H I; Grossman, R I

    1987-01-01

    1.5 Tesla MRI examinations were evaluated for aqueductal configuration, hydrocephalus and flow-related signal void in 70 patients with juxtaaqueductal pathology and in 20 normal controls. In the 70 cases with pathology, the aqueduct was obliterated or distorted in 34, dilated in 3, normal in 29 and not evaluable in 4. A definite flow-related signal void indicated CSF movement within the aqueduct in all normal examinations. Flow-related signal void was absent in some, but not all, patients with aqueductal obliteration and distortion. CSF turbulence can create an intra-aqueductal signal void in the dilated proximal aqueduct, despite more distal obstruction. Thus hydrocephalus related to aqueductal obstruction is frequently, but not always, associated with absence of signal void.

  14. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern. PMID:25729844

  15. Oral cancer staging established by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Rogério Ribeiro de; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; Leite, André Ferreira; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical staging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging for oral cancer, and to assess inter-observer agreement between oral and medical radiologists. A total of 10 patients diagnosed with oral cancer were assessed before treatment. A head and neck surgeon performed clinical TNM staging. Two medical radiologists and two oral radiologists performed a new staging assessment by interpreting MRI scans, without prior knowledge of the clinical staging. They evaluated the extent of the primary tumor (T), metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N) and grouping by stages. The data were analyzed using the Kappa Index. There was significant agreement (p < 0.05) between the clinical and MRI staging assessments made by one oral radiologist for N stage, and between those made by one medical radiologist for the T and N stages and for the grouping by stages. In the MRI assessment, there was significant agreement among all four observers for both T stage and grouping by stages. For the N stage, there was no significant agreement between one oral radiologist and one medical radiologist or between both medical radiologists. There was significant agreement among the remaining radiologists. There was no agreement between the clinical and MRI staging. These results indicate the importance of using MRI for the diagnosis of oral cancer. Training initiatives and calibration of medical and oral radiologists should be promoted to provide an improved multidisciplinary approach to oral cancer.

  16. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  19. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  20. Long-term evaluation of asymptomatic patients operated on for intracranial epidermoid cysts. Comparison of the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and computer-assisted cisternography for detection of cholesterin fragments.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Fortuna, A; Cantore, G; Missori, P

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computer-assisted cisternography (CAc) assessment of latent late recurrences in long-term asymptomatic patients surgically treated for intracranial epidermoid cyst is here presented. MRI was exclusively utilized in one patient; CAc was exclusively employed in three patients with metalic operative clips; both CAc and MRI were employed in another four patients. CAc appears to be more reliable than MRI in detecting cholesterin fragments in asymptomatic patients operated on for intracranial epidermoid cyst.

  1. Detectability of early brain meningitis with magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect early brain meningitis was evaluated in a canine model. Contrast dose, timing postinjection, and imaging technique (specifically the use of magnetization transfer) were assessed. Imaging of five canines was performed at 1.5 T 24 hours after injection of Cowans staphylococcus into the cisterna magna. Two control animals also were imaged using the same protocol. Contrast doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.8 mmol/kg gadoteridol were compared. Scans were performed at 2, 13, and 22 minutes after an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg. Thirty minutes after the initial injection of contrast, a supplemental dose of 0.2 mmol/kg was given. Scans were then repeated at 2, 12, and 22 minutes after this dose was administered. A second supplemental contrast injection of 0.5 mmol/kg was given at 70 minutes, and immediate postinjection scans with and without MT were acquired. Results. In the animals receiving a cisternal injection of bacteria, the degree of meningeal enhancement was greatest at 0.8 mmol/kg, intermediate at 0.3 mmol/kg, and least at 0.1 mmol/kg. Scans in control studies did not demonstrate abnormal meningeal enhancement. High-contrast dose, MT, and acquisition of immediate postcontrast scans all resulted in statistically significant improvement. On masked film review, abnormal meningeal enhancement was noted in only 2 of 5 experimental dogs at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg (regardless of the use of MT) compared with all animals at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. In 18 of 37 dogs (paired scans with and without MT), when abnormal enhancement was noted, the use of MT improved the visualization of abnormal meningeal enhancement. In early brain meningitis, high-contrast dose (0.3 mmol/kg), MT, and scanning immediately after injection improve detection of abnormal meningeal enhancement, thus facilitating the diagnosis of meningitis. Of these factors, contrast dose is the most important. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Watts, Lora Tally; Li, Wei; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Common causes of TBI include falls, violence, injuries from wars, and vehicular and sporting accidents. The initial direct mechanical damage in TBI is followed by progressive secondary injuries such as brain swelling, perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF), abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity (CR), metabolic dysfunction, blood-brain-barrier disruption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, among others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the means to noninvasively probe many of these secondary injuries. MRI has been used to image anatomical, physiological, and functional changes associated with TBI in a longitudinal manner. This chapter describes controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI surgical procedures, a few common MRI protocols used in TBI imaging, and, finally, image analysis pertaining to experimental TBI imaging in rats. PMID:27604743

  4. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with 90-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamin, H J; Poggio, M; Degen, C L; Rugar, D

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging technique that typically operates on the scale of millimetres to micrometres. Conventional MRI is based on the manipulation of nuclear spins with radio-frequency fields, and the subsequent detection of spins with induction-based techniques. An alternative approach, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), uses force detection to overcome the sensitivity limitations of conventional MRI. Here, we show that the two-dimensional imaging of nuclear spins can be extended to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm using MRFM. The imaging of 19F nuclei in a patterned CaF(2) test object was enabled by a detection sensitivity of roughly 1,200 nuclear spins at a temperature of 600 mK. To achieve this sensitivity, we developed high-moment magnetic tips that produced field gradients up to 1.4 x 10(6) T m(-1), and implemented a measurement protocol based on force-gradient detection of naturally occurring spin fluctuations. The resulting detection volume was less than 650 zeptolitres. This is 60,000 times smaller than the previous smallest volume for nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy, and demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI into the nanoscale regime.

  6. MR imaging evaluation of perianal fistulas: spectrum of imaging features.

    PubMed

    de Miguel Criado, Jaime; del Salto, Laura García; Rivas, Patricia Fraga; del Hoyo, Luis Felipe Aguilera; Velasco, Leticia Gutiérrez; de las Vacas, M Isabel Díez Pérez; Marco Sanz, Ana G; Paradela, Marcos Manzano; Moreno, Eduardo Fraile

    2012-01-01

    Perianal fistulization is an inflammatory condition that affects the region around the anal canal, causing significant morbidity and often requiring repeated surgical treatments due to its high tendency to recur. To adopt the best surgical strategy and avoid recurrences, it is necessary to obtain precise radiologic information about the location of the fistulous track and the affected pelvic structures. Until recently, imaging techniques played a limited role in evaluation of perianal fistulas. However, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging now provides more precise information on the anatomy of the anal canal, the anal sphincter complex, and the relationships of the fistula to the pelvic floor structures and the plane of the levator ani muscle. MR imaging allows precise definition of the fistulous track and identification of secondary fistulas or abscesses. It provides accurate information for appropriate surgical treatment, decreasing the incidence of recurrence and allowing side effects such as fecal incontinence to be avoided. Radiologists should be familiar with the anatomic and pathologic findings of perianal fistulas and classify them using the St James's University Hospital MR imaging-based grading system.

  7. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging for the study of fossils.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Guerrini, Andrea; Salvadori, Piero A

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been used for investigating palaeontological specimens, as it is a nondestructive technique which avoids the need to dissolve or ionize the fossil sample. However, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently gained ground as analytical tools for examination of palaeontological samples, by nondestructively providing information about the structure and composition of fossils. While MRI techniques are able to reveal the three-dimensional geometry of the trace fossil, MRS can provide information on the chemical composition of the samples. The multidimensional nature of MR (magnetic resonance) signals has potential to provide rich three-dimensional data on the palaeontological specimens and also to help in elucidating paleopathological and paleoecological questions. In this work the verified applications and the emerging uses of MRI and MRS in paleontology are reviewed, with particular attention to fossil spores, fossil plants, ambers, fossil invertebrates, and fossil vertebrate studies.

  9. Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging in double aortic arch diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Trobo Marina, Duna; Bravo, Coral; Lancharro, Ángel; Gámez Alderete, Francisco; Marín, Carlos; de León-Luis, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Congenital double aortic arch (DAA) is an uncommon vascular anomaly; however, its prenatal detection is associated with congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities, including 22q11 deletion. We present a case of DAA diagnosed prenatally. DAA can be diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound in the transverse three vessel-trachea view, which shows a trident image formed by a complete vascular ring and the ductus arteriosus. Postnatal magnetic resonance images in this view correlate well with prenatal ultrasound images and help in confirmation of diagnosis, evaluation of the risk of airway or esophageal compression, and planning of surgery. PMID:26979672

  10. Assessment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Mullins, Carola; Solberg, Agnieszka; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the last two decades, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has emerged as the primary imaging tool in the detection and prognostic assessment of ischemic heart disease. In a single study, CMRI allows evaluation of not only myocardial wall perfusion, but also the presence, acuity, and extent of myocardial ischemia and infarction complications. Also, rest and stress perfusion imaging can accurately depict inducible ischemia secondary to significant coronary artery stenosis. We present a pictorial review of the assessment of ischemic cardiomyopathy with an emphasis on CMRI features. PMID:26085960

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Auer, Tibor; Schwarcz, Attila; Horváth, Réka A; Barsi, Péter; Janszky, József

    2008-01-30

    The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and sensory-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in post-stroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer's disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.

  12. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  13. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  14. Resonant plasmonic nanoparticles for multicolor second harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accanto, Nicolò; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hancu, Ion M.; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles capable of efficiently generating nonlinear optical signals, like second harmonic generation, are attracting a lot of attention as potential background-free and stable nano-probes for biological imaging. However, second harmonic nanoparticles of different species do not produce readily distinguishable optical signals, as the excitation laser mainly defines their second harmonic spectrum. This is in marked contrast to other fluorescent nano-probes like quantum dots that emit light at different colors depending on their sizes and materials. Here, we present the use of resonant plasmonic nanoparticles, combined with broadband phase-controlled laser pulses, as tunable sources of multicolor second harmonic generation. The resonant plasmonic nanoparticles strongly interact with the electromagnetic field of the incident light, enhancing the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. Because the plasmon resonance in these structures is spectrally narrower than the laser bandwidth, the plasmonic nanoparticles imprint their fingerprints on the second harmonic spectrum. We show how nanoparticles of different sizes produce different colors in the second harmonic spectra even when excited with the same laser pulse. Using these resonant plasmonic nanoparticles as nano-probes is promising for multicolor second harmonic imaging while keeping all the advantages of nonlinear optical microscopy.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  16. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  17. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, B.D. ); Zimmerman, R.D. )

    1990-03-23

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT.

  18. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  19. Single-shot magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with partial parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2009-03-01

    A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on proton-echo-planar-spectroscopic-imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures two-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3-T whole-body scanner equipped with a 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and fourfold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16 x 16 spatial matrix with a 390-Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with fourfold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor-related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of inositol, choline, creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement.

  20. Single-shot magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with partial parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2009-03-01

    A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on proton-echo-planar-spectroscopic-imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures two-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3-T whole-body scanner equipped with a 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and fourfold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16 x 16 spatial matrix with a 390-Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with fourfold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor-related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of inositol, choline, creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement. PMID:19097245

  1. Early Response of Hepatic Malignancies to Locoregional Therapy—Value of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, Susanne; Shen, Jialin; Salibi, Nouha; Lai, Hong C.; Geschwind, Jeff; Kamel, Ihab R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of our study was to determine the usefulness of the diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of hepatic malignancies for the assessment of response to locoregional treatment. Methods Forty-four patients (29 men; mean age, 58 years) with hepatic malignancies were treated locally. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations obtained before and at 1 and 6 months after transarterial chemoembolization were analyzed retrospectively. Imaging criteria included change in tumor size, percentage of enhancement in the arterial and portal venous phases, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging apparent diffusion coefficients, and choline concentration by quantitative 1H-MRS. Response to treatment was grouped according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria based on magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months after treatment. Statistical analysis used paired t test, Fisher exact test, and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results Before treatment, the median tumor diameter was 6 cm; at 6 months after treatment, median tumor diameter was 5.1 cm. According to RECIST and EASL, 66% of the patients achieved partial response, 31% had stable disease, and 3% of the patients showed progressive disease. One month after transarterial chemoembolization, apparent diffusion coefficient increased (P < 0.14), and mean choline concentration of the tumors decreased (P < 0.008). Conclusions Diffusion-weighted imaging and hepatic choline levels by 1H-MRS could predict response to locoregional therapy. PMID:21412085

  2. Development of spatial-temporal ventilation heterogeneity and probability analysis tools for hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, S.; Ahmed, H.; Wheatley, A.; McCormack, D. G.; Parraga, G.

    2010-03-01

    We developed image analysis tools to evaluate spatial and temporal 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation in asthma and cystic fibrosis. We also developed temporal ventilation probability maps to provide a way to describe and quantify ventilation heterogeneity over time, as a way to test respiratory exacerbations or treatment predictions and to provide a discrete probability measurement of 3He ventilation defect persistence.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of patients wearing a surgical traction halo.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Fox, R A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of patients wearing a surgical halo may have unacceptable artifacts if the halo has a conductive loop structure. This study shows that the observed artifacts are predominantly due to eddy currents generated in the halo by switching field gradients, and that these artifacts can be substantially reduced by adjusting the phase encoding direction in MRI sequences so that it is parallel to the axis of the halo. PMID:8851441

  4. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  5. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Diagnostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Singh, Navjeeven; Sharma, Sonal; Rohatgi, Jolly; Oberai, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a well-known clinical entity, characterized by facial angio-fibroma, shagreen patch, and hypo-melanotic, and confetti-like skin lesions. An exquisite fresh case is being narrated, emphasizing its microscopic pathology. The role of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, in particular, is highlighted to define the large variety of neurological abrasions for determining its future progression. PMID:26288435

  6. Towards T 1-limited magnetic resonance imaging using Rabi beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedder, H.; Dolde, F.; Rempp, F.; Wolf, T.; Hemmer, P.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2011-03-01

    Two proof-of-principle experiments toward T 1-limited magnetic resonance imaging with NV centers in diamond are demonstrated. First, a large number of Rabi oscillations is measured and it is demonstrated that the hyperfine interaction due to the NV's 14N can be extracted from the beating oscillations. Second, the Rabi beats under V-type microwave excitation of the three hyperfine manifolds is studied experimentally and described theoretically.

  7. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model. PMID:21096567

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  9. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-04-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal.

  11. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of knee joint sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Shubkin, V N; Gunicheva, N V; Akhadov, T A; Puzhitskiĭ, L B; Keshishian, R A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to study the potentialities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of knee joint sarcomas. The paper presents the results of examining 13 patients of different age, shows the potentialities of the technique in the identification of knee joint sarcomas, and describes the MRI semiotics of sarcomas in both the routine study and that using contrast enhancement in lesions of bone and soft tissue elements in the presence of regional metastases.

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance imaging of Co films using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, B.J.; Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Midzor, M.M.; Roukes, M.L.; Childress, J.R.

    1998-07-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) technique has been applied to the study of spatial imaging in thin Co ferromagnetic film. A novel approach is proposesd to improve spatial resolution in MRFM, which is limited by the broad width of Co ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line. The authors introduce a selective local field with a small yittrium iron garnet (YIG) grain. They have performed MRFM detected FMR on a sample consisting of two sections of Co films laterally separated by {approximately}20 {micro}m. The experimental results demonstrate the scanning imaging capabilities of MRFM. The results can be understood qualitatively by means of the calculated magnetic field and field gradient profiles generated by the YIG shere.

  13. Bulk and surface sensitivity of a resonant waveguide grating imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Kovacs, Boglarka; Farkas, Eniko; Szabó, Bálint; Zaytseva, Natalya; Fang, Ye; Horvath, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report the assessment of the sensitivity of a microplate-compatible resonant waveguide grating imager. The sensitivity to bulk refractive index changes was determined using a serial dilution of glycerol solution with the help of a refractometer. The surface sensitivity was examined using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte films in conjunction with optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy and characterized by the binding of acetazolamide to immobilized carbonic anhydrase under microfluidics. The results suggest that the imager has a limit of detection down to 2.2 × 10-6 for refractive index change and 0.078 ng/cm2 for the adsorbed mass.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the retina: from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-04-01

    This mini-review provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications to study rodent, cat, non-human primate, and human retinas. These techniques include T(1) - and T(2) -weighted anatomical, diffusion, blood flow, blood volume, blood-oxygenation level dependent, manganese-enhanced, physiological, and functional MRI. Applications to study the retinas in diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and retinal degeneration are also reviewed. MRI offers some unique advantages compared with existing imaging techniques and has the potential to further our understanding of physiology and function in healthy and diseased retinas.

  15. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not fully understood, considerable research has gone into studying anatomical changes in the brain that take place with this condition. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can demonstrate changes in the volume of numerous brain regions, and functional MR imaging shows changes in activation when subjects are exposed to trauma-related stimuli. This article reviews current research findings on PTSD-associated brain changes and behavioral effects and discusses how PTSD affects patients of different ages. PMID:27390232

  16. A method for functional magnetic resonance imaging of olfaction.

    PubMed

    Sobel, N; Prabhakaran, V; Desmond, J E; Glover, G H; Sullivan, E V; Gabrieli, J D

    1997-12-30

    A method for generating olfactory stimuli for humans within a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experimental design is described. The system incorporates a nasal-mask in which the change from odorant to no-odorant conditions occurs in less than 500 ms and is not accompanied by visual, auditory, tactile, or thermal cues. The mask provides an ordorant-free environment following prolonged ordorant presence. Specific imaging parameters that are conducive to the study of the human olfactory system are described. In a pilot study performed using these methods, the specific patterns of activation observed converged with published experimental and clinical findings. PMID:9497007

  17. [Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Application in Ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Lindner, T; Langner, S; Paul, K; Pohlmann, A; Hadlich, S; Niendorf, T; Jünemann, A; Guthoff, R F; Stachs, O

    2015-12-01

    The value of diffusion-weighted magnet resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) has been demonstrated for an ever growing range of clinical indications. DWI is sensitive to the diffusion of water molecules and probes their random displacement within tissue. DWI provides both qualitative and quantitative information on tissue characteristics, e.g. tissue cellularity. This review provides an overview of diffusion-weighted imaging and its emerging applications in ophthalmology. The basic physics and technical foundations of DWI are introduced. The emerging applications of DWI are surveyed, particularly in diseases of the eye, orbit and optical nerve.

  18. New Clathrin-Based Nanoplatforms for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vitaliano, Gordana D.; Vitaliano, Franco; Rios, Jose D.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has high spatial resolution, but low sensitivity for visualization of molecular targets in the central nervous system (CNS). Our goal was to develop a new MRI method with the potential for non-invasive molecular brain imaging. We herein introduce new bio-nanotechnology approaches for designing CNS contrast media based on the ubiquitous clathrin cell protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The first approach utilizes three-legged clathrin triskelia modified to carry 81 gadolinium chelates. The second approach uses clathrin cages self-assembled from triskelia and designed to carry 432 gadolinium chelates. Clathrin triskelia and cages were characterized by size, structure, protein concentration, and chelate and gadolinium contents. Relaxivity was evaluated at 0.47 T. A series of studies were conducted to ascertain whether fluorescent-tagged clathrin nanoplatforms could cross the blood brain barriers (BBB) unaided following intranasal, intravenous, and intraperitoneal routes of administration. Clathrin nanoparticles can be constituted as triskelia (18.5 nm in size), and as cages assembled from them (55 nm). The mean chelate: clathrin heavy chain molar ratio was 27.04±4.8: 1 for triskelia, and 4.2±1.04: 1 for cages. Triskelia had ionic relaxivity of 16 mM−1s−1, and molecular relaxivity of 1,166 mM−1s−1, while cages had ionic relaxivity of 81 mM−1s−1 and molecular relaxivity of 31,512 mM−1s−1. Thus, cages exhibited 20 times higher ionic relaxivity and 8,000-fold greater molecular relaxivity than gadopentetate dimeglumine. Clathrin nanoplatforms modified with fluorescent tags were able to cross or bypass the BBB without enhancements following intravenous, intraperitoneal and intranasal administration in rats. Conclusions/Significance Use of clathrin triskelia and cages as carriers of CNS contrast media represents a new approach. This new biocompatible protein-based nanotechnology demonstrated suitable

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing; Poe, Dennis; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Naganawa, Shinji

    2010-10-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have made it possible to examine the compartments of the cochlea using gadolidium-chelate (GdC) as a contrast agent. As GdC loads into the perilymph space without entering the endolymph in healthy inner ears, the technique provides possibilities to visualize the different cochlear compartments and evaluate the integrity of the inner ear barriers. This critical review presents the recent advancements in the inner ear MRI technology, contrast agent application and the correlated ototoxicity study, and the uptake dynamics of GdC in the inner ear. GdC causes inflammation of the mucosa of the middle ear, but there are no reports or evidence of toxicity-related changes in vivo either in animals or in humans. Intravenously administered GdC reached the guinea pig cochlea about 10 minutes after administration and loaded the scala tympani and scala vestibuli with the peak at 60 minutes. However, the perilymphatic loading peak was 80 to 100 minutes in mice after intravenous administration of GdC. In healthy animals the scala media did not load GdC. In mice in which GdC was administered topically onto the round window, loading of the cochlea peaked at 4 hours, at which time it reached the apex. The initial portions of the organ to be filled were the basal turn of the cochlea and vestibule. In animal models with endolymphatic hydrops (EH), bulging of the Reissner's membrane was observed as deficit of GdC in the scala vestibuli. Histologically the degree of bulging correlated with the MR images. In animals with immune reaction-induced EH, MRI showed that EH could be limited to restricted regions of the inner ear, and in the same inner ear both EH and leakage of GdC into the scala media were visualized. More than 100 inner ear MRI scans have been performed to date in humans. Loading of GdC followed the pattern seen in animals, but the time frame was different. In intravenous delivery of double-dose GdC, the inner ear compartments

  20. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.